Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 MML Command Reference
Chapter 1 - MML Command Overview
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MML Command Overview

Table Of Contents

MML Command Overview

How to Use This Guide

Information Covered in This Chapter

MML Command Guidelines

MML Basics

Starting an MML Session

Saving an MML Session for Review

Stopping an MML Session

Killing an MML Session

Killing an Orphan Configuration Session

Getting Help

MML on High-Availability Systems

MML Command Conventions

Backus-Naur Conventions

Bellcore TL1 Conventions

Wildcards in MML Commands

MML Messages

MML Status Messages

MML Error Codes

Impact of MML Commands on Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Call Processing


MML Command Overview


Revised: Aug 30, 2011, OL-1116-24

This guide describes each of the Man-Machine Language (MML) commands you can use with the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. Use MML to configure your Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, add components to your system, retrieve information about system components, and perform logging and tracing.

How to Use This Guide

This guide is a comprehensive reference to the commands. You can use this document to look up detailed information on all commands, components, parameters, properties, value ranges, and default values. It should be used in conjunction with the following documents, which provide the provisioning, maintenance, and troubleshooting procedures that use these MML commands:

For information on using MML commands for component provisioning, see Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Provisioning Guide (through Release 9.7) at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/pgw/9/provisioning/guide/R9prvgde.html

or Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/pgw/9.8/Provisioning/Guide/prvgde98.html

For more information on using MML commands for provisioning the dial plan, see Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Dial Plan Guide (through Release 9.7) at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/pgw/9/dial_plan/guide/dplan.html

or Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/pgw/9.8/Dial_Plan/Guide/Dplan98.html

For more information on using MML commands for maintenance and troubleshooting, see Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Operations, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting Guide at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/pgw/9/maintenance/guide/omtguide.html

or Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Operations, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting Guide at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/pgw/9.8/Maintenance/Guide/98omtguide.html

Information Covered in This Chapter

This chapter describes MML command syntax, conventions used with MML commands, and responses expected from MML. It includes the following sections:

MML Command Guidelines

MML Basics

MML on High-Availability Systems

MML Command Conventions

Wildcards in MML Commands

MML Messages

Impact of MML Commands on Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Call Processing

MML Command Guidelines

MML commands use the following syntax:

command_name:[component][, component][, component. . .][:Parameter_List][;comments]

When entering MML commands, remember the following:

MML component names must be 16 characters or shorter.

In general, MML commands are not case sensitive, but some are (ExtCOT is an example of a case-sensitive command). However, property values are case sensitive.

Neither keywords nor value strings need to be enclosed in quotation marks, except where specified in this guide.

Use only one MML command on each line.

Anything entered after a semicolon (;) is treated as a comment. This is primarily useful for MML command scripts.

Do not use punctuation (such as the period character) for target names; for example, do not use test.log as a logging destination.

Create an ASCII text file for batch processing of provisioning commands. For more information about performing batch provisioning, see Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Provisioning Guide at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/pgw/9/provisioning/guide/R9prvgde.html


Timesaver MML maintains a history buffer of all MML commands you enter during an MML session. To repeat your last MML command, press the Up Arrow at the MML prompt to redisplay the command, and press Enter. Press the Up and Down Arrow keys to scroll through all commands in the history buffer. To modify and re-enter a command, use the Up Arrow to display the command, and then edit the command using the keyboard. Press Enter to execute the command.

While viewing a lengthy response to an MML command, press the spacebar to display the next screen of output text, or press Enter to display the next line.


MML Basics

You must start an interactive MML session before you can use MML commands for provisioning, information retrieval, or troubleshooting. As many as 12 MML sessions can be open at a time, but only one provisioning session is permitted.

If an MML provisioning session is inactive for 30 minutes, a warning is issued by the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. After 5 additional minutes of inactivity, the session is terminated.


Note It is possible to run only one current MML provisioning session on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, but other administrative commands can be run from one or more additional MML sessions. However, you should avoid running simultaneous MML sessions because doing so can affect performance.


Starting an MML Session

Perform the following steps to start an MML session:


Step 1 Log in to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch host computer from a terminal.


Caution Do not log in as UNIX root; if you attempt to start an MML session as the root user, the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch displays a message and MML fails to start.

Step 2 At a UNIX command prompt, type:

MGC% mml
 
   

The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch responds with the status of your MML session.

If your UNIX prompt looks similar to the following, your session has started successfully, and you can begin entering MML commands.

MGC:mml>
 
   

If another MML session is running, you receive a message similar to the following:

MGC% mml1: Already in use
Failure to run MML, reason=Entry was already present.
 
   

Step 3 To start another MML session, enter the following command:

MGC% mml -s 2
 
   

The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch responds with an MML session prompt.


