Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Operations, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting Guide
Troubleshooting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Platform
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Troubleshooting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Platform

Table Of Contents

Troubleshooting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Platform

Troubleshooting Overview

Cisco ITP-L Failure

Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure

Operating System Failure

Troubleshooting Using Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Alarms

Retrieving All Active Alarms

Acknowledging Alarms

Alarm Troubleshooting Procedures

All Conn Cntl Links Fail

All C7 IP Links Fail

All ISDN BRI IP Conn Fail

All ISDN IP Conn Fail

All M3UAKEY Ack Pending

All M3UA Assoc Fail

All SUAKEY Ack Pending

All SUA Assoc Fail

ANAL: ALoopCtrExceeded

ANAL: ATableFail_GetDigMod

ANAL: ATableFail_GetResult

ANAL: ATableFlt_DgtRangeError

ANAL: BLoopCtrExceeded

ANAL: BNum_GetFail_SrvcTbl

ANAL: BNum_MdfyBFail_ AnnounceID

ANAL: BTableFail_GetDigTree

ANAL: BTableFail_GetDigMod

ANAL: BTableFail_GetResult

ANAL: BTableFlt_DgtRangeError

ANAL: Cause_GetFail_CauseTbl

ANAL:Cause_GetFail_DigModTbl

ANAL: Cause_GetFail_InvldRsltType

ANAL:Cause_GetFail_LocTbl

ANAL:Cause_GetFail_RsltTbl

ANAL:Cause_InvldRslts_CauseTbl

ANAL: Cause_MdfyBFail_AnnounceID

ANAL: Cause_MdfyBFail_AppPtInvld

ANAL: Cause_Rte_LoopDetected

ANAL: CustId/StartIdx Missing

ANAL:DataBaseAccessFail

ANAL: Data Failure Rcvd

ANAL:dpselection_table_fail

ANAL:getDialplanBase_fail

ANAL: InvalidtrkGrpType

ANAL: Prof_GetFail_DigModTbl

ANAL: Prof_GetFail_InvldRslt

ANAL: Prof_GetFail_NOATbl

ANAL: Prof_GetFail_NOATbl_A

ANAL: Prof_GetFail_NPITbl

ANAL: Prof_GetFail_NPITbl_A

ANAL: Prof_GetFail_RsltTbl

ANAL: Prof_InvldNPAValue

ANAL: Prof_InvRslts_NOATbl

ANAL: Prof_InvRslts_NOATbl_A

ANAL: Prof_MdfyBFail_AppPtInvld

ANAL: RteStartIndexInvalid

ANAL: Rte_TableHopCtrExceeded

ANAL: RteTableFail_GetRteList

ANAL: RteTableFail_GetTrkAttrdata

ANAL: RteTableFail_GetTrkGrpdata

ANAL: RteTableFail_GetTrunkList

ANAL: TableFail_BearerCapTable

ANAL: TableFail_CondRouteDescTable

ANAL: TableFail_CondRouteTable

ANAL: TableFail_CPCTable

ANAL: TableFail_RouteHolTable

ANAL: TableFail_PercRouteTable

ANAL: TableFail_TMRTable

ANAL: TableFail_TNSTable

ANAL: TrunkGrpRsltCtrExceeded

Association Degraded

Association Fail

C7LNK ALGNMT LOST

C7DPC CONGESTION

C7LNK CONGESTION

C7LNK INHIBIT

C7SLTLnkCong

Call Back Feature Insertion Failure

Call Back Feature Deletion Failure

Charge Table Access Failure

Charge Table Load Failure

Comm Srvc Creation Error

Config Fail

CTI Connection Failed

CTI Version Mismatch

Dial Plan Loading Failed

DISK

EISUP: Unexpected Msg/Par

ENGINE CONFIG FAIL

FAIL

FailoverPeerLost

FailoverPeerOOS

FAIL REMOTE STANDBY

FORCE NODE RESTART

Gen Fail

Holiday Table Access Failure

Holiday Table Load Failure

INVALID M3UA RC

INVALID SUA RC

Invalid Virtual_IP_Addr

IP CONNECTION FAILED

IP RTE CONF FAIL

IP RTE FAIL

ISUP: COT Failure

License server unreachable

LIF BER

LIF FAIL

LIF LOF

LIF LOS

LIF SES

LIF YELLOW

LIF: IDLE CHANGE

LIF: LOST CD

LIF: LOST CTS

M3UAKEY Ack Pending

MeterPulseTariff Table Load Failure

MMDB: Database unavailable

MMDB: Database cause switchover

MMDB: Database nearly full

NAS: AuditResponse Failure

NAS: CommsFailure

NAS: ResourceFailure

OLC: Leg1chanSeizedUnpackError

OLC: Leg1chanModifiedUnpackError

OLC: Leg1chanDeletedUnpackError

OLC: Leg1notifyUnpackError

OLC: Leg1deleteChanUnpackError

OLC: Leg1notifyRequestAckUnpackError

OLC: Leg1chanOpsFailed

OOS TRAFFIC RE-ROUTE

OverloadHeavy

OverloadMedium

OverloadLight

OverResIncomingThreshold

PC UNAVAIL

Peer IP Links Failure

PEER LINK A FAILURE

PEER LINK B FAILURE

PEER MODULE FAILURE

POM INACTIVITY TIMEOUT

POM SESSION TERMINATE

POM: DynamicReconfiguration

POM: PEER_SYNC_ERR

PRI: B-Channel not available

ProcM No Response

ProtocolFileMissing

REPL: all connections failure

RSET CONFIG FAIL

SC CONFIG FAIL

SC FAIL

SC M-OOS

SG Node Interface Fail

SG Pair Interface Fail

SIP: DNS CACHE NEARLY FULL

SIP: DNS SERVICE OOS

SIP: OOS

SIP Service Fail Over

Standby Warm Start

SS7 RTE KEY FAIL

SS7 SIG SRVC CONFIG FAIL

SS7 SIG SRVC UNAVAIL

SSN FAIL

SUAKEY Ack Pending

SUPPORT FAILED

SwitchoverFail

Tariff Table Access Failure

Tariff Table Load Failure

TLC: Leg2chanSeizedUnpackError

TLC: Leg2chanModifiedUnpackError

TLC: Leg2chanDeletedUnpackError

TLC: Leg2notifyUnpackError

TLC: Leg2deleteChanUnpackError

TLC: Leg2notifyRequestAckUnpackError

TLC: Leg2chanOpFailed

UCM: CCodeModfailed

UCM: MGCPDIALAuthFail

Virtual_IP_Addr Mismatch

Wrong IP Path

XE Rsrc Fail

Troubleshooting with System Logs

Viewing System Logs

Understanding System Log Messages

Changing the Log Level for Processes

Creating a Diagnostics Log File

Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC

Resolving SS7 Network Related Problems

Signaling Channel Problems

SS7 Link is Out-of-Service

SS7 Load Sharing Malfunction

Physical Layer Failures

Configuration Errors

Supporting Entity Failures

Incomplete Signaling

Changing Service States

Signaling Destination Problems

Bouncing SS7 Links

Configuration Errors

Traffic Restart

SS7 Destination is Out of Service

SS7 Route is Out of Service

SS7 Destination is Unavailable

Signaling Channel Troubleshooting Procedures

Setting the Service State of a Signaling Service

Setting the Service State of an SS7 Signaling Service

Setting the Service State of a C7/SS7 Link or Linkset

Setting the Service State of an IP Link

Setting the Service State of an IP Route

Setting the Service State of a D-channel

Setting the Service State of a Local Subsystem Number

Setting the Service State of an Association

Verifying MTP Timer Settings

Modifying Configurable Timers

Managing Japanese SS7 Signaling Link Tests

Managing Japanese SS7 Signaling Route Tests

Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan

Verifying Configuration to Support Multiple Versions of SS7

Resolving an Association Alarm

Converting Stored and Sent Point Code Values

Resolving Bearer Channel Connection Problems

Setting the Administrative State

Setting the Administrative State of a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

Setting the Administrative State of a Media Gateway

Setting the Administrative State of a Trunk Group

Setting the Administrative State of a Signaling Service

Setting the Administrative State of Spans

Setting the Administrative State of CICs

Querying Local and Remote CIC States

Resolving Local and Remote CIC State Mismatch

Performing CIC Validation Tests

Resolving ISDN D-Channel Discrepancies

Unblocking CICs

Unblocking Locally Blocked CICs

Unblocking Remotely Blocked CICs

Resetting CICs

Resolving Stuck CICs

Manually Resolving Stuck CICs

Auditing Call States

Stopping Calls

Stopping Calls on a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

Stopping Calls on a Media Gateway

Stopping Calls on a Trunk Group

Stopping Calls on a Signaling Service

Stopping Calls on Spans

Stopping Calls on CICs

Auditing an MGCP Media Gateway

Starting an MGCP Media Gateway Audit

Retrieving an MGCP Media Gateway Audit

Running a Manual Continuity Test

Verifying Continuity Test Settings

Media Gateway IP Destination or Link Out-of-Service

Calls Fail at the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

3.1 kHz (ISDN Category 3) Calls are Failing

Calls are Misrouting

Resolving SIP Communication Problems

Stopping SIP-to-SIP Calls

Tracing

Performing a Call Trace

Starting A Call Trace

Starting A Call Trace (on Release 9.7(3) Patch 8)

Stopping A Call Trace

Retrieving Names of Open Call Trace Files

Viewing the Call Trace

Deleting Call Trace Files

Understanding the Call Trace

Alternatives to Call Tracing

Diagnosing Hung Calls

Performing an Abnormal Call Termination Trace

Performing a TCAP Trace

Platform Troubleshooting

Verifying Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Ethernet Operation

Deleting Unnecessary Files to Increase Available Disk Space

Recovering from a Switchover Failure

Recovering from Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure

Recovering from a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure in a Simplex System

Recovering from a Single Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure in a Continuous Service System

Recovering from a Dual Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure in a Continuous Service System

Restoring Stored Configuration Data

Restoring Procedures for Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software

Verifying Proper Configuration of Replication

Configuration Export Failed Because of MMDB

Measurements Are Not Being Generated

Call Detail Records Are Not Being Generated

Resolving a Failed Connection to a Peer

Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters

Diagnosing SNMP Failure

Correcting the System Time

NTP is Not Used and the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is Not the Source of the CDRs

NTP is Not Used and Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is the Source of the CDRs

NTP is Used and the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is the Source of the CDRs

Securing Your Network

Securing the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

Securing Cisco BAMS

TIBCO Interface Not Working

Installing the License File

Replacing a Failed Disk


Troubleshooting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Platform


Revised: March 7, 2011, OL-0800-14

This chapter describes troubleshooting methods for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch platform. The following sections include instructions to help you isolate system problems:

Troubleshooting Overview

Troubleshooting Using Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Alarms

Troubleshooting with System Logs

Resolving SS7 Network Related Problems

Resolving Bearer Channel Connection Problems

Resolving SIP Communication Problems

Tracing

Platform Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting Overview

This chapter presents the alarms and logs that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch generates. Information provided by the alarms and log files help to isolate problems with the system. For complete lists of alarms and logs, see Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Messages Reference.

Several of the corrective actions in this chapter point to other chapters in this manual. This chapter also refers to troubleshooting tools including the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software, the Cisco WAN Manager, the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Node Manager (CMNM), and CiscoWorks.

The chapter describes ways to troubleshoot typical problems. The examples provide a logical sequence for troubleshooting that you can use as a model.


Note To troubleshoot problems with the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch platform, users must have some experience administering the system, and must understand UNIX at the system administrator level.


The following sections present solutions to various equipment failure scenarios:

Cisco ITP-L Failure

Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure

Operating System Failure

Cisco ITP-L Failure

Each Cisco IP Transfer Point LinkExtender (ITP-L) has a Reliable User Datagram Protocol (RUDP)/User Datagram Protocol (UDP)/IP connection to each Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for the transfer of Message Transfer Part (MTP) Level 3 (MTP3), ISDN User Part (ISUP), and Transaction Capabilities Application Part (TCAP) information. A Cisco ITP-L platform failure causes the surviving Cisco ITP-L platforms to take over the distribution of messages to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. You should provision Cisco ITP-L platforms so that half of the platforms can support the entire signaling load. A single Cisco ITP-L platform failure should not have a significant effect on call processing.

There are several Cisco ITP-L failure scenarios to consider:

IP link failure between the Cisco ITP-L and the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, which indicates that it is impossible to transfer MTP3 messages. In this case, MTP Level 2 (MTP2) transmits Status Indication Processor Outage (SIPO) messages to the signaling transfer point (STP) to begin switchover to another Cisco ITP-L.

If MTP2 failed (equivalent to a Cisco ITP-L failure), no SIPO messages are sent because MTP2 is inoperable. Instead, the mated STP pair detects the failure because of timer expiration or link unavailability and starts the switchover to another SS7 link.

If a Cisco ITP-L timer detects a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch fault, a coordination mechanism causes SS7 messaging to flow to the newly active (formerly standby) Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. The standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch assumes control for all calls in progress and all new calls.

Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure

Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches run in active-standby mode. The call-processing application is active on only one Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch at a time, and the application switches to the standby platform when a critical alarm occurs. Consequently, a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch failure and switchover events are invisible to the SS7 signaling network.

Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch alarms can be minor, major, or critical. Critical alarms are generated whenever any significant failure occurs. Any critical alarm causes a switchover to occur. For example, if the call engine or I/O channel controller (IOCC)-MTP in the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch fails, there is a disconnection from the process manager and a switchover to the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Operating System Failure

An operating system or hardware failure in the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch can also cause a switchover to the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. The failover daemon in the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch detects the failure of the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and instructs the process manager to start a switchover. The standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch then takes over all call-processing functions. The switchover is transparent to all Cisco ITP-Ls.

Troubleshooting Using Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Alarms

The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch generates alarms to indicate problems with processes, routes, linksets, signaling links, and bearer channels. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Messages Reference lists all of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch alarms and logs, and provides descriptions, possible causes, and suggested actions. You can find procedures for alarms that require you to take corrective action in the "Alarm Troubleshooting Procedures" section.

The active alarm log files reside in the /opt/CiscoMGC/var/log directory. These alarm log files are archived based on the criteria that are set in the dmprSink.dat file. For more information on the dmprSink.dat file, see the "Configuring the Data Dumper" section.

The following sections describe troubleshooting using the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch alarms:

Retrieving All Active Alarms

Acknowledging Alarms

Alarm Troubleshooting Procedures

Retrieving All Active Alarms

To retrieve all active alarms, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start a Man-Machine Language (MML) session, and enter the rtrv-alms command:

The system returns a response that shows all active alarms. See the following:

Media Gateway Controller 2000-02-26 11:41:01
M  RTRV
   "LPC-01: 2000-02-26 09:16:07.806,"
   "LPC-01:ALM=\"SCMGC MTP3 COMM FAIL\",SEV=MJ"
   "IOCM-01: 2000-02-26 09:17:00.690,"
   "IOCM-01:ALM=\"Config Fail\",SEV=MN"
   "MGC1alink2: 2000-02-26 09:17:47.224,ALM=\"SC FAIL\",SEV=MJ"
   "MGC1alink3: 2000-02-26 09:17:47.225,ALM=\"SC FAIL\",SEV=MJ"
   "MGC1alink4: 2000-02-26 09:17:47.226,ALM=\"SC FAIL\",SEV=MJ"
   "MGC2alink1: 2000-02-26 09:17:47.227,ALM=\"SC FAIL\",SEV=MJ"
   "MGC2alink2: 2000-02-26 09:17:47.227,ALM=\"SC FAIL\",SEV=MJ"
   "MGC2alink4: 2000-02-26 09:17:47.229,ALM=\"SC FAIL\",SEV=MJ"
   "dpc5: 2000-02-26 09:17:47.271,ALM=\"PC UNAVAIL\",SEV=MJ"
   "ls3link1: 2000-02-26 09:16:28.174,"
   "ls3link1:ALM=\"Config Fail\",SEV=MN"
   "ls3link1: 2000-02-26 09:18:59.844,ALM=\"SC FAIL\",SEV=MJ"
 
   

Acknowledging Alarms

Acknowledging an alarm does not clear the alarm. You can still retrieve it with the rtrv-alm MML command. To acknowledge an alarm, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the ack-alm:comp:"alarmCategory" command:

Where:

comp—MML name of the component. For a complete list of components, see the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide. You can retrieve a list of provisioned components by entering the prov-rtrv:all MML command.

alarmCategory—MML name of the associated alarm category. The name you enter must match exactly the name of the alarm as it is displayed.

For example, to acknowledge a signaling channel fail alarm (SC FAIL) that occurred on the link MGC2alink1, enter the ack-alm:MGC2alink1:"SC Fail" command:

Alarm Troubleshooting Procedures

This section contains alarms that require you to take corrective action. For a complete list of alarms, including alarms that do not require you to take corrective action, see
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Messages Reference.

All Conn Cntl Links Fail

This alarm occurs when the MGCP session loses a heartbeat, which indicates that the session is down.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Follow the procedure to collect system data, which is detailed in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the associated media gateway are working properly.


Note To find information on verifying the proper operation of an Ethernet interface on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on verifying the proper functioning of an Ethernet interface on the media gateway, see the documentation for the specific media gateway.


If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.


Note To find information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the media gateway, see the documentation for the specific media gateway.


Step 3 Verify that the near-end and far-end MGCP sessions are operating normally. See the documentation for the affected media gateway.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


All C7 IP Links Fail

This alarm occurs when communication is lost to all Cisco ITP-Ls of every configured protocol family. This alarm is critical, and causes an automatic switchover, if a standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is present.


Note The XECfgParm.dat parameter, *.AllLinksFailCausesFailover, controls the generation of this alarm. When this parameter is set to false (the default value), this alarm is not generated when the alarm condition occurs. If you want the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to generate this alarm, you must set the parameter to true. See the procedure that is described in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

If your Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches are in separate geographic locations, you should set the value of *AllLinksFailCausesFailover to true.


Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 If your system is provisioned with destinations that use more than one version of SS7, ensure that this alarm is configured correctly, as described in the "Verifying Configuration to Support Multiple Versions of SS7" section.

Step 3 Verify that the Cisco ITP-Ls are operating normally. See the documentation for the Cisco 2800 Series Integrated Services Routers.

Step 4 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the Cisco ITP-Ls are working properly.


Note To find information on verifying the proper operation of an Ethernet interface on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system.


If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.


Note To find information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on removing and replacing an interface card on the Cisco ITP-L, see
Cisco 2800 Series Integrated Services Routers.


Step 5 Verify that the configuration for your system is correct. To verify the provisioning data for your
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, use the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section. To verify the provisioning data for the Cisco ITP-Ls, use the show commands.

If the configuration of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is incorrect, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If the configuration of the Cisco ITP-Ls is incorrect, modify the provisioning data for your system. See Cisco Signaling Link Terminal document for more information.

If the configuration of both the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the Cisco ITP-Ls are correct, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


All ISDN BRI IP Conn Fail

This alarm occurs when all IP connections that support an ISDN BRI data pathway have failed.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Determine the health of the associated media gateway by using the procedures in the user documentation for the media gateway.

If the media gateway is working correctly, proceed to Step 3.

If the media gateway is not working correctly, restore it using the procedures in the user documentation for the media gateway. If those procedures restore the media gateway and this alarm clears, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify the cabling between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the switch is functioning.

If the cables are functioning properly, proceed to Step 4.

If you find a bad cable, replace it. If replacing a cable resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Verify the functioning of the associated switch. See the documentation for the switch for the necessary steps.

If the switch is functioning properly, proceed to Step 5.

If the switch is not functioning properly, see the appropriate troubleshooting procedures in the documentation for the switch. If those methods correct the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 5 Check the IP connectivity between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the associated Cisco BRI voice gateway.

If the IP connectivity is good, proceed to Step 6.

If the IP connectivity is bad, restore the IP connectivity. If the alarm clears after the IP connectivity is restored, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Verify that the provisioning data for your ISDN BRI backhaul connect is correct. To verify the provisioning data, use the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

If the provisioning data is correct, proceed to Step 7.

If the provisioning data is not correct, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


All ISDN IP Conn Fail

This alarm occurs when communication is lost to all ISDN IP connections. The severity of this alarm is Critical, which causes an automatic switchover if a standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is present.


Note The ability to change the severity level of this alarm is implemented in the patch (CSCOgs059) for Release 9.5(2). The XECfgParm.dat parameter, *.AllISDNLinksFailCausesFailover, now controls the severity level of this alarm. When this parameter is set to false (the default value), this alarm has a severity level of Major. If you set this parameter to true, this alarm has a severity level of Critical.

This parameter should be set to true if the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches are in separate geographic locations. You can also set this parameter to true if the system is not processing SS7 calls and you want your system to perform an automatic switchover if all the ISDN IP connections fail. To change the value of this parameter, use the procedure that is defined in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.


Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the affected media gateways are operating normally, as described in the associated documentation.

Step 3 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the media gateways are working properly.


Note To find information on verifying the proper operation of an Ethernet interface on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on verifying the proper functioning of an Ethernet interface on a media gateway, see the documentation for the specific media gateway.


If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.


Note You can find information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch in the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on verifying the proper functioning of an Ethernet interface on a media gateway, see the documentation for the specific media gateway.


Step 4 Verify that the configuration for your system is correct. To verify the provisioning data for the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, use the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section. To verify the provisioning data for the media gateways, use show commands, as described in the associated documentation.

If the configuration of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is incorrect, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If the configuration of the media gateways is incorrect, modify the provisioning data for the media gateways. See the documentation that is associated with the media gateway for more information.

If the configuration of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the media gateways are correct, then proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


All M3UAKEY Ack Pending

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch cannot send or receive traffic for the identified SS7 signaling service that is associated with a Cisco ITP.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Determine the AS definitions on the associated Cisco ITP. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information.

Step 3 Retrieve the settings for the affected M3UA routing keys using the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

Step 4 The AS definitions should match the routing contexts of the M3UA routing keys. If they match, proceed to Step 6. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Open a dynamic reconfiguration session to modify the routing contexts of the M3UA routing keys, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If modifying the routing contexts corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Verify that the AS is not shutdown on the Cisco ITP. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information. If the AS is shut down, restart it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

If tending to the AS corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.



Note If you modify an ss7path that is configured for M3UAKEY, the system generates the "All M3UAKEY Ack Pending" alarm for all the other ss7paths that are configured with the same M3UAKEY, although they are not being modified.

Coincidentally, when you modify an ss7path, the system generates the M3UAKEY Ack Pending alarms when the prov-cpy and prov-dply commands are being processed. However, these alarms are cleared after the commands have been completed.

When the prov-cpy and prov-dply commands are being processed, no new calls can be placed on any of the ss7paths for which alarms were generated. However, the calls that already exist on the ss7paths are not affected.


All M3UA Assoc Fail

This alarm occurs when all M3UA associations transporting SS7 signaling have failed.


Note The XECfgParm.dat parameter, *.AllLinksFailCausesFailover, now controls the generation of this alarm. When this parameter is set to false (the default value), this alarm is not generated when the alarm condition occurs. For the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to generate this alarm, set the parameter to true, by using the procedure that is defined in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

If the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches are in separate geographic locations, set the value of *AllLinksFailCausesFailover to true.


Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the Cisco ITPs are operating normally. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information.

If ensuring that the Cisco ITPs operate normally corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the Cisco ITPs are working properly.


Note For information on verifying the proper operation of an Ethernet interface on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on verifying the proper functioning of an Ethernet interface on a Cisco ITP, see the documentation for the Cisco ITP.


If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.


Note For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco ITP, see the documentation for the Cisco ITP.


Step 4 Verify that the M3UA provisioning data on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is correct.

If the provisioning data is correct, proceed to Step 6. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Open a dynamic reconfiguration session to modify the M3UA provisioning data, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If modifying the M3UA provisioning data corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


All SUAKEY Ack Pending

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch cannot send or receive traffic for the identified SS7 subsystem.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Determine the AS definitions on the associated Cisco ITP. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information.

Step 3 Retrieve the settings for the affected SUA routing keys using the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

Step 4 The AS definitions should match the routing contexts of the SUA routing keys. If they match, proceed to Step 6. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Open a dynamic reconfiguration session to modify the routing contexts of the M3UA routing keys, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If modifying the routing contexts of the M3UA routing keys corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Verify that the AS is not shut down on the Cisco ITP. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information. If the AS is shut down, restart it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

If tending to the AS corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


All SUA Assoc Fail

This alarm occurs when all SUA associations transporting SS7 signaling have failed.


Note The XECfgParm.dat parameter, *.AllLinksFailCausesFailover, now controls the generation of this alarm. When this parameter is set to false (the default value), this alarm is not generated when the alarm condition occurs. For the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to generate this alarm, set the parameter to true, by using the procedure that is defined in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

If the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches are in separate geographic locations, set the value of *AllLinksFailCausesFailover to true.


Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the Cisco ITPs are operating normally. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information.

If ensuring that the Cisco ITPs are operating normally corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the Cisco ITPs are working properly.


Note For information on verifying the proper operation of an Ethernet interface on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on verifying the proper functioning of an Ethernet interface on a Cisco ITP, see the documentation for the Cisco ITP.


If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.


Note For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco ITP, see the documentation for the Cisco ITP.


Step 4 Verify that the SUA provisioning data on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is correct.

If the provisioning data is correct, proceed to Step 6. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Open a dynamic reconfiguration session to modify the SUA provisioning data, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If modifying the SUA provisioning data corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: ALoopCtrExceeded

This alarm occurs when an A-number analysis operation has gone into an infinite loop. The purpose of the alarm is to limit the number of passes spent in the analysis tree to 30.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Validate that there are no infinite loops in the A-number dial plan, as described in the "Verifying a Dial Plan Translation" section.

If there are infinite loops in your A-number dial plan, modify the settings in your A-number dial plan to remove the infinite loops, using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

If there are no infinite loops in your A-number dial plan, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: ATableFail_GetDigMod

This alarm occurs when an attempt to retrieve a modification string fails during A-number analysis. The problem occurs when the modification table is not loaded or the system provides a pointer to a nonexistent location in the modification table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: ATableFail_GetResult

This alarm occurs when access to the result table failed during A-number analysis. The problem occurs if the result table is not loaded or the system provides a pointer to a nonexistent location in the result table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: ATableFlt_DgtRangeError

This alarm occurs when the A-number analysis digit tree has been accessed with a digit that is out of range for the digit tree table. This alarm could occur if the system was incorrectly configured to support a base 10 dial plan, and an overdecadic digit was received from the line and passed to analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the parameter, *.OverdecadicDigitsEnabled, is set correctly in the XECfgParm.dat file on each host.


Note The setting of this parameter should reflect the dial plan restrictions for the protocol in use. If the configured protocol supports the use of overdecadic digits, you should set the parameter to true. If the configured protocol does not support the use of overdecadic digits, you should set the parameter to false.


If the setting for the parameter is correct, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, reboot your software using the procedure that is described in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

Step 3 If the setting for the parameter is false, check the received digit string for presence of an overdecadic digit. If the digit string does not have an overdecadic digit, proceed to Step 5. If the digit string does have an overdecadic digit, proceed to Step 4.

If the setting for the parameter is true, proceed to Step 5.

Step 4 Check the compliancy documentation for the configured protocol.

If the documentation indicates that overdecadic digits are supported, change the setting for the *.OverdecadicDigitsEnabled XECfgParm.dat parameter to true on both hosts, by using the procedure in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

If the documentation indicates that overdecadic digits are not supported, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: BLoopCtrExceeded

The alarm occurs when a B-number analysis operation has gone into an infinite loop. The purpose of the alarm is to limit the number of passes spent in the analysis tree to 30.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Validate that there are no infinite loops in the B-number dial plan, as described in the "Verifying a Dial Plan Translation" section.

If there are infinite loops in your B-number dial plan, modify the settings in your B-number dial plan to remove the infinite loops, by using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

If there are no infinite loops in your B-number dial plan, then proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: BNum_GetFail_SrvcTbl

This alarm occurs during B-number analysis when a screening result is encountered and an attempt to read the service table to determine the name of the service performing the screening fails. This failure is because of corruption of either the result table or the service table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: BNum_MdfyBFail_ AnnounceID

This alarm occurs during B-number analysis when an announcement result is encountered and analysis is unable to replace the last four digits of the B-number with the announcement ID. An out-of-range announcement ID (it should be 0-9999) or a B-number less than four digits long commonly causes this replacement failure.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that all the configured announcement IDs are within the range 0 through 9999, by using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If any of the announcement IDs are outside of the range, modify its value using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL: BTableFail_GetDigTree

This alarm occurs if you specified an invalid path for B-number analysis or if the B-number analysis table is not loaded.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: BTableFail_GetDigMod

This alarm occurs when an attempt to retrieve a modification string during B-number analysis fails. The problem occurs if the modification table is not loaded or the system provides a pointer to a nonexistent location in the modification table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: BTableFail_GetResult

This alarm occurs when access to the result table failed during B-number analysis. The problem occurs if the result table is not loaded or the system provides a pointer to a nonexistent location in the result table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: BTableFlt_DgtRangeError

This alarm occurs when the B-number analysis digit tree has been accessed with a digit that is out of range for the digit tree table. This alarm could occur if the system was incorrectly configured to support a base 10 dial plan, and an overdecadic digit was received from the line and passed to analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the parameter, *.OverdecadicDigitsEnabled, is set correctly in the XECfgParm.dat file on each host.


Note The setting of this parameter should reflect the dial plan restrictions for the protocol in use. If the configured protocol supports the use of overdecadic digits, set the parameter to true. If the configured protocol does not support the use of overdecadic digits, set the parameter to false.


If the setting for the parameter is correct, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, update the parameter settings in the XECfgParm.dat files by using the procedure in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

Step 3 If the setting for the parameter is false, check the received digit string for presence of an overdecadic digit. If the digit string does not have an overdecadic digit, proceed to Step 5. If the digit string does have an overdecadic digit, proceed to Step 4.

If the setting for the parameter is true, proceed to Step 5.

Step 4 Check the compliancy documentation for the configured protocol.

If the documentation indicates that overdecadic digits are supported, change the setting for the *.OverdecadicDigitsEnabled XECfgParm.dat parameter to true on each host using the procedure in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

If the documentation indicates that overdecadic digits are not supported, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: Cause_GetFail_CauseTbl

This alarm occurs during cause analysis when the cause table is unreadable. The cause table can be unreadable if the cause table is corrupted, if the underlying software failed, or if the cause table was built without all of the existing call context cause values.

Corrective Action


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the associated cause table contains all of the existing call context cause values, by using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If the cause table is incomplete, modify its value using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL:Cause_GetFail_DigModTbl

This alarm occurs during cause analysis when a B-number modification result is encountered and the digit modification string is unreadable. This problem can occur if the digit modification table is corrupted or if an incorrect digit modification index was stored in the B-number modification results data.

Corrective Action


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the associated B-number digit modification table is correct, by using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If the information in the B-number digit modification table is incorrect, modify its value using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, as is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL: Cause_GetFail_InvldRsltType

This alarm occurs during cause analysis when a result is encountered that is not supported in cause analysis. This problem is due to corruption of the cause or location tables or the result table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL:Cause_GetFail_LocTbl

This alarm occurs during cause analysis when the location table is unreadable. This problem can occur if the location table is corrupted, the underlying software fails, or the location table is not fully populated with all possible references from the cause table.

