Deployment Guide for Cisco Unified Presence Release 8.6
Planning a Cisco Unified Presence Multi-Node Deployment
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Planning a Cisco Unified Presence Multi-Node Deployment

Table Of Contents

Planning a Cisco Unified Presence Multi-Node Deployment

About the Multi-Node Scalability Feature

Scalability Enhancements

Scalability Examples

Multi-Node Hardware Recommendations (moved up from further down in chapter)

Supported Cisco End Points

Third-Party Integrations

IM-Only Deployment

Performance Recommendations

High Availability Deployments

Subclusters

Active/Standby User Assignment Redundant High Availability Deployment

User Assignment

High Availability for Cisco Unified Personal Communicator 7.x and 8.x Clients

Cisco Unified Personal Communicator Sign-In and Redirect

Clustering over WAN

About the Multi-Node Deployment Models

Balanced User Assignment Redundant High Availability Deployment

Scalability Options for Your Deployment

Cluster-Wide DNS SRV

About Clustering over WAN Deployments

WAN Bandwidth requirements

Intracluster Deployments over WAN

Local Failover

Subcluster Failure Detection

Method Event Routing

Multi-Node Configuration for Deployment over WAN

External Database Recommendations

Intercluster Deployments over WAN


Planning a Cisco Unified Presence Multi-Node Deployment


July 5, 2013

About the Multi-Node Scalability Feature

About the Multi-Node Deployment Models

Scalability Options for Your Deployment

Cluster-Wide DNS SRV

About Clustering over WAN Deployments

About Clustering over WAN Deployments

About the Multi-Node Scalability Feature

Scalability Enhancements

Multi-Node Hardware Recommendations (moved up from further down in chapter)

IM-Only Deployment

Performance Recommendations

High Availability Deployments

Subclusters

User Assignment

High Availability for Cisco Unified Personal Communicator 7.x and 8.x Clients

Cisco Unified Personal Communicator Sign-In and Redirect

Clustering over WAN

Scalability Enhancements

The Cisco Unified Presence multi-node scalability feature supports the following:

Maximum of six nodes per cluster

In an IM-only deployment, 25,000 users per node

45, 000 users per cluster with maximum of 15, 000 users per node in a full Unified Communication mode deployment

Administrable customer-defined limit on the maximum contacts per user (default unlimited).

Cisco Unified Presence continues to support intercluster deployments with the multi-node feature.

With High Availability enabled, subclusters include active nodes and standby nodes, whereby the standard node takes over when the active node goes down.

Scalability Examples

Single Cisco Unified Communications Manager without Cisco Unified Presence

Scalability:

4,000 users that can scale to 13,000 users

Single Cisco Unified Communications Manager cluster

High availability not needed

Hardware:

Cisco MCS 7845 servers

Deployment:

Three single-server subclusters using User Assignment Mode = balanced

Two Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters without Cisco Unified Presence

Scalability:

11,000 users that can scale to 24,000 users

Two Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters

High availability is not needed

Hardware:

Cisco MCS 7845 servers

Deployment:

Two Cisco Unified Presence clusters (one per Cisco Unified Communications Manager cluster), each with three subclusters with one server using User Assignment Mode = balanced

Single Cisco Unified Communications Manager with Cisco Unified Presence

Scalability:

500 users that can scale to 2500 users

Single Cisco Unified Communications Manager cluster

High availability is required

Hardware:

Cisco MCS 7835 servers

Deployment:

One 2-server subcluster using User Assignment Mode = balanced

Multiple Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters with Cisco Unified Presence

Scalability:

5,000 users that can scale to 40,000 users

Multiple Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters

High Availability is required

Hardware

Cisco MCS 7845 servers

Deployment:

Multiple Cisco Unified Presence clusters must be set up with intercluster peers between each cluster. Start with a single two-server subcluster, with up to 5000 users for each cluster prior to adding additional subclusters within existing Cisco Unified Presence clusters. With a large number of users within a single Cisco Unified Presence cluster, the User Assignment Mode service parameter to use is dictated by the system administrator. If the desire is to monitor a single server per subcluster, Active/Standby mode might be preferred; if equal user distribution is desired, then Active/Active mode might be preferred.

Multi-Node Hardware Recommendations (moved up from further down in chapter)

When configuring the multi-node feature, consider the following:

We recommend turning on High Availability in your deployment.

Minimize your hardware, for example, instead of using six MCS 7825 servers that support a total of six thousand users, choose two MCS 7835 servers that can support a total of five thousand users.