Note The MML command mml -s 2 starts the second MML session, and mml -s 3 starts the third session. There can be as many as 12 MML sessions open at a time.



Saving an MML Session for Review

To save a provisioning session for later review, perform the following procedure:


Step 1 Create a log file of the provisioning session, cie3, for later review, by entering the following command:

mml> diaglog:pom-log-session-cie3:start
 
   

All MML commands entered are now logged to the mml.log file located in /opt/CiscoMGC/var/log directory.

Step 2 Stop logging the provisioning session, cie3, by entering the following command:

mml> diaglog:pom-log-session-cie3:stop
 
   

The log file of the provisioning session can now be reviewed using an ASCII text editor.

Step 3 Create a new configuration, cie3-prov, by entering the following command:

mml> prov-sta::srcver="new",dstver="cie3-prov"
 
   

Stopping an MML Session

To stop an MML session, enter the quit command:

MGC mml>quit
MGC%

Killing an MML Session

If an MML session cannot be stopped with the quit command, or if another MML session is running, you can kill the session by performing the following steps:


Step 1 Close MML by entering the quit command, or telnet to the host server where the MML session is running.

Step 2 To kill an MML session started by another user, log in as root.

Step 3 At the UNIX prompt, enter the following command:

va-purple% ps -ef | grep mml
 
   

The host server responds with information similar to the following:

MGCUSR 17999 17989 0 13:30:44 pts/2 0:00 mml
 
   

Step 4 Locate the process entry for the MML session you want to kill, and determine the process number of the session. In the preceding example, the process number is 17999. Enter the following command:

kill -9 xxxxx
 
   

where: xxxxx is the process number of the MML session.

Step 5 To kill multiple MML sessions, enter a UNIX kill command for each MML session. Each session will have a unique process number.


Killing an Orphan Configuration Session

To kill a nonfunctioning configuration session, enter the prov-stp command at the MML prompt.

Note that this command does not activate the new configuration.

Getting Help

To display a list of all MML commands, enter help at the MML prompt.

To get help for a specific command, enter help:<command> at the MML prompt. The following example shows the help available for clr-tcap-trans:

MGC mml> help:clr-tcap-trans
 
   
CLR-TCAP-TRANS -- Clear TCAP Transactions
               -----------------------------------------
   
Purpose:      This MML command clears all transaction capabilities 
              application part (TCAP) transactions that are older than 
              the specified period. 
              
Format:       clr-tcap-trans::T=<number>
 
Input 
Description:  * number -- The time period, in seconds, after which you 
                want to clear TCAP transactions. 
                 
Example:      The MML command shown in the following example clears all 
              TCAP transactions that are older than 60 seconds: 
              
              mml> CLR-TCAP-TRANS::T=60
              Media Gateway Controller - MGC-01 2000-01-12 15:19:51 
              M  RTRV
              "TCAP-01:CLRD=0"
              ;

MML on High-Availability Systems

To check the state of a high-availability system, you must be using MML on the active server. Although MML on the standby system shows checkpointed information, the updating is not instantaneous, and it is not obvious which information gets checkpointed and which does not.

To determine which server is active and which is standby, use the rtrv-ne command.

MML Command Conventions

Conventions used in MML commands are described in this section.

Backus-Naur Conventions

MML commands use the Backus-Naur symbols shown in Table 1-1.

Table 1-1 MML Backus-Naur Conventions

Symbol
Description

|

Pipe indicates that the preceding symbol or the succeeding symbol can occur, but not both in succession.

[ ]

Brackets enclose an optional parameter.

{ | }

Preceding symbol or succeeding symbol can occur, but not both in succession. There can be more than two symbols and pipes.

< >

Encloses an identifier to be replaced with appropriate data.


Bellcore TL1 Conventions

The structure of MML is based on the Telcordia (Bellcore) TL1 standard (TR-NWT-831, Operations Application Message-Operations Applications Messages, Issue 3). Therefore, MML commands can be interpreted and monitored through a network's TL1 interface. The TL1 symbols shown in Table 1-2 are used in MML.

Table 1-2 MML Bellcore TL1 Conventions 

Symbol
Description

:

Parameter separator.

::

Empty parameter block.

&

Arguments are grouped together so that one parameter can convey several arguments.

;

End of command (optional). Anything on the same line after this symbol is treated as a comment.


Wildcards in MML Commands

Some MML commands support the use of wildcards. For software Release 7.4 and earlier, wildcards are available only as either postfix or prefix to MML names. The syntax for using wildcards with MML commands is as follows:

<MML command name>:<*><part of TID MML name><*>:[optional parameters]
 
   

For example, there are two ways to retrieve administrative states of trunk groups using wildcards:

RTRV-ADMIN-STATE:TG* retrieves the administrative state of all trunk groups with MML names starting with "TG".