Corrective Action


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the associated location table contains all of the possible references from the cause table, using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If the location table does not contain all of the references, modify its value by using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL:Cause_GetFail_RsltTbl

This alarm occurs during cause analysis when the result table is unreadable. This problem can occur if the result table is corrupted, the underlying software fails, or the result table is not fully populated with all possible references from the cause and location tables.

Corrective Action


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the associated result table contains all the possible references from the cause and location tables, using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If the result table does not contain all the references, modify its value using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL:Cause_InvldRslts_CauseTbl

This alarm occurs when cause analysis successfully reads the cause table but the value that is returned is logically invalid. Cause analysis gets two values from the cause table: an immediate result index and a location index. The immediate result index indicates that analysis should start reading results now, but the location index indicates that another table read is required to find the correct result table index. These results are logically incompatible. Most likely this results from a failure of the underlying software or a corruption of the cause table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: Cause_MdfyBFail_AnnounceID

This alarm occurs during cause analysis when an announcement result is encountered and analysis is unable to replace the last four digits of the B-number with the announcement ID. An out-of-range announcement ID (it should be 0 to 9999) or a B-number less than four digits long usually causes this problem.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the affected announcement ID is within the range 0 through 9999, using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If the announcement ID is outside of the range, modify its value using the numan-ed MML command and proceed to Step 3. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the affected B-number is at least four digits long, using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If the affected B-number is less than four digits long, modify its value using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 If you modified your dial plan, save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL: Cause_MdfyBFail_AppPtInvld

This alarm occurs during cause analysis when a B-number modification result is encountered and the application point (where digits are inserted) specified is beyond the end of the digit string. This problem can occur if an incorrect application point is specified in the result data, a result table is corrupted, or cause analysis values are incorrectly constructed.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the specified application points in the result data are correct, using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If any of the application points are incorrect, modify their value using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL: Cause_Rte_LoopDetected

This alarm occurs during cause analysis when a route or announcement result is encountered. In these cases, the indicated route identifier is compared to a list of previously provided results. If the system finds a match, it raises this alarm and returns an error to call processing. The system performs these actions to prevent calls from being endlessly routed to a single route or series of routes because of cause analysis interactions.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: CustId/StartIdx Missing

This alarm occurs when the property CustGrpId is not present on the identified trunk group. The property CustGrpId must be present to enable the system to find the correct place to begin analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the value of the CustGrpId property for the associated trunk group is correct by logging in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:trnkgrpprop:name="comp_name" command:

Where:

comp_name is the MML name for the affected trunk group.

For example, if you wanted to verify the properties of the trunk group that is called 1001, enter the prov-rtrv:trnkgrpprop:name="1001" command:

If your system has been properly configured for dial plan use, the system returns a response like the following:

MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2001-06-01 10:09:47
M  RTRV
   "session=active:trnkgrpprop"
   /*
    .
    .
    .
CustGrpId=2222
    .
    .
    .
 
   

Step 3 If you need to modify your settings, start a provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 4 If the CustGrpId property is missing from the affected trunk group, enter the prov-ed:trnkgrp:name="comp_name", CustGrpId=number command:


Note If you are modifying the CustGrpId value for an SS7 signaling service, you must set that SS7 signaling service to the out-of-service administrative state, as described in the "Setting the Administrative State" section. After you have entered the CustGrpId value, you can return the SS7 signaling service to the in-service administrative state.


Where:

comp_name—MML name for the affected trunk group.

number—Customer group ID number that is associated with your dial plan.

Step 5 Save and activate your provisioning session as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

If the alarm clears, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, See the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL:DataBaseAccessFail

This alarm occurs when certain functions in generic analysis have failed. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch raises this alarm in response to a failure of any of the following general analysis functions:

ReadANumDpSelection ()—Alarm is found in the Analysis MDL log.

CheckEPortedHandling(VAR BNumRecd : BNumberElem, B_DgtBuff : Dgtbuff, VAR ResultsFromBnoForUpdate : AnalyseBnoResults ): GeneralActionRslts—Alarm is found in the B_Analysis MDL log.

CheckERouteNumHandling(B_DgtBuff : Dgtbuff, VAR ResultsFromBnoForUpdate: AnalyseBnoResults): GeneralActionRslts—Alarm is found in the B_Analysis MDL log.

ANumberHandling()—Alarm is found in either the B_Analysis or A_Analysis MDL log.

BNumberHandling()—Alarm is found in the MDL log as B-Analysis.

Corrective Action


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the parameter, engine.SysConnectDataAccess, is set to true in the XECfgParm.dat file on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. If the setting is correct, proceed to Step 4. Otherwise, update the value of the parameter for each host, using the procedure in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

If correcting the setting does not clear the alarm, proceed to Step 4.

Step 3 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: Data Failure Rcvd

This alarm occurs during analysis when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch detects a data failure in the external routing engine.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL:dpselection_table_fail

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch cannot find the correct dial plan selection.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL:getDialplanBase_fail

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch could not load or generate the dial plan.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: InvalidtrkGrpType

This alarm occurs when the analysis module has not provided a valid trunk group type. The problem occurs if the route analysis table specifies an invalid trunk group type.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Display the valid trunk group types using the prov-rtrv MML command that is described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

Step 3 Correct the invalid trunk group type in the route analysis table using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

If the alarm clears, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: Prof_GetFail_DigModTbl

This alarm occurs during profile analysis when a B-number modification result is encountered and the digit modification string is unreadable. This problem can occur if the digit modification table is corrupted or an incorrect digit modification index is stored in the B-number modification results data.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: Prof_GetFail_InvldRslt

This alarm occurs during profile analysis when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch encounters a result that is not supported in profile analysis. Corruption of either the NOA or NPI tables, or the result table, causes this problem.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: Prof_GetFail_NOATbl

This alarm occurs during profile analysis when the NOA table is unreadable. This problem can occur if the NOA table is corrupted, the underlying software fails, or the NOA table is built without all the existing call context NOA values.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the NOA table uses all of the existing call context NOA values using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If the NOA table is missing any of the existing call context NOA values, add them using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL: Prof_GetFail_NOATbl_A

This alarm occurs during profile analysis when the NOA table is unreadable. This problem can occur if the NOA table is corrupted or if the underlying software fails.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: Prof_GetFail_NPITbl

This alarm occurs during profile analysis when the NPI table is unreadable. This problem can occur if the NPI table is corrupted, the underlying software fails, or the NPI table is not fully populated with all the possible references from the NOA table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the NPI table uses all of the possible references from the NOA table using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If the NPI table is missing any of the references from the NOA table, add them using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL: Prof_GetFail_NPITbl_A

This alarm occurs during profile analysis when the NPI table is unreadable. This problem can occur if the NOA table is corrupted, the underlying software fails.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: Prof_GetFail_RsltTbl

This alarm occurs during profile analysis when the result table is unreadable. This problem can occur if the result table is corrupted, the underlying software fails, or the result table is not fully populated with all the possible references from the NOA or NPI tables.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the result table uses all of the possible references from the NOA and NPI tables using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If the result table is missing any of the references from the NOA and NPI tables, add them using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL: Prof_InvldNPAValue

This alarm occurs during profile analysis when the system encounters a 7-digit B-number and the NPA property is set against the originating trunk group. An NPA string of more or less than three characters is invalid. Data corruption is the most likely cause of this problem.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the NPA values have been properly provisioned for the trunk group by using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If the NPA values are incorrect, modify them using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL: Prof_InvRslts_NOATbl

This alarm occurs when profile analysis successfully reads the NOA table but the value that is returned is logically invalid. Profile analysis gets two values from the NOA table: an immediate result index and an NPI index. An immediate result index indicates that analysis should start reading results now, but an NPI index indicates that another table read is required to find the correct result table index. These results are logically incompatible. Most likely this results from a failure of the underlying software or a corruption of the NOA table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: Prof_InvRslts_NOATbl_A

This alarm occurs when profile analysis successfully reads the NOA table but the value that is returned is logically invalid. Profile analysis gets two values from the NOA table, an immediate result index and an NPI index. The immediate result index indicates that analysis should start reading results now but the NPI index indicates that another table read is required to find the correct result table index. These results are logically incompatible. Most likely, the system raises this alarm when it detects a failure of the underlying software or a corruption of the NOA table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: Prof_MdfyBFail_AppPtInvld

This alarm occurs during profile analysis when the system encounters a B-number modification result and the specified application point (where digits are inserted) is beyond the end of the digit string. This problem can occur if an incorrect application point is specified in the result data, a result table is corrupted, or profile analysis values are incorrectly constructed.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem that this alarm identifies, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the specified application points in the result data are correct, using the numan-rtrv MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information.

If any of the application points are incorrect, modify their value by using the numan-ed MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide for more information. Save and activate your dial plan changes as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.


ANAL: RteStartIndexInvalid

This alarm occurs when the start index for the route analysis table is invalid.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the data for the provisioned route lists is correct by logging in to the active
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:rtlist:"all" command:

Step 3 If the data for the route lists is incorrect, correct it by using the prov-ed MML command. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4. See the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide for more information on provisioning route lists.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: Rte_TableHopCtrExceeded

This alarm occurs when generic analysis fails because of an excessive number of routing table changes.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Test for a loop in the routing configuration by completing the following steps:

a. Export the routing configuration to a file, as described in the "Exporting Provisioning Data" section.

b. Import the routing configuration file that is created in Step 2a, as described in the "Importing Provisioning Data" section.

If the import fails, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 3 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: RteTableFail_GetRteList

This alarm occurs when access to the route list failed. The problem occurs if the index to the route list is not valid or if the route list is not loaded.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: RteTableFail_GetTrkAttrdata

This alarm occurs when access to the trunk group attribute data table failed. The problem occurs if the index to the trunk group attribute data table is not valid or if the table is not loaded.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: RteTableFail_GetTrkGrpdata

This alarm occurs when access to the trunk group data failed. The problem occurs if the index to the trunk group data is not valid or if the trunk group data table is not loaded.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly. Use the procedure described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: RteTableFail_GetTrunkList

This alarm occurs when access to the trunk group list failed. The problem occurs if the index to the trunk group list is not valid or if the trunk group list is not loaded.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly. Use the procedure described in the"Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

ANAL: TableFail_BearerCapTable

This alarm occurs when the bearer capability table could not be read during generic analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: TableFail_CondRouteDescTable

This alarm occurs when the conditional route description table could not be read during generic analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: TableFail_CondRouteTable

This alarm occurs when the system could not read the conditional routing table during generic analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

If that procedure resolves the problem, the procedure is finished. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: TableFail_CPCTable

This alarm occurs when the calling party category (CPC) table could not be read during generic analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: TableFail_RouteHolTable

This alarm occurs when route holiday table could not be read during generic analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: TableFail_PercRouteTable

This alarm occurs when the percentage route holiday table could not be read during generic analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: TableFail_TMRTable

This alarm occurs when the transmission medium requirements (TMR) table could not be read during generic analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: TableFail_TNSTable

This alarm occurs when the system cannot read the transit network selection (TNS) table during generic analysis.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ANAL: TrunkGrpRsltCtrExceeded

This alarm occurs when the analysis module provided the maximum number of candidate trunk groups allowed. The maximum number is 20. The purpose of the alarm is to limit the time spent searching for candidate trunk groups.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly, by using the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

Association Degraded

This alarm occurs when one of the destination addresses for an SCTP association fails, but the association is still in-service (IS).

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the procedure in the "Resolving an Association Alarm" section.

Association Fail

This alarm occurs when an SCTP association fails because of an IP connectivity failure or an out-of-service (OOS) destination.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the procedure in the "Resolving an Association Alarm" section.

C7LNK ALGNMT LOST

This alarm occurs when the MTP2 for the C7 link between a Cisco ITP-L and an associated APC loses alignment.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, use the diagnostics on the affected Cisco ITP-L to determine why the link lost alignment. See the "Verifying the Link Alignment Status" section.

C7DPC CONGESTION

This alarm occurs when a link in a signaling route towards a given DPC becomes congested or when a DPC is congested and has sent a congestion indication to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify the status of the links that are associated with the affected DPC, as described in the "Retrieving Service State of C7/SS7 Links or Linksets" section.

If none of the links are out-of-service, this alarm occurred because the DPC is congested. Corrective action is not necessary. Wait for the congestion condition to clear.

If any of the links are out-of-service, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Return the out-of-service links to service, as described in the "Setting the Service State of a C7/SS7 Link or Linkset" section.

If that does not resolve the problem, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


C7LNK CONGESTION

This alarm occurs when an SS7 MTP2 link becomes congested and it cannot receive any more messages.

Corrective Action

If this alarm occurs repeatedly, perform the following steps to correct the problem:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Reduce the amount of traffic from the far-end that is associated with the affected link.

If that clears the alarm, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Add additional links to the linkset associated with the affected link. See
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide for more information about adding links.

If that does not resolve the problem, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


C7LNK INHIBIT

This alarm occurs when a C7 link has been inhibited for maintenance.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, uninhibit the specified C7 link, as described in the "Setting the Service State of a C7/SS7 Link or Linkset" section, when the maintenance is complete.

C7SLTLnkCong

This alarm occurs when an SS7 link on a 4-link Cisco ITP-L is congested.

Corrective Action

If this alarm occurs repeatedly, perform the following steps to correct the problem:


Step 1 To collect system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Reroute the SS7 traffic to other links to reduce the congestion. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide for more information about adding links.

If that does not resolve the problem, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Call Back Feature Insertion Failure

This alarm occurs when an attempt to insert a call-back feature entry in the main memory database fails. When this insertion fails, the call-back feature does not work.

Corrective Action

Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem and determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.

Call Back Feature Deletion Failure

This alarm occurs when an attempt to delete a call-back feature entry from the main memory database fails. When this deletion fails, the call-back feature does not work.

Corrective Action

Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem and determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.

Charge Table Access Failure

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch cannot access the charge table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, check for the presence of the Charge Table Load Failure alarm, using the procedure in the "Retrieving All Active Alarms" section. If this alarm is present, perform the corrective action for that alarm. Otherwise, the procedure is complete.

Charge Table Load Failure

This alarm occurs when a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch process is unable to load the charge table.

Corrective Action


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify whether a charge table is present on your system by logging in to your active
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:charge:"all" command:

The system responds with a list of elements in the charge table, or with an error indicating that a charge table does not exist.

If a charge table is not present, provision a charge table, as described in
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide.

If a charge table is present, verify that the information returned is correct. If the information is correct, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, correct the contents of the charge table, as described in
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Comm Srvc Creation Error

This alarm occurs when an error occurred while creating or opening a communication service.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 3 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Hardware" section.

Step 4 Perform a manual switchover operation, as described in the "Performing a Manual Switchover" section.


Caution Switchover operations cause the loss of all SS7 messages that are sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for approximately three seconds. The switchover affects unstable in-progress calls as well as new calls. Stable in-progress calls are not affected.

Step 5 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 6 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

Step 7 Perform a manual switchover operation, as described in the "Performing a Manual Switchover" section.


Caution Switchover operations cause the loss of all SS7 messages that are sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for approximately 3 seconds. This switchover affects unstable in-progress calls as well as new calls. Stable in-progress calls are not affected.

If the switchover does not resolve the alarm, proceed to Step 8.

Step 8 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Config Fail

This alarm occurs when the configuration has failed.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Search the active system log file, as described in the "Viewing System Logs" section, for logs that indicate errors in the content of the provisioning data.

If there are no logs that indicate errors in the content of the provisioning data, proceed to Step 3.

If there are logs that indicate errors in the content of the provisioning data, start a dynamic reconfiguration session to change the settings for the components that are identified in the log messages. See the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If changing component settings corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


CTI Connection Failed

This alarm occurs when the CTI connection to the Cisco CallManager cluster has failed.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Collect diagnostic information from your system.

Step 2 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the Cisco CallManager cluster are working properly.

Determine the status of the Ethernet interfaces on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch by using the
Cisco IPT Platform Administration application. See the online Help topic for this subject for more information. You can find information on verifying the proper functioning of an Ethernet interface on the Cisco CallManager cluster in the associated documentation.

If the Ethernet connections are working correctly, proceed to Step 4. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. After the replacement is complete, return to Step 2.

Find information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on either platform in the documentation that came with the platform.

Step 4 Verify that the MGCP sessions are operating normally. See the documentation for the affected media gateway for more information on verifying the functioning of the MGCP sessions.

If the MGCP sessions are not operating normally, return the MGCP sessions to normal operations, as described in the documentation for the affected Cisco CallManager cluster. Otherwise, proceed to
Step 5.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


CTI Version Mismatch

This alarm occurs when the CTI version of the CTI Manager component that is configured on
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is not compatible with the version on the CTI Manager.

Corrective Action

Check the version of CTI Manager and install appropriate patches on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to make it compatible with the version on CTI Manager.

Dial Plan Loading Failed

This alarm occurs when a dial plan did not load properly.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, verify that the dial plan file loaded correctly. Use the procedure that is described in the "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

DISK

This alarm occurs when the system disk is running out of space.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, delete any unnecessary files from the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Deleting Unnecessary Files to Increase Available Disk Space" section.

EISUP: Unexpected Msg/Par

This alarm occurs when the EISUP module receives an unsupported message or parameter. This alarm is most likely to occur when the local EISUP version is older than the EISUP version used by the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch or the Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface (HSI) on the other end.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 To upgrade the version of EISUP locally, you must either upgrade the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software to the same release as the other Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, or to the release supported by your current version of the Cisco HSI software.

The steps that are required to upgrade the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software are in
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Software Installation and Configuration Guide.

If upgrading the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software clears the alarm, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ENGINE CONFIG FAIL

This alarm occurs when a component in the engine configuration fails.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Search the active system log file for log messages indicating which component is raising this alarm. Use the procedure that is described in the "Viewing System Logs" section.

If there are logs that indicate a failed component, proceed to Step 3.

If there are no logs that indicate a failed component, proceed to Step 4.

Step 3 Begin a dynamic reconfiguration session to reprovision the failed component. Use the procedure that is described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If that resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


FAIL

This alarm occurs when the component referenced in the alarm failed. The failure might affect service, in which case, the system raises other alarms.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 If the component identified in the alarm text is in the system software, contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.

If the component identified in the alarm text is a component of system hardware, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on your standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 4 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on your standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

Step 5 Perform a manual switchover, as described in the "Performing a Manual Switchover" section.


Caution Switchover operations cause the loss of all SS7 messages that are sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for approximately three seconds. The switchover affects unstable in-progress calls as well as new calls. Stable in-progress calls are not affected.

Step 6 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 7 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

If that resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 8.

Step 8 Replace the component that is identified in the alarm text. You can find procedures for replacing Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch hardware in the associated Sun Microsystems documentation. For procedures to replace Cisco ITP-L hardware, see the documentation for the
Cisco 2800 Series Integrated Services Routers. Find procedures for replacing Cisco switch hardware in the documentation for the switch.

Step 9 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. See the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


FailoverPeerLost

This alarm occurs when the failover daemon on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is not reachable.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces between the active and standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches and the Cisco switches are working properly.


Note For information on verifying the proper operation of an Ethernet interface on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on verifying the proper functioning of an Ethernet interface on the Cisco switches, see the documentation for your switch.


If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.


Note For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco switch, see the documentation for your switch.


Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


FailoverPeerOOS

This alarm occurs when the failover daemon goes out-of-service in the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, check the alarms on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. Use the procedure in the "Retrieving All Active Alarms" section, and resolve those alarms.

FAIL REMOTE STANDBY

This alarm occurs on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch when a synchronization operation between the active and standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches fails. The system automatically clears this alarm if a synchronization operation succeeds after the failure. If the synchronization succeeds, the system triggers the Standby Warm Start alarm. See the "Standby Warm Start" section for more information.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is in the standby platform state. Use the procedure that is defined in the "Verifying the Platform State of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches" section.

If the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is in the standby platform state, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 3 Synchronize the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch with the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch by entering the prov-sync MML command.

Step 4 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on your standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 5 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on your standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

If that resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


FORCE NODE RESTART

This alarm occurs on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch when a new SS7 IOCC is added to the configuration of the system. This alarm causes the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to be rebooted. This alarm does not affect the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 When the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software has restarted on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, collect system data. Refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is in the standby platform state, using the procedure that is defined in the "Verifying the Platform State of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches" section.

If the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is in the standby platform state, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Gen Fail

This alarm occurs when a failure occurs because of resource exhaustion or configuration problems, such as the following:

Memory exhaustion

Queue overflow

Message congestion

IPC file cannot be opened

Expired timer

Log messages in the active system log file indicate the nature of the failure. For the majority of the failures, this alarm is informational and no user action is required. If the system generates this alarm because it cannot open an IPC file, you must take corrective action.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Search the active system log file, as described in the "Viewing System Logs" section, for logs that indicate that an IPC file cannot be opened.

If there are no logs that indicate that an IPC file cannot be opened, no further action is required.

If there are logs that indicate that an IPC file cannot be opened, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 4 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

Step 5 Perform a manual switchover, as described in the "Performing a Manual Switchover" section.


Caution Switchover operations cause the loss of all SS7 messages that are sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for approximately three seconds. The switchover affects unstable in-progress calls as well as new calls. Stable in-progress calls are not affected.

Step 6 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on your newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 7 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on your newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

If that resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 8.

Step 8 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Holiday Table Access Failure

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch cannot access the holiday table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, check for the presence of the Holiday Table Load Failure alarm, by using the procedure in the "Retrieving All Active Alarms" section. If this alarm is present, perform the corrective action for that alarm. Otherwise, the procedure is complete.

Holiday Table Load Failure

This alarm occurs when a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch process is unable to load the holiday table.

Corrective Action


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify whether a holiday table is present on your system by logging in to the active
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:holiday:"all" command:

The system responds with a list of elements in the holiday table, or with an error indicating that a holiday table does not exist.

If a holiday table is not present, provision a holiday table, as described in
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide.

If a holiday table is present, verify that the information returned is correct. If the information is correct, proceed to Step 2. Otherwise, correct the contents of the holiday table, as described in
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


INVALID M3UA RC

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives an M3UA message from the identified Cisco ITP that includes a routing context that has not been provisioned on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Determine the AS definitions on the associated Cisco ITP. See the documentation for the Cisco ITP for more information.

Step 3 Retrieve the settings for the affected M3UA routing keys by using the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

Step 4 Identify the AS defined on the Cisco ITP that is not provisioned as a routing context on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Step 5 Open a dynamic reconfiguration session to add the routing context to the M3UA routing keys, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If adding the routing context to the M3UA routing keys corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


INVALID SUA RC

This alarm occurs when the SUA routing keys that are defined on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch do not match the SUA routing keys that are defined on the signaling gateway.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Determine the AS definitions on the associated Cisco ITP. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information.

Step 3 Retrieve the settings for the affected SUA routing keys by using the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

Step 4 Identify the AS defined on the Cisco ITP that is not provisioned as a routing context on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Step 5 Open a dynamic reconfiguration session to add the routing context to the SUA routing keys, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If adding the routing context corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Invalid Virtual_IP_Addr

This alarm occurs when the configured virtual IP address is not part of the networks that are associated with the IP addresses set for the IP_Addr1 or IP_Addr2 parameters in the XECfgParm.dat file.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the IP address defined for the XECfgParm.dat parameter, *.Virtual_IP_Addr, is set correctly in the XECfgParm.dat file on each host.


Note The IP address that is defined for this parameter should be a part of the networks that are associated with the IP addresses defined for the XECfgParm.dat parameters IP_Addr1 or IP_Addr2.


If the setting for the parameter is correct, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, reboot your software using the procedure that is described in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


IP CONNECTION FAILED

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch loses network (IP) connectivity to a
Cisco ITP-L. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch generates this alarm for each SS7 link that is associated with the affected Cisco ITP-L.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the affected Cisco ITP-L is operating. See the documentation for the
Cisco 2800 Series Integrated Services Routers.

If the affected Cisco ITP-L is not operating, start it using the procedure in the "Cisco SS7 Interface Startup Procedure" section. If starting the Cisco ITP-L does not resolve the problem, replace the affected Cisco ITP-L. See the documentation for the Cisco 2800 Series Integrated Services Routers.

If the affected Cisco ITP-L is operating, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the affected
Cisco ITP-L are working properly.


Note For information on verifying the proper operation of an Ethernet interface on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on verifying the proper functioning of an Ethernet interface on the Cisco ITP-L, see the documentation for the Cisco 2800 Series Integrated Services Routers.


If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.


Note For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on removing and replacing components on the Cisco ITP-L, see the documentation for the Cisco 2800 Series Integrated Services Routers.


Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


IP RTE CONF FAIL

This alarm occurs when an IP route cannot access the local interface that its IP address parameter defined.

Corrective Action

To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section. Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.

IP RTE FAIL

This alarm occurs when an IP route is in the OOS state with a cause other than off-duty or commanded out-of-service.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify the IP addresses of the local interfaces on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch by using the ifconfig -a UNIX command.

The system returns a response indicating the IP addresses of your local interfaces.

Step 3 Verify that the IP addresses obtained in Step 2 match the values that are set for the IP_Addr1 through IP_Addr4 parameters in the XECfgParm.dat file.

If the settings for the local IP addresses are not the same, proceed to Step 4.

If the settings for the local IP addresses are the same, proceed to Step 12.

Step 4 Log in to your active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and change directories to the /opt/CiscoMGC/etc directory using the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/etc UNIX command:

Step 5 Open the XECfgParm.dat file in a text editor, such as vi.

Step 6 Search for the IP_Addr properties and change the properties that are not configured correctly.

Step 7 Save the file and exit the text editor.

Step 8 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch by entering the /etc/init.d/CiscoMGC stop UNIX command:


Note Shutting down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch causes the currently standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to become the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.


Step 9 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on this Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch by entering the /etc/init.d/CiscoMGC start command:

Step 10 When the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software is fully activated, log in to the active
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and perform a manual switchover, using the sw-over::confirm MML command:

Step 11 Repeat Step 2 through Step 9 on the newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

If the problem has not been resolved after you have completed those steps, proceed to Step 12.

Step 12 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ISUP: COT Failure

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a COT message that indicates a failed continuity test.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, run a manual COT test, as described in the "Running a Manual Continuity Test" section.

License server unreachable

This alarm appears if the license server is unavailable. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch looks at the local license files to retrieve the configuration time TDM ports/ the run time license information. Simultaneously, a timer starts.

If the license server is still unreachable after one week, the license number is half of the license number in license files.

If the license server is still unreachable after eight weeks, the license number is the number of demo licenses.

Corrective Action

If the license server unreachable alarm appears, use the rtrv-lics output to determine how many days license server has been unreachable.

Follow these steps to resolve this problem.


Step 1 Go to the machine where the license server is running (see the first line of the license file for the server hostname).

Step 2 Enter the ps -ef |grep lmgrd command to see whether the license server daemon is running.

a. If the license server is not running, enter the /opt/CiscoMGC/local/reload_lics.sh command to restart the license server.

b. If the license server still fails to start, check the /opt/CiscoMGC/var/log/flexlm_server.log for detailed information or contact Cisco TAC.

c. If the license server is running, but the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is running on a separate machine, ensure that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch machine can reach the IP address of the license server machine.


LIF BER

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch detects an excessive bit error ratio from a frame alignment signal. Any source of electrical noise might cause this alarm; for example, a degraded transmission line, degraded line connectors, or a high-voltage electrical source that is located in proximity to a line.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, isolate the source by testing the connections and transmission line for the identified component. When you have identified the source, resolve as necessary.

LIF FAIL

This alarm occurs when a local Ethernet interface fails.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Note If the Association Degraded or Association Failed alarms occur along with this alarm, follow the procedure that is defined in the "Resolving an Association Alarm" section.



Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Use the Log viewer in the MGC Viewer toolkit to search the system log file from the same time period as this alarm for a GEN_ERR_IPINTF_FAIL log message.


Note For more information on using the Log viewer, see
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Operations, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting Guide.


If you detect a GEN_ERR_IPINTF_FAIL log message, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 3 Identify the cause of the failure from the information in the log message.

If the cause in the log message is "Admin Down," the interface was taken down using an administrative command. Proceed to Step 4.

If the cause in the log message is "Link Down," the Ethernet path failed. Proceed to Step 5.

Step 4 Enter the ifconfig interface up UNIX command to restore the link to service:

Where:

interface—IP address of the affected interface.

If the interface is restored and is working fine, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 5 Verify that the cable connected between the interface and the associated Ethernet switch is working properly.

If the cable is working correctly, proceed to Step 6.

If the cable is not working correctly, replace it. If replacing the cable resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Verify that the associated Ethernet switch is working properly.

If the Ethernet switch is working correctly, proceed to Step 7.

If the Ethernet switch is not working correctly, troubleshoot the problem as indicated in the documentation for your switch. If that resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


LIF LOF

This alarm occurs when a loss of T1/E1 framing is detected on the LIF. The physical line has a signal but lost the framing pattern.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the framing format used on the port matches the framing format that is used on the line.

If the framing formats are different, change the framing format on the port to the other framing format. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3. If the alarm does not clear, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Change the line build-out setting. If the alarm does not clear, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Open the statistics report for the port and look for evidence of a bad line. Bursts of Latvia could indicate a timing problem.

If you find evidence of a bad line, perform loopback tests on the line to isolate the problem. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5. Once you have isolated the problem, resolve as necessary. If the alarm does not clear, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


LIF LOS

This alarm occurs when the sent signal is lost in the T1/E1. The receiving end does not receive the signal. The physical line might have a break in it.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the cable connections are correct between the interface port and the service provider equipment or T1/E1 terminal equipment.

If the cable was built on-site, check the cable connectors. A reversal of send and receive pairs or an open receive pair can cause this condition.

If the cable connections appear correct, then proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Check your T1/E1 equipment, or ask your service provider to test your T1/E1 line and correct any errors found.

If the alarm does not clear, then proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


LIF SES

This alarm occurs when the LIF is automatically set to the out-of-service state because of severely errored seconds. The TDM line has a large amount of noise, causing an error rate greater than 10-3. Framing and signal are within tolerance. This alarm indicates a degraded but functioning line.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the terminations and cabling for the LIF are working. If you can identify the source of the problem, resolve as necessary. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


LIF YELLOW

This alarm occurs when the receiving end reports a loss of the sent signal. This alarm is reported for T1/E1 facilities only.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Connect an external loopback cable to the affected port.

If no alarms are produced, proceed to Step 3.

If alarms are produced, the port is causing the error. Replace the hardware component that is associated with the port. See the associated media gateway documentation for more information on replacing the component.

Step 3 Check for an open, short, or wiring error in the cable between the network interface port and your service provider network interface unit T1/E1 terminal equipment. An open send pair can cause this condition.

If you find a wiring problem, replace the cable. If that does not clear the alarm, proceed to Step 4.