Use the same generation of server hardware.

Use similar hardware for all nodes in your deployment. If you must mix generations of similar hardware, put the same generations of older hardware together in a subcluster and put fewer users on this subcluster than on the more powerful subclusters. Note that we do not recommend this deployment practice.


Warning For multi-node deployments using mixed hardware (for example, UCS, MCS, or VMware), it is highly recommended that the subscriber and publisher nodes in the same subcluster have similar database size. If a significant difference in database size exists between the two nodes, you will receive an error during installation of the subscriber node.

Use the following disk drives for the multi-node feature:

MCS 7816: minimum one 160GB drive (a 250GB drive can also be used)

MCS 7825: minimum two 160GB drives (two 250GB drives can also be used, upgrade required from smaller 80GB drives)

MCS 7835: minimum two 146GB drives (upgrade required from smaller 72GB drives)

MCS 7845: minimum four 72GB drives (upgrade recommended to four 146GB drives)


Note The MCS 7845 with four 72GB drives can run the scalability feature, but this hardware with four 146GB drives is preferred.


If you have older-generation hardware, follow the disk drive upgrade recommendations above. You must meet the minimal disk capacity on each server in the cluster in order to achieve scale.


Note Upgrading drives will allow you to use older hardware in a multi-node cluster. However, we recommend that you use the latest hardware available for the multi-node feature because this hardware has more powerful CPU, more memory and faster input/output processing.


Related Topic

For a list of the supported hardware for the multi-node feature, and hardware user assignment guidelines for the multi-node feature, see the Cisco Unified Presence compatibility matrices at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6837/products_device_support_tables_list.html

Supported Cisco End Points

The multi-node scalability feature supports the following Cisco end points:

Cisco Unified Communications Manager (desk phone)

Cisco Unified Personal Communicator Release 8.x (XMPP client)

Cisco Unified Personal Communicator Release 7.x (SIP client)

Third-Party XMPP clients

Cisco Jabber

Third-Party Integrations

This guide only details how to configure a basic Cisco Unified Presence deployment. For third-party integrations, see the documents below.

Third Party Integration
This Guide Describes...

Integrating Cisco Unified Presence with Microsoft Exchange

Integrating with Microsoft Exchange 2003, 2007 and 2010

Configuring Microsoft Active Directory for this integration

Integrating Cisco Unified Presence with Microsoft OCS/LCS for MOC Call Control

Configuring Cisco Unified Presence as a CSTA gateway for remote call control from the Microsoft Office Communicator client

Configuring Microsoft Active Directory for this integration

Load-balancing MOC requests in a dual node Cisco Unified Presence deployment over TCP

Load-balancing MOC requests in a dual node Cisco Unified Presence deployment over TLS

Integrating Cisco Unified Presence for Interdomain Federation

Configuring Cisco Unified Presence for interdomain federation over the SIP protocol with Microsoft OCS and AOL, and over the XMPP protocol with IBM Sametime, Googletalk, WebEx Connect, and another Cisco Unified Presence Release 8.x enterprise.

Integration Guide for Configuring Cisco Unified Presence with Microsoft Lync Server 2010 for Remote Call Control

Need description


Microsoft Office Communicator (Microsoft soft client)

Lotus Sametime (Lotus soft client)

Third-Party Interface clients

Lync 2010 Client (Microsoft Office Communicator client)

IM-Only Deployment

Cisco Unified Presence supports an IM-only deployment. This type of deployment supports up to 25, 000 users per node and up to 75, 000 users in a Cisco Unified Presence cluster.

Related Topic

Configuring a Basic IM-Only Deployment

Performance Recommendations

You can achieve optimum performance with the multi-node feature when:

The resources on all Cisco Unified Presence servers are equivalent in terms of memory, disk size, and age. Mixing hardware classes results in servers that are under-powered, therefore resulting in poor performance.

You deploy hardware that complies with the hardware recommendations.

You configure a Balanced Mode deployment model. In this case, the total number of users is equally divided across all nodes in all subclusters. Cisco Unified Presence defaults to Balanced Mode user assignment to achieve optimum performance.

Related Topics

About Clustering over WAN Deployments

Balanced User Assignment Redundant High Availability Deployment

High Availability Deployments

Cisco Unified Presence Release 8.5 (x) and later releases support High Availability deployments. Any earlier Cisco Unified Presence 8.0(x) releases do not support High Availability deployments.