RTRV-ADMIN-STATE:*GP retrieves the administrative state of all trunk groups with MML names ending with "GP".

The following commands support wildcards:

ACK-ALM

RTRV-ADMIN-STATE

RTRV-DEST

RTRV-DCHAN

RTRV-C7LNK

RTRV-IPLNK

RTRV-TC

SET-ADMIN-STATE

SET-DEST-STATE

MML Messages

Messages that MML can display are described in this section.

MML Status Messages

After you enter an MML command, the system performs the task you requested and returns a status message. Table 1-3 lists the MML status messages and descriptions.

.

Table 1-3 MML Status Messages 

Status
Meaning
Definition

COMPLD

Completed

MML received a response from the subsystem on which it performed the action.

Note A completed response does not always signify successful completion. A completed response can be returned on invalid components, such as alarms.

RTRV

Retrieve

MML is attempting to retrieve the contents specified.

SUCC

Successful

Successful completion.

SWDC

Waiting for dependent processes to start

Status message—Waiting for dependent processes to start.

SWDT

Waiting for dependent processes to stop

Status message—Waiting for dependent processes to stop. This is not an error. Enter the rtrv-softw command to see if the dependent processes have stopped.


MML Error Codes

MML displays error codes if a command cannot be performed. Table 1-4 lists the MML error codes and descriptions.

Table 1-4 MML Error Message Descriptions 

Error Code
Meaning
Definition

DENY

Command denied

The command is recognized, but the system does not allow you to perform the requested function.

ICNV

Input command not valid

The MML command is not recognized.

IDNV

Input data not valid

An unknown parameter was entered.

Example:

mml> RESET-CIC:dpc2:cic5
   Media Gateway Controller  2000-01-03 15:22:48
M  RTRV
   IDNV
   "dpc2"
   /* Input, Data Not Valid */
   ;

 

IIDV

Invalid data parameter

An unknown parameter was entered. An incorrect parameter name has been used in the command, or a value has been entered incorrectly.

Note A string value must be surrounded by quotes, and an integer value must not be surrounded by quotes.

Example:

mml> RESET-CIC:dpc2:cic5
   Media Gateway Controller  2000-01-03 15:22:48
M  RTRV
   IIDV
   "dpc2"
   /* Input, Data Not Valid */
   ;

IISP

Input syntax error

Incorrect syntax was used. A semicolon or comma has been used incorrectly when entering the command.

Example:

mml> reset-cic:dpc9,cic22
Media Gateway Controller  - MGC-01 2000-01-12
M  RTRV
   IISP
   reset-cic:dpc9,
   /* Input, Syntax Error */
   ;

IITA

Invalid target

The requested operation cannot be performed on the network element component, or the component does not exist in the system.

Example:

mml> reset-cic:dpc9:CIC=10
Media Gateway Controller  - MGC-01 2000-01-12 
15:19:51 
M  RTRV
   IITA
   "dpc9"
   /* Input, Invalid Target */
   ;

IPRM

Input parameter missing

An expected parameter cannot be found.

SABT

Status abort

The command did not finish in the time allocated.

SCNF

Status not found

There are problems with the engine.

SNVS

State not in valid state

The requested operation failed because the component is not configured to accept the operation. It is possible that the component is already performing the operation or is already in the desired state.

SNSP

State not supported

This operation is not supported by the component.

SROF

Status requested operation failed

The requested operation failed on the component.

Example:

mml> query-cic:dpc1:CIC=1,rng=1
Media Gateway Controller  - MGC-01 2002-04-26 
11:35:51 
M  RTRV
SROF
"dpc1"
/* Range is not allowed*/
;

Impact of MML Commands on Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Call Processing

Some MML commands impact Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch call processing when executed. A small number of these commands can cause the system to go into an overload condition and limit the number of incoming calls the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is able to process. For this reason, some MML commands should be issued only during periods of minimal call traffic. The performance impact of some MML commands also varies with the number of data objects being accessed.

MML commands have been divided into categories depending on their impact on system performance. See the "Performance Impact Category" section of a specific MML command for its performance category and for additional guidelines designed to minimize performance impact. MML performance impact categories are defined as follows:

Category A—These commands have minimal impact on system performance. Multiple MML sessions are acceptable, and a maximum of four concurrent MML sessions is recommended.

Category B—These commands have a moderate impact on system performance, because CPU utilization is high while these commands are executing. A maximum of one active MML session is recommended.

Category C—These commands are similar to those in Category B and have a moderate impact on system performance. However, CPU utilization is higher than for Category B because these commands are executed while the system is simultaneously handling call traffic.

Category D—These commands have a severe impact on system performance and should be issued only during a maintenance period when call traffic is minimal.