Cisco Customer Voice Portal (CVP) Release 3.1 Solution Reference Network Design (SRND)
Index
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Index

Table Of Contents

A - B - C - D - F - G - H - I - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - V - W -

Index

A

alternate endpoints 5-11

application server

call disposition 5-8, 5-9

configuration 5-8

Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) 2-6

call disposition 5-18

configuration 5-17

server 5-17

B

bandwidth

for ASR/TTS 8-5

for H.323 Signaling 8-5

for media file retrieval 8-5

for voice traffic 8-6

for VoiceXML Documents 8-4

provisioning 8-1

sizing 8-4

C

caching on IOS

configuration 14-2

Call Admission Control (CAC) 6-2, 8-6

call control traffic 8-2

call disposition

failures 5-6

voice browser 5-8

call flows 10-2

ICM Outbound with Transfer to IVR 10-2

internal Help Desk 10-2

warm consultative transfer 10-2

call flows (protocol) 10-3

for Model #1, Standalone Self Service 10-3

for Model #2, CVP Call Control 10-3

for Model #3a, CVP Call Control with Queue and Collect 10-4

for Model #3b, CVP Call Control with Queue and Self Service 10-6

CallManager

and ACD Originated Calls 9-11

and high availability 5-18

call disposition 5-18

configuration 5-18

H323 signaling flow 6-4

optional component 2-7

calls

from CallManager 10-1

survivability 6-1

transfer options 7-1

call transfers

Hook flash and Wink 7-2

Intelligent Network (IN) Release Trunk 7-4

release trunk 7-1

Takeback-N-Transfer (TNT) 7-2

Two B Channel Transfer (TBCT) 7-3

components

of CVP 2-1

Content Services Switch (CSS) 2-5, 5-12

call disposition 5-13

core components of CVP 2-2

CSS 2-5

Customer Voice Portal (see CVP)

CVP

Application Server 5-8

as Intelligent Peripheral IVR 9-3, 9-4

as Service Node IVR 9-2

call disposition with microapplications 5-14

call server 4-2

components 2-1

configuring microapplications 5-14

deployment models and networkVRU types 9-4

features 1-1

Network Architecture 8-2

overview 1-1

Studio 2-5

Voice Browser 5-6

VoiceXML Server 2-5, 5-15

D

data traffic 8-4

deployment implications 10-6

for CallManager Configuration 10-7

for CVP Call Control Servers 10-7

for gateways 10-7

for hosted implementations 10-6

for ICM Configuration 10-6

for MTP resources 10-8

for network level 10-7

for sizing 10-7

deployment models 3-1

Model #1. Standalone Self Service 3-1

Model #2, CVP Call Control 3-5

Model #3a, CVP Call Control with Queue and Collect 3-9

Model #3b, CVP Call Control with Queue and Self Service 3-14

Model #4, NIC-based Call Control with CVP Queue, Collect and Self Service 3-17

F

features of CVP 1-1

G

G.711 Media Burst

blocking 8-7

gatekeeper

alternate configuration 5-6

call disposition 5-6

configuration 5-5

H.323 6-5

high availaility 5-4

HSRP 5-4

HSRP configuration 5-5

in distributed deployment 6-2

overview 2-4

sizing 4-3, 4-6

gateways

and TDM Interfaces 12-2

MGCP 4-6

options 12-1

originating 5-3

overview 2-3

PSTN 12-1

sizing 4-3

VoiceXML 5-10

VoiceXML & PSTN 12-1

VoiceXML with DTMF or ASR/TTS 12-1

GED-125 8-3

GKTMP

and ICM 11-1

applications 11-2

call flow 11-3

deployment implications 11-4

Gatekeeper Transaction Message Protocol NIC 11-1

glossary GL-1

H

H.323 8-2

high availability 5-1

gatekeeper 5-4

layer 2 switch 5-2

history of revisions xiii

Hook flash and Wink 7-2

hosted implementations 9-7

Hosted IPCC 2-7

Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) 2-4

how to use this document xiv

HSRP 2-4, 5-4, 5-5

alternate gatekeeper 5-5

I

ICM 2-7, 9-1

ICM Central Controller 8-3

Intelligent Contact Management (ICM) 2-7, 5-19

configuration 5-19

disposition 5-19

interacting with 9-1

network VRU types 9-1

Intelligent Network (IN) Release Trunk Transfers 7-4

IPCC

current release xiii

Hosted 2-7

IP infastructure 8-1

L

Layer 2 Switch 5-2

licensing 15-1

ASR/TTS 15-3

CVP 15-1

enforcement 15-3

gateways 15-4

redundant licenses 15-2

regular ports 15-1

regular servers 15-2

M

media files 14-1

Media Gateway Controller (MGC) 2-5

media server 2-6, 5-14

configuration 5-14

MGC 2-5

monitoring

end-to-end call tracking 16-2

real-time 16-1

statistical 16-2

MRCP 8-3

multilanguage support 13-2

N

network level considerations 8-1

network security

using firewalls 8-8

networkVRU types 9-1

and CVP deployment models 9-4

in a Hosted environment 9-10

O

organization of this document xiv

originating gateway 5-3

call disposition 5-4

configuration 5-3

P

PGW Softswitch 2-5

prompt management

best practices 14-2

protocols

HSRP 2-4

SS7 2-5

Q

QoS 8-7

R

RAS 2-5

releases of software xiii

release trunk transfers 7-1

Remote Access Service (RAS) 2-5

reporting

on CVP VoiceXML data 16-3

on ICM data 16-3

revision history xiii

RSVP 6-5, 8-6

S

SDDSN 2-5

servers

for media 2-6

for VoiceXML 2-5

service creation environment 2-5

Signaling System 7 (SS7) 2-5

sizing

CVP call server 4-2

gatekeeper 4-3, 4-6

gateways 4-3

overview 4-1

VoiceXML server 4-3

software versions xiii

SS7 2-5

Standalone Distributed Diagnostics and Services Network (SDDSN) 2-5, 5-19

call disposition 5-20

configuration 5-20

T

Takeback-N-Transfer (TNT) 7-2

TDM interfaces 12-2

Text-To-Speech (TTS) 2-6

Text-to-Speech (TTS)

call disposition 5-18

configuration 5-17

server 5-17

Third Party VRU's 9-12

TTS 2-6

Two B Channel Transfer (TBCT) 7-3

V

versions of software xiii

voice browser

call disposition 5-8

configuration 5-7

Voice eXtensible Markup Language (see VoiceXML)

voice traffic 8-2

VoiceXML

CVP Studio installation location 13-3

described 1-2

multilanguage support 13-2

over HTTP 13-1

server 2-5, 4-3

server design implications 13-1

web appllication server differences 13-2

VoiceXML gateways 5-10

alternate endpoints 5-11

call disposition 5-12

configuration 5-10

content services switch (CSS) 5-12

hardware configuration 5-12

VoiceXML server

call disposition 5-16

configuration 5-15

W

W3C 2-6

World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) 2-6