We recommend that you configure your Cisco Unified Presence deployments as High Availability deployments. Although mixed mode deployments are permitted, for example High Availability subclusters and non High Availability subclusters in a single deployment, we do not recommend this configuration.

You must manually turn on High Availability in a subcluster. You can achieve a High Availability deployment by configuring the Balanced Mode (Redundant High Availability) or the Active/Standby Redundant High Availability deployment models, and turning on High Availability in your deployment.

Related Topics

Subclusters

Balanced User Assignment Redundant High Availability Deployment

Scalability Options for Your Deployment

Subclusters

The multi-node feature introduces the concept of a subcluster. A subcluster is a single Cisco Unified Presence server, or a pair of Cisco Unified Presence servers, where each node has an independent database and set of users operating with a shared availability database that is able to support common users.

In a single-node deployment within a subcluster, there is no High Availability failover protection for users assigned to the node. In a dual-node deployment within a subcluster, if you turn on High Availability in the subcluster, users have failover protection; each node acts as a backup for the other node allowing clients to fail over in case of outages of components or nodes. When you turn on High Availability in a subcluster, all users in the subcluster have redundancy and full failover capabilities.

Related Topics

About High Availability Cisco Unified Presence Deployments

Creating Subclusters in System Topology

Active/Standby User Assignment Redundant High Availability Deployment

For this deployment model, assign all your users to the primary Cisco Unified Presence node, and none to the backup node. When you turn on High Availability in the subcluster, the backup node can handle all traffic from the primary node if the primary node fails.

See Figure 6-1 for an example configuration for this deployment model on system topology management GUI. In this example, there are 15,000 users in total, so 5000 users are assigned to the first node of each subcluster.

Figure 6-1 Active/Standby User Assignment High Availability Deployment

Related Topics

How to Configure the Cluster Topology on Cisco Unified Presence

User Redistribution

User Assignment Mode Recommendations

Scalability Options for Your Deployment

How To Configure High Availability Cisco Unified Presence Deployments

For the hardware user assignment guidelines for the multi-node feature, see the Cisco Unified Presence compatibility matrices at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6837/products_device_support_tables_list.html

User Assignment

To allow users receive the availability and Instant Messaging (IM) services on Cisco Unified Presence, you must assign users to nodes, and subclusters, in your Cisco Unified Presence deployment. You can manually or automatically assign users in a Cisco Unified Presence deployment. You manage user assignment using the User Assignment Mode parameter on the Sync Agent on Cisco Unified Presence.

If you select automatic user assignment, the Sync Agent assigns the users to all nodes in all subclusters in an attempt to balance the user assignment evenly across all nodes. You can also configure the Sync Agent to assign the total number of users to only the first (active) node of an subcluster.

If you select manual user assignment, you must manually assign your users to nodes, and subclusters, using the System Topology interface in Cisco Unified Presence Administration.

Related Topics

About the Multi-Node Deployment Models

User Assignment Mode Recommendations

Configuring User Assignment in System Topology

High Availability for Cisco Unified Personal Communicator 7.x and 8.x Clients

Cisco Unified Presence provides server-side failback, which uses the same throttle mechanism as server failover. This feature detects when a failed Cisco Unified Presence server in a High Availability deployment comes back in service. It then sends terminating notify messages to Cisco Unified Personal Communicator clients that are failed over to initiate failback to their home node. Also, if a user is moved between nodes in the subcluster, the Cisco Unified Presence server sends terminating notify messages, and the client will sign out and sign in to the new node. To balance the load between two nodes in the subcluster, you can assign the users equally in each node.

Cisco Unified Personal Communicator Sign-In and Redirect

Cisco Unified Presence supports the ability to redirect a Cisco Unified Personal Communicator client application to the Cisco Unified Presence node to which the user is assigned (home node). The redirect feature is supported in intracluster and intercluster deployments. In both types of deployments, redirect occurs automatically when the client application signs in. After the user successfully signs in to the home node, Cisco Unified Personal Communicator caches the server name. As a result, redirect happens only once, unless a user is reassigned.

Using Figure 6-2 as a reference, see the following examples to gain a better understanding of the various redirect scenarios. In Figure 6-2, Cluster1 is assumed to be a Cisco Unified Presence Release 8.6 cluster and Cluster2 is a 7.x or 8.x cluster.