If you do not find a wiring problem, then proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 If your port is configured to use D4 framing, the port might intermittently detect yellow alarms because the packet data might contain the pattern that is used to signal yellow alarm in D4 framing. If possible, switch to ESF framing in both the terminal equipment and the line equipment.

If switching the framing does not clear the alarm, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


LIF: IDLE CHANGE

This alarm occurs when the physical line fails because its cable is broken or not plugged in. This alarm is reported for V.35 facilities only.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the V.35 cables between the port and the far-end are working correctly.

If you find a problem with a V.35 cable, replace the cable. If that does not correct the problem, proceed to Step 3.

If you do not find a problem with the V.35 cables, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


LIF: LOST CD

This alarm occurs when the physical line has failed because its cable is broken or not plugged in. This is reported for V.35 facilities only.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the V.35 cables between the port and the far-end are working correctly.

If you find a problem with a V.35 cable, replace the cable. If that does not correct the problem, proceed to Step 3.

If you do not find a problem with the V.35 cables, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


LIF: LOST CTS

This alarm occurs when the physical line fails because its cable is broken or not plugged in. This is reported for V.35 facilities only.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the V.35 cables between the port and the far-end are working correctly.

If you find a problem with a V.35 cable, replace the cable. If that does not correct the problem, proceed to Step 3.

If you do not find a problem with the V.35 cables, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


M3UAKEY Ack Pending

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch cannot send or receive traffic for the identified SS7 signaling service via the Cisco ITP that has not acknowledged the M3UAKEY.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Determine the AS definitions on the associated Cisco ITP. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information.

Step 3 Retrieve the settings for the affected M3UA routing keys using the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

Step 4 The AS definitions should match the routing contexts of the M3UA routing keys. If they match, proceed to Step 6. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Open a dynamic reconfiguration session to modify the routing contexts of the M3UA routing keys, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If modifying the routing contexts corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Verify that the AS is not shut down on the Cisco ITP. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information. If the AS is shut down, restart it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

If restarting the AS corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.



Note If you modify an ss7path that is configured for M3UAKEY, the system generates the "All M3UAKEY Ack Pending" alarm for all the other ss7paths that are configured with the same M3UAKEY, although they are not being modified.

Coincidentally, when you modify an ss7path, the system generates the M3UAKEY Ack Pending alarms when the prov-cpy and prov-dply commands are being processed. However, these alarms are cleared after the commands have been completed.

When the prov-cpy and prov-dply commands are being processed, no new calls can be placed on any of the ss7paths for which alarms were generated. However, the calls that already exist on the ss7paths are not affected.


MeterPulseTariff Table Load Failure

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch fails to load the meter pulse tariff table.

Corrective Action


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify whether a tariff table is present on your system by logging in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:metertariff:"all" command:

The system responds with a list of elements in the meter pulse tariff table, or with an error message indicating that the meter pulse tariff table does not exist.

If the meter pulse tariff table is not present, provision a meter pulse tariff table, as described in
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide.

If a meter pulse tariff table is present, verify that the information returned is correct. If the information is correct, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, correct the contents of the meter pulse tariff table, as described in Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


MMDB: Database unavailable

This alarm occurs when the main memory database is unavailable to provide any services. The
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch attempts to recover. The alarm clears when the database becomes available.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, delete any unnecessary files from the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Deleting Unnecessary Files to Increase Available Disk Space" section.

MMDB: Database cause switchover

This alarm occurs when the main memory database is unavailable on a redundant system and is indicating that the system should switchover. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch attempts to recover. The alarm clears when the database becomes available.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, delete any unnecessary files from the standby
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Deleting Unnecessary Files to Increase Available Disk Space" section.

MMDB: Database nearly full

This alarm occurs when the main memory database detects that allocated resources for data storage are nearly all utilized.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, delete any unnecessary files from the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Deleting Unnecessary Files to Increase Available Disk Space" section.

NAS: AuditResponse Failure

This alarm occurs when the identified media gateway fails to send a RESYNC RESP message back to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch within the audit time interval.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the affected media gateway is in the in-service state, as described in the "Verifying the Status of all Signaling Services" section.

If the affected media gateway is in-service, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 3 Verify that the configuration of the affected media gateway is correct. See the documentation for the media gateway for more information.

If that does not resolve the problem, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the associated media gateway are working properly.


Note For information on verifying the proper operation of an Ethernet interface on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on verifying the proper functioning of an Ethernet interface on the media gateway, see the documentation for the specific media gateway.


If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.


Note For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the media gateway, see the documentation for the specific media gateway.


Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


NAS: CommsFailure

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch cannot communicate with the identified media gateway.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Determine whether the affected media gateway is operating. See the documentation for the media gateway for more information.

If the affected media gateway is not operating, restore it to service. See the documentation for the media gateway for more information.

If the affected media gateway is operating, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the IP configuration parameters for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the affected media gateway are correct.


Note Use the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section, to retrieve the IP configuration information for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. See the documentation for the media gateway for information on retrieving the IP configuration data.


If the configuration of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is incorrect, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If the configuration of the affected media gateway is incorrect, modify the provisioning data for your system. See the documentation for the media gateway for more information.

If the configuration of both the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the affected media gateway are correct, then proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


NAS: ResourceFailure

This alarm occurs when the indicated media gateway does not acknowledge a continuity test (COT).

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, run a manual COT on the indicated media gateway, as described in the Running a Manual Continuity Test.

OLC: Leg1chanSeizedUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Seized Channel (CRCX) acknowledge message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


OLC: Leg1chanModifiedUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Modify Channel (MDCX) acknowledge message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


OLC: Leg1chanDeletedUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Delete Channel (DLCX) acknowledge message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


OLC: Leg1notifyUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Notify (NTFY) message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


OLC: Leg1deleteChanUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Delete Channel (DLCX) message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


OLC: Leg1notifyRequestAckUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Request Notify (RQNT) acknowledge message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


OLC: Leg1chanOpsFailed

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch detects an internal error or a problem that is related to a media gateway.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


OOS TRAFFIC RE-ROUTE

This alarm occurs when the traffic channels (bearer channels, IP network) on one side of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch are lost, which causes the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to reroute channels away from the affected component. Usually, this alarm is generally because of a network or equipment failure, but might be because of a provisioning failure.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch should display the other alarms that are associated with the affected component. Resolve those alarms first.

If resolving those alarms does not clear this alarm, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that the traffic channel settings that are provisioned for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the affected media gateway are correct.


Note Use the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section, to retrieve the traffic channel provisioning data for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. See the documentation for the media gateway for information on retrieving the traffic channel data.


If the configuration of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is incorrect, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If the configuration of the affected media gateway is incorrect, modify the provisioning data for your system. See the documentation for the media gateway for more information.

If the configuration of both the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the affected media gateway are correct, then proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


OverloadHeavy

This alarm occurs when the system reaches the threshold for overload level 3. The system performs an automatic switchover operation. If the call rejection percentage setting for overload level 3 is unchanged from its default value, the system rejects all new calls until the abate threshold for overload level 3 is reached. The system automatically clears the alarm at that time. For more information, see the "Managing Automatic Congestion Control" section.

Corrective Action

If a rare spike in traffic causes this alarm, corrective action is not necessary. If this alarm occurs regularly, you should ensure that your links and routes are properly configured for load sharing, as described in the "SS7 Load Sharing Malfunction" section, and reroute some of your traffic to other Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches.


Note This alarm can occur when a provisioning session is active during peak busy hours. If this alarm occurs during a provisioning session, you might clear the alarm by stopping the provisioning session. For more information on the MML commands to manage a provisioning session, see the "Provisioning a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch" section.


OverloadMedium

This alarm occurs when the system reaches the threshold for overload level 2. The system rejects a percentage of new calls that are based on the call rejection percentage setting for overload level 2, until the system reaches the abate threshold for overload level 2. The system automatically clears this alarm at that time. For more information, see the "Managing Automatic Congestion Control" section.

Corrective Action

If a a rare spike in traffic causes this alarm, corrective action is not necessary. If this alarm occurs regularly, you should ensure that your links and routes are properly configured for load sharing, as described in the "SS7 Load Sharing Malfunction" section, and reroute some of your traffic to other Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches.


Note This alarm can occur when a provisioning session is active during peak busy hours. If a provisioning session is active, you can clear the alarm by stopping the provisioning session. For more information on the MML commands to manage a provisioning session, see the "Provisioning a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch" section.


OverloadLight

This alarm occurs when the system reaches the threshold for overload level 1. The system rejects a percentage of new calls that are based on the call rejection percentage setting for overload level 1, until the abate threshold for overload level 1 is reached. The system automatically clears this alarm at that time. For more information, see the "Managing Automatic Congestion Control" section.

Corrective Action

If a rare spike in traffic causes this alarm, corrective action is not necessary. If this alarm occurs regularly, you should ensure that your links and routes are properly configured for load sharing, as described in the "SS7 Load Sharing Malfunction" section, and reroute traffic to other Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches.


Note This alarm can occur when a provisioning session is active during peak busy hours. If a provisioning session is active, you might clear the alarm by stopping the provisioning session. For more information on the MML commands to manage a provisioning session, see the "Provisioning a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch" section.


OverResIncomingThreshold

This alarm occurs when the percentage of idle CICs in a trunk group is less than or equal to the configured threshold.

Corrective Action

This alarm might occur occasionally during periods of congestion. However, if this alarm occurs repeatedly, you might need to adjust the value of the parameter that controls the percentage of idle CICs for the affected trunk group. To modify the parameter, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.Retrieve the current settings for the affected trunk group using the prov-rtrv:rttrnkgrp:name="trnkgrp_name" command:

Where:

trnkgrp_name is the name of the affected trunk group.

The system returns a response like the following:

MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2002-09-20 15:38:02.892 EST
M  RTRV
   "session=NOA_SPAIN:rttrnkgrp"
   /*
name        type  reattempts  queuing  cutThrough  resIncomingPerc
----------  ----  ----------  -------  ----------  ----------
111         1     2           120      2           0
   */
 
   

The parameter, ResIncomingPerc, controls the percentage of idle CICs for the trunk group. In the preceding example, the value is 0.

Step 2 Start a provisioning session, as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 3 Use the prov-ed MML command to modify the setting of the resIncomingPerc parameter. For example, to change the percentage of idle CICs to 30 percent in a trunk group that is called 1000, enter the prov-ed:rttrnkgrp:name="1000", resImcomingPerc="30" command:


Note The new value for resIncomingPerc takes effect after your provisioning session is activated. Once the new value is activated, the OverResIncomingThreshold alarm is set or cleared after an outgoing call is routed over the affected trunk group.


Step 4 Save and activate the provisioning session, as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

If the alarm clears, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


PC UNAVAIL

This alarm occurs when a destination point code (DPC) is unavailable. This alarm can occur if a network failure isolates the DPC; or, the alarm can occur if a local equipment failure causes a loss of connectivity. Also, the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch can raise the alarm if the DPC, or routes to the DPC, were configured improperly.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch should also display other alarms that indicate problems with hardware, the SS7 links, or the network. Resolve those alarms first.

If resolving those alarms does not clear this alarm, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Ensure that the provisioning settings for the DPC and for all routes to the DPC and adjacent STPs match the settings that are used on the far-end, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

If the configuration data associated with the DPC is incorrect, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If the configuration data associated with the DPC is correct, then proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Peer IP Links Failure

This alarm occurs when the IP links to the peer Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch are removed or down.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces for the active and standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches are working properly.


Note You can find information on verifying the proper operation of an Ethernet interface on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch in the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system.


If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.


Note You can find information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch in the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system.


Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


PEER LINK A FAILURE

This alarm occurs either because a communication path between peer modules was lost or a peer module has stopped communicating.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the procedure in the "Resolving a Failed Connection to a Peer" section.

PEER LINK B FAILURE

This alarm occurs either because a communication path between peer modules was lost or a peer module has stopped communicating.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the procedure in the "Resolving a Failed Connection to a Peer" section.

PEER MODULE FAILURE

This alarm occurs when communications to a peer module are lost, indicating failure.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the procedure in the "Resolving a Failed Connection to a Peer" section.

POM INACTIVITY TIMEOUT

This alarm occurs when a provisioning session has been idle for 20 minutes. If there is no provisioning activity within the next 5 minutes, the system terminates the session.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, enter some provisioning MML commands, or stop the provisioning session as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section. For more information about provisioning the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide.

POM SESSION TERMINATE

This alarm occurs when a provisioning session is terminated. Any additional provisioning commands are not accepted.

Corrective Action

If you want to restart your provisioning session, perform the steps that are listed in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section, using the same source version set equal to the destination version name.

POM: DynamicReconfiguration

This alarm occurs when a dynamic reconfiguration procedure is started. It is cleared once the dynamic reconfiguration is successfully completed. See the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section for more information.

Corrective Action

If necessary, you can complete the dynamic reconfiguration procedure, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.


Note If you modify an ss7path that is configured for M3UAKEY, the system generates the "All M3UAKEY Ack Pending" alarm for all the other ss7paths that are configured with the same M3UAKEY, although they are not being modified.

Coincidentally, when you modify an ss7path, the system generates the M3UAKEY Ack Pending alarms when the prov-cpy and prov-dply commands are being processed. However, these alarms are cleared after the commands have been completed.

When the prov-cpy and prov-dply commands are being processed, no new calls can be placed on any of the ss7paths for which alarms were generated. However, the calls that already exist on the ss7paths are not affected.


POM: PEER_SYNC_ERR

This alarm occurs when the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch attempts to synchronize the contents of its configuration library while a provisioning session is in progress on the active
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, either stop the provisioning session as described in the "Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating your Changes" section. Alternatively, you can save and activate your changes according to the method described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

PRI: B-Channel not available

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a PRI "setup" message and the requested B channel is not available or cannot be allocated to the call.

Corrective Action

If necessary, you can save and activate a provisioning session, as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

ProcM No Response

The process manager is not responding to state information changes from the failover daemon.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Stop the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 3 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

Step 4 Perform a manual switchover, as described in the "Performing a Manual Switchover" section.


Caution Switchover operations cause the loss of all SS7 messages that are sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for approximately three seconds. The switchover affects unstable in-progress calls as well as new calls. Stable in-progress calls are not affected.

Step 5 Stop the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 6 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

If restarting the software does not resolve the problem, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


ProtocolFileMissing

This alarm occurs when the protocol files associated with your system configuration have not been installed.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Search the active system log file, as described in the "Viewing System Logs" section, for logs that indicate that a *.mdo or *.so file cannot be found.

If there are logs that indicate that a *.mdo or *.so file cannot be found, proceed to Step 3.

If there are no logs that indicate that an IPC file cannot be opened, proceed to Step 5.

Step 3 Determine which protocol patch contains the missing file. To find the patch that contains the missing file, consult the Release Notes for your particular release of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software.

Step 4 When you determine the protocol patch that contains your missing files, go to the following URL to down load this patch for your version of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software:

http://www.cisco.com/kobayashi/sw-center/sw-voice.shmtl

Step 5 Install the patch as instructed in its associated text file.

Step 6 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


REPL: all connections failure

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch cannot establish communication to the peer Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the Ethernet interfaces for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch are working properly.


Note For information on verifying the proper operation of an Ethernet interface on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system.


If an element of the Ethernet connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.


Note For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system.


Step 3 Verify the replicator configuration on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches, as described in the "Restoring a Backup File from a Device" section.

If that does not resolve the alarm, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


RSET CONFIG FAIL

This alarm occurs when the provisioning data for the SS7 route that is set to a DPC has invalid or incompatible parameter values. This alarm does not occur because of a mismatch between the network topology and the DPC data.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Ensure that the provisioning settings for the DPC and for all routes to the DPC match the settings that are used on the far-end, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

If the configuration data associated with the DPC is incorrect, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If the configuration data associated with the DPC is correct, then proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SC CONFIG FAIL

This alarm occurs when the provisioning parameters for the data link layer of a signaling channel are inconsistent or invalid. The signaling channel might already be provisioned. The configuration file might be corrupted so that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch cannot read it.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Place the affected signaling channel in the out-of-service state.

Step 3 Start a provisioning session, as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 4 Remove the affected signaling channel from your configuration using the prov-dlt MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 MML Command Reference for more information.

Step 5 While referring to your local provisioning parameters, reprovision the signaling channel using the prov-add MML command. See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 MML Command Reference for more information.

Step 6 Save and activate the provisioning session, as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

Step 7 Place the signaling channel in the in-service state.

If placing the signaling channel in-service does not resolve the problem, proceed to Step 8.

Step 8 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SC FAIL

This alarm occurs when the signaling channel is down and unable to process traffic. As a result, the signaling channel fails to negotiate a D-channel session, automatic restarts cannot recover the session, and the data link-layer fails. This problem can occur when SS7 SLTM/SLTA fails or when a PRI D-channel fails.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Ensure that the near-end and far-end data link terminations are operating.

If the near-end or far-end data link terminations are not operating, fix as necessary.

If the near-end and far-end data link terminations are operating, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Ensure that the provisioning settings for the signaling channel match the settings that are used on the far-end, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

If the configuration data for the signaling channel is incorrect, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If the configuration data for the signaling channel is correct, then proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SC M-OOS

This alarm occurs when a signaling channel has been taken out of service manually.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, restore the affected signaling channel to the in-service state, using the appropriate procedure. Procedures for modifying the state of signaling channels are described in the "Setting the Service State of a C7/SS7 Link or Linkset" section, the "Setting the Service State of an IP Link" section, and the "Setting the Service State of a D-channel" section.

SG Node Interface Fail

This alarm occurs when all IP connections to a signaling gateway (SG) node are out of service.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, check the configuration of the SG node and, if necessary, configure it to connect to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

SG Pair Interface Fail

This alarm occurs when all IP connections to both SGs of a pair or a single nonpaired SG are out of service.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, check the configuration of the affected SG and, if necessary, configure it to connect to the peer SG.

SIP: DNS CACHE NEARLY FULL

This alarm occurs when the domain name service (DNS) cache is nearly full.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Retrieve the current DNS properties by logging in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:dnsparam:"all" command:

The system returns a response like the following:

MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 1999-12-30 14:27:48
M  RTRV
"session=test:dnsparam"
/*
*.DnsCacheSize = 500
*.DnsKeepAlive = 30
*.DnsPolicy = HIERARCHY
*.DnsQueryTimeout = 1000
*.DnsServer1 = 172.22.1.1
*.DnsServer2 = 143.83.1.1
*DnsTTL = 3600
*/
 
   

Make note of the value of the *.DnsCacheSize parameter.

Step 3 Begin a dynamic reconfiguration session to increase the value of the *.DnsCacheSize parameter, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If this alarm occurs repeatedly despite increasing the size of the cache, then proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SIP: DNS SERVICE OOS

This alarm occurs when the DNS servers do not respond to queries. The DNS servers might be out of service or access to them might be lost.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Retrieve the current DNS properties by logging in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:dnsparam:"all" command:

The system returns a response like the following:

MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 1999-12-30 14:27:48
M  RTRV
"session=test:dnsparam"
/*
*.DnsCacheSize = 500
*.DnsKeepAlive = 30
*.DnsPolicy = HIERARCHY
*.DnsQueryTimeout = 1000
*.DnsServer1 = 172.22.1.1
*.DnsServer2 = 143.83.1.1
*DnsTTL = 3600
*/
 
   

Note the value of the *.DnsServer1 and *.DnsServer2 parameters.

Step 3 Begin a dynamic reconfiguration session to select new DNS servers for your system, entering their IP addresses in the *.DnsServer1 and *.DnsServer2 parameters, using the procedure that is described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If this alarm occurs repeatedly despite selecting new DNS servers, then proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SIP: OOS

This alarm occurs when an IP link used by the SIP is out of service.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, attempt to restore the IP link to service using the procedure that is described in the "Setting the Service State of an IP Link" section.

SIP Service Fail Over

This alarm occurs in response to the failure of switch interfaces, because of either a physical failure or an administrative shutdown.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Determine whether a physical failure or an administrative shutdown caused the alarm.

If a physical failure caused the alarm, proceed to Step 3.

If an administrative shutdown caused the alarm, check for this alarm again once the interface has been restored. If this alarm is still active, proceed to Step 4.

Step 3 Verify that the switch interfaces between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the affected SIP element are working properly.


Note For information on verifying the proper operation of a switch interface on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on verifying the proper functioning of a switch interface on other devices, see the documentation that came with the particular device.


If an element of the switch connection (such as a cable or an Ethernet interface card) is not working properly, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.


Note For information on removing and replacing an Ethernet interface card on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system. For information on removing and replacing components on other devices, see the documentation can that came with the particular device.


Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Standby Warm Start

This alarm occurs on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch when a synchronization operation between the active and standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches begins. This alarm clears automatically when the synchronization operation finishes. This alarm also occurs on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch when the prov-sync MML command is entered on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. In that case, the alarm clears automatically when the synchronization of provisioning data is complete. If a synchronization operation fails, the system clears this alarm automatically and generates a FAIL REMOTE STANDBY alarm. See the "FAIL REMOTE STANDBY" section for more information.

Corrective Action

Corrective action is only required when the alarm does not clear automatically. If this alarm does not clear automatically, verify that the pom.dataSync parameter in the XECfgParm.dat is set to true on each host, using the procedure in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

SS7 RTE KEY FAIL

This alarm occurs when one or more routing keys for an SS7 signaling service that is associated with an SG has failed; the signaling service cannot receive some ISUP messages. The maximum number of routing keys that the associated SG supports might have been exceeded.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Ensure that the provisioning settings for the bearer channels that are associated with this SG are correct by using the procedure that is described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

If the configuration data associated with the bearer channels is incorrect, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section. If reconfiguration clears the alarm, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

If the configuration data associated with the bearer channels is correct, then proceed to Step 4.

Step 3 Determine the maximum number of dynamic routing keys that are allowed on the associated SG.

Step 4 Determine how many routing keys the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is using for the affected SG by adding the number of CICs associated with the SS7 signaling service (ss7sgpath) and the number of SS7 subsystems (ss7sgsubsys).

For example, if 990 CICs and 10 SS7 subsystems were associated with the SG, then the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch would be using 1000 routing keys.

Step 5 Compare the maximum number of routing keys that are allowed to the number of routing keys being used. If the number of routing keys being used is greater, proceed to Step 6. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 6 Begin a dynamic reconfiguration session to delete the excess routing keys by removing either CICs or SS7 subsystems from your configuration, using the procedure that is described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If deleting excess routing keys clears the alarm, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SS7 SIG SRVC CONFIG FAIL

This alarm occurs when the identified SS7 signaling service that is associated with an SG is not configured correctly.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Retrieve the current DNS properties by logging in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:ss7SGPath:name="sig_srv" command:

Where:

sig_srv is the MML name of the identified SS7 signaling service.

The system returns a response that lists all the properties that are associated with the selected SS7 signaling service.

Step 3 Verify that the information displayed for the SS7 signaling service is correct.

If it is correct, proceed to Step 4. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 4 Begin a dynamic reconfiguration session to correct the settings for the SS7 signaling service by using the procedure that is described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If correcting the settings for the SS7 signaling service clears the alarm, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SS7 SIG SRVC UNAVAIL

The identified SS7 signaling service is unavailable.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform the MML command rtrv-dest on the SS7PATH or SS7SUBSYS object.

If the state is OOS,FLD, the signaling service is out of service because of failure of the MTP3 transport. Enter the MML command a prov-rtrv:SS7PATH or a prov-rtrv:SS7SUBSYS on the signaling service object.

a. If the object has an OPC attribute defined, the signaling service is using Cisco ITP-Ls for SS7 communication. The MTP3 layer is on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. Examine the SS7ROUTEs and LINKSETs to determine the cause of the failure.

b. If the object does not have an OPC attribute defined, the signaling service is using ITPs for SS7 communication. The MTP3 layer is one of the ITPs. Examine the M3UAROUTEs that have the same OPC and DPC as SS7PATH or the SUAROUTEs that have the same OPC, APC, and REMOTE SSN to determine which ITP EXTNODEs the signaling service uses. Consult the ITP documentation and debug the problem on the ITPs.

If the state is OOS, FLD&UPU, the signaling service is out of service because of failure of the user part layer at the destination. Examine the remote destination to determine the cause of the failure.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.



Note If you modify an ss7path that is configured for M3UAKEY, the system generates the "All M3UAKEY Ack Pending" alarm for all the other ss7paths that are configured with the same M3UAKEY, although they are not being modified.

Coincidentally, when you modify an ss7path, the system generates the M3UAKEY Ack Pending alarms when the prov-cpy and prov-dply commands are being processed. However, these alarms are cleared after the commands have been completed.

When the prov-cpy and prov-dply commands are being processed, no new calls can be placed on any of the ss7paths for which alarms were generated. However, the calls that already exist on the ss7paths are not affected.


SSN FAIL

This alarm occurs when the SCP located by the subsystem number (SSN) is not available.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Ensure that the provisioning settings for the SSN and the associated routes match the settings that are used on the far-end, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

If the configuration data associated with the SSN is incorrect, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If the configuration data associated with the SSN is correct, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify the network configuration to confirm that the SCP identified with the SSN is reachable.

If the SCP is not reachable, begin a dynamic reconfiguration session, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section. Reprovision your data for an SCP that is reachable or remove the SSN and its associated data.

If the SCP is reachable, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SUAKEY Ack Pending

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch cannot send or receive traffic for the identified SS7 subsystem via the Cisco ITP that has not acknowledged the SUAKEY.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Determine the AS definitions on the associated Cisco ITP. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information.

Step 3 Retrieve the settings for the affected SUA routing keys using the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

Step 4 The AS definitions should match the routing contexts of the SUA routing keys. If they match, proceed to Step 6. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Open a dynamic reconfiguration session to modify the routing contexts of the M3UA routing keys, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If modifying the routing contexts of the M3UA routing keys corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Verify that the AS is not shut down on the Cisco ITP. See the documentation for your Cisco ITP for more information. If the AS is shut down, restart it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

If restarting the AS corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SUPPORT FAILED

This alarm occurs when the identified entity cannot provide service because a supporting entity is not providing service. The supporting entity might be hardware or software.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Check for other alarms, as described in the "Retrieving All Active Alarms" section, which further identify the failed entity.

Step 3 After you have identified the failed entity, replace it and restore it to service. If the entity is hardware, see the appropriate documentation for replacement. If it is software, attempt to reboot the software.

If the alarms clear, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SwitchoverFail

This alarm occurs when a switchover operation from the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch fails.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the procedure described in the "Recovering from a Switchover Failure" section.

Tariff Table Access Failure

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch could not access the tariff table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, check for the presence of the Tariff Table Load Failure alarm, by using the procedure described in the "Retrieving All Active Alarms" section. If this alarm is present, perform the corrective action for that alarm. Otherwise, the procedure is complete.

Tariff Table Load Failure

This alarm occurs when a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch process is unable to load the tariff table.

Corrective Action


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify whether a tariff table is present on your system by logging in to your active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:tariff:"all" command:

The system responds with a list of elements in the tariff table, or with an error indicating that a tariff table does not exist.

If a tariff table is not present, provision a tariff table, as described in
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide.

If a tariff table is present, verify that the information returned is correct. If the information is correct, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, correct the contents of the tariff table, as described in
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


TLC: Leg2chanSeizedUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Seize Channel (CRCX) acknowledge message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


TLC: Leg2chanModifiedUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Modify Channel (MDCX) acknowledge message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


TLC: Leg2chanDeletedUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Delete Channel (DLCX) acknowledge message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


TLC: Leg2notifyUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Notify (NTFY) message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


TLC: Leg2deleteChanUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Delete Channel (DLCX) message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


TLC: Leg2notifyRequestAckUnpackError

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a Request Notify (RQNT) acknowledge message from the media gateway, which could not be unpacked.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


TLC: Leg2chanOpFailed

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch detects an internal error or a problem that is related to a media gateway.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a call trace, as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


UCM: CCodeModfailed

This alarm occurs when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch could not apply or remove a country code prefix.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Determine whether the country code prefix could not be applied or removed by viewing the active system log file. Use the procedure that is described in the "Viewing System Logs" section. A log should be present that uses the same text as the alarm. The log indicates whether the country code prefix could not be applied or removed and lists the affected B-number.

Step 3 Determine whether country code prefix application or removal should be performed for the affected B-number.

If country code prefix processing should not be performed, proceed to Step 4.

If country code prefix processing should be performed, proceed to Step 8.

Step 4 Verify whether the result set associated with the affected B-number has a result type of CC_DIG configured. Use the numan-rtrv MML command that is shown in the following example:

numan-rtrv:resulttable:custgrpid=T002
 
   

If the result set does have a result type of CC_DIG configured, enter the numan-dlt MML command to remove the CC_DIG result set as shown in the following example:

numan-dlt:resulttable:custgrpid="T002", name="result46", resulttype="CC_DIG"
 
   

Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Verify that the BDigitCCPrefix property for the associated trunk group is set to 0 (disabled) by issuing the prov-rtrv MML command that is shown in the following example:

prov-rtrv:trnkgrpprop:name="trnkgrp1"
 
   

If the BDigitCCPrefix property in the associated trunk group is not set to 0, enter the prov-ed MML command to modify the value of the property as shown in the following example:

prov-ed:trnkgrp:name="trnkgrp1", BDigitCCPrefix=0
 
   

Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Verify that the BDigitCCrm property for the associated trunk group is set to NULL (disabled). Enter the prov-rtrv MML command that is shown in the following example:

prov-rtrv:trnkgrpprop:name="trnkgrp1"
 
   

If the BDigitCCrm property in the associated trunk group is not set to NULL, enter the prov-ed MML command to modify the value of the property as shown in the following example:

prov-ed:trnkgrp:name="trnkgrp1", BDigitCCrm=null
 
   

Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Verify that the associated B-number analysis configuration does not allow for country code digit removal. Enter the numan-rtrv MML command that is shown in the following example:

numan-rtrv:digmodstring:custgrpid="T002"
 
   

If the associated B-number analysis configuration allows country code digit removal, enter the numan-dlt MML command to remove the digit string as shown in the following example:

numan-dlt:digmodstring:custgrpid="T002", name="ccspain"
 
   

Otherwise, proceed to Step 13.

Step 8 Select a step that is based on the country code prefix information that is found in the log identified in Step 2.

If the log indicates that the country code prefix could not be applied, proceed to Step 9.

If the log indicates that the country code prefix could not be removed, proceed to Step 11.

Step 9 Verify whether the result set associated with the affected B-number has a result type of CC_DIG configured by issuing the numan-rtrv MML command.

If the result set does not have a result type of CC_DIG configured, enter the numan-ed MML command to add the CC_DIG result set as shown in the following example:

numan-ed:resulttable:custgrpid="T002", name="result46", resulttype="CC_DIG", dw1=ccspain, 
setname="setname1"
 
   

Otherwise, proceed to Step 10.

Step 10 Verify that the BDigitCCPrefix property for the associated trunk group is set to 1 (enabled). Enter the prov-rtrv MML command that is shown in the following example:

prov-rtrv:trnkgrpprop:name="trnkgrp1"
 
   

If the BDigitCCPrefix property in the associated trunk group is not set to 1, enter the prov-ed MML command to modify the value of the property as shown in the following example:

prov-ed:trnkgrp:name="trnkgrp1", BDigitCCPrefix=1
 
   

Otherwise, proceed to Step 13.