Figure 6-2 Intercluster and Intracluster Redirect Diagram

In the preceding figure, Cluster1 has three nodes, a publisher (C1Node1) and two subscribers (C1Node2 and C1Node3) and has an intercluster peer relationship with Cluster2, which contains a publisher (C2Node1) and subscriber (C2Node2). Several different redirect scenarios are possible:

1. A Cisco Unified Personal Communicator user is assigned C1Node1 as a home node and attempts to sign in to C1Node2. C1Node2 automatically redirects the Cisco Unified Personal Communicator client to C1Node1. In this scenario, High Availability is disabled in Subcluster1. If High Availability is enabled in Subcluster1, C1Node2 will process the login request. There is no redirect.

2. A Cisco Unified Personal Communicator user is assigned C1Node3 as a home node and attempts to sign in to C1Node1 or C1Node2. Regardless of whether High Availability is enabled in Subcluster1, C1Node1 or C1Node2 redirects the Cisco Unified Personal Communicator client to C1Node3. High Availability rules do not apply here because C1Node3 is part of Subcluster2.

3. A Cisco Unified Personal Communicator user is assigned C2Node1 or C2Node2 as a home node and attempts to sign in to C1Node1, C1Node2, or C1Node3. C1Node1, C1Node2, or C1Node3 automatically redirects the Cisco Unified Personal Communicator client its home node.


Note For more information about establishing intercluster peer relationships and syncing users, see Configuring a Cisco Unified Presence Intercluster Deployment.


Related Topic

AXL/SOAP Interface

Clustering over WAN

Cisco Unified Presence Release 8.5(x) or later releases support Clustering over WAN deployments. Any earlier Cisco Unified Presence 8.0(x) releases do not support Clustering over WAN.

Related Topic

About Clustering over WAN Deployments

About the Multi-Node Deployment Models

You need to consider how you are going to deploy the multi-node feature in your network. You configure your desired multi-node deployment model in system topology management GUI in Cisco Unified Presence Administration. Select System > Cluster Topology in Cisco Unified Presence Administration to access system topology management GUI.

This module provides an overview of the deployment model options for the multi-node feature, and provides examples of these deployments on system topology management GUI.

You only use system topology management GUI to configure your local Cisco Unified Presence cluster. See the intercluster peer module for information about configuring intercluster peer relationships with remote Cisco Unified Presence clusters.


Note The High Availability deployment models described in this module are only applicable to Cisco Unified Presence Release 8.5.x or later releases.


Balanced User Assignment Redundant High Availability Deployment

Scalability Options for Your Deployment

Balanced User Assignment Redundant High Availability Deployment

You can achieve a balanced mode High Availability deployment by evenly balancing users across all nodes in the subcluster, but only using up to 35% of the CPU of each Cisco Unified Presence server.

The balanced mode High Availability deployment option in a redundant mode supports up to fifteen thousand users per cluster. For example, if you have six Cisco Unified Presence nodes in your deployment, and fifteen thousand users, you assign 2.5 thousand users to each Cisco Unified Presence node.

When you use the balanced mode High Availability deployment option in a redundant mode, as compared to a non-redundant mode, only half the number of users are assigned to each node. However, if one node fails, the other node will handle the full load of the additional 50% of users in the subcluster, even at peak traffic. In order to support this failover protection, you must turn on High Availability in each of the subclusters in your deployment.

See Figure 6-3 for an example of this deployment model on system topology management GUI. In this example, there are 15,000 users in total, so 2500 users are evenly balanced across the six nodes.

Figure 6-3 Balanced User Assignment Non- Redundant High Availability Deployment

Related Topics

How to Configure the Cluster Topology on Cisco Unified Presence

User Assignment Mode Recommendations

Scalability Options for Your Deployment

How To Configure High Availability Cisco Unified Presence Deployments

For the hardware user assignment guidelines for the multi-node feature, see the Cisco Unified Presence compatibility matrices at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6837/products_device_support_tables_list.html

Scalability Options for Your Deployment

Cisco Unified Presence clusters can support up to six nodes. If you originally installed less than six nodes, then you can install additional nodes at any time. If you want to scale your Cisco Unified Presence deployment to support more users, you must consider the multi-node deployment model you have configured. Table 6-1 describes the scalability options for each multi-node deployment model.

Table 6-1 Multi-node Scalability Options

Deployment Mode
Scalability Option
Add a New Node to an Existing Subcluster
Add a New Node to a New Subcluster

Balanced Non-Redundant High Availability Deployment

If you add a new node to an existing subcluster, the new node can support the same number of users as the existing node; the subcluster can now support twice the number of users. It also provides balanced High Availability for the users on the existing node and the new node in that subcluster.