Step 11 Verify that the BDigitCCrm property for the associated trunk group is set to the correct number string. Enter the prov-rtrv MML command that is shown in the following example:

prov-rtrv:trnkgrpprop:name="trnkgrp1"
 
   

If the BDigitCCrm property in the associated trunk group is not set to the correct number string, enter the prov-ed MML command to modify the value of the property as shown in the following example:

prov-ed:trnkgrp:name="trnkgrp1", BDigitCCrm=34
 
   

Otherwise, proceed to Step 12.

Step 12 Verify that the associated B-number analysis configuration allows removal of a country code digit. Enter the numan-rtrv MML command that is shown in the following example:

numan-rtrv:digmodstring:custgrpid="T002"
 
   

If the associated B-number analysis configuration does not allow removal of a for country code digit, enter the numan-ed MML command to modify of the setting as shown in the following example:

numan-ed:digmodstring:custgrpid="T002", name="ccspain", digstring="34"
 
   

Otherwise, proceed to Step 13.

Step 13 Verify that the dial plan file was loaded correctly by using the procedure that is described in "Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan" section.

If the dial plan was loaded correctly, the procedure is finished. Otherwise, proceed to Step 14.

Step 14 Perform a call trace, as described in "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 15 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


UCM: MGCPDIALAuthFail

This alarm occurs when an MGCP dial call fails after an automatic switchover, because of the expiration of a timer waiting for a Notify message from the associated media gateway.


Note This alarm is valid as of Release 9.3(1). There is a patch for Release 9.3(2) that retires this alarm.


Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify the configuration of the associated media gateway. If there are no configuration problems, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, fix the identified configuration problems.

Step 3 Verify that the IP path between the media gateway and the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is working properly. If you find no problems in the IP path between the media gateway and the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, proceed to Step 4. Otherwise, fix the identified IP path problems.

Step 4 Verify that the IP path between the media gateway and the authentication server is working properly. If you find no problems in the IP path between the media gateway and the authentication, proceed to
Step 5. Otherwise, fix the identified IP path problems.

Step 5 Verify that the authentication server is working properly. If you find no problems in the authentication server, proceed to Step 6. Otherwise, fix the identified problems in the authentication server.

Step 6 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Virtual_IP_Addr Mismatch

This alarm occurs when the virtual IP addresses configured in XECfgParm.dat files on the active and the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch do not match.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify the value that is set for the XECfgParm.dat parameter, *.Virtual_IP_Addr, on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Step 3 Verify the value that is set for the XECfgParm.dat parameter, *.Virtual_IP_Addr, on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

If the parameter values match, proceed to Step 10. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Log in to the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and change directories to the /etc subdirectory by entering the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/etc UNIX command:

Step 5 Open the XECfgParm.dat file by using a text editor, such as vi.

Step 6 Set the value of the *.Virtual_IP_Addr parameter to match the value on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Step 7 Save the changes and close the text editor.

Step 8 Stop the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 9 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

If that resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 10.

Step 10 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Wrong IP Path

This alarm occurs when an IP route or local interface that is associated with the identified component cannot be used. The system can raise this alarm when one of the following occurs:

Another route in the operating system routing table overrides the affected route.

Someone deletes a route that is configured on your system by issuing the route delete UNIX command.

An IP link or route has been provisioned incorrectly.

This alarm can also occur if an IP signaling channel is misconfigured. Enter the netstat -rnv UNIX command to retrieve the current operating system routing table.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and retrieve the current operating system routing table by issuing the netstat -rnv UNIX command:

The system returns a response like the following:

IRE Table: IPv4 
  Destination         Mask            Gateway     Device Flags  
----------------- ---------------- -------------- ------ -----  
10.82.80.0        255.255.255.0    10.82.82.1            UGH  
10.82.81.0        255.255.255.0    10.82.83.1            UGH 
10.82.82.0        255.255.255.0    10.82.82.112   hme0   U  
10.82.83.0        255.255.255.0    10.82.83.112   hme1   U 
default           0.0.0.0          10.82.82.1            UG 
224.0.0.0         240.0.0.0        10.82.82.112   hme0   U 
127.0.0.1         255.255.255.255  127.0.0.1      lo0    UH
 
   

Step 3 If the response does not contain the route that is identified in the alarm, open the operating system routing table file by using a text editor such as vi. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 4 Add the route to the routing table by using the appropriate text editor command.

Step 5 Save the file and exit the editing session. If adding the route to the routing table resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Verify that the provisioned settings for the identified IP link are correct. Enter the prov-rtrv MML command, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section.

If the provisioned settings for the IP link are correct, proceed to Step 8.

If the provisioned settings for the IP link are incorrect, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Start a dynamic reconfiguration session to change the settings, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section. If changing the IP link settings resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 8.

Step 8 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


XE Rsrc Fail

This alarm occurs when memory resources have been exhausted on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. If this alarm occurs frequently, you might need to add additional memory to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. See the Sun Microsystems documentation for your Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for more information about adding additional memory.

Corrective Action

To correct the problem, perform the following steps:


Step 1 To collect system data, see the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a manual switchover, as described in the "Performing a Manual Switchover" section.


Caution Switchover operations cause the loss of all SS7 messages that are sent to the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for approximately 3 seconds. The switchover affects unstable in-progress calls as well as new calls. Stable in-progress calls are not affected.

Step 3 Stop the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 4 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

If restarting the software resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Troubleshooting with System Logs

You can review system logs in conjunction with alarms to obtain vital information, which you can use to troubleshoot problems. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Messages Reference provides a complete list of system logs.

The active system log files reside in the /opt/CiscoMGC/var/log directory. These system log files are archived based on the criteria that are set in the dmprSink.dat file. For more information on the dmprSink.dat file, see the "Configuring the Data Dumper" section.


Note You can control log levels and destinations by modifying settings in the XECfgParm.dat file. See
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Software Installation and Configuration Guide for more information.


Viewing System Logs

The log viewer, which is part of the Cisco MGC viewer toolkit, is the best tool for viewing logs. The log viewer enables you to search for specific log information, accounts for log rotations, and makes new logs available. The log server is responsible for log rotation. The log server closes the current file, and creates a new file for current logging. The log viewer also has an option for exporting the results of a log file search to a UNIX file.

For more information on using the log viewer, see the "Using the Log Viewer" section.

To view a log file when the Cisco MGC viewer toolkit is not installed on your system, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. Enter the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/var/log UNIX command to change to the /opt/CiscoMGC/var/log directory.

Step 2 Enter the ls UNIX command to list the available logs:

The system returns a response like the following:

alm.csv                       platform.log
cdr.bin                       platform_20010516141831.log
meas.csv                      platform_20010517040508.log
mml.log                       platform_20010518040508.log
mml_20010516141831.log        platform_20010519040508.log
mml_20010517040508.log        platform_20010520040508.log
mml_20010518040508.log        platform_20010521040508.log
 
   

Step 3 To view a specific system log file, enter the cat log_file_name | more command:

Where:

log_file_name—Name of the log file you want to view.


Note Because the log files are very large, use the more parameter to scroll through the file.
You might prefer to print the file to find the information you need.


For example, enter the cat platform_20010516141831.log | more command to view a specific platform log file:

The system returns a response like the following:

Tue May  8 13:35:32:920 2001 EST | cdrDmpr (PID 15526) <Error>
GEN_ERR_GETCFGPARM: cdrDmprSink::readObj: Failed to get MGC_CDR_NODE_ID for facility *
 
   
Tue May  8 13:35:32:921 2001 EST | cdrDmpr (PID 15526) <Error>
GEN_ERR_GETCFGPARM: cdrDmprSink::readObj: Failed to get MGC_CDR_NODE_ID for facility *
 
   
Tue May  8 13:35:32:922 2001 EST | cdrDmpr (PID 15526) <Error>
GEN_ERR_GETCFGPARM: cdrDmprSink::readObj: Failed to get MGC_CDR_NODE_ID for facility 
*Process id is 15517 and thead id is 1 in set the destination
 
   
Tue May  8 13:37:13:201 2001 EST | unknown (PID 15663) <Info>
/tmp/almM_input: installed time handler, hdlrId = 1
 
   
Tue May  8 13:37:31:786 2001 EST | engine (PID 15590) <Error>
CP_ERR_START_GWAY_AUDIT: engProcEvtHdlr::handleGoActiveLocal Failed to start GWAY 
auditProcess id is 15508 and thead id is 1 in set the destination
Process id is 15509 and thead id is 1 in set the destination
 
   
--More--
 
   

Understanding System Log Messages

Each system log message conforms to the following format:

Timestamp, Process Name, Process ID, <Log Level>, Log ID:<Message Text> 
 
   

Timestamp—Displays the date and time on the system when the log message was created, for example, "May 8 01:35:23:047 2001 EST". The time that is displayed is presented to the millisecond level.

Process Name—Displays the name of the process that created the log message, for example, "engine".

Process ID—Displays the identification number of the process that created the log message, for example, "(PID29974)".

Log Level—Displays the severity level of the log message, for example, "Info".

Log ID—Displays a short, symbolic name for the message, for example, "GEN_ERR_GETCFGPARM:".

Message Text—Displays the log message text, for example, "installed time handler, hdlrId = 1". Typically, the message text requires only a single line, but the text can extend to multiple lines.

Changing the Log Level for Processes

To control the types of log messages that are written to the system log file, use the set-log MML command to change the logging level for system processes. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch can generate many logged events, which can result in large numbers of archived system log files in the opt/CiscoMGC/var/spool directory. For example, if the maxTime parameter in the dmprSink.dat file is set to 15 minutes, the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch creates over 2000 files in the opt/CiscoMGC/var/spool directory daily. Therefore, you might want to limit the number of logs that are created by changing the logging level of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software processes.

Table 6-1 lists the logging levels that you can select for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software processes without severely degrading system performance.

Table 6-1 Processes and their Lowest Possible Logging Levels

Process
Lowest Logging Level Without Severe Performance Degradation

Engine

Informational (the debug level causes major performance impacts—do not set).

All others

Debug, but only a single process can be in debug at any time.



Caution Debug level logging provides extremely verbose output and, if misused, can cause severe system performance degradation.

To change the log level of a single process, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-log:process_name:log_level,[confirm] command.

Where:

process_name—Name of the process for which you want to change the logging level. Processes are listed in the "Understanding Processes" section.

log_level—Desired logging level. The valid log levels are as follows:

CRIT—Critical level messages

WARN—Warning condition messages

ERR—Error condition messages

TRACE—Trace messages

INFO—Informational messages

DEBUG—Debug-level messages (lowest level). Do not set the process to this logging level unless directed to do so by the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC).

confirm—Used when changing the logging level of a process to debug (DEBUG).


Note When you set a log level, the system also generates information for all levels above the level that you select. That is, if you set a process to the INFO log level, the system also displays information for the TRACE, ERR, WARN, and CRIT levels. The order of the log levels also constitutes levels of verbosity. For instance, the CRIT level generates the least information; the DEBUG level generates the most information.


For example, to change the log level of the engine, enter the set-log:eng-01:info command.

To change the log level of all processes, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-log:all:log_level command.

Where:

log_level—Desired logging level. The valid log levels are as follows:

CRIT—Critical level messages

WARN—Warning condition messages

ERR—Error condition messages

TRACE—Trace messages

INFO—Informational messages


Note When you set a log level, the system also generates information for all levels above the level that you select. That is, if you set a process to the INFO log level, the system also displays information for the TRACE, ERR, WARN, and CRIT levels. The order of the log levels also constitutes levels of verbosity. For instance, the CRIT level generates the least information; the DEBUG level generates the most information.


For example, to change the log level of all processes to warning, enter the set-log:all:warn command.


Note You cannot set the logging level of the process manager (PM-01) by issuing the set-log:all:log_level MML command. You can change the logging level of the process manager only by issuing the set-log:pm-01:log_level MML command.



Note You cannot enter the set-log:all:log_level MML command to set all of the processes to the debug (DEBUG) logging level.



Note The disk monitor (DSKM-01) process does not accept log-level change requests.


Creating a Diagnostics Log File

You can create a diagnostics log file that records the MML commands and responses that you execute. To create a diagnostics log file, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Create a diagnostics log file by logging in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the diaglog:filename:start command.

Where:

filename is the name of the diagnostics log file. Enter the name only, do not enter a suffix, such as .log.

Step 2 Perform your troubleshooting procedures.

Step 3 When you have finished troubleshooting and you want to view your diagnostics file, enter the diaglog:filename:stop command at the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

You can find the file, which is given the name that you entered in Step 1, without a suffix, in the $BASEDIR/var/log directory. You can view the file using a text editor, such as vi.


Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC

Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software has a data collection script. When you run this script, the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch saves a data snapshot of the system in a log file. You should run this script shortly after you discover a problem, and before taking any corrective action.

This script collects the following information in the log file:

System name

System boot messages

Operating system patch level

System patch level

Processor information

Disk usage

Processor tables

CPU utilization

Number of users that are logged in

Statistics for the Ethernet interfaces

IP routing

System setup

Swap space

Date and time of last system reboot

Permissions for the configuration library (CONFIG_LIB)

File permissions for the /opt/CiscoMGC/etc and /opt/CiscoMGC/bin directories

Copy of the XECfgParm.dat file

To collect your system data snapshot, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, and enter the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/local UNIX command to change directories.

Step 2 Enter the collectdata command to run the system data snapshot script:

The system returns a response that indicates the name of the file and the data path to the file.


Note The name of the log file contains the time stamp when the file was created and the name of the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. The file is always saved to the opt/CiscoMGC/var/log directory.


Step 3 Provide the log file to the Cisco TAC as instructed by TAC personnel.


Resolving SS7 Network Related Problems

The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch platform is a standard Service Switching Point (SSP) in an SS7 network. The SS7 network carries two types of signals:

Circuit-related

Noncircuit-related

The signals that are involved in the setup and teardown of bearer circuits are circuit-related. The
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch uses non-circuit-related signals for all the ancillary services that the SS7 network provides, including database access and network management.

The SS7 protocol is composed of several levels or parts, including the following:

Message Transfer Part (MTP)—Levels 1 (MTP1) through 3 (MTP3)

Signaling Connection Control (SCCP)

Application Service Part (ASP)

Transaction Capabilities Application Part (TCAP)

Telephony User Part (TUP)

ISDN User Part (ISUP)

Broadband ISUP (BISUP)

There are many variations of the different parts of the SS7 protocol stack. MTP has ANSI, ITU, Bellcore, and several national variations. Each country and each major carrier might have slightly different variations of a part to fit its particular needs.

The SS7 network must have the highest degree of reliability. Each switch with access to the SS7 network must be configured to a preconceived set of network parameters. There is some risk that the person configuring a switch is not using the correct set of parameters or values. Misconfiguration is the root cause of most SS7 problems at both the MTP layers and upper layers of the SS7 protocol. A single parameter value, such as an incorrect timer value, can cause SS7 connectivity to operate improperly or fail completely.

The first, and most important, step in troubleshooting SS7 related problems is to understand, and fully document, the SS7 network topology and protocols. The protocol documents are used as a reference over the months and years of maintenance on the SS7 network.

The following sections describe troubleshooting SS7 network:

Signaling Channel Problems

Signaling Destination Problems

Signaling Channel Troubleshooting Procedures

Signaling Channel Problems

The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software generates signaling alarms if it detects problems with the transportation of data on a signaling channel or at a signaling destination.

Signaling alarms have four classifications of severity:

Critical

Major

Minor

Informational


Note Multiple alarms are likely to occur for severe failures. For example, SUPPORT FAIL and SC FAIL would typically occur with LIF LOS.


Signaling links are the dedicated communication channels that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch uses to transfer signaling information between itself, the Cisco ITP-Ls, and the Signal Transfer Points (STPs). Signaling links provide the necessary delivery reliability for higher-layer SS7 signaling protocols.

You can use the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software and MML commands to manage signaling channels and lines. You can retrieve signaling channel attributes, change the states of signaling channels, and change the state of signaling lines. See Chapter 3 "Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Platform Operations," for detailed information.


Note For more information on MML commands, see Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 MML Reference.


Because all types of signaling channels have basically the same functionality, you manage them similarly. Unless otherwise noted, all commands, counters, and alarms that are documented in this section apply to all types of signaling channels.

The following sections describe signaling channel problems:

SS7 Link is Out-of-Service

SS7 Load Sharing Malfunction

Physical Layer Failures

Configuration Errors

Supporting Entity Failures

Incomplete Signaling

Changing Service States

SS7 Link is Out-of-Service

If an SS7 link is out-of-service on your system, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Change the service state of the SS7 link to in-service, as described in the "Setting the Service State of a C7/SS7 Link or Linkset" section.

If the SS7 link returns to service, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify that MTP1 is working correctly on the affected Cisco ITP-L, as described in the "Identifying MTP1 Communication Problems" section.

If MTP1 is working correctly on the affected Cisco ITP-L, proceed to Step 4. Otherwise, correct the MTP1 problems according to instructions in the "Resolving MTP1 Communication Problems" section.

Repeat Step 2. If the link returns to service, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 4 Search for excessive SUREM/AERM errors and link failure messages in the active system log file, as described in the "Viewing System Logs" section.

If MTP2 is working correctly on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, proceed to Step 5. Otherwise, correct the MTP2 problems according to instructions in the "Resolving MTP2 Communication Problems" section.

Repeat Step 1. If the link returns to service, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Verify that MTP2 is working correctly on the affected Cisco ITP-L, as described in the "Identifying MTP2 Communication Problems" section.

If MTP2 is working correctly on the affected Cisco ITP-L, proceed to Step 6. Otherwise, correct the MTP2 problems according to instructions in the "Resolving MTP2 Communication Problems" section.

Repeat Step 1. If the link returns to service, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Troubleshoot the SS7 link by following the instructions in the "Troubleshooting SS7 Link Problems" section.

If you do not find any problems, proceed to Step 7. Otherwise, repeat Step 2. If the link returns to service, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SS7 Load Sharing Malfunction

If load sharing on your SS7 links or routes is not working properly, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the prov-rtrv:c7iplnk:"all" command to verify the priority settings of the SS7 links.

The system returns a response like the following:

   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2001-07-24 12:11:44
M  RTRV
   "session=active:c7iplnk"
   /*
NAME       LNKSET      PRI         SLC         TIMESLOT    SESSIONSET
----       ------      ---         ---         --------    -----------
ls1link1    ls1         1           0           0            c7-slt1
ls1link2    ls1         1           1           0            c7-slt2
 
   

The PRI field in the response shows the priority settings for your SS7 links. For load sharing to work properly, the priority settings for all of the links should be set to 1.

Step 3 Enter the prov-rtrv:ss7route:"all" command to verify the priority settings of the SS7 routes.

The system returns a response like the following:

MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2001-07-24 12:25:05
M  RTRV
   "session=active:ss7route"
   /*
NAME                  OPC                   DPC                   LNKSET     PRI
----                  ---                   ---                   ------     ---
route1                opc1                  dpc1                  ls1         1
rout2                 opc1                  dpc2                  ls2         1
rt3                   opc2                  scp2                  ls-itu      1
rt1                   opc2                  stp1                  ls-itu      1
rt2                   opc2                  scp1                  ls-itu      1
   */
 
   

The PRI field in the response shows the priority settings for the SS7 routes. For load sharing to work properly, the priority settings for all of the routes should be set to 1.

Step 4 Start a provisioning session, as described in "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 5 If any of the SS7 links show a priority other than 1, change the priority settings to ensure proper link load sharing. Before changing the priority settings for the link, take the link out-of-service, as described in the "Setting the Service State of a C7/SS7 Link or Linkset" section.

Step 6 Modify the priority settings of the link by entering the prov-ed:c7iplnk:name="lnkname",pri=1 command.

Where:

lnkname—Name of an SS7 link that is not set to priority 1.

Repeat this step for each link that is not set to priority 1.

Step 7 If any of the SS7 routes show a priority other than 1, change the priority settings to ensure proper route load sharing. Before changing the priority settings for the route, take the route out-of-service, as described in the "Setting the Service State of an SS7 Signaling Service" section.

Step 8 Modify the priority settings of the link by entering the prov-ed:ss7route:name="rtname",pri=1 command.

Where:

rtname—Name of an SS7 route that is not set to priority 1.

Repeat this step for each route that is not set to priority 1.

Step 9 Save and activate your provisioning changes, as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

If the condition clears, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 10.

Step 10 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Physical Layer Failures

The major issues pertaining to the physical layer of an SS7 signaling link are related to cabling, clock source, and connector pinouts. The cable should be of high quality (shielded) and the connectors should be attached and crimped solidly. Because SS7 links are synchronous, one side of the link must provide the clock source and the other side must use this clock signal to read the bits.

The most common mistake is to use the wrong cable pinouts for a specific physical configuration. Make sure that the connector has the correct number of pins (RJ-45, DB-25) and that each pin maps to the correct signal. Several physical layers are supported, including ANSI T1, CEPT E1, and V.35. Ensure that the cable complies with the connector and the physical protocol being used.

If the configuration appears to be valid and the cable pinout is good, check that the signal is being sent and received correctly. Use a Bit Error Rate Tester (BERT) or perform a signal loopback on the interface. It is possible that the cable is bad, so try to replace it. The line card might be defective, so consider replacing it.

Configuration Errors

The most common mistake in SS7 signal link configuration is to misconfigure the Signal Link Code (SLC) for the SS7 link. The SLC is a preconfigured code on both ends of the link. If the SLC or the point codes do not match, the link does not align and no transmission can take place.

For T1 and E1 connectors, an SS7 signaling link is carried in a single 56- or 64-kbps time slot. The time slot that is used must also match on both sides of the link.

Ensure that the MTP2 timers and thresholds match the network defaults. Confirm that the far-end switch or STP has the same values as your system.

When you use a Cisco ITP-L to terminate MTP2, confirm that the RUDP parameters match on both sides and are consistent with the documentation.

Supporting Entity Failures

An SS7 signaling link has a hierarchy of network element entities that must be functioning before the link can function. The entities include the physical interface (discussed previously) and the control software for the link. If any of these entities fail, the link also fails.

Incomplete Signaling

The following problems can cause a link to fail between the Cisco ITP-L and the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Ethernet card failure on the Cisco ITP-L

Ethernet card failure on the Cisco switch

Cisco switch failure

Fast Ethernet interface card failure on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

In each of the preceding cases, it is impossible to transfer MTP3 signaling messages from the Cisco ITP-L to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. Cisco ITP-L platform failure (which is equivalent to MTP2 failure) prevents signaling messages from going to MTP3. The MTP2 layer on the Cisco ITP-L is supposed to send SIPO messages to the STP mated pair to start the changeover procedure. The mated STP pair, which detects timer expiration and link unavailability, detects Cisco ITP-L platform failure on the SS7 network.

Changing Service States

Signal channels comply with the Generic Service State model that is defined in the "Physical Layer Failures" section. You can change the service state of a signaling channel by using the following transition requests. Note that there is a difference between a desired service state and an actual service state, and the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch might not be able to honor the request. For example, a signal channel that is out-of-service because of an equipment failure cannot transition to an in-service state upon request. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch attempts to bring the channel in-service, but it fails. You must resolve the failure before the transition can succeed.

In-service (IS)—Signaling channel is requested to start providing service.

Out-of-service (OOS)—Signaling channel is requested to stop providing service.

For some protocols, the system accepts this request, but does not grant the request until after all calls have been released. During the interim period, the channel service state appears as OOS, PEND.

Forced out-of-service (FOOS)—Signaling channel is requested to stop providing service immediately, regardless of related call states, and to drop currently active calls.

Inhibit (INH)—Signaling channel is requested to transition to an inhibit state. This state is for SS7 signaling channels only and fails on other types of signaling channels.

In this state, the channel is active but does not provide service for call processing. If the signaling channel is the last one in the signal path, the system denies the inhibit request and returns an error.

Uninhibit (UNH)—Signaling channel is requested to be removed from an INH state and to provide service for call processing. This state is for SS7 signaling channels only and fails on other types of signaling channels.

Use this option (UNH), rather than the IS option, to return an inhibited signaling channel to service.


Note Changing the state of a signaling channel generates an alarm. For more information on retrieving and clearing alarms, see the "Troubleshooting Using Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Alarms" section.


Signaling Destination Problems

Signaling destinations refer to the endpoints of a network. Typically, if signaling links are in service, the signaling destinations should also be in service.

For ISDN signaling, the signaling channel is in service if the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch can communicate with the media gateway and ISDN backhaul is configured. The destination is in service if the signaling channel is in service and the remote ISDN device is in service.

Apparent mismatches can occur because of:

SS7 traffic restart processing (TRW/TRA)

SS7 STP problems

Configuration problems

Software problems

The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch regards an SS7 STP as an adjacent point code (APC). SS7 MTP uses a message exchange called Signaling Link Test Message (SLTM)/Signaling Link Test Acknowledgment (SLTA) to confirm that the far-end point code is the one configured. The SLTM consists of the originating point code (OPC) of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, an APC number, and an SS7 network indicator. If the values for these parameters match with the values used at the far-end switch, an SLTA is returned. If the value for any of these parameters does not match, the far-end switch does not send an SLTA. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch drops the link and tries to realign it. This process continues until the SLTM parameters match on both sides. The symptom of this problem is SS7 links dropping and recovering in roughly 30-second cycles (this symptom is referred to as bouncing).

The following sections describe signaling destination problems:

Bouncing SS7 Links

Configuration Errors

Traffic Restart

SS7 Destination is Out of Service

SS7 Route is Out of Service

SS7 Destination is Unavailable

Bouncing SS7 Links

Usually, mismatched signaling link codes (SLCs) or DPCs/OPCs between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the far end cause this condition. To resolve a bouncing SS7 condition, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the SLC, OPC, and DPC provisioning settings match with the settings used on the far end. To verify settings, enter the prov-rtrv MML command for the SS7 link, OPC, and DPC components, as described in the "Retrieving Provisioning Data" section. Compare the values that are retrieved with the settings used by the far end.

If the provisioning settings for the SLC, OPC, and DPC match the settings that are used on the far end, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, modify the settings to match the settings that are used on the far end. See the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section for more information about modifying the settings of a provisioned component. If that clears the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Ensure that the local MTP3 timer settings match the network defaults by following the instructions in the "Verifying MTP3 Timers" section.

If the local MTP3 timer settings match the network defaults, proceed to Step 4. Otherwise, contact the far-end to determine whether they can change timer settings to match your settings. If that clears the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 View the system logs, as described in the "Viewing System Logs" section, looking for excessive alignment error monitoring (AERM) logs. If large numbers of AERM logs are present, proceed to Step 5.

If no AERM logs are present, proceed to Step 6.

Step 5 Determine why the link is not aligning properly by checking the alignment status on the Cisco ITP-L associated with the affected link, as described in the "Verifying the Link Alignment Status" section.

If the condition clears, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Configuration Errors

If the SS7 DPC is fully associated, it can have the same SLTM/SLTA problems that were described in the preceding section.

If the SS7 DPC is quasi-associated, the most common cause for failure is a route misconfiguration. Review the route information between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the DPC to ensure that the APCs are valid, the route priorities are set correctly, and the route uses the appropriate linkset.

Traffic Restart

Ensure that the MTP3 traffic restart timers and thresholds agree with the network defaults. Confirm that the far-end switch or STP has the same values.

SS7 Destination is Out of Service

Typically, a signaling destination is out of service when all the SS7 links from the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to the destination or APC are out of service, or when all of the SS7 links from the destination to the APC are out of service.

To restore an SS7 destination to service, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Contact your SS7 provider to verify the links from the DPC to the associated STP.

Step 3 Verify the state of the signaling channels, as described in the "Verifying the Status of all Signaling Services" section.

If any of the SS7 links are out-of-service, restore the links according to the instructions in the "SS7 Link is Out-of-Service" section. If all of the SS7 links to a destination are out-of-service, restore the destination as described in the "SS7 Destination is Out of Service" section.

If the condition clears, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SS7 Route is Out of Service

To restore an SS7 route to service, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Change the service state of the destination to in-service, as described in the "Setting the Service State of a Signaling Service" section.

If the destination goes into service, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Verify the state of the signaling channels, as described in the "Verifying the Status of all Signaling Services" section.

If none of the SS7 links are in-service, proceed to Step 4. If all or at least one of the SS7 links to the destination are in-service, then contact your SS7 provider to verify the links from the DPC to the associated STP.

Step 4 Determine why the link is not aligning properly by checking the alignment status on the Cisco ITP-L that is associated with the affected link, as described in the "Verifying the Link Alignment Status" section.

If the condition clears, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


SS7 Destination is Unavailable

An SS7 destination is unavailable when all of the routes to the destination are out-of-service. Perform the procedure that is defined in the "SS7 Route is Out of Service" section.

Signaling Channel Troubleshooting Procedures

The following sections present procedures that you can follow to resolve problems that are associated with the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch platform signaling connections to other networks:

Setting the Service State of a Signaling Service

Setting the Service State of an SS7 Signaling Service

Setting the Service State of a C7/SS7 Link or Linkset

Setting the Service State of an IP Link

Setting the Service State of an IP Route

Setting the Service State of a D-channel

Setting the Service State of a Local Subsystem Number

Setting the Service State of an Association

Verifying MTP Timer Settings

Modifying Configurable Timers

Managing Japanese SS7 Signaling Link Tests

Managing Japanese SS7 Signaling Route Tests

Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan

Verifying Configuration to Support Multiple Versions of SS7

Resolving an Association Alarm

Converting Stored and Sent Point Code Values

Setting the Service State of a Signaling Service

To set the service state of a signaling service, perform the following steps:


Caution Use the set-dest command only while you are dynamically reconfiguring the system. Do not use the set-dest command to take a signaling service out-of-service during a maintenance session, because all calls associated with the specified signaling service are dropped. Instead, when you need to perform maintenance, use the blk-cic command to block the CICs associated with the signaling service.


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-dest:sig_srv:serv_state command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the desired signaling service.

serv_state—Desired service state. The following service states are valid:

IS—Places a signaling service in service.

OOS—Takes a signaling service out of service.


Note Before you can take a NAS signaling service out of service, you must shut down the D-channel on the associated media gateway. See the documentation for the media gateway for more information on shutting down D-channels.


For example, to set the service state of a signaling service called sigsrv1 to IS, enter the set-dest:sigsrv1:IS command:

Step 2 Verify that the state of the destination has changed by entering the rtrv-dest command, as described in the Retrieving Signaling Service States.


Setting the Service State of an SS7 Signaling Service

To set the service state of an SS7 signaling service, perform the following steps:


Caution Use the set-spc command only while you are dynamically reconfiguring the system. Do not use the set-spc command to take an SS7 signaling service out-of-service during a maintenance session, because all calls associated with the specified SS7 signaling service are dropped. Instead, when you need to perform maintenance, use the blk-cic command to block the CICs associated with the SS7 signaling service.


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-spc:ss7_srv:serv_state command.