If you add a new node to a new subcluster, you can support more users in your deployment.

This does not provide balanced High Availability for the users in the subcluster. To provide balanced High Availability, you must add a second node to the subcluster.

Balanced Redundant High Availability Deployment

If you add a new node to an existing subcluster, the new node can support the same number of users as the existing node; the subcluster can now support twice the number of users. It also provides balanced redundant High Availability for the users on the existing node and the new node in that subcluster.


Note You may have to reassign your users within the subcluster, depending how many users were on the existing node.


If you add a new node to a new subcluster, you can support more users in your deployment.

This does not provide balanced High Availability for the users in the subcluster. To provide balanced High Availability, you must add a second node to the subcluster.

Active/Standby Redundant High Availability Deployment

If you add a new node to an existing subcluster, you provide High Availability for the users in the existing node in the subcluster. This provides a High Availability enhancement only; it does not increase the number of users you can support in your deployment.

If you add a new node in a new subcluster, you can support more users in your deployment.

This does not provide High Availability for the users in the subcluster. To provide High Availability, you must add a second node to the subcluster.


Related Topics

About the Multi-Node Deployment Models

Expanding the Cluster

Cluster-Wide DNS SRV

For DNS configuration, you can define a cluster-wide Cisco Unified Presence address. The SIP Publish Trunk on Cisco Unified Communications Manager uses this address to load-balance SIP PUBLISH messages from Cisco Unified Communications Manager to all nodes in the Cisco Unified Presence cluster. Notably this configuration ensures that the initial SIP PUBLISH messages are load-balanced across all nodes in the Cisco Unified Presence cluster. This configuration also provides a High Availability deployment as, in the event of a node failing, Cisco Unified Communications Manager will route the SIP PUBLISH messages to the remaining nodes.

The cluster-wide DNS configuration is not a required configuration. It is a suggested configuration that provides a method to load-balance the initial SIP PUBLISH messages across all nodes in the Cisco Unified Presence cluster. Cisco Unified Presence sends subsequent SIP PUBLISH messages for each device to the node where the user is homed on Cisco Unified Presence.

Related Topic

Configuring a Cluster-Wide Cisco Unified Presence Address

About Clustering over WAN Deployments

Cisco Unified Presence supports Clustering over WAN for intracluster and intercluster deployments.

WAN Bandwidth requirements

Intracluster Deployments over WAN

Local Failover

Subcluster Failure Detection

Method Event Routing

Multi-Node Configuration for Deployment over WAN

External Database Recommendations

Intercluster Deployments over WAN

WAN Bandwidth requirements

At a minimum, you must dedicate five megabits per second of bandwidth for each Cisco Unified Presence subcluster, with no more than an eighty millisecond round-trip latency. These bandwidth recommendations apply to both intracluster and intercluster WAN deployments. Any bandwidth less than this recommendation can adversely impact performance.


Note Each Cisco Unified Presence subcluster that you add to your Clustering over WAN deployment requires an additional (dedicated) five megabits per second bandwidth.


When you calculate the bandwidth requirements for your Clustering over WAN deployment, consider the following:

In your bandwidth considerations, you must include the normal bandwidth consumption of a Cisco Unified Communications Manager cluster. If you configure multiple nodes, Cisco Unified Communications Manager uses a round-robin mechanism to load balance SIP/SIMPLE messages, which consumes more bandwidth. To improve performance and decrease traffic, you could provision a single dedicated Cisco Unified Communications Manager node for all SIP/SIMPLE messages sent between Cisco Unified Presence and Cisco Unified Communications Manager.

In your bandwidth considerations, we also recommend that you consider the number of contacts in the contact list for a Cisco Unified Personal Communicator user, and the size of user profiles on Cisco Unified Presence. See the Cisco Unified Presence SRND for recommendations regarding the size of a contact list when you deploy Cisco Unified Presence over WAN. Note also that the default contact list size on Cisco Unified Presence is 200, so you need to factor this in to your bandwidth considerations for systems with large numbers of users.

Related Topic

Cisco Unified Presence Solution Reference Network Design (SRND):

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/srnd/7x/uc7_0.html

Intracluster Deployments over WAN

Cisco Unified Presence supports intracluster deployments over WAN, using the bandwidth recommendations provided in this module. Cisco Unified Presence supports a single subcluster geographically split over WAN, where one node in the subcluster is in one geographic site and the second node in the subcluster is in another geographic location.