Where:

ss7_srv—MML name of the SS7 signaling service that you want to set.

serv_state—Service state you want to set. The following service states are valid:

IS—Places the SS7 signaling service in service.

OOS—Takes the SS7 signaling service out of service.

For example, to set the service state of an SS7 signaling service called ss7srv1 to IS, enter the set-spc:ss7srv11:IS command:

Step 2 Verify that the state of the SS7 signaling service has changed by entering the rtrv-spc CRIT command, as described in the Retrieving the State of SS7 Signaling Services.


Setting the Service State of a C7/SS7 Link or Linkset

To change the service state of an SS7 link, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-c7lnk:c7link_name:serv_state command.

Where:

c7link_name—MML name of the SS7 link you want to modify.

serv_state—Service state to set. Valid values for SS7 links are IS, OOS, FOOS, INH, and UNH.


Note To set the last link in a linkset out of service, you must enter the FOOS service state in the command.


For example, to set the service state of the SS7 link (c7link1) to IS, enter the set-c7lnk:c7link1:IS command.

Verify if the selected SS7 link is in the proper service state by performing the procedure in the Retrieving Service State of C7/SS7 Links or Linksets.


Note To modify the service state of the backhaul link for the Cisco ITP-L, set the state of all link types that are associated with that Cisco ITP-L. The possible link types are S77 links (c7lnk), D-channels, (dchan), and IP links (iplnk).


Setting the Service State of an IP Link

To change the service state of an IP link, login to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-iplnk:iplink_name:serv_state[::confirm] command.

Where:

iplink_name—MML name of the IP link you want to modify.

serv_state—Service state that you want to set. Valid values for IP links are IS, OOS, and FOOS.

confirm—This parameter is required when you are setting the service state of an MGCP link. Other types of IP links do not require this parameter.

For example, to set the service state of the IP link (iplink1) to IS, enter the set-iplnk:iplink1:IS command.

For example, enter the set-iplnk:mgcplnk1:IS:confirm command to set the service state of an MGCP link called mgcplnk1 to IS.

Verify that the selected IP link is in the proper service state by performing the procedure in the "Retrieving the Service State for IP Links" section.


Note To modify the service state of the backhaul link for the Cisco ITP-L, set the state of all link types that are associated with that Cisco ITP-L. The possible link types are S77 links (c7lnk), D-channels (dchan), and IP links (iplnk).


Setting the Service State of an IP Route

To change the service state of an IP route, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-iproute:iproute_name:serv_state[,confirm] command.

 
   

Where:

iproute_name—MML name of the IP route you want to modify.

serv_state—Service state that you want to set. Valid values for IP links are IS, OOS, and FOOS.

confirm—Required parameter when you are setting the service state to OOS or FOOS.


Note You cannot use this command on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.


You can set an IP route in any of the following combinations of primary and secondary service states to OOS or FOOS:

IS

OOS, CONF

OOS, OFF_DUTY

OOS, STDBY

To set an IP route to IS, the IP route must have a primary service state of OOS and secondary service state of COOS.

For example, to set the service state of an IP route called iprte1 to OOS, enter the set-iproute:iprte1:OOS,confirm command.


Note Verify that the selected IP route is in the proper service state by performing the procedure in the "Retrieving the Service State for IP Routes" section.


Setting the Service State of a D-channel

To change the service state of a D-channel, login to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-dchan:dchan_name:serv_state command.

Where:

dchan_name—MML name of the D-channel you want to modify.

serv_state—Service state to set. Valid values for D-channels are IS and OOS.

For example, to set the service state of the D-channel, dchan-1, to IS, enter the set-dchan:dchan-1:IS command.

Verify that the selected D-channel is in the proper service state by performing the procedure in the "Retrieving the Service State of D-Channels" section.


Note To modify the service state of the backhaul link for the Cisco ITP-L, set the state of all link types that are associated with that Cisco ITP-L. The possible link types are S77 links (c7lnk), D-channels (dchan), and IP links (iplnk).


Setting the Service State of a Local Subsystem Number

To set the service state of a local subsystem number (LSSN), perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-lssn-state:ssn:serve_state command.

Where:

ssn—MML name of the desired LSSN.

serv_state—Desired service state. The following service states are valid:

IS—Places an LSSN in service.

OOS—Takes an LSSN out of service.

For example, to set the service state of an LSSN called lnp to IS, enter the set-lssn-state:lnp:IS command.

Step 2 Verify that the state of the LSSN has changed by entering the rtrv-lssn command, as described in the "Retrieving the State of All Local Subsystem Numbers" section.


Setting the Service State of an Association

To change the service state of an association, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-association:assoc_name:serv_state[,confirm] command.

Where:

assoc_name—MML name of the association you want to modify.

serv_state—Service state to set. Valid values for IP links are IS, OOS, and FOOS.

confirm—Required parameter when you are setting the service state to OOS or FOOS.


Note You cannot use this command on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.


For example, to set the service state of the association, assoc1, to OOS, enter the set-association:assoc1:OOS,confirm command.

Verify that the selected association is in the proper service state by performing the procedure in the "Retrieving the Service State for Associations" section.

Verifying MTP Timer Settings

When resolving signaling problems between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and an associated SS7 network element (such as an STP), you might need to verify that the MTP2 and MTP3 timer settings that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch uses conform to settings of the associated SS7 network element. Use MML commands on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to retrieve the settings for the MTP2 and MTP3 timers. The following subsections describe methods for verifying the MTP timer settings on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.


Note See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide for more information on the MTP timers.


Verifying MTP2 Timers

To verify the values that are used for the MTP2 timers on the Cisco ITP-Ls, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the #show ss7 mtp2 timer channel command at the Cisco ITP-L to display the settings for the MTP2 timers.

Where:

channel—Specifies a channel, 0 through 3.

The system returns a message like the following:

SS7 MTP2 Timers for channel 0 in milliseconds
Protocol version for channel 0 is Japan NTT Q.703 Version 1-1 
    T1 aligned/ready = 15000 
      T2 not aligned = 5000  
          T3 aligned = 3000  
T4 Emergency Proving = 3000 
   T4 Normal Proving = 3000 
      T5 sending SIB = 200   
      T6 remote cong = 3000  
 T7 excess ack delay = 2000  
  T8 errored int mon = 0     
TA SIE timer = 20    
       TF FISU timer = 20    
        TO SIO timer = 20    
       TS SIOS timer = 20
 
   

Step 2 Compare the MTP2 timers settings that are listed for the Cisco ITP-Ls to the MTP2 timers that are used at the associated destination.

If the MTP2 timers settings match, the timer settings are not causing the signaling problem. Continue troubleshooting the problem.

If the MTP2 timers settings do not match, perform the procedure in the "Modifying MTP2 Timers" section.


Verifying MTP3 Timers

To verify the values that are used for the MTP3 timers, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Log on to active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the prov-rtrv:lnksetprop:name="MML_name" command to display the settings for the MTP3 timers.

Where:

MML_name—MML name for the linkset that is associated with the MTP3 timers you want to verify.

The system returns a message like the following:

MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2000-07-27 18:33:56 
M RTRV 
"session=nsite04:sigsvcprop" 
/* 
	mtp3ApcMtpRstrtT28 = 50 
	mtp3DlnkConnAckT7 = 10 
	mtp3FrcUnhT13 = 10 
	mtp3InhAckT14 = 20 
	mtp3LocInhTstT20 = 900 
	mtp3MaxSltTries = 2 
	mtp3MsgPriority = 2 
	mtp3MtpRstrtT24 = 60 
	mtp3RepeatRstrtT26 = 150 
	mtp3TfrUsed = false 
	mtp3TraSnT29 = 600 
	mtp3tstSltmT1 = 60 
	mtp3tstSltmT2 = 600 
	mtp3UnhAckTl2 = 10 
	reference = ANSI96
 
   

Step 2 Compare the listed MTP3 timers settings to the MTP3 timers that are used at the associated destination.

If the MTP3 timers settings match, the timer settings are not causing the signaling problem. Continue troubleshooting the problem.


Modifying Configurable Timers

In earlier releases of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software, you could not modify the settings of the message transfer part level 3 (MTP3) and redundant link manager (RLM) timers. You can modify the settings of these timers. The following sections describe the procedures for verifying and modifying the timers:

Modifying MTP2 Timers

Verifying and Modifying MTP3 Timer Settings

Verifying and Modifying RLM Timers

Verifying and Modifying ISUP Timer Settings

Rebooting Your System to Modify Properties

Modifying MTP2 Timers

Use the following MML commands at the Cisco ITP-L to modify the settings for the MTP2 timers:

Router (config)#ss7 mtp-variant standard channel
Router(config-standard)# parameters
 
   

Where:

standard—Name of the SS7 standard that is used for your links. Valid values are Bellcore, ITU, NTT, and TTC

channel—Specifies a channel, 0 through 3

parameters—Timer number and the new value for the timer


Note See Cisco Signaling Link Terminal for more information on the parameters for this command.


In the following example, the aligned/ready timer duration on channel 0 is set to 30,000 ms:

Router(config)# ss7 mtp2-variant Bellcore 0
Router(config-Bellcore)# T1 30000
 
   

In the following example, the aligned/ready timer is restored to its default value of 13,000 ms:

Router(config)# ss7 mtp2-variant Bellcore 0
Router(config-Bellcore)# no T1
 
   

After the modification is complete, verify the new settings according to the procedure in the "Verifying MTP2 Timers" section.


Verifying and Modifying MTP3 Timer Settings

When resolving signaling problems between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and an associated SS7 network element (such as an STP), you might need to verify that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch MTP3 timer settings conform to settings on the associated SS7 network element. If the settings do not match, you must modify the settings for the MTP3 timers.


Note See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide for more information on the MTP timers.


To verify and modify the values that are used for the MTP3 timers, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Log on to active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the prov-rtrv:sigsvcprop:name="protocol" command to display the settings for the MTP3 timers.

Where:

protocol is the MML name for the SS7 protocol family being used, such as SS7-ANSI or SS7-ITU.

The system returns a message like the following:

MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2001-06-01 10:31:00
M  RTRV
   "session=active:lnksetprop"
   /*
mtp2AermEmgThr = 1
mtp2AermNrmThr = 4
mtp2CongDiscard = false
mtp2LssuLen = 1
mtp2MaxAlignRetries = 5
mtp2MaxMsuFrmLen = 272
mtp2MaxOutsFrames = 127
mtp2ProvingEmgT4 = 6
mtp2ProvingNormalT4 = 23
mtp2SuermThr = 64
mtp2T1 = 130
mtp2T2 = 115
mtp2T3 = 115
mtp2T5 = 1
mtp2T6 = 30
mtp2T7 = 10
mtp3ApcMtpRstrtT28 = 30
mtp3DlnkConnAckT7 = 10
mtp3FrcUnhT13 = 10
mtp3InhAckT14 = 20
mtp3LocInhTstT20 = 900
mtp3MaxSltTries = 2
mtp3MsgPriority = 2
mtp3MtpRstrtT24 = 100
mtp3RepeatRstrtT26 = 150
mtp3TfrUsed = false
mtp3TraSntT29 = 600
mtp3tstSltmT1 = 60
mtp3tstSltmT2 = 600
mtp3UnhAckT12 = 10
reference = ANSI92
rudpAck = enable
rudpKeepAlives = enable
rudpNumRetx = 2
rudpRetxTimer = 6
rudpSdm = enable
rudpWindowSz = 32
 
   

Step 2 Compare the displayed MTP3 timers to the MTP3 timers on the associated destination.

If the MTP3 timers settings match, the timer settings are not causing the signaling problem. Check for alarms on your system and resolve them using the procedures in the "Alarm Troubleshooting Procedures" section.

If the MTP3 timers settings do not match, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Start a provisioning session by using the procedure in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 4 Modify the parameters for the desired MTP3 timers by entering the prov-ed:lnkset:name="protocol",param_name=param_value command.

Where:

protocol—MML name for the SS7 protocol family, such as SS7-ANSI or SS7-ITU.

param_name—Name of the MTP timer you want to change.

param_value—New value for the MTP timer.


Note See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 MML Command Reference for more information on the parameters for this command.


In the following example, the MTP3 T1 timer, waiting for signaling link test acknowledgment message, is set to 65 tenths of a second.

prov-ed:lnkset:name="SS7-ANSI",mtp3tstSltmT1=65
 
   

Step 5 Save and activate your provisioning session by using the procedure in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

Step 6 Reboot your system as described in the "Rebooting Your System to Modify Properties" section.


Verifying and Modifying RLM Timers

To change the values for these timers, change them on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and on the associated media gateways. See the documentation for your media gateway for more information on changing the RLM timers on the media gateway. To change the RLM timers on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, perform the following steps.


Note RLM keepalives are sent only when traffic has not been sent for some time; that is, when the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives a signaling message, the RLM keepalive timer is reset. The media gateway sends RLM keepalives to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. If the RLM keepalive timer on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch expires, the system sets the IP link out-of-service. Increasing the RLM keepalive timer values on both sides can ensure that the IP link is not reset during transient conditions in the IP network, when the default values might be too stringent. However, if your system is in a continuous service configuration, increasing the values of the RLM keepalive timers reduces the system's ability to quickly detect a link failure. Systems in a simplex configuration would not be affected.



Step 1 Verify the current settings of your RLM timers on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch by logging in to the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:lnksetprop:name="protocol_fam" command.

Where:

protocol_fam is the MML name for the associated protocol family.

For example, to retrieve the values of RLM timers for an ANSI signaling environment, enter the prov-rtrv:lnksetprop:name="ss7-ANSI" command.

The system returns a response like the following:

   MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2001-07-27 11:00:06
M  RTRV
   "session=active:lnksetprop"
   /*
linkEchoRetry = 3
linkLatencyTest = 600
linkOpenWait = 30
linkRecovery = 120
linkSwitch = 50
linkUpRecoveredMin = 600
port = 3000
PropagateSvcMsgBlock = false
timerCmdAck = 10
timerLinkDownMin = 100
timerLinkEcho = 10
unstableLink = 10
   */
 
   

All the properties that are listed, except for port and PropagateSvcMsgBlock, are RLM timer properties.

Step 2 Start a provisioning session by using the procedure in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 3 Modify the RLM timer properties, as needed, by issuing the prov-ed:lnksetprop:name="protocol_fam",prop_name="value",prop_name="value",... command.

Where:

protocol_fam—MML name of the associated protocol family.

prop_name—Name of the RLM timer property you want to modify.

value—Value you want to set for the specified RLM timer property.

For example, to change the values of RLM timers for an ANSI signaling environment, enter the prov-ed:lnksetprop:name="ss7-ANSI",timerLinkDownMin="120",timerLinkEcho="15" command.

Step 4 Save and activate your provisioning session by using the procedure in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

Step 5 Reboot your system as described in the "Rebooting Your System to Modify Properties" section.


Verifying and Modifying ISUP Timer Settings

When resolving signaling problems, you might need to verify that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch ISUP timer settings the conform to the settings on the associated network elements. If the settings do not match, modify the settings for the ISUP timers. You can modify the settings of the local ISUP timers. The timers are grouped according to the associated ISUP protocols for each timer. You cannot change other ISUP timers.

Table Table 6-2 lists the configurable ISUP timers.

Table 6-2 Configurable ISUP Timer Protocol Listings 

Timers
Associated Protocol Files

T1

ANSISS7_STANDARD

Q761_BASE

Q767_BASE

Q761_SINGAPORE

Q761_ARGENTINA

ISUPV2_FINNISH96

ISUPV2_FRENCH

Q761_THAILAND

Q761_PERU

Q761_BELG_C2

ISUPV2_JAPAN

T2, T5, T6

T7, T8, T9

T12, T13, T14

T15, T16, T17

T18, T19, T20

T21, T22, T23

T24, T25, T26

T27, T33, T36

ANSISS7_STANDARD

Q761_BASE

Q767_BASE

Q761_SINGAPORE

Q761_ARGENTINA

ISUPV2_SPANISH

ISUPV2_FINNISH96

ISUPV2_FRENCH

Q761_THAILAND

Q761_PERU

Q761_BELG_C2

ISUPV2_JAPAN

T28

T34

ANSISS7_STANDARD

Q761_BASE

Q761_SINGAPORE

Q761_ARGENTINA

ISUPV2_SPANISH

ISUPV2_FINNISH96

ISUPV2_FRENCH

Q761_THAILAND

Q761_PERU

Q761_BELG_C2

ISUPV2_JAPAN

T35

Q761_BASE

Q767_BASE

Q761_SINGAPORE

Q761_ARGENTINA

ISUPV2_SPANISH

ISUPV2_FINNISH96

ISUPV2_FRENCH

Q761_THAILAND

Q761_PERU

Q761_BELG_C2

ISUPV2_JAPAN

T38

Q761_BASE

Q761_SINGAPORE

Q761_ARGENTINA

ISUPV2_SPANISH

ISUPV2_FINNISH96

ISUPV2_FRENCH

Q761_THAILAND

Q761_BELG_C2

ISUPV2_JAPAN

T_CCR

T_CCRR

T_CGB

T_CGBA

T_CRA

T_GRS

T_CVT

ANSISS7_STANDARD



Note For the default values and valid ranges for each of these timers within the supported protocols, see
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 MML Command Reference.


To verify and modify the values that are used for the ISUP timers, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Unless you previously created a profile for the associated signaling service or trunk group with modified values for these ISUP timers, the values for these eight timers match the default values listed in the preceding table. If you previously created a profile with modified ISUP timer values for the associated signaling service or trunk group, proceed to Step 2 to retrieve the current values that are set in the profile. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 2 Log on to active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the prov-rtrv:profile:name="profile_name" command to display the settings for the modified ISUP timers.

Where:

profile_name is the MML name for the profile that contains the modified values for the configurable ISUP timers.

The system returns a message like the following:

MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2002-10-07 15:47:39.928 EST
M  RTRV
   "session=NOA_SPAIN:profile"
   /*
ProfileType          PropertyName         ProfileValue
-------------------- -------------------- -----------
isuptmrprofile				T1	5000
   */
 
   

Step 3 Compare the displayed ISUP timers settings listed to the ISUP timers on the associated destination.

If the ISUP timers settings match, the timer settings are not causing the signaling problem. Check for alarms on your system and resolve them using the procedures in the "Alarm Troubleshooting Procedures" section.

If the ISUP timers settings do not match, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Start a provisioning session, using the procedure in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 5 If you have already defined a profile that modifies the configurable ISUP timers, proceed to Step 8. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Enter your new ISUP timer values using the prov-add:profile:name="profile_name",type="isuptmrprofile", timer_number="timer_value", timer_number="timer_value", timer_number="timer_value"... command.

Where:

profile_name—MML name for the profile that contains the set of ISUP measurements in use.

timer_number—Number of the timer you want to modify.

timer_value—New value for the selected ISUP timer.


Note See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide for more information on the valid ranges for the ISUP timers. If you enter a number outside the valid range, the default value is used.


In the following example, the command modifies the values of the T6, T8, and T35 ISUP timers:

prov-add:profile:name="set1",type="isuptmrprofile",T6="30000",T8="12000",T35="18000"
 
   

Step 7 Create a profile for your new ISUP timer values by using the prov-add:component:name="comp_name", isuptmrprofile="profile_name" command.

Where:

component—MML component type name for signaling service or trunk group profiles. Enter one of the following:

sigpathprof—Component type for signaling service profiles.

trnkgrpprof—Component type for trunk group profiles.

comp_name—MML name for the signaling service or trunk group profile to associate with the set of new ISUP timer values, as set in Step 6.

profile_name—MML name for the profile that contains the customized set of ISUP measurements, as set in Step 6.

Once the new ISUP timer values are set, proceed to Step 9.

Step 8 Modify the parameters for the selected ISUP timers by entering the prov-ed:profile:name="profile_name",type="isuptmrprofile", timer_number="timer_value", timer_number="timer_value", timer_number="timer_value"... command.

Where:

profile_name—MML name for the profile that contains the set of ISUP measurements in use.

timer_number—Number of the timer that you want to modify.

timer_value—New value for the selected ISUP timer.


Note See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide for more information on the valid ranges for the ISUP timers. If you enter a number outside the valid range, the system uses the default value.


In the following example, the command modifies the values of the T6, T8, and T33 ISUP timers:

prov-ed:profile:name="set1",type="isuptmrprofile",T6="180",T8="12",T33="14"
 
   

After you set the new ISUP timer values, proceed to Step 9.

Step 9 Save and activate your provisioning session, using the procedure in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.


Rebooting Your System to Modify Properties

When you modify MTP3 and RLM timers on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, you must reboot the system as part of the modification process. To modify the timers, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to your active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and change directories to the /opt/CiscoMGC/etc directory using the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/etc UNIX command.

Step 2 Open the XECfgParm.dat file in a text editor, such as vi.

Step 3 Search for the pom.dataSync property and ensure that it is set to false.

Step 4 Save the file and exit the text editor.

Step 5 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on your active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, using the procedure in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.


Note Shutting down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch causes the currently standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to become the active
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.


Step 6 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, using the procedure in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

Step 7 After the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software is fully activated, log in to the active
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and perform a manual switchover, using the procedure in the "Performing a Manual Switchover" section.


Caution Switchover operations cause the loss of all SS7 messages that are sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for approximately three seconds. The switchover affects unstable in-progress calls as well as new calls. Stable in-progress calls are not affected.

Step 8 After the manual switchover is complete, log in to the newly active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session and enter the prov-sync command to synchronize the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitches.

Step 9 After the synchronization is complete, perform a manual switchover using the procedure in the "Performing a Manual Switchover" section.


Caution Switchover operations cause the loss of all SS7 messages that are sent to the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for approximately three seconds. The switchover affects unstable in-progress calls as well as new calls. Stable in-progress calls are not affected.

Step 10 After the manual switchover is complete, log in to your newly standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and change directories to the /opt/CiscoMGC/etc directory using the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/etc UNIX command.

Step 11 Open the XECfgParm.dat file in a text editor, such as vi.

Step 12 Search for the pom.dataSync property and ensure that it is set to true.

Step 13 Save the file and exit the text editor.

Step 14 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch by entering the /etc/init.d/CiscoMGC stop UNIX command:

Step 15 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch by entering the /etc/init.d/CiscoMGC start command.


Managing Japanese SS7 Signaling Link Tests

The following subsections detail the procedures that are used to manage the tests that you can run on a signaling link that is configured for Japanese SS7:

Starting a Japanese SS7 Signaling Link Test

Retrieving Results for a Japanese SS7 Signaling Link Test

Starting a Japanese SS7 Signaling Link Test

To start a signaling link test on a link that is configured for Japanese SS7, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the sta-ss7-slt:link command.

Where link is the MML name of a link that is configured for Japanese SS7.

For example, to start a signaling link test on a link that is called ls1-link1, enter the sta-ss7-slt:ls1-link1 command.

Retrieving Results for a Japanese SS7 Signaling Link Test

To retrieve the results of a Japanese SS7 signaling link test, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the rtrv-ss7-slt:link command.

Where link is the MML name of a link that is configured for Japanese SS7.

For example, to retrieve the results of a signaling link test that is run on a link that is called ls1-link1, enter the rtrv-ss7-slt:ls1-link1 command.

The system returns a result that indicates the name of the link and the status of the signaling link test. The following status responses are valid:

TEST PASSED

TEST FAILED—reasons for failure can be any of the following:

TEST TIMEOUT

LINK INACTIVE

LINKSET INACTIVE

ROUTE UNAVAILABLE

INVALID TEST PATTERN

INVALID SLC

FLOW CONTROL ON

UNKNOWN REASON

COMPLETED hh:mm:ss

TEST RUNNING

The following example shows a sample response to a signaling link test run on a link that is called ls1-link1:

Media Gateway Controller  - MGC-01 2000-01-12 15:18:41 
M  RTRV 
   "ls1link1:TEST PASSED; COMPLETED 15:18:34" 
 
   

Managing Japanese SS7 Signaling Route Tests

The following subsections detail the procedures that are used to manage the tests that can be run on a signaling route that is configured for Japanese SS7:

Starting a Japanese SS7 Signaling Route Test

Retrieving Results for a Japanese SS7 Signaling Route Test

Starting a Japanese SS7 Signaling Route Test

To start a signaling route test on a route that is configured for Japanese SS7, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the sta-ss7-srt:pt_code:lset="linkset" command.

Where:

pt_code—MML name of an adjacent point code (APC) or destination point code (DPC) configured for Japanese SS7.

linkset—MML name of a linkset that is associated with the specified destination.

For example, to start a signaling route test on a point code that is called dpc1, which is associated with a linkset called ls1, enter the sta-ss7-srt:dpc1:lset="ls1" command.

Retrieving Results for a Japanese SS7 Signaling Route Test

To retrieve the result of a Japanese SS7 signaling route test, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the rtrv-ss7-srt:pt_code:lset="linkset" command.

Where:

pt_code—MML name of an adjacent point code (APC) or destination point code (DPC) configured for Japanese SS7.

linkset—MML name of a linkset that is associated with the specified destination.

For example, to retrieve the results of a signaling route test that is run on a point code that is called dpc1, which is associated with a linkset called ls1, enter the rtrv-ss7-srt:dpc1:lset="ls1" command.

The system returns a result that indicates the name of the link and the status of the signaling route test. The following status responses are valid:

TEST PASSED

TEST FAILED—reasons for failure can be any of the following:

TEST TIMEOUT

LINK INACTIVE

LINKSET INACTIVE

ROUTE UNAVAILABLE

INVALID TEST PATTERN

INVALID SLC

FLOW CONTROL ON

UNKNOWN REASON

COMPLETED hh:mm:ss

TEST RUNNING

The following example shows a sample response to a signaling route test run on a point code that is called dpc1, which is associated with a linkset called ls1:

Media Gateway Controller  - MGC-01 2000-01-12 15:20:09 
M  RTRV 
   "dpc1:TEST FAILED; TEST TIMEOUT; COMPLETED 15:20:01"
 
   

Verifying Proper Loading of a Dial Plan


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Search the active system log file, as described in the "Viewing System Logs" section, for logs that indicate that the dial plan was loaded incorrectly.

If the dial plan was not loaded correctly, reload the dial plan by saving and activate your dial plan again as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

If there are no logs that indicate that the dial plan was loaded incorrectly, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Verifying Configuration to Support Multiple Versions of SS7


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and change directories to the /etc subdirectory by entering the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/etc UNIX command.

Step 3 Open the alarmCats.dat using a text editor, such as vi.

Step 4 The third column in the file indicates the severity level for each alarm. Verify that the severity level for the All C7 IP Links Fail alarm is set to 2. If the severity level is set correctly, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5 to begin the process of correcting your configuration.

Step 5 Set the severity level of the All C7 IP Links Fail alarm to 2.

Step 6 Save your changes and close the text editor.

Step 7 Repeat Step 2 through Step 6 on the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Step 8 Stop the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on your standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Shutting Down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software Manually" section.

Step 9 Restart the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on your standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

Step 10 Perform a manual switchover from the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the "Performing a Manual Switchover" section.


Caution Switchover operations cause the loss of all SS7 messages that are sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for approximately three seconds. The switchover affects unstable in-progress calls as well as new calls. Stable in-progress calls are not affected.


Resolving an Association Alarm

When an alarm indicates a failure on an association, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 If this alarm occurs along with the LIF FAIL alarm on the failed destination address, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, proceed to Step 5.

Step 3 Verify the functioning of the cabling between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the destination address.

If the cables are functioning properly, proceed to Step 4.

If you find bad cables, replace them. If replacing a cable resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Verify if the associated Cisco switch is functioning.

If the switch is functioning properly, proceed to Step 5.

If the switch is not functioning properly, see the documentation for your switch for troubleshooting information. If that corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 5 Debug the IP connectivity between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the associated external node.

If the IP connectivity is working correctly, proceed to Step 6.

If the IP connectivity is not working correctly, see the documentation for the external node to determine a method to identify and fix the IP connectivity problem. If that corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Determine the health of the associated external node.

If the external node is working correctly, proceed to Step 7.

If the external node is not operating properly, see the documentation for the external node for troubleshooting information. If that corrects the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Converting Stored and Sent Point Code Values

If you are troubleshooting signaling problems, you might encounter point code values displayed in hexadecimal or decimal. You must convert these values to understand which point code is affected, or the value that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch sends. To convert and stored and sent point code values, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Convert the hexadecimal or decimal value to binary code.

For example, if you found a log message indicating a problem with a point code in a ITU SS7 connection that is identified with a hexadecimal value of 00:00:36:33, the converted binary value is 00000000000000000011011000110011.

Step 2 Remove the padding according the to point code address type that applies to the point code (14-, 16-, or 24-bit).


Note For an explanation of the point code address types, see
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide.


Continuing with the example, because the problem is with an ITU SS7 connection, the address should be 14 bits in length, resulting in the binary value 11011000110011.


Note If you are troubleshooting signaling problems for a Japanese ISUP connection, remember that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch sends the higher-order bits first for those point codes. The fields for any sent point code value that you retrieve for a Japanese ISUP connection must be reversed while in its binary value, so that you can correctly identify the associated point code on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.


Step 3 Convert the binary code into decimal, using the correct point code format.


Note For an explanation of the point code formats, see Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Provisioning Guide.


Concluding the example, since the problem is with an ITU SS7 connection and the value came from a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch log message, the address should use the ITU International point code format (3-bits/8-bits/3-bits, or 3-8-3), the resulting point code is 6.198.3.


Resolving Bearer Channel Connection Problems

Processing bearer channels is the primary responsibility of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. The main function of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is to ensure that an ingress bearer channel at one endpoint can connect successfully to an egress bearer channel at another endpoint.

The state of the bearer channels is often a good indicator of the overall operation of the system. You can find procedures for determining the state of bearer channels in the "Verifying CIC States" section.

The following sections contains procedures that are related to resolving problems associated with the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch platform bearer channel connections:

Setting the Administrative State

Querying Local and Remote CIC States

Performing CIC Validation Tests

Resolving ISDN D-Channel Discrepancies

Unblocking CICs

Resetting CICs

Resolving Stuck CICs

Auditing Call States

Stopping Calls

Auditing an MGCP Media Gateway

Running a Manual Continuity Test

Verifying Continuity Test Settings

Media Gateway IP Destination or Link Out-of-Service

Calls Fail at the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

3.1 kHz (ISDN Category 3) Calls are Failing

Calls are Misrouting

Setting the Administrative State

Use the set-admin-state MML command to change the administrative state of various components. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch generates a log message every time you enter the set-admin-state command. The system also generates an alarm every time one issues the set-admin-state command at either the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, media gateway, signaling service, or trunk group level.

The following sections present procedures that use the set-admin-state command:

Setting the Administrative State of a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

Setting the Administrative State of a Media Gateway

Setting the Administrative State of a Trunk Group

Setting the Administrative State of a Signaling Service

Setting the Administrative State of Spans

Setting the Administrative State of CICs

Setting the Administrative State of a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

To set the administrative state of a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-admin-state:mgc:state command.

Where:

mgc—MML name of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

state—Administrative state that you want to set. The following states are valid:

lock—Makes all bearer channels unavailable for call processing. If the state is set to lock, active calls go into pending state, where calls remain until either party voluntarily releases the call. New calls are disallowed.

unlock—Makes all bearer channels available for call processing. If the state is set to unlock, the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch becomes available. New calls are allowed to use the unlocked bearer channels.

reset—Clears local and remote blocking on all bearer channels and they take the blocking state of the remote side.

For example, to set the administrative state of a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch called mgc1 to unlock, enter the set-admin-state:mgc1:unlock command.

Step 2 Verify that the state of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch changed by entering the rtrv-admin-state MML command, as described in the "Retrieving the Administrative State of a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch" section.


Setting the Administrative State of a Media Gateway

To set the administrative state of an associated media gateway, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-admin-state:gway:state command:

Where:

gway—MML name of the media gateway.


Note Not all media gateway types are applicable. Supported types are CU, MUX, MGW, and AVM external nodes.


state—Administrative state that you want to set. The following states are valid:

Lock—Makes all bearer channels that are associated with the media gateway unavailable for call processing. If the state is set to lock, active calls on the affected bearer channels go into pending state, where calls remain until either party voluntarily releases the call. New calls are disallowed on the affected bearer channels.

Unlock—Makes all bearer channels that are associated with the media gateway available for call processing. If the state is set to unlock, the media gateway becomes available. New calls are allowed to use the affected bearer channels.

Reset—Clears local and remote blocking on the bearer channels that are associated with the media gateway and these bearer channels take the blocking state of the remote side.

For example, to set the administrative state of a media gateway called sfgway to lock, enter the set-admin-state:sfgway:lock command.

Step 2 Verify that the state of the media gateway changed by entering the rtrv-admin-state MML command, as described in the "Retrieving the Administrative State of a Media Gateway" section.


Setting the Administrative State of a Trunk Group

To set the administrative state of a trunk group, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-admin-state:trkgrp:state command.

Where:

trkgrp—MML name of the trunk group.


Note Use this command only for time-division multiplexing (TDM) trunk groups. Allow the corresponding MML name for component type 0020.


state—The administrative state. The following states are valid:

Lock—Makes all bearer channels that are associated with the trunk group unavailable for call processing. If the state is set to lock, active calls on the affected bearer channels go into pending state, where calls remain until either party voluntarily releases the call. New calls are disallowed on the affected bearer channels.

Unlock—Makes all bearer channels that are associated with the trunk group available for call processing. If the state is set to unlock, the media gateway becomes available. New calls are allowed to use the affected bearer channels.

Reset—Clears local and remote blocking on the bearer channels that are associated with the trunk group and these bearer channels take the blocking state of remote side.

For example, to set the administrative state of a trunk group called trunkgrp1 to lock, enter the set-admin-state:trunkgrp1:lock command:

Step 2 Verify that the state of the trunk group changed by entering the rtrv-admin-state MML command, as described in the "Retrieving the Administrative State of a Trunk Group" section.


Setting the Administrative State of a Signaling Service

To set the administrative state of a signaling service, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-admin-state:sig_srv:state command:

Where:

sig_srv—The MML name of the signaling service. The following signaling service types are valid for this command:

In-band TDM up to MUX and then time switched to TDM media and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to CU and then encapsulated and sent over IP to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to the media gateway and then converted to NI2 and sent to the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch over IP (that is, FE box<-sig/tdm->media gateway<-NI2/IP-> Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch).

Signaling service or routeset that is associated with a DPC.

EISUP signaling service.

state—Administrative state. The following states are valid:

Lock—Makes all bearer channels that are associated with the signaling service unavailable for call processing. If the state is set to lock, active calls on the affected bearer channels go into pending state, where calls remain until either party voluntarily releases the call. New calls are disallowed on the affected bearer channels.

Unlock—Makes all bearer channels that are associated with the signaling service available for call processing. If the state is set to unlock, the media gateway becomes available. New calls are allowed to use the affected bearer channels.

For example, to set the administrative state of a signaling service called nassrv1 to lock, enter the set-admin-state:nassrv1:lock command:

Step 2 Verify that the state of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch changed by entering the rtrv-admin-state MML command, as described in the "Retrieving the Administrative State of a Signaling Service" section.


Setting the Administrative State of Spans

To set the administrative state of a single span, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-admin-state:sig_srv:span=x:state command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the signaling service. The following signaling service types are valid for this command:

In-band TDM up to MUX and then time switched to TDM media and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to CU and then encapsulated and sent over IP to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to the media gateway and then converted to NI2 and sent to the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch over IP (that is, FE box<-sig/tdm->media gateway<-NI2/IP-> Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch).

Signaling service or routeset that is associated with a DPC.

EISUP signaling service.

x—16-bit value that identifies an ISDN/PRI physical cable.

state—Administrative state. The following states are valid:

Lock—Makes all bearer channels that are associated with the span unavailable for call processing. If the state is set to lock, active calls on the affected bearer channels go into pending state, where calls remain until either party voluntarily releases the call. New calls are disallowed on the affected bearer channels.

Unlock—Makes all bearer channels that are associated with the span available for call processing. If the state is set to unlock, the span becomes available. New calls are allowed to use the affected bearer channels.

For example, to set the administrative state of span number 2, associated with a signaling service called ss7svc1, to unlock, enter the set-admin-state:ss7svc1:span=2:lock command.

Step 2 Verify that the state of the bearer channels changed by entering the rtrv-admin-state MML command, as described in the "Retrieving the Administrative State of Spans" section.


To set the administrative state of a bearer channel or a range of bearer channels in a span, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the rtrv-admin-state:sig_srv:span=x,bc=y[,rng=range]:state command:

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the signaling service. The following signaling service types are valid for this command:

In-band TDM up to MUX and then time switched to TDM media and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to CU and then encapsulated and sent over IP to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to the media gateway and then converted to NI2 and sent to the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch over IP (that is, FE box<-sig/tdm->media gateway<-NI2/IP-> Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch).

Signaling service or routeset that is associated with a DPC.

EISUP signaling service.

x—16-bit value that identifies an ISDN/PRI physical cable.

y—Numeric value that identifies the non-ISUP bearer channel number.

range—A value such that y+range is a valid bearer channel number. The administrative state for all bearer channels between y and y+range are retrieved.

state—Administrative state. The following states are valid:

Lock—Makes the specified bearer channels unavailable for call processing. If the state is set to lock, active calls on the affected bearer channels go into pending state, where calls remain until either party voluntarily releases the call. New calls are disallowed on the affected bearer channels.

Unlock—Makes the specified bearer channels available for call processing. If the state is set to unlock, the bearer channels become available. New calls are allowed to use the affected bearer channels.

For example, to set the administrative state of bearer channel numbers 2 through 6, associated with a signaling service called ss7svc1, to unlock, enter the rtrv-admin-state:ss7svc1:span=2,bc=2,rng=5:unlock command.

Step 2 Verify that the state of the bearer channels changed by entering the rtrv-admin-state MML command, as described in the "Retrieving the Administrative State of Spans" section.


Setting the Administrative State of CICs

To set the administrative state of a CIC or a range of CICs, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the set-admin-state:sig_srv:cic=number[,rng=range]:state command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the signaling service. The following signaling service types are valid for this command:

In-band TDM up to MUX and then time switched to TDM media and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to CU and then encapsulated and sent over IP to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to the media gateway and then converted to NI2 and sent to the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch over IP (that is, FE box<-sig/tdm->media gateway<-NI2/IP-> Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch).

Signaling service or routeset that is associated with a DPC.

EISUP signaling service.

number—Valid CIC number.

range—Value such that y+range is a valid CIC number. The administrative state for all CICs between y and y+range are retrieved.

state—Administrative state. The following states are valid:

Lock—Makes all bearer channels that are associated with the CICs unavailable for call processing. If the state is set to lock, active calls on the affected bearer channels go into pending state, where calls remain until either party voluntarily releases the call. New calls are disallowed on the affected bearer channels.

Unlock—Makes all bearer channels that are associated with the CICs available for call processing. If the state is set to unlock, the CICs become available. New calls are allowed to use the affected bearer channels.

Reset—Clears local and remote blocking on the bearer channels that are associated with the CICs and these bearer channels take the blocking state of the remote side.

For example, to set the administrative state of CICs 2 through 11, associated with a signaling service called ss7svc1, to lock, enter the set-admin-state:ss7svc1:cic=2,rng=9:lock command.

Step 2 Verify that the state of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch changed by entering the rtrv-admin-state MML command, as described in the "Retrieving the Administrative State of CICs" section.


Querying Local and Remote CIC States

In the course of troubleshooting bearer channel problems, you might need to query the local and remote states of the related CICs to verify that they match. To query the local and remote states of a single CIC or a range of CICs, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the query-cic:sig_srv:cic=number[,rng=range] command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name for the signaling service that is associated with the affected CICs.

number—Number of the first CIC in the range of affected CICs.

range—Number such that number+range is the number of the last CIC in the range of affected CICs. All CICs between number and number+range are displayed.


Note Not all SS7 variants support the querying of CICs. If you execute this command on a signaling service that is configured for an SS7 variant that does not support the querying of CICs, the system returns an error code, SABT, when the query operation times out.
See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 MML Command Reference for more information on the SABT error code.



Note You can configure the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software to issue individual or group supervision messages for point codes that are associated with an ISUP signaling service. ISUP signaling services issue group supervision messages by default. If you configure an ISUP signaling service to issue individual supervision messages, you cannot use the range option cannot with this command. You can query CICs only one CIC number at a time for point codes that are associated with an ISUP signaling service configured to issue individual supervision messages.


For example, to query the state of CICs 20 through 24, associated with a signaling service called ss7svc1, enter the query-cic:ss7svc1:cic=20,rng=4 command.

The system responds with a message like the following:

Media Gateway Controller  - MGC-01 2000-01-12 15:19:51 
M  RTRV
   "ss7svc1:CIC=20;LPST=IS;LSST=IDLE;RPST=IS;RSST=IDLE"
   "ss7svc1:CIC=21;LPST=IS;LSST=IDLE;RPST=IS;RSST=IDLE"
   "ss7svc1:CIC=22;LPST=IS;LSST=IDLE;RPST=IS;RSST=IDLE"
   "ss7svc1:CIC=23;LPST=IS;LSST=IDLE;RPST=IS;RSST=IDLE"
   "ss7svc1:CIC=24;LPST=OOS;LSST=IDLE_LOC_BLOC;RPST=IS;RSST=IDLE"
 
   

The response lists the local and remote primary and secondary states of the requested CICs. If the response indicates that the mismatch is because of a problem on the local side, you can attempt to resolve the state mismatch using the instructions in the "Resolving Local and Remote CIC State Mismatch" section. If the response indicates that the mismatch is because of a problem on the remote side, you must contact the personnel at the remote site to resolve the problem.

The valid values for the fields that are present in the response to this command are as follows:

LPST and RPST—Local primary state and remote primary state

IS—In-Service.

OOS—Out-of-Service.

TRNS—Transient, the state is currently being changed

LSST and RSST—Local secondary state and remote secondary state

N/A—Not available

UNEQUIPPED—Unequipped

IC_BUSY—Incoming is busy

IC_BUSY_LOC_BLOC—Incoming is busy, blocked locally

IC_BUSY_REM_BLOC—Incoming is busy, blocked remotely

IC_BUSY_BOTH_BLOC—Incoming is busy, blocked both remotely and locally

OG_BUSY—Outgoing is busy

OG_BUSY_LOC_BLOC—Outgoing is busy, blocked locally

OG_BUSY_REM_BLOC—Outgoing is busy, blocked remotely

OG_BUSY_BOTH_BLOC—Outgoing is busy, blocked both remotely and locally

IDLE—The circuit is idle, available for use

IDLE_LOC_BLOC—Idle, blocked locally

IDLE_REM_BLOC—Idle, blocked locally

IDLE_BOTH_BLOC—Idle, blocked both locally and remotely

Resolving Local and Remote CIC State Mismatch

When the local and remote states for CICs do not match and the problem lies with the local CIC states, you can attempt to resolve the mismatch using an MML command, if your CICs are using ANSI SS7 signaling. To resolve a CIC state mismatch, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the query-cic:sig_srv:cic=number[,rng=range],rslv command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name for the signaling service that is associated with the affected CICs.

number—Number of the first CIC in the range of affected CICs.

range—Number such that number+range is the number of the last CIC in the range of affected CICs. The system attempts to resolve state mismatches for all CICs between number and number+range.


Note Use the rslv option only if the system is using ANSI SS7 signaling. If the system uses ITU SS7 signaling and you enter this command, the system ignores the rslv option and performs a regular query-cic operation.



Note Configure the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software to issue individual or group supervision messages for point codes that are associated with an ISUP signaling service. ISUP signaling services issue group supervision messages by default. Configure an ISUP signaling service to issue individual supervision messages, you cannot use the range option with this command. Resolve CIC state mismatches only one CIC number at a time for point codes that are associated with an ISUP signaling service configured to issue individual supervision messages.


If the command fails in its attempt to resolve the local and remote CIC state mismatch, collect system data according to the instructions in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section and contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.

Performing CIC Validation Tests

When performing initial turn-up of circuits or in troubleshooting certain problems with your bearer channels, perform a circuit validation test to verify that the properties defined in the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch for the affected bearer channels match the associated properties that are defined in the far-end exchange.


Note Perform CIC validation tests only on CICs associated with ANSI SS7-based DPCs.


To perform a circuit validation test, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Start an MML session on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and validate the properties for a particular circuit identification code (CIC) using the vld-cic:dest_pc:cic=number command.

Where:

dest_pc—MML name for the DPC associated with the affected CIC.

number—Trunk identification number for the affected CIC.

If the circuit validation test is passed, the system returns a message like the following:

Media Gateway Controller - MGC-01 2000-03-07 09:35:19
 M  RTRV
    "dms100-pc:CIC=105,PASSED"
 
   

If the circuit validation test failed, the system returns a message like the following:

Media Gateway Controller - MGC-01 2000-03-07 09:35:19
 M  RTRV
    "dms100-pc:CIC=105,FAIL"
    LOC: GRP=DIG,SEIZ=EVEN,ALM=UNK,COT=NONE
    LOC: TRK=1003,A_CLLI=dms1003****,Z_CLLI=na*********
    REM: GRP=DIG,SEIZ=ODD,ALM=SOFT,COT=STAT
 
   

The fields in the LOC line are values that are associated with the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. The fields in the REM line are values that are associated with the far-end exchange. The following list presents the valid values for the fields that the vld-cid command displays:

GRP—Circuit group carrier indicator. The values in these fields should be the same in the LOC and REM lines. The following values are valid for this field:

UNK—Unknown circuit group carrier type

ANL—Analog circuit group carrier type

DIG—Digital circuit group carrier type

AND—Analog and digital circuit group carrier type

SIEZ—Double seizing indicator. The values for this field in the LOC line should be logically opposite to the value for the REM line. The following values are valid for this field:

NONE—No circuit control. When one line is set to NONE, the other should be set to ALL.

ALL—All circuit control. When one line is set to ALL, the other should be set to NONE.

EVEN—Even circuit control. When one line is set to EVEN, the other should be set to ODD.

ODD—Odd circuit control. When one line is set to ODD, the other should be set to EVEN.

ALM—Alarm carrier indicator. The values in these fields should be the same in the LOC and REM lines. The following values are valid for this field:

UNK—Unknown alarm carrier

SOFT—Software alarm carrier

HARD—Hardware alarm carrier

COT—Continuity check requirements indicator. The values in these fields should be the same in the LOC and REM lines. The following values are valid for this field:

UNK—Unknown continuity check requirements

NONE—No continuity check requirements

STAT—Statistical continuity check requirements

PERC—Per call continuity check requirements

TRK—Trunk number. This field is always displayed in the LOC line. It is only displayed in the REM line when the circuit identification names for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the far-end exchange do not match.

A_CLLI—Common language location identifier (CLLI) code for either the far-end exchange or the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. The CLLIs for each are sorted alphabetically, and the A_CLLI field is populated with the CLLI that is found to be first. This field is always displayed in the LOC line. It is displayed in the REM line only when the CLLIs for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the far-end exchange do not match.

Z_CLLI—CLLI code for either the far-end exchange or the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. The CLLIs for each are sorted alphabetically, and the Z_CLLI field is populated with the CLLI that is found to be second. This field is always displayed in the LOC line. It is displayed in the REM line only when the CLLIs for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the far-end exchange do not match.

If the circuit validation test passes, proceed to Step 14.

If the circuit validation test fails, proceed to Step 2.

Step 2 Determine which settings are not correct by comparing the values that are displayed in the LOC field (from the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch) to values displayed in the REM field (from the associated far-end exchange), based on the field descriptions (previously described).

Step 3 Consult your provisioning records to determine whether the settings on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch or the associated far-end exchange need to be modified to resolve the error.

To modify the settings on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to resolve the error, proceed to Step 4.

If the settings on the associated far-end exchange need to be modified to resolve the error, contact the provider that operates the switch and work with them to resolve the configuration error.

Step 4 Identify the signaling service that is associated with the affected DPC by issuing the prov-rtrv:ss7path:"all" command:

The system returns a message like the following:

mgc-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2000-09-26 15:55:17 
M RTRV 
"session=active:ss7path" 
/* 
NAME 	DPC 	MDO 	CUSTGRPID	CUSTGRPTBL	SIDE 
---- 	--- 	--- 	---------	----------	---- 
ss7am401a	am401a-pc	ANSISS7_STANDARD	0000	0101	network 
ss7am702b	am702b-pc	ANSISS7_STANDARD	0000	0101	network 
ss7inet1	inetsp1-pc	ANSISS7_STANDARD	0000	0101	network 
ss7am408a	am408a-pc	ANSISS7_STANDARD	0000	0101	network 
ss7am408b	am408b-pc	ANSISS7_STANDARD	0000	0101	network 
ss7inet2	inetsp2-pc	ANSISS7_STANDARD	0000	0101	network 
ss7dms	dms100-pc	ANSISS7_STANDARD	0000	0101	network 
ss7am401b	am401b-pc	ANSISS7_STANDARD	0000	0101	network 
ss7am608b	am608b-pc	ANSISS7_STANDARD	0000	0101	network 
ss7sc2200	sc2200-pc	ANSISS7_STANDARD	0000	0101	network 
 
   

The response lists the SS7 signaling services and their associated DPCs. Search for the DPC associated with the trunk to identify the name of the SS7 signaling service. In the example, dms100-pc is the name of the DPC associated with the trunk. The SS7 signaling service names are in the column to the immediate left of the DPCs, so the name of the associated SS7 signaling service in the example is ss7dms.

Step 5 Identify the MML names of the mismatched settings for the affected signaling service that was found in Step 4 by using the prov-rtrv:sigsvcprop:name="sig_serv" command.

Where:

sig_serv—MML name of the affected signaling service.

The system returns a message like the following:

MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2000-09-26 15:57:29 
M RTRV 
"session=active:sigsvcprop" 
/* 
adjDestinations = 16 
AlarmCarrier = 0 
BothwayWorking = 1 
CctGrpCarrier = 2 
CGBA2 = 0 
CircHopCount = 0 
CLIPEss = 0 
CotInTone = 2010 
CotOutTone = 2010 
CotPercentage = 0 
dialogRange = 0 
ExtCOT = Loop 
ForwardCLIinIAM = 1 
ForwardSegmentedNEED = 1
GLARE = 0 
GRA2 = 0 
GRSEnabled = false 
InternationalPrefix = 0 
layerRetries = 2 
layerTimer = 10 
maxMessageLength = 250 
mtp3Queue = 1024 
NationalPrefix = 0 
NatureOfAddrHandling = 0 
Normalization = 0 
OMaxDigits = 24 
OMinDigits = 0 
OOverlap = 0 
OwnClli = na 
RedirMax = 3 
restartTimer = 10 
RoutePref = 0 
sendAfterRestart = 16 
slsTimer = 300
srtTimer = 300 
sstTimer = 300 
standard = ANSI92 
SwitchID = 0 
TMaxDigits = 24 
TMinDigits = 0 
TOverlap = 0 
variant = SS7-ANSI 
VOIPPrefix = 0 
 
   

You can map the preceding response to the circuit validation test in Step 1, as presented in the following list:

CctGrpCarrier—Value in this field maps to the value in the GRP field, as follows:

0—Equal to UNK (unknown carrier) in the GRP field.

1—Equal to ANL (analog carrier) in the GRP field.

2—Equal to DIG (digital carrier) in the GRP field.

3—Equal to AND (analog and diglossia carrier) in the GRP field.

Glare—Value in this field maps to the value in the SEIZ field, as follows:

0 or 3—Equal to NONE (no circuit control) in the SEIZ field.

1—Equal to ALL (all circuit control) in the SEIZ field.

2—Equal to ODD (odd circuit control) in the SEIZ field when the OPC is less than the associated DPC. Equal to EVEN (even circuit control) in the SEIZ field when the OPC is greater than the associated DPC.

AlarmCarrier—Value in this field maps to the value in the ALM field, as follows:

0—Equal to UNK (unknown) in the ALM field.

1—Equal to SOFT (software handling) in the ALM field.

2—Equal to HARD (hardware handling) in the ALM field.

CotPercentage and ExtCOT—Values in this field maps to the value in the COT field, as follows:

CotPercentage is undefined and ExtCOT is not set to Loop or Transponder—Equal to UNK (unknown continuity check requirements) in the COT field.

CotPercentage is set to any value and ExtCOT is not set to Loop or Transponder—Equal to NONE (no continuity check requirements) in the COT field.

CotPercentage is greater than 0 and less than 100 and ExtCOT is set to Loop or Transponder— Equal to STAT (statistical continuity check requirements) in the COT field.

CotPercentage is set to 100 and ExtCOT is set to Loop or Transponder—Equal to PERC (per call continuity check requirements) in the COT field.

Step 6 Start a provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 7 Modify the appropriate signaling service settings using the prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="sig_svc",param_name="param_value",param_name="param_value",... command.

Where:

sig_svc—MML name for the affected signaling service.

param_name—MML name for a mismatched setting.

param_value—Correct value for a mismatched setting.

For example, to change the settings for the COT to per call and seizing (glare) to no circuit control for the ss7dms signaling service, enter the prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="ss7dms",ExtCOT="Loop", CotPercentage="100",GLARE="0" command:

Step 8 If the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is provisioned for a switched environment and you need to modify the COT or seizing (glare) properties, modify the trunk group properties.

If you must modify the trunk group properties, proceed to Step 9.

If you do not need to modify the trunk group properties, proceed to Step 12.

Step 9 Identify the trunk group that is associated with the affected DPC using the prov-rtrv:trnkgrp:svc="sig_serv" command:

Where:

sig_serv—MML name of the SS7 signaling service that was identified in Step 4.

The system returns a message like the following:

MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2000-09-26 15:55:17 
M RTRV 
"session=active:trnkgrp" 
/* 
NAME 	CLLI 	SVC	TYPE	SELSEQ	QABLE
---- 	--- 	--- 	-----	------	------ 
1003	DMS100CLLI	ss7dms		TDM_ISUP		ASC	N 
 
   

The response lists the trunk group that is associated with the affected SS7 signaling service. The MML name of the trunk group is displayed in the NAME column. In the example, ss7dms is the name of the SS7 signaling service that is associated with the trunk. The trunk group names are in the first column, so the name of the associated trunk group in the example is 1003.

Step 10 Identify the MML names of the mismatched settings for the affected trunk group that was found in Step 9 by using the prov-rtrv:trnkgrpprop:name="trnk_grp" command:

Where:

trnk_grp—MML name of the affected trunk group.

The system returns a message like the following:

mgc-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2000-09-26 15:57:29 
M RTRV 
"session=active:trnkgrpprop" 
/* 
CarrierIdentity = 0333
CLLI = GR31764KB5
CompressionType = 1
CotPercentage = 1
CustGrpId = V123
EchoCanRequired = 0
ExtCOT = Loop
GLARE = 2
Npa = 919
RingNoAnswer = 100000
SatelliteInd = 0
ScreenFailAction = 0
*/
 
   

Step 11 Modify the appropriate trunk group settings by using the prov-ed:trnkgrp:name="trnk_grp",param_name="param_value",param_name="param_value",... command:

Where:

trnk_grp—MML name for the affected trunk group.

param_name—MML name for a mismatched setting.

param_value—Correct value for a mismatched setting.


Note The values for the COT or seizing properties that are entered here should match the values that were set in Step 7.


For example, to change the settings for the COT to per call and seizing (glare) to no circuit control for the trnkgrpdms trunk group, enter the
prov-ed:ztrnkgrp:name="trnkgrpdms",ExtCOT="Loop", CotPercentage="100",GLARE="0" command:

Step 12 Activate your new configuration as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

Step 13 Return to Step 1 and enter the vld-cic command again.

If the response indicates that the test passed, proceed to Step 14.

If the response indicates that the test failed, resume performing this procedure from Step 2 and modify the mismatched settings that were identified in the latest command response.

Step 14 Repeat Step 1 through Step 13 for each additional CIC that you want to test.


Resolving ISDN D-Channel Discrepancies

When there is a mismatch between the D-channels that are configured on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the D-channels that are configured on the associated media gateway, the system generates an ISDN log message. To resolve the log message, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the cd $BASEDIR/etc command at the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to change directories.

Step 2 Determine the component IDs associated with the D-channel number identified in the log text by searching for the D-channel number in the data files.

For example, if the log message contains the following text:

PROT_ERR_ISDN:Error message from ISDN:Receive MGMT_ERROR_IND for set 1, channel 2854
 
   

The D-channel number in the example is 2854. Therefore, search for occurrences of D-channel 2854 in the data files.

Enter the grep d_num *.dat command to search the data files for the identified D-channel number:

Where d_num is the D-channel number that is identified in the alarm message.

The system returns a message like the following:

sigChanDev.dat:001002bd  00160002  1  0034015e  00030011  00060001  2854
sigChanDev.dat:001002be  00160002  1  0034015e  00030011  00060002  2854
 
   

The response lists the data files in which the D-channel number was found, along with the associated properties. In the preceding example, the D-channel number, 2854, was found twice in the sigChanDev.dat file. The component IDs are in the column immediately following the data filename. So, in this example, the component IDs are 001002bd and 001002be.

Step 3 Determine the MML name of an IP link that is associated with one of the component IDs you identified in Step 2 by using the grep comp_ID components.dat command.

Where:

comp_ID—Component ID identified in Step 2.

The system returns a message like the following:

001002bd  0034015e  "bh531-31"              "IP link-backhaul svc mgx8260 EAST"
 
   

The response lists the properties that are associated with the selected component ID. The MML name for the IP link is in the third column in the response. In the preceding example, "bh531-31" is the MML name for the IP link.

Step 4 Repeat Step 3 for each component ID identified in Step 2.

Step 5 Start an MML session from the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and enter the prov-rtrv:iplnk:name="ip_link" command to determine the MML name for the signaling service that is associated with the IP links identified in Step 3.

Where:

ip_link—MML name for an IP link that was identified in Step 3.

The system returns a message like the following:

Media Gateway Controller 2000-06-08 13:49:53
 M  RTRV
    "session=active:iplnk"
    /* 
 NAME = bh531-31
 DESC = IP link-backhaul svc mgx8260 EAST
 SVC = bh531-3
 IF = enif1
 IPADDR = IP_Addr1
 PORT = 7007
 PEERADDR = 10.15.26.20
 PEERPORT = 7007
 PRI = 1
 SIGSLOT = 11
 SIGPORT = 38
    */
 
   

The response lists the properties that are associated with your selected IP link. The MML name for the signaling service that is associated with the link is in the SVC field. In the preceding example, bh531-3 is the MML name for the signaling service. Note the values in the SIGSLOT and SIGPORT fields. Use these values later to determine whether the D-channel is defined on the media gateway.

Step 6 Enter the rtrv-dest:sig_serv command to retrieve the properties for the signaling service that was identified in Step 5.

Where sig_serv is the MML name for a signaling service that was identified in Step 5.

The system returns a message like the following:

Media Gateway Controller 2000-06-08 13:50:26
 M  RTRV
    "bh531-3:PKG=ISDNPRI,ASSOC=SWITCHED,PST=OOS,SST=UND"
 
   

Step 7 Log into the associated media gateway and determine whether the D-channel is defined. See the documentation for the media gateway for information on how to verify whether the D-channel is defined.

For example, to determine whether a D-channel is defined for a Cisco MGX8260 media gateway, enter the lsdchan 12.39 command.

The values, 12.39, specify the D-channel. These numbers are determined by adding 1 to the SIGSLOT and SIGPORT values identified in Step 5.

The media gateway responds with a message that indicates whether the D-channel is defined.

Step 8 Consult your provisioning records and determine whether the identified D-channel should exist.

If your provisioning records indicate that the D-channel should exist, proceed to Step 9.

If your provisioning records indicate that the D-channel should not exist, proceed to Step 10.

Step 9 Define the D-channel on the associated media gateway. See the documentation for the media gateway for information on how to define a D-channel.

The procedure is finished.

Step 10 Start a provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 11 Delete the appropriate D-channels using the prov-dlt:iplnk:name="ip_link",... command.

Where:

ip_link—MML names for an IP link that was identified in Step 3.

For example, to delete a D-channel that is named bh531-31, enter the prov-dlt:iplink:name="bh531-31" command.

Step 12 Delete the signaling service that is associated with the D-channel using the prov-dlt:ipfaspath:name="sig_serv" command.

Where:

sig_serv—MML name for a signaling service that was identified in Step 5.

For example, to delete a signaling service that is named bh531-3, enter the prov-dlt:ipfaspath:name="bh531-3" command.

Step 13 Activate your new configuration as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.


Unblocking CICs

You may need to unblock a CIC or a range of CICs on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. There are two types of blocking on a CIC, local and remote.

Unblocking Locally Blocked CICs

To unblock a single CIC, log in to your active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session and enter the unblk-cic:sig_svc:CIC=number command.

Where:

sig_svc—MML name of the signaling service that is associated with the CICs that you want to unblock.

number—Number of the affected CIC.

For example, to unblock CIC number 2, which is associated with a signaling service called ss7svc1, enter the unblk-cic:ss7svc1:CIC=2 command.

To unblock a range of CICs, log in to your active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the unblk-cic:sig_svc:CIC=number,RNG=range command.

Where:

sig_svc—MML name of a signaling service that is associated with the CICs you want to unblock.

number—Number of the first CIC in the range of CICs you want to unblock.

range—Number such that number+range is the number of the last CIC in the range of affected CICs. All CICs between number and number+range are displayed.


Note You can configure the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software to issue individual or group supervision messages for point codes that are associated with an ISUP signaling service. ISUP signaling services issue group supervision messages by default. If you configure an ISUP signaling service to issue individual supervision messages, specifying the range option causes the system to issue individual supervision messages for each CIC in the range, instead a single group supervision message.


For example, to unblock CIC number 1 through 20, which are associated with a signaling service called ss7svc1, enter the unblk-cic:ss7svc1:cic=1,rng=19 command.

To verify that the CICs are successfully unblocked, retrieve the status of the affected CICs as described in the "Verifying CIC States" section. If the CICs are still blocked, see the "Resetting CICs" section.