This model can provide geographical redundancy and remote failover, for example failover to a backup Cisco Unified Presence node on a remote site. With this model, the Cisco Unified Presence server does not need to be co-located with the Cisco Unified Communications Manager publisher server. The Cisco Unified Personal Communicator client can be either local or remote to the Cisco Unified Presence server.

This model also supports High Availability for the Cisco Unified Personal Communicator Release clients, where the clients fail over to the remote peer Cisco Unified Presence node if the services or hardware fails on the home Cisco Unified Presence node. When the failed node comes online again, the clients automatically reconnect to the home Cisco Unified Presence node.

When you deploy Cisco Unified Presence over WAN with remote failover, note the following restrictions:

This model only supports High Availability at the system level. Certain Cisco Unified Presence components may still have a single point of failure. These components are the Cisco UP Sync Agent, Cisco Intercluster Sync Agent, and Cisco Unified Presence Administration interface.

This model supports High Availability for the Cisco Unified Personal Communicator Release 7.x and Cisco Unified Personal Communicator Releases 8.5 and 8.6.

Cisco Unified Presence also supports multiple subclusters in a Clustering over WAN deployment. For information about scale for a Clustering over WAN deployment, see the Cisco Unified Presence SRND.

Related Topic

Cisco Unified Presence Solution Reference Network Design (SRND):

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/srnd/7x/uc7_0.html

Local Failover

You can also deploy Cisco Unified Presence over WAN where one subcluster is located in one geographic site, and a second subcluster is located in another geographic site. The subcluster can contain a single node, or a dual node for High Availability between the local nodes. This model provides no failover between geographic sites.

Subcluster Failure Detection

Cisco Unified Presence supports a failure detection mechanism for a subcluster. Each node in the subcluster monitors the status, or heartbeat, of the peer node. You can configure the heartbeat connection and heartbeat intervals on Cisco Unified Presence by selecting Cisco Unified Presence Administration > System > Service Parameters > Cisco UP Config Agent (service). In the section General Cisco UP Config Agent Parameters (Clusterwide), configure the following parameters:

Heart Beat Interval: This parameter specifies how often in seconds the Cisco UP Config Agent sends a heartbeat message to the peer Cisco UP Config Agent in the same subcluster. The heartbeat is used to determine network availability. The default value is 60 seconds.

Connect Timeout: This parameter specifies how long in seconds the Cisco UP Config Agent waits to receive a response from a connection request to the peer Cisco UP Config Agent. The default value is 30 seconds.


Note We recommend that you configure these parameters with the default values.


Method Event Routing

When you deploy Cisco Unified Presence over WAN we recommend that you configure TCP method event routing on Cisco Unified Presence. Select Cisco Unified Presence Administration > Presence > Routing > Method/Event Routing to configure method event routes.

Multi-Node Configuration for Deployment over WAN

When you configure the Cisco Unified Presence multi-node feature for an intracluster deployment over WAN, configure the Cisco Unified Presence subcluster, nodes and user assignment as described in the multi-node section, but note the following recommendations:

For optimum performance, we recommend that you assign the majority of your users to the home Cisco Unified Presence node. This deployment model decreases the volume of messages sent to the remote Cisco Unified Presence server over WAN, however the failover time to the secondary node depends on the number of users failing over.

If you wish to configure a High Availability deployment model over WAN, you can configure a subcluster-wide DNS SRV address. In this case Cisco Unified Presence sends the initial PUBLISH request message to the node specified by DNS SRV and the response message indicates the host node for the user. Cisco Unified Presence then sends all subsequent PUBLISH messages for that user to the host node. Before configuring this High Availability deployment model, you must consider if you have sufficient bandwidth for the potential volume of messages that may be sent over the WAN.

Related Topics

Intracluster Deployments over WAN

Performing a Cisco Unified Presence Multi-Node Deployment

Cisco Unified Presence Solution Reference Network Design (SRND):

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/srnd/7x/uc7_0.html

External Database Recommendations

If you configure external database server(s) in your Clustering over WAN deployment, we recommend that you co-locate the external database server(s) with the Cisco Unified Presence servers that will use the external database server(s).

Related Topic

Database Setup Guide for Cisco Unified Presence

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6837/products_installation_and_configuration_guides_list.html

Intercluster Deployments over WAN

Cisco Unified Presence supports intercluster deployments over WAN, using the bandwidth recommendations provided in this module. This bandwidth is during database sync.

Related Topics

WAN Bandwidth requirements

Configuring a Cisco Unified Presence Intercluster Deployment