Unblocking Remotely Blocked CICs

Generally, you cannot unblock a CIC that was blocked remotely, because the block was set on the far-end. However, in some instances, a remotely blocked CIC is misreported. You can fix this problem by resetting the CIC as described in the "Resetting CICs" section.

Resetting CICs

When trying to clear a blocked CIC or range of CICs, you might need to perform a reset on the affected CICs by issuing the reset-cic MML command.


Note The reset-cic MML command is not supported for signaling services that use variants of the BTNUP protocol.


To reset a single CIC, log in to your active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session and enter the reset-cic:sig_srv:CIC=number command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the signaling service that is associated with the CICs to be reset.

number—Number of the affected CIC.

For example, to reset CIC number 2, which is associated with a signaling service called ss7svc1, enter the reset-cic:ss7svc1:CIC=2 command.

To reset a range of CICs, log in to your active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the reset-cic:sig_srv:CIC=number,RNG=range command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of a signaling service that is associated with the CICs you want to reset.

number—Number of the first CIC in the range of CICs you want to reset.

range—Number such that number+range is the number of the last CIC in the range of affected CICs. All CICs between number and number+range are displayed.


Note You can configure the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software to issue individual or group supervision messages for point codes that are associated with an ISUP signaling service. ISUP signaling services issue group supervision messages by default. If you configure an ISUP signaling service to issue individual supervision messages, specifying the range option causes the system to issue individual supervision messages for each CIC in the range, instead of a single group supervision message.


For example, to reset CICs number 1 through 20, which are associated with a signaling service called ss7svc1, enter the reset-cic:ss7svc1:cic=1,rng=19 command:

To verify that the CICs are successfully reset, retrieve the status of the affected CICs as described in the "Verifying CIC States" section. If the CICs are still blocked, see the "Resolving Stuck CICs" section.

Resolving Stuck CICs

A CIC is stuck or hung when one or more bearer channels that are associated with a single call instance refuse to return to the idle call state, despite attempts to manually clearit by issuing the reset-cic MML command. Usually, a CIC is stuck when transient network glitches or configuration errors trigger protocol state machine errors. Typically these conditions result in a mismatch between the call state of a CIC on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the call state for the associated span and bearer channel (also known as time slot) on the media gateway.

The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch can automatically detect and terminate stuck CICs. The system runs an audit cron job once a day that verifies, using the sta-aud MML command, that the call states for the CICs on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch match the associated states for the spans and bearer channels on the media gateway. If the audit finds that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch call states on a CIC show that a call is in progress while the associated media gateway span and bearer channel states are idle, the system attempts to release the identified CIC by issuing the stp-call MML command. The stp-call MML command monitors for the release of the CIC. If the CIC is not released within 1 to 2 minutes, the system forcefully releases the CIC. When a CIC is forcefully released, a minimal CDR is written, with a cause of Temporary Failure.


Note If you believe CICs are stuck CICs, and do not want to wait for the periodic audit cron job to run, or if the audit cron job seems unable to clear the CICs, perform the steps that are identified in the "Manually Resolving Stuck CICs" section.



Note The format of the CDR depends upon your configuration of the associated XECfgParm.dat parameters. For more information on XECfgParm.dat configuration, see
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Software Installation and Configuration Guide. For more information on CDRs, see Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Billing Interface Guide.


To run the audit cron job more than once a day, increase the frequency of the audit in the mgcusr crontab entry. You must have system administration authority to use crontab. For more information on crontab, enter the UNIX man crontab command on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.


Note The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch does not run the audit cron job when the CPU load of the call engine is greater than the limit set in the XECfgParm.dat file. For more information on XECfgParm.dat configuration, see
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Software Installation and Configuration Guide.


Manually Resolving Stuck CICs

If you want to resolve stuck CICs manually, perform the follow steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Set the logging level of the call engine process (eng-01) to info by using the procedure that is described in the "Changing the Log Level for Processes" section.

Step 3 Perform a call state audit by using the procedure that is described in the "Auditing Call States" section.

When you search the active system log file, look for a CP_INFO_CHAN_STATE message containing the following text:

NAS is idle, SC is busy
 
   

The following example shows the log message:

Fri May 25 13:27:45:384 2001 | engine (PID 14217) <Info>
CP_INFO_CHAN_STATE:Mismatch in channel state, NAS is idle, SC is busy, span 0, channel 2
 
   

If you find this kind of CP_INFO_CHAN_STATE message in the active system log file, proceed to
Step 4. Otherwise, proceed to Step 16.

Step 4 There should be two associated CP_ERR_AUEP messages, one containing information on the affected span and bearer channel and another containing information on the affected CIC.

Search the active system log file for a CP_ERR_AUEP message that contains the following text:

Audit:failed to audit end point
 
   

The following example shows these messages:

Fri May 25 13:27:45:384 2001 | engine (PID 14217) <Error>
CP_ERR_AUEP:Audit:failed to audit end point nassvc1[00140001]/0/2
 
   
Fri May 25 13:27:45:384 2001 | engine (PID 14217) <Error>
CP_ERR_AUEP:Audit:failed to audit end point sigsrv1[00130002]/ffff/2
 
   

In the first message, which contains information on the affected span and bearer channel, the text that immediately follows the word "point" identifies the following:

MML name of the media gateway destination that is associated with the affected span and bearer channel (nasssvc1 in the example).

Internal hexadecimal code that is associated with the identified media gateway destination (00140001 in the example). This number appears in brackets.

Affected span number, in hexadecimal (0 in the example).

Affected bearer channel number, in hexadecimal (2 in the example).

In the second message, which contains information on the affected CIC, the text that immediately follows the word "point" identifies the following:

MML name of the signaling service that is associated with the affected CIC (sigsrv1 in the example).

Internal hexadecimal code that is associated with the identified signaling service (00130002 in the example). This number appears in brackets.

Affected span number, in hexadecimal (ffff in the example). This field for this type of message is always set to "ffff", because there is no correlation to span in SS7 networks.

Affected CIC number, in hexadecimal (2 in the example).

Step 5 Convert the hexadecimal values for the span, bearer channel, and CIC into decimal values.

Step 6 Refer to the information gathered in Step 4 and Step 5 and stop the call on an affected CIC for its associated signaling service. Use the procedure that is described in the "Stopping Calls on CICs" section.

Step 7 Refer to the information gathered in Step 4and Step 5, stop the call on an affected span and bearer channel for its associated media gateway destination, by using the procedure that is described in the "Stopping Calls on Spans" section.

Step 8 Reset the affected CIC using the procedure in the "Resetting CICs" section.

Step 9 Repeat Step 3 through Step 8. Search for additional sets of affected CICs, spans, and bearer channels, until you address all of the stuck CICs identified by the call state audit.

Step 10 Repeat Step 3 and Step 4. Perform a second call state audit and search the active system log file to determine whether the previously identified CICs are still stuck.

If the previously identified CICs are still stuck, proceed to Step 11. Otherwise, proceed to Step 14.

Step 11 Forcefully end the call on the signaling services and CICs identified in Step 4 by entering the kill-call:sig_srv:cic=num,confirm command.


Caution The kill-call MML command forcibly ends calls locally. It does not send any SS7 messages to the far-end. Enter the Kill-call command only to clear stuck CICs that you cannot clear by issuing the reset-cic or stp-call MML commands.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the signaling service that is identified in Step 4.

num—Number of the stuck CIC identified in Step 4.

For example, to forcefully stop a call on CIC 215, which is associated with a signaling service called sigsrv1, enter the kill-call:sigsrv1:cic=215,confirm command.

Repeat this step for each CIC you have identified as being stuck.

Step 12 Forcefully end the call on the signaling service, spans, and bearer channels that were identified in Step 4 by entering the kill-call:sig_srv:span=span_num,bc=bear_chan,confirm command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the signaling service that is identified in Step 4.

span_num—Number of the span that was identified in Step 4.

bear_chan—Number of the stuck bearer channel that was identified in Step 4.

For example, to forcefully stop a call on bearer channel 2, which is on span 2, and is associated with a signaling service called nassvc1, enter the kill-call:nassvc1:span=2,bc=2,confirm command.

Repeat this step for each bearer channel you have identified as being stuck.

Step 13 Repeat Step 3 and Step 4. Perform a third call state audit and search the active system log file to determine whether the previously identified CICs are still stuck.

If the previously identified CICs are no longer stuck, proceed to Step 14. If these CICs are still stuck, proceed to Step 15.

Step 14 Set the logging level of the call engine (eng-01) to err, by using the procedure that is described in the "Changing the Log Level for Processes" section.

Step 15 Perform a call trace as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 16 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Auditing Call States

To run a call state audit, which compares the call states of the CICs on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch with the associated states of the spans and bearer channels on the media gateway, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the sta-aud command.


Note The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch does not indicate when the sta-aud MML command completes its call state audit process. Wait a few minutes before proceeding to the next step.


The call state audit sends results to the active system log file.

Step 3 View the active system log file according to the instructions in the "Viewing System Logs" section. If you see any call state mismatch logs in the active system log file, contact the Cisco TAC for assistance in resolving the call state mismatch. See the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section for more information about contacting the Cisco TAC.

Step 4 When you finished auditing the call states, enter the stp-aud command:


Stopping Calls

Enter the stp-call MML command to stop calls gracefully on all traffic channels that are associated with a specified system resource. The following sections describe the stp-call MML command:

Stopping Calls on a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

Stopping Calls on a Media Gateway

Stopping Calls on a Trunk Group

Stopping Calls on a Signaling Service

Stopping Calls on Spans

Stopping Calls on CICs

Stopping Calls on a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

To stop all active calls on all traffic channels on a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-call:mgc,confirm command.

Where:

mgc— MML name of the desired Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

For example, to stop all active calls on all traffic channels on a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch called mgc1, enter the stp-call:mgc1,confirm command.

Stopping Calls on a Media Gateway

To stop all active calls on all traffic channels on a media gateway, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-call:gway,confirm command.

Where:

gway—MML name of the desired media gateway.


Note This procedure does not apply to all media gateway types. Supported types are CU, MUX, MGW, and AVM external nodes.


For example, to stop all active calls on all traffic channels on a media gateway called sfgway, enter the stp-call:sfgway,confirm command.

Stopping Calls on a Trunk Group

To stop all active calls on all traffic channels that are associated with a trunk group, log in to the active
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-call:trkgrp,confirm command.

Where:

trkgrp—MML name of the trunk group.


Note You can use this command only for TDM trunk groups.


For example, to stop all active calls on all traffic channels that are associated with a trunk group called trunkgrp1, enter the stp-call:trunkgrp1,confirm command.

Stopping Calls on a Signaling Service

To stop all active calls on all traffic channels that are associated with a signaling service, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-call:sig_srv,confirm command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the desired signaling service. The following signaling service types are valid for this command:

In-band TDM up to MUX and then time switched to TDM media and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to CU and then encapsulated and sent over IP to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to the media gateway and then converted to NI2 and sent to the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch over IP (that is, FE box<-sig/tdm->media gateway<-NI2/IP-> Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch).

Signaling service or routeset that is associated with a DPC.

EISUP signaling service.

For example, to stop all active calls on all traffic channels that are associated with a signaling service called nassrv1, enter the stp-call:nassrv1,confirm command.

Stopping Calls on Spans

To stop all active calls on all bearer channels that are associated with a single span, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-call:sig_srv:span=x,confirm command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the signaling service. The following signaling service types are valid for this command:

In-band TDM up to MUX and then time switched to TDM media and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to CU and then encapsulated and sent over IP to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to the media gateway and then converted to NI2 and sent to the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch over IP (that is, FE box<-sig/tdm->media gateway<-NI2/IP-> Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch).

Signaling service or routeset that is associated with a DPC.

EISUP signaling service.

x—16-bit value that identifies an ISDN/PRI physical cable.

For example, to stop all active calls on all bearer channels on a signaling service that is called ss7svc1 associated with span number 1, enter the stp-call:ss7svc1:span=1,confirm command.

To stop all active calls on a bearer channel, or a range of bearer channels, for a span that is associated with a signaling service, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-call:sig_srv:span=x,bc=y[,rng=range],confirm command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the signaling service. The following signaling service types are valid for this command:

In-band TDM up to MUX and then time switched to TDM media and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to CU and then encapsulated and sent over IP to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to the media gateway and then converted to NI2 and sent to the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch over IP (that is, FE box<-sig/tdm->media gateway<-NI2/IP-> Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch).

Signaling service or routeset that is associated with a DPC.

EISUP signaling service.

x—16-bit value that identifies an ISDN/PRI physical cable.

y—Numeric value that identifies the non-ISUP bearer channel number.

range—Value such that y+range is a valid bearer channel number. The administrative state for all bearer channels between y and y+range are retrieved.

For example, to stop all active calls on all bearer channel numbers 2 through 6, associated with a signaling service called ss7svc1, enter the stp-call:ss7svc1:span=2,bc=2,rng=5,confirm command.

Stopping Calls on CICs

To stop all active calls on a CIC, or a range of CICs, associated with a signaling service, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-call:sig_srv:cic=number[,rng=range],confirm command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the signaling service. The following signaling service types are valid for this command:

In-band TDM up to MUX and then time switched to TDM media and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to CU and then encapsulated and sent over IP to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

In-band TDM signaling up to the media gateway and then converted to NI2 and sent to the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch over IP (that is, FE box<-sig/tdm->media gateway<-NI2/IP-> Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch).

Signaling service or routeset that is associated with a DPC.

EISUP signaling service.

number—Valid CIC number.

range—Value such that y+range is a valid bearer channel number. The administrative state for all bearer channels between y and y+range are retrieved.

For example, to stop all active calls on CICs 2 through 11, associated with a signaling service called ss7svc1, enter the stp-call:ss7svc1:cic=2,rng=9,confirm command.

Auditing an MGCP Media Gateway

You can audit an MGCP media gateway from the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. The following sections describe the procedure to audit an MGCP media gateway:

Starting an MGCP Media Gateway Audit

Retrieving an MGCP Media Gateway Audit

Starting an MGCP Media Gateway Audit

You can run an audit on a single MGCP media gateway, or on all the provisioned MGCP media gateways. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch does not prompt you to indicate when the audit is complete. Please wait a few moments before retrieving the audit results as described in the "Retrieving an MGCP Media Gateway Audit" section.

To run an audit on a single MGCP media gateway, log on to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the sta-aud-gw:MGCP_sig_srv command.

Where:

MGCP_sig_srv—MML name of the MGCP signaling service that is associated with the MGCP media gateway.

For example, to start an audit on an MGCP media gateway that is associated with an MGCP signaling service called T-1-16, enter the sta-aud-gw:T-1-16 command:

To run an audit on all the MGCP media gateways, log on to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the sta-aud-gw:all command.

Retrieving an MGCP Media Gateway Audit

You can retrieve an audit for a single MGCP media gateway, or for audits on all the MGCP media gateways. To retrieve an audit for a single MGCP media gateway, log on to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the rtrv-aud-gw:MGCP_sig_srv command.

Where:

MGCP_sig_srv—MML name of the MGCP signaling service that is associated with the MGCP media gateway.

For example, to retrieve an audit on an MGCP media gateway that is associated with an MGCP signaling service called T-1-16, enter the rtrv-aud-gw:T-1-16 command.

The system returns a response like the following:

Media Gateway Controller  - MGC-01 2000-01-12 15:19:51 
M COMPLD
   "SP1-MGCP1:Audit gw received at 2000-01-12 15:19:51
Audit GW PASSED
pass pn
pass pt - not alarmed
pass sl - not alarmed
pass nl
pass bp
pass cp
pass rp
pass nb
pass uc
pass ic
pass us
pass is"
 
   

The response indicates whether the audit passed or failed. If the audit failed, see the documentation for the associated MGCP media gateway for more information on troubleshooting the identified problem.

To retrieve an audit that is run on all the MGCP media gateways, log on to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the rtrv-aud-gw:all command.

The system returns a response like the one shown previously, with a set of data for every MGCP media gateway that is associated with your system.

Running a Manual Continuity Test

To run a manual continuity test (COT) on a specified remote switch CIC, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the tst-cot:sig_srv:cic=number command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name of the signaling service that is associated with the CIC that you want to test.

number—Identification number of the CIC that you want to test.

For example, to run a manual COT on CIC number 5 of a signaling service named sigsrv1, you would enter the tst-cot:sigsrv1:cic=5 command.

If the manual COT test fails, verify the COT settings for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the associated media gateway, as described in the "Verifying Continuity Test Settings" section.

Verifying Continuity Test Settings


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Verify that the COT properties for the associated SS7 signaling service or trunk group are correct by logging in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the prov-rtrv:component:name="comp_name" command.

Where:

component—MML component type name for the SS7 signaling service or trunk group properties. Enter one of the following:

sigsvcprop—Component type for SS7 signaling service properties.

trnkgrpprop—Component type for trunk group properties.

comp_name—MML name for the affected SS7 signaling service or trunk group.

For example, if you wanted to verify the properties for an SS7 signaling service that is called ss7svc1, enter the prov-rtrv:sigsvcprop:name="ss7svc1" command:

If the system is properly configured to use a dial plan, the system returns a response like the following:

MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2001-06-01 10:09:47
M  RTRV
   "session=active:sigsvcprop"
   /*
adjDestinations = 16
AlarmCarrier = 0
BothwayWorking = 1
CctGrpCarrier = 2
CGBA2 = 0
CircHopCount = 0
CLIPEss = 0
CotInTone = 2010
CotOutTone = 2010
CotPercentage = 0
CustGrpId=2222
dialogRange = 0
ExtCOT = Loop
ForwardCLIinIAM = 1
ForwardSegmentedNEED = 1
		        .
        .
        .
 
   

Step 3 If your settings for the highlighted properties match what is displayed, proceed to Step 6. Otherwise, you must modify the COT settings on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. To begin modifying the COT settings, start a provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 4 Enter the prov-ed:component:name="comp_name",cot_prop=value,cot_prop=value,... command to modify the COT settings on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Where:

component—MML component type name for the SS7 signaling service or trunk group properties. Enter one of the following:

ss7path—Component type for SS7 signaling services.

trnkgrp—Component type for trunk groups.

comp_name—MML name for the affected SS7 signaling service or trunk group.

cot_prop—Name of the COT property you want to modify.

value—Value for the specified COT property.

Step 5 Save and activate your changes according to the instructions in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

Step 6 Debug the COT settings on the associated media gateway using the show cot dsp, show cot request, show cot summary, and debug cot detail commands. See the documentation for the associated media gateway for more information on these commands.

If debugging the COT settings on the media gateway does not reveal any problems, or does not fix the COT failure, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Media Gateway IP Destination or Link Out-of-Service

If an IP link or destination to a media gateway is out-of-service, perform the following steps:


Note An IP destination to a media gateway is out-of-service when both IP links associated with the destination are out-of-service.



Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Ping the affected Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch link from the associated media gateway by using
the ping link_addr UNIX command.

Where:

link_addr—IP address of the affected Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch link.

Repeat this step if the second link for the destination is also out-of-service.

If the links are unreachable, proceed to Step 10. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 If the path between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the media gateway is defined using an MGCP signaling service, proceed to Step 4. If the path between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the media gateway is defined using a NAS signaling service, proceed to Step 5.

Step 4 Verify that the MGCP interface on your media gateway is working properly. See the documentation that is associated with the media gateway for more information.

If the MGCP interface on your media gateway is working properly, proceed to Step 10. Otherwise, correct the problems with the MGCP interface as described in the documentation that is associated with the media gateway.

Step 5 Identify which Redundant Link Manager (RLM) group is configured on the media gateway by entering the sh run command. For more information on this command, see the documentation that is associated with the media gateway.

Step 6 Verify that the RLM group identified in Step 5 is defined under the D-channel serial interface. See the documentation that is associated with the media gateway for more information.

If the RLM group is defined, proceed to Step 7. Otherwise, add the RLM group to the D-channel serial interface. See the documentation that is associated with the media gateway for more information.

If the link returns to service, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Reset the RLM group using the shut/no shut commands. See the documentation that is associated with the media gateway for more information.

If the links return to service, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 8.

Step 8 Verify that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch acknowledges RLM messages by issuing the debug command. See the documentation that is associated with the media gateway for more information.

If the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch acknowledges RLM messages, proceed to Step 10. Otherwise, proceed to Step 9.

Step 9 Verify that the configuration for RLM on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch matches the configuration on the media gateway. To display the configuration of the IP links on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, enter the prov-rtrv:iplnk:"all" MML command at the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

The system returns a response like the following:

   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2001-07-26 12:57:48
M  RTRV
   "session=active:iplnk"
   /*
NAME                  SVC                   IF                    IPADDR      PORT        
PEERADDR        PEERPORT    PRI         SIGSLOT     SIGPORT     NEXTHOP         NETMASK
----                  ---                   --                    ------      ----        
--------        --------    ---         ------      -------     -------         -------
va-5300-202-1         va-5300-202           enif1                 IP_Addr1    3001        
172.24.200.19   3001        1           0           0           0.0.0.0    255.255.255.255
va-5300-202-2         va-5300-202           enif1                 IP_Addr1    3001        
172.24.200.19   3001        1           0           0           0.0.0.0    255.255.255.255
va-5300-203-1         va-5300-203           enif1                 IP_Addr1    3001        
172.24.200.20   3001        1           0           0           0.0.0.0    255.255.255.255
va-5300-203-2         va-5300-203           enif1                 IP_Addr1    3001        
172.24.200.20   3001        1           0           0           0.0.0.0    255.255.255.255
   */
 
   

Ensure that the IP addresses (IPADDR and PEERADDR) and the ports (PORT and PEERPORT) match the values that the media gateway uses. If the values match, proceed to Step 10.

Otherwise, changes must be made on the media gateway, see the documentation for your media gateway for more information. If you need to make changes to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start a dynamic reconfiguration session to make your changes, as described in the "Invoking Dynamic Reconfiguration" section.

If the changes resolve the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 10.

Step 10 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Calls Fail at the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

If calls appear to be failing at the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, and the calls are not appearing on the associated media gateway, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Debug the interface on the media gateway that is associated with the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. If your system is configured for signaling, the interface is Q.931. If your system is configured for call control, the interface is MGCP. See the documentation for the associated media gateway for more information on debugging the interface.

If the calls in question do not appear on the media gateway, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, resolve the problems with the interface as described in the documentation for the associated media gateway.

Step 3 Verify that the signaling channels are in-service, as described in the "Verifying the Status of all Signaling Services" section.

If any of the signaling channels are out-of-service, attempt to return them to service by using the appropriate procedures. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Run a call trace as described in the "Performing a Call Trace" section.

Step 5 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


3.1 kHz (ISDN Category 3) Calls are Failing

If 3.1-kHz calls (also known as ISDN Category 3 calls) are failing, perform the following steps:


Note The following procedure is valid only if the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is using the BTNUP protocol.



Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 If your system is configured for the BTNUP protocol, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 3 Verify the setting for the defaultBC property on the trunk group that is associated with the failed calls by entering the prov-rtrv:trnkgrpprop:name="trnkgrpname" MML command at the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Where:

trnkgrpname—MML name of the trunk group that is associated with the failed calls.

The system returns a response listing the values of all of the properties for the specified trunk group. The defaultBC property should be set to 3_1_KHZ to ensure proper processing of 3.1 kHz calls. If the defaultBC property is set to 3_1_KHZ, proceed to Step 7. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.


Note Setting the defaultBC property changes the identifying information for incoming 3.1 kHz (ISDN Category 3) calls to match the settings for speech (ISDN category 2) calls. This change allows far-end switches to process 3.1-kHz calls, which are rejected ordinarily.


Step 4 Start a provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 5 Modify the appropriate signaling service settings by issuing the prov-ed:trnkgrpprop:name="trnkgrpname",defaultBC="3_1_KHZ" command:

Where:

trnkgrpname—MML name for the affected trunk group.

Step 6 Save and activate the new configuration as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.

If your system now completes 3.1-kHz calls, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Calls are Misrouting

If calls are misrouting, you might have a problem with your dial plan or routing data. To identify the source of the problem and resolve it, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Perform a diagnostic trace of the dial plan and routing data using the translation verification viewer, as described in the "Using the Translation Verification Viewer" section.

If the diagnostic trace does not reveal any configuration errors in your dial plan or routing data, proceed to Step 8. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3 to correct the configuration errors.

Step 3 Correct your dial plan or routing data that is indicated in the output of the translation verification viewer and proceed to Step 7.


Note Use the appropriate MML commands to correct the data based on the elements of the configuration that you must change. For more information on the appropriate MML commands for changing the configuration of individual dial plan and routing data elements, see the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Dial Plan Guide.


If the call that is misrouting is an MGCP dial call, the value for the MGCPDIALPKG result type could be incorrect. To correct the value of the MGCPDIALPKG result type, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Verify the current setting of the MGCPDIALPKG result type by using the numan-rtrv:resulttable:custgrpid="group_number",name="result_name",resulttype="MGCPDIALPKG",SETNAME="set_name" MML command:

Where:

group_number—Customer group identification number that is associated with the affected dial plan.

result_name—Result name that is associated with the affected dial plan.

set_name—Name of the set that is associated with the affected MGCP dial plan.

If the setting is not correct, proceed to Step 5. Otherwise, proceed to Step 8.

Step 5 Change the MGCPDIALPKG settings by issuing the numan-ed:resulttable:custgrpid="group_number",name="result_name",resulttype="MGCPDIALPKG",SETNAME="set_name" DW1="call_type" DW2="x" MML command:

Where:

group_number—Customer group identification number that is associated with the affected dial plan.

result_name—Result name that is associated with the affected dial plan.

set_name—Name of the set that is associated with the affected MGCP dial plan.

call_type—Call type for the MGCP calls. Valid values are digital, analog, and dynamic.

x—Value for data word 2. Valid values are 0 and 1.

Step 6 Deploy the updated dial plan by issuing the chg-dpl:custgrpid="group_number" MML command:

Wher:

group_number—Customer group identification number that is associated with the affected dial plan.

Step 7 Re-run the diagnostic trace on the dial plan according to way described in Step 1. If the system finds no errors, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, return to Step 3 and continue to modify your dial plan.


Note If you repeatedly modified your dial plan and routing data and errors are still appearing in the diagnostic trace, proceed to Step 8.


Step 8 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Resolving SIP Communication Problems

The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software enables SIP communications. The procedures that resolve signaling channel and bearer channel problems also serve to resolve SIP communication problems. This section presents procedures for resolving SIP problems.

Stopping SIP-to-SIP Calls

Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software can control SIP-to-SIP calls. To stop a particular SIP-to-SIP call, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the kill-call:sip_sig_srv:cid="name",confirm command:

Where:

sip_sig_srv—MML name for the SIP signaling service that is associated with the SIP-to-SIP call.

name—SIP call identification name. You can get this name by issuing the rtrv-sip MML command according to instructions in the "Retrieving SIP Call Information" section.

For example, the kill-call:sip_svc1:cid="ccdd33ee-423fdedd-55438954-1@172.22.119.215",confirm MML command stops a SIP-to-SIP call that runs on a SIP signaling service that is called sip_svc1:

Tracing

The following sections describe tracing on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch:

Performing a Call Trace

Alternatives to Call Tracing

Performing a TCAP Trace

Performing a Call Trace

After eliminating all physical connections, signal links, bearer channels, and destinations as the cause of a problem, the call engine running on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch might be part of a problem. Performing a call trace while making a call can derive details about what takes place inside the call engine and might indicate where a breakdown is occurring.

The following sections describe call tracing:

Starting A Call Trace

Starting A Call Trace (on Release 9.7(3) Patch 8)

Stopping A Call Trace

Retrieving Names of Open Call Trace Files

Viewing the Call Trace

Deleting Call Trace Files

Understanding the Call Trace

Starting A Call Trace

To start a call trace, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the appropriate command.

You can enter this command in any one of five different formats:

sta-sc-trc:sig_path:[log="filenameprefix"][,prd=n], confirm

sta-sc-trc:sig_path:span=x[,rng=y][,log="filenameprefix"][,prd=n]

sta-sc-trc:sig_path:span=x[[,tc=z],rng=y][,log="filenameprefix"][,prd=n]

sta-sc-trc:trkgrp:[log="filenameprefix"][,prd=n], confirm

sta-sc-trc:trkgrp:trk=w[,rng=y][,log="filenameprefix"][,prd=n]

 
   

Where:

sig_path—Logical signaling destination, such as an SS7 point code, an FAS path, an IP FAS path, or a DPNSS path,

trkgrp—Logical trunk group that is associated with the call that you want to trace.

filenameprefix—Trace files are created and written to a file that the system names differently according to how you enter the command. (The system generates a log message for each trace started. The sta-sc-trc command creates the filenames that are contained in the log messages.) If you specify the log= parameter, the value of this parameter is prefixed to the filename.

If you do not specify the log= parameter, the system adds default filenameprefix values for each sta-sc-trc command, as shown in the following examples:

The command sta-sc-trc:sig_path:confirm generates the following filename:

sig_path_yyyymmddhhmmss.btr

The command sta-sc-trc:trkgrp:confirm generates the following filename:

trkgrp_sig_path_yyyymmddhhmmss.btr

Where:

The filename (yyyymmddhhmmss) is a time stamp that is formatted as follows:

yyyy—Four-digit designation for the year, such as 2000, 2001, or 2002.

mm—Two-digit designation for the month (01 through 12).

dd—Two-digit designation for the day of the month (01 through 31).

hh—Two-digit designation for the hour of the day (00 through 23).

mm—Two-digit designation for the minutes of an hour (00 through 59).

ss—Two-digit designation for the seconds of a minute (00 through 59).

n—Duration for which call trace information is collected, in seconds. At the expiration of this period, the system discontinues PDU collection on the signaling path and closes the log file. In the absence of this parameter, the default period is set to 1800 seconds (30 minutes), after which the system stops the trace automatically.

confirm—An option that is required to confirm a sig_path level trace or a trkgrp level trace command. This option is required because of the large volume of data that the system can generate and the potential performance impact of generating a large trace file. If you do not specify the confirm option, the system rejects the command and displays a message about the potential performance impact of this command.

span—Span ID, an integer value denoting the traffic channel for the sig_path (NFAS only).

rng—Range. When used with "span=x," y is an optional range of spans beginning with span x and continuing for y spans. When used with "tc=z," y is an optional range of traffic channels beginning with z and continuing for y traffic channels. When used with "trk=w," y is an optional range of contiguous trunks that you want to trace starting with trunk w and ending with trunk y.

tc—Traffic channel that is associated with the trace, in integer form.

trk—Trunk that is associated with the trace, integer form.

The following paragraphs present examples of the five possible command variations:

Signaling path level trace traces all calls occurring on the signaling path. Use this format if you do not know the specific signaling path level.

sta-sc-trc:sig_path:log="filenameprefix", prd=600, confirm
 
   

In this form of the command, the confirm parameter is required.

Signaling path span-level trace traces calls at the span level. Use this format to reduce the amount of trace information if you know the span on which the call is placed.

sta-sc-trc:sig_path:span=x
 
   

The confirm parameter is not needed in this form of the command because the volume of the trace file should not be an issue, nor should system performance.

Signaling path span-traffic-channel level trace traces calls at the TC or CIC level. Use this format if the traffic channel on which the call is placed is known.

sta-sc-trc:sig_path:span=x,tc=y
 
   

Trunk group level trace traces all calls at a trunk group level. Use this format if the trunk group on which the call is placed is known.

sta-sc-trc:trkgrp:confirm
 
   

This form of the command requires the confirm parameter.

Trunk group trunk-level trace traces only calls for a given trunk (or CIC). Use this format if the trunk group and trunk on which the call is placed is known.

sta-sc-trc:trkgrp:trk=w

Note See Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 MML Command Reference for detailed information on using the sta-sc-trc command.


Step 2 Make the call.


Starting A Call Trace (on Release 9.7(3) Patch 8)

You can perform advanced call traces starting from Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.7(3) Patch 8. The advanced call trace is based on the existing call trace function and adds the calling party number, the called party number, the MCL (Machine Congestion Level) setting, the cause value, and the call duration as call trace criteria. This enhancement makes the call trace more accurate and reduces system performance impacts on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch when it is performing call traces.

To start the call trace, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the command.

You can enter this command in either of the following two formats:

sta-sc-trc:<sig_path>:[span=x[,rng=y][,tc=z[,rng=w]]][,anubmer="calling party 
number"][,bnumber="called party number"][,causevalue=c][,incompleteoverlapnumber] 
[,duration=d][,mcl=m][,autostop][,prd=n][,log="log"],confirm
 
   
sta-sc-trc:<trunkgroup>:[trk=x[,rng=y]][,anubmer="calling party number"][,bnumber="called 
party number"][,causevalue=c][,incompleteoverlapnumber][,duration=d] 
[,mcl=m][,autostop][,prd=n][,log="log"],confirm
 
   

Table 6-3 provides a parameter list for this sta-sc-trc MML command.

Table 6-3 Parameter List of the MML Command sta-sc-trc 

Parameter Name
Description
Parameter Category
Parameter Combinations

sig_path

See Starting A Call Trace.

Trace location

Possible combinations:

sig_path:[span=x[,rng=y][,tc=w[,rng=z]]]

trunkgroup:[trk=x[,rng=y]]

Note If "sig_path" is present, all span/CICs at this sigpath are traced. If "sig_path" and "span" are present, all CICs at this sig_path/span are traced. If "trunkgroup" is present, all trunks in this trunk group are traced.

span

See Starting A Call Trace.
Specify this parameter with the parameters rng and sig_path.

rng

See Starting A Call Trace.

tc

See Starting A Call Trace. Specify this parameter the parameters rng, span, and sig_path.

trunkgroup

See Starting A Call Trace.

trk

See Starting A Call Trace. Specify this parameter is used with the parameters trunk group and rng.

rng

See Starting A Call Trace.

anumber

The original calling party number up to 32 digits. Allowed digits are 0123456789abcdefABCDEF*. The wildcard "*" at the end is supported.

Call trace trigger

Optional parameters. If more than one call trace trigger parameter is present, the system collects the call trace when all conditions are met.

Note If no trigger parameter is present, this command is used in the former way, which is described in
Starting A Call Trace.


bnumber

The original calling party number up to 32 digits. Allowed digits are 0123456789abcdefABCDEF*. The wildcard "*" at the end is supported.

causevalue

The internal cause value for the release message. Valid values are from 1 to 300.

incompleteoverlapnumber

The indicator to collect incomplete-number overlap call traces. These calls are failed calls with incomplete numbers.

duration

The call duration, in seconds. Valid values are from 3600 to 2147483. You must set this parameter value to be less than "prd" in the presence of the parameter prd. If the call duration of the call is greater than prd, the trace criterion is met and the system stops the call trace. At the same time, the system adds one new parameter CallNumberToWriteIntoTracefile in the file XECfgParm.dat to limit the number of calls (default: 200) that are included in the trace file.

mcl

The machine congestion level. Valid values are integers from 0 to 3. Default value is 1.

Where:

0—Do not stop the call trace when MCL occurs.

1—Stop the call trace when the MCL reaches MCL1.

2—Stop the call trace when the MCL reaches MCL2.

3—Stop the call trace when the MCL reaches MCL3.

Stop condition

Optional parameters. If more than one stop condition parameter is present, the system stops the call trace when any one of these stop conditions is met.

autostop

Indicator to stop the call trace when one trace (for example, all input trace criteria are matched) is collected. This parameter is unavailable in the presence of the parameter "duration" or in the absence of all the other parameters.

prd

Duration, in seconds, for which call trace information is collected. At the expiration of this period, the system discontinues PDU collection on the signaling path and closes the log file. In the absence of this parameter, the default period is set to 1800 seconds (30 minutes) after which the system stops the trace automatically.

log

See Starting A Call Trace.

Other parameters

Optional parameter log.

The parameter confirm is mandatory.

confirm

See Starting A Call Trace.


The following paragraphs present examples of possible command variations:

Use the following command to trace the call with the calling number 7300 and the called number 7000 at the sigpath ss7svc6:

sta-sc-trc:ss7svc6,anumber="7300",bnumber="7000",confirm
 
   

Use the following command to trace the call with the calling number 7300 at the sigpath ss7svc6. Stop the call trace when the required call trace is collected:

sta-sc-trc:ss7svc6,anumber="7300",autostop,confirm
 
   

Use the following command to trace the call at the sigpath ss7svc6 with CIC range from 22 to 30. Stop the call trace when the MCL reaches MCL2:

sta-sc-trc:ss7svc6,span=65535,tc=22,rng=8,mcl=2,confirm
 
   

Use the following command to trace the call with the internal cause value 44 at the sigpath ss7svc6:

sta-sc-trc:ss7svc6,causevalue=44,confirm
 
   

Use the following command to trace the failed call for which the overlap flag is set and the called number is incomplete at the sigpath ss7svc6:

sta-sc-trc:ss7svc6,bnumber="7000",incompleteoverlapnumber,confirm
 
   

Use the following command to start a 12 hour call trace of the call with duration longer than 3 hours in the trunk group tg-6006:

sta-sc-trc:tg-6006,duration=10800,prd=43200,confirm
 
   

Note You can use the following two commands to perform call traces on a standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.
sta-sc-trc:<sig_path>:[span=x[,rng=y][,tc=z[,rng=w]]][,mcl=m][,prd=n][,log="log"],
confirm
sta-sc-trc:<trunkgroup>:[trk=x[,rng=y]][,mcl=m][,prd=n][,log="log"],confirm


Step 2 Make the call.


Stopping A Call Trace

You can stop a call trace session by issuing the stp-sc-trc MML command. To stop a call trace session on a particular signaling service, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-sc-trc:sig_srv|trkgrp command.

Where:

sig_srv—MML name for the signaling service on which you are running a call trace.

trkgrp—MML name for the trunk group on which you are running a call trace.

For example, to stop a call trace session on a trunk group that is called T-1-1, enter the stp-sc-trc:T-1-1 command.

To stop all call trace sessions, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-sc-trc:all command.

The system returns a response like the following:

Media Gateway Controller 2000-03-21 15:28:03
M  COMPLD
   "ALL:Trace stopped for the following files:
   ../var/trace/_dpc1_20000321152752.btr
   "
 
   

Retrieving Names of Open Call Trace Files

To retrieve the names of call trace files for sessions that are in progress, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the rtrv-sc-trc command.

The system returns a response like the following:

Media Gateway Controller 2000-03-21 15:28:03
M  RTRV
   "RTRV-SC-TRC:Trace in progress for the following files:
   ../var/trace/_dpc1_19991221131108.btr
   ../var/trace/sigtest_dpc2_19991221131109.btr
  "
 
   

Starting with Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.7(3) Patch 8, you can use the rtrv-sc-trc::stopreason command to retrieve the stop reason of the last trace file.

The call trace stops for one of the following four reasons.

Call trace is stopped because the MCL is reached.

   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2008-04-28 10:25:36.782 EDT
M  RTRV
   "../var/trace/eisup-0428_eisup-pgw2_20080427223536.btr: MCL reached.
"
   ;
 
   

Call trace is stopped automatically and the desired call trace is collected.

   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2008-04-30 14:39:19.042 CST
M RTRV
   "../var/trace/_ss7svc1_20080430143908.btr: automatically stopped.
"
   ;
 
   

Call trace is stopped manually.

   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2008-04-30 14:39:59.849 CST
M RTRV
   "../var/trace/_ss7svc1_20080430143951.btr: manually stopped.
"
   ;
 
   

Call trace is stopped because the trace period is over.

   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2008-04-30 14:43:59.982 CST
M RTRV
   "../var/trace/_ss7svc1_20080430144354.btr: trace period expired.
"
   ;

Viewing the Call Trace

The MML command sta-sc-trc produces binary trace (.btr) files, which you cannot view with a text editor. The main part of the filename is set up in the sta-sc-trc command, as explained in the "Starting A Call Trace" section, and the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch adds the extension .btr to these files. The .btr files can contain tracings from many calls all mixed together. Each tracing record in the file has a specific record type and records information of the type that relates to that record. Each record has a unique call ID that associates it with a specific call and is a recording of the external events to which the MDL call model was exposed while the recording was made. Each tracing record is not a recording of the actual MDL.

Use the trace viewer to view and navigate through call trace outputs. For more information on using the trace viewer, see the "Using the Trace Viewer" section.

Also view the call trace output data using the get_trc.sh UNIX script. Get_trc.sh uses the Conversion Analyzer and SimPrint utilities in combination to give a single common interface to all the trace tools. Get_trc.sh uses the UNIX less utility for displaying file output (it is assumed that less is available on the system). For more information on the less utility, enter the man less UNIX command.

You can start the script by entering the get_trc.sh filename UNIX command.

Where:

filename—Name of the call trace output data file (.btr) that you want to view.

The script then displays a list of commands and prompts you to enter a command. The script lists the following commands:

S—Displays the call trace data using the SimPrint utility. For more information on SimPrint, see the "Understanding SimPrint" section.

F—Displays the call trace data using the SimPrint utility, and a listing of the sent and received fields.

D—Displays the data in the .trc file associated with this call trace. For more information on .trc files, see the "Understanding Trace Files" section.

C—Converts the file that this script creates to a .trc file.

A—Displays the data in the .ca file associated with this call trace. For more information on .ca files, see the "Understanding the Conversion Analyzer" section.

N—Displays the information for the next call ID in the list.

P—Displays the information for the previous call ID in the list.

L—Lists all the call IDs in the data for this call trace.

H—Provides help on displaying call trace data.

Q—Closes the script.

id—Displays the information for a call ID that you specify.

Deleting Call Trace Files

Call trace files can be rather large. Leaving these files on your disk after you no longer require them could raise capacity issues. Delete call trace files by issuing UNIX commands, as described in the "Deleting Unnecessary Files to Increase Available Disk Space" section.

Understanding the Call Trace

Call traces record information in a trace file that shows how the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch processed a specific call. Traces are most useful when you can be sure that a problem call is reaching the call engine and starting an instance of a Message Definition Language (MDL) state machine. You can determine whether the problem call is reaching the call engine by looking for the presence of non-idle circuits (rtrv-cic) or "new cmgCall" entries in the debug logs.

After you start a trace, all call-processing activity for calls originating from the specified destination is captured. The trace enables you to follow the call through the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to discover where it fails.

The trace output is in binary format. It shows:

PDU that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch receives

How the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch decodes the PDU

PDU that the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch sends

Using call trace logs is uncomplicated if you remember how to locate the record of a call:

You can locate incoming signal messages that start instances of engine call objects by searching backwards in the call trace for "new cmgCall."

Similarly, you can find the end of a call by searching forward from the "new cmgCall" message for the next "end cmgCall" message.

If you are experiencing problems with call processing and need to contact Cisco for support, you should run a call trace before contacting Cisco TAC. The trace file helps the Cisco TAC troubleshoot the problem more effectively. For some problems, the Cisco TAC cannot begin troubleshooting the problem until you supply the trace file; so, it is a good practice to create this file before contacting them.

Understanding the Conversion Analyzer

The Conversion Analyzer is a viewer utility for .btr trace files. The Conversion Analyzer displays each record from a .btr file in a readable form (ASCII text) that you can view with any text editor; however, some useful sorting and display options are also available.

The .btr files serve as source files for .ca files. The .ca files are ASCII text output from the Conversion Analyzer, which is obtained because of redirection of the standard output to a file. There are two main sections in a .ca file. The header section contains a list of every signaling path that is defined on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and a list of the message definition object (MDO) modules that are loaded. The main body contains a printout of every record. Each record has a record number, a timestamp, a call ID, and the print data that the record contains.

Understanding the Simulator Utility

The Simulator is a powerful MDO file processing utility that uses .mdo files to replay the events recorded in a .btr file. The front end of the Simulator reads the .btr file. The interpreter in the Simulator utility that loads the .mdo files and replays the events (.btr files) through the MDO, is the same interpreter that the call engine uses in the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch when .mdo files are used. As the interpreter steps through each line of object code (and the action of each object is interpreted) in the .mdo file, the utility activates the print method of each object, which forms the next line of text in the .trc file.

The print method for each object contains text that directly relates to the appearance of the .mdl source code that produced the object in the .mdo file (through compilation of the .mdl source code with the MDL compiler). The .mdo files that are used with the Simulator when it is processing a .btr file to create a .trc file, must be the same .mdo files that were in use when the .btr file was originally recorded on the
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. This requirement defines why the conversion from a .btr file to a .trc file is usually done on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch that originated the .btr file.

The interpreter is not used with .so files because those files interact directly with the call engine in the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch; but, the tracer can record a .btr file regardless of whether .mdo or .so files were used to process the call. The Simulator can, however, replay .btr files by using .so files in place of .mdo files. This capability of the Simulator provides a way of ensuring that the .so and .mdo files perform the same way (although .so is faster).

Because .so files do not contain MDO objects, there are no print methods available to the Simulator, so no .trc output is possible. When the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch produces a .btr file by using .so files, the replay in the Simulator must be done with the .mdo files that were used to produce the .so files to produce an accurate .trc file.

Understanding Trace Files

The Simulator utility produces trace files (.trc files), which are text files. Trace files contain detailed line-by-line trace information from the MDO code that was run in the simulation replay that produced the file, thus they contain MDL traces. The get_trc.sh script adds the .trc extension if the source of the trace is a .btr file.

Trace files are source files for the SimPrint (SP) utility. Trace files are text files and can be viewed with a text editor. You should send the .trc file to Cisco TAC if expert analysis is required.

Understanding SimPrint

SimPrint (SP) is a utility for viewing .trc files. SP converts a .trc file into a sequence diagram that shows all of the external and internal events that occur in a .trc file. The sequence diagram is useful for getting an overview of what is occurring in the trace.

The following list defines the terms that are used in the call flow printouts, which the SimPrint tool generates:

LINE—Incoming and outgoing interfaces of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

OCC—Originating Call Control state machine. The call is passed from the incoming interface to a protocol adapter, where it is converted into a generic message signaling unit (MSU) and sent to the OCC for parsing of MSU data to memory.

LCM—Lightspeed Call Model state machine. The LCM is a generic call model, which contains event handlers to process generic call event data. This processing includes generic call analysis, requests for bearer channels, and transfer of the MSU to the appropriate TCC state machine. The LCM is also known as the Universal Call Model (UCM).

ANALYSIS—LCM can perform generic call analysis that is based on the content of the MSU. The LCM exchanges data with the call processing engine to analyze the MSU. After analysis is complete, an available circuit is identified and the LCM sends a bearer channel seizure request message to the CPM state machine.

CPM—Connection Plane Manager state machine. The CPM exchanges data with the call processing engine to seize and prepare a bearer channel for routing of the call data.

CDR—Call Detail Record. CDR information is created because of LCM processing of the MSU.

TRIGGER—Intelligent Network (IN) Trigger state machine. This state machine to sends and receives IN trigger events to the Transfer Capabilities Application Part (TCAP) interface in the I/O channel controller (IOCC). This ability to send and receive IN trigger events enables the tool to send IN messages to a service control point (SCP).

ENGINE—Call processing engine exchanges data with the LCM as generic call analysis is performed on the MSU and a bearer channel is seized and prepared for routing of the call data.

TCC—Terminating Call Control state machine. The TCC changes the call data into a protocol-specific protocol data unit (PDU) and passes the PDU to the terminating IOCC for routing to the outgoing interface.

Alternatives to Call Tracing

Performing call traces to identify problems can be difficult. A trace can gather much data before the error occurs. Traces can negatively affect system performance. The Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software has MML commands that you can use to diagnose problems with hung calls and abnormal call termination. The following sections describe the commands.

Diagnosing Hung Calls

You can print the diagnostic information about hung calls to a file by issuing the prt-call MML command. The contents of the file include all the previous states of the call and a history of occurrences leading up to the call being stuck in its current state.

To print diagnostic information on a hung call, complete the following steps:


Step 1 If the hung call is a SIP-to-SIP call, proceed to Step 3. Otherwise, proceed to Step 2.

Step 2 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and enter the prt-call:sig_path:cic=number [,log="xyz"] command

or

prt-call:sig_path:span=phys, bc=bchan [,log="xyz"]
 
   

Where:

sig_path—Corresponding MML name for any of the following component types:

Signaling path of in-band TDM up to MUX and then time switched to TDM media and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Signaling path of in-band TDM signaling up to CU and then encapsulated and sent over IP to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Signaling path of in-band TDM signaling up to NAS and then converted to NI2 and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch over IP (that is, FE box<-sig/tdm->NAS<-NI2/IP->Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch).

Signaling path or routeset that is associated with an SS7 destination point code.

Signaling path for EISUP.


Note This command allows use of wildcards for the sig_path parameter.


number—Numeric value that identifies the ISUP circuit identification code (CIC) number.

phys—16-bit value that identifies an ISDN/PRI physical cable.

bchan—Numeric value that identifies the non-ISUP bearer channel number. BC is used for non-ISUP trunks. Otherwise, use CIC.

xyz—Optional parameter that names the ASCII log file to which the output of this command is written. The name that is specified for this parameter is prefixed to the actual name of the file, which includes the sig_path name, date, and time. If you do not provide a log filename, a default name consisting of the sig_path name, date, and time is created. The extension of these log files is .prt. The files are located in the $BASEDIR/var/trace directory.

For example, the prt-call:dms100-pc:cic=124 MML command prints call data for a signaling service that is called dms100-pc using a CIC of 124.

Proceed to Step 4.

Step 3 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and enter the prt-call:sig_path:cid="name" [,log="xyz"] command.

Where:

sig_path—MML name for the signaling service that is associated with the SIP-to-SIP call.

name—SIP call identification name. You can obtain this name by issuing the rtrv-sip MML command, as described in the "Retrieving SIP Call Information" section.

xyz—Optional parameter that names the ASCII log file to which the output of this command is written. The name that you specify for this parameter is prefixed to the actual name of the file, which includes the sig_path name, date, and time. If you do not provide a log filename, a default name consisting of the sig_path name, date, and time is created. The extension of these log files is .prt. The files are located in the $BASEDIR/var/trace directory.

For example, the prt-call:sip_svc1:cid="ccdd33ee-423fdedd-55438954-1@172.22.119.215" MML command prints call data for a particular call on a SIP signaling service that is called sip_svc1.

Step 4 Change directories to access the log file by entering the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/var/trace command.

Step 5 Use a text file viewer, such as vi, to view the contents of the log file.


Performing an Abnormal Call Termination Trace

You can print the global variable information from the state machine, and external event information for a call, to a file by issuing the sta-abn-trc MML command. To print this information, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the sta-abn-trc:sig_path|all[,log=xyz] [,prd=n],confirm command:

Where:

sig_path—Corresponding MML name for any of the following component types:

Signaling path of in-band TDM up to MUX and then time switched to TDM media and sent to Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Signaling path of in-band TDM signaling up to CU and then encapsulated and sent over IP to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Signaling path of in-band TDM signaling up to NAS and then converted to NI2 and sent to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch over IP (that is, FE box<-sig/tdm->NAS<-NI2/IP->Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch).

Signaling path or routeset that is associated with SS7 DPC.

Signaling path for EISUP.


Note This command allows wildcards for the sig_path parameter.


all—Indicates that the start trace command applies to the whole Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, in which case only one trace file is generated.

xyz—Name of an ASCII log file to which the output of this command is written. The name that you specify for this parameter prefixes the actual name of the file, which includes the sig_path name, date, and time. If you do not specify a log filename, the command creates a default name consisting of the sig_path name, date. The extension of these log files is .prt. The files are located in the $BASEDIR/var/trace directory.

n—Period, in seconds, for which this trace is enabled, during which time any abnormal calls are traced. If you do not specify this optional parameter, the period defaults to 30 seconds.

For example, the sta-abn-trc:dms100-pc,log=trace1,confirm MML command prints call data for a signaling path that is called dms100-pc to a file named trace1 (because the period parameter, n, is not specified, the trace lasts for the default period, 30 seconds).

Step 2 To change directories, enter the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/var/trace UNIX command.

Step 3 Use a text file viewer, such as vi, to view the contents of the log file.


Stopping an Abnormal Call Termination Trace

You can stop an in-progress abnormal call termination trace by issuing the stp-abn-trc MML command. To stop the trace in progress, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-abn-trc:sig_srv command.

Where:

sig_srv is the MML name for a signaling service on which the abnormal call termination trace is run.

For example, to stop an abnormal call termination trace that is run on a signaling service, which is called ss7srv1, enter the stp-abn-trc:ss7srv1 command.

The system responds with a response like the following:

Media Gateway Controller 2000-05-26 07:02:11
M  COMPLD
"Trace stopped for the following file:
 
   
../var/trace/_20000526070211.abn
"
 
   

To stop all in-progress abnormal call termination traces, log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and enter the stp-abn-trc:all command.

The system returns a response like the following:

Media Gateway Controller 2000-05-26 07:02:11
M  COMPLD
   "ALL:Trace stopped for the following files:
 
   
   ../var/trace/_20000526070211.abn
   "
 
   

Performing a TCAP Trace

To run a TCAP trace on your system, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start the TCAP trace by logging in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, starting an MML session, and entering the sta-tcap-trc command.

The system begins sending TCAP trace messages to the active system logs file.

Step 2 View the active system logs file according to instructions in the "Viewing System Logs" section. Note any TCAP trace messages, such as hex dumps of messages that are sent to the SCCP layer.

Step 3 When the TCAP trace is complete, enter the stp-tcap-trc command to stop the TCAP trace.


Platform Troubleshooting

The following sections contain procedures that pertain to resolving problems with the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch platform:

Verifying Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Ethernet Operation

Deleting Unnecessary Files to Increase Available Disk Space

Recovering from a Switchover Failure

Recovering from Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure

Restoring Stored Configuration Data

Restoring a Backup File from a Device

Configuration Export Failed Because of MMDB

Measurements Are Not Being Generated

Call Detail Records Are Not Being Generated

Resolving a Failed Connection to a Peer

Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters

Diagnosing SNMP Failure

Correcting the System Time

Securing Your Network

TIBCO Interface Not Working

Installing the License File

Replacing a Failed Disk

Verifying Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Ethernet Operation

See the documentation that Sun Microsystems provides for more information on verifying the proper functioning of the Ethernet connections on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Deleting Unnecessary Files to Increase Available Disk Space

You might need to delete call trace files, archived log files, or configurations from your system to increase available disk space on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. The following procedure presents the process for deleting all three file types.


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and enter the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/var/trace and ls UNIX commands to determine whether the affected disk drive contains any call trace files in the /opt/CiscoMGC/var/trace directory.

The system responds with a list of files in the directory. If the command response indicates that there are *.btr and *.trc files in this directory, proceed to Step 2. Otherwise, proceed to Step 4.


Note Do not delete any call trace files that are related to troubleshooting any current system problems.


Step 2 Delete the identified call trace files using the rm -i filename UNIX command.

Where:

filename—Name of the call trace file (either *.btr or *.trc) that you identified for deletion.

Step 3 Repeat Step 2 for each additional call trace file that is identified for deletion.

Step 4 Enter the cd /opt/CiscoMGC/var/spool and ls UNIX commands to view the archived logs in the /opt/CiscoMGC/var/spool directory on the affected disk drive:

The system responds with a list of files in the directory. Review the listed files. If archived log files are listed, which are no longer required, proceed to Step 5. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.


Note If you back up the system software regularly, you can retrieve files that to delete from your backup files. For more information on backing up your system software, see the "Backing Up System Software" section.


Step 5 Delete the identified archived log files using the rm -i filename UNIX command.

Where:

filename—Name of the archived log file you want to delete.

Step 6 Repeat Step 5 for each additional identified archived log file.

Step 7 Use the config-lib viewer to view the contents of the configuration library, according to instructions the "Using the Config-Lib Viewer" section. Determine whether any of the configurations that are listed are no longer necessary for the operation of the system. If you can delete any of the configurations, delete them by using the procedure in the "Using the Config-Lib Viewer" section.


Recovering from a Switchover Failure

Use the procedure in this section to recover from a failed switchover operation. Typically, you would use this procedure when the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is unavailable to process calls and a critical alarm occurs on the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

To recover from a switchover failure, complete the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already collected system data, refer to the method that is described in the "Collecting System Data for Cisco TAC" section.

Step 2 Log in to the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and view the current alarms, as described in the "Retrieving All Active Alarms" section.

Step 3 To identify the critical alarm that caused the switchover attempt, review the alarms that are listed in the response. There should be at least one critical alarm and an alarm indicating that a switchover began and another alarm indicating that the switchover failed.

If only one critical alarm is listed, that alarm caused the switchover attempt.

If more than one critical alarm is listed, compare the timestamp of the critical alarms with the timestamp of the alarm indicating that a switchover began. The critical alarm that occurred before the switchover was begun is the alarm that caused the switchover attempt.

Step 4 See the "Alarm Troubleshooting Procedures" section for descriptions of the steps necessary to resolve the critical alarm that caused the switchover attempt.

Step 5 Log in to the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, start an MML session, and view the current alarms, as described in the "Retrieving All Active Alarms" section.

Step 6 Resolve the listed alarms. See the "Alarm Troubleshooting Procedures" section for the steps that are required to resolve the alarms.

If resolving the alarms does not stabilize the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Transmit a ping from the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch to the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch by issuing the ping standby_addr UNIX command at the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch:

Where:

standby_addr—IP address of the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

If the ping fails, proceed to Step 8. Otherwise, proceed to Step 9.

Step 8 Verify the Ethernet interfaces between the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. See the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system for more information.

If an element of the Ethernet interfaces between the active Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is faulty, replace it. Otherwise, proceed to Step 9. See the Sun Microsystems documentation that came with your system for more information.

If replacing a faulty element resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 9.

Step 9 Verify that the hostname for each Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch is unique. To verify the hostnames, log on as root to each Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and view the contents of the host file in the /etc directory. If a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch does not have a unique hostname, enter
the echo host_name > /etc/host UNIX command.

Where:

host_name—Unique name for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.

Step 10 Verify that the IP address parameters in the XECfgParm.dat file, which are presented in the following list, are set correctly on each host.

*.ipAddrLocalA

*.ipAddrLocalB

*.ipAddrPeerB

*.IP_Addr1

*.IP_Addr2

*.IP_Addr3

*.IP_Addr4

*.Virtual_IP_Addr

If the IP address settings are correct, proceed to Step 11. Otherwise, update the IP address parameters for each host by using the procedure in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

If updating the IP address parameters resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 11.

Step 11 Verify that the settings for the foverd parameters, which are presented in the following list, are set correctly in the XECfgParm.dat file on each host.

foverd.conn1Type         = socket
foverd.ipLocalPortA      = 1051
foverd.ipPeerPortA       = 1052
foverd.conn2Type         = socket
foverd.ipLocalPortB      = 1053
foverd.ipPeerPortB       = 1054
foverd.conn3Type         = serial
foverd.conn3Addr         = /dev/null
foverd.abswitchPort      = (/dev/null)
foverd.heartbeatInterval = 1000
 
   

If the foverd settings are correct, proceed to Step 12. Otherwise, update the foverd settings in the XECfgParm.dat files using the procedure in the "Rebooting Software to Modify Configuration Parameters" section.

If updating the foverd settings resolves the problem, the procedure is complete. Otherwise, proceed to Step 12.

Step 12 Contact the Cisco TAC to analyze the problem further and to determine a solution. For more information about contacting the Cisco TAC, see the "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section.


Recovering from Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure

Some situations, such as a replacement of a failed disk drive, natural or man-made disaster, or software corruption, require you to recover the software configuration data for a failed Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch (for example, if the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software is corrupted or you have replaced a failed disk drive).


Note In these procedures, it is assumed that backup operations have been performed regularly on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. For more information on backing up the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, see the "Backing Up System Software" section.



Note Successful recovery from a natural or man-made disaster depends upon advanced planning for a possible disaster. See the "Creating a Disaster Recovery Plan" section for more information.


The following sections contain the procedures that describe how to recover from Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch failure:

Recovering from a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure in a Simplex System

Recovering from a Single Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure in a Continuous Service System

Recovering from a Dual Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure in a Continuous Service System

Recovering from a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Failure in a Simplex System

To recover from a Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch failure in a system that is equipped with only one Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Reload the Solaris 10 operating system on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the
Installing the Sun Solaris 10 Operating System chapter of
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9 Software Installation and Configuration Guide.

Step 2 Reload the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software on the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch, as described in the Installing the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software chapter of
Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Release 9.8 Software Installation and Configuration Guide.

Step 3 Restore the configuration of the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch from the latest backup file, as described in the "Restoring Stored Configuration Data" section.


Note If backup files are stored on a remote server, a network administrator must re-establish the path between the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch and the server that stores the backups.



Note Any changes that you made to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch system subsequent to your last backup are lost.


Step 4 Start the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software, as described in the "Starting the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Software" section.

Recovering from a DiskSuite Failure on the Opteron Platform

To recover from a DiskSuite failure on the Opteron platform, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Shut down the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. See "Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Shutdown Procedure" section.

Step 2 Remove the damaged disk, for example, Disk 1.

Step 3 Boot up the system from Disk 2.
The system enters the maintenance mode automatically.

Step 4 Enter the metadb -d c0t2d0s4 command and press Enter to delete state database replicas of the damaged disk.


Note In the preceding command example, the last parameter is the device ID of the damaged disk. In this example, the device ID for the damaged disk is c0t2d0s4. You can use the metadb command to get the device ID of the damaged disk, which is marked as unknown.


Step 5 Plug in a new disk to replace the damaged Disk 1 in the slot for Disk 1.

Step 6 Enter the reboot -- -r command and press Enter.


Note Change the boot sequence in the bios settings. Ensure that the system boots from Disk 2 rather than the newly inserted disk. The system enters the maintenance mode automatically.


Step 7 Enter the format command in the console and press Enter.

Step 8 Enter 1 to select Disk 2.

Step 9 Enter the partition command in the console and press Enter to enter the partition menu.

Step 10 Enter the name command to name the current partition table.

Step 11 Enter cisco for the current partition table name.

Step 12 Enter the quit command and press Enter.

Step 13 Enter the save command and press Enter.
The new disk partition definitions are saved to the default file ./format.dat.

Step 14 Enter the quit command and press Enter.

Step 15 Enter the format -x ./format.dat command and press Enter.

Step 16 Enter