Cisco Unified Communications Manager System Guide, Release 6.1(1)
Understanding Cisco Unified Communications Manager Trunk Types
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Understanding Cisco Unified Communications Manager Trunk Types

Table Of Contents

Understanding Cisco Unified Communications Manager Trunk Types

Cisco Unified Communications Manager Trunk Configuration

Trunks and Gatekeepers in Cisco Unified Communications Manager

Gatekeeper-Controlled Trunks

Non-Gatekeeper-Controlled Trunks

Trunk Types in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration

H.225 Trunk (Gatekeeper Controlled)

Intercluster Trunk (Gatekeeper Controlled)

Intercluster Trunk (Non-Gatekeeper Controlled)

SIP Trunk

Transferring Calls Between Trunks

Configuring Transfer Capabilities Using Trunk Configuration

Configuring Transfer Capabilities by Using Call Classification Service Parameter

Blocking Transfer Capabilities by Using Service Parameters

Dependency Records for Trunks and Associated Route Groups

Trunk Configuration Checklist

Where to Find More Information


Understanding Cisco Unified Communications Manager Trunk Types


In a distributed call-processing environment, Cisco Unified Communications Manager communicates with other Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters, the public switched telephone network (PSTN), and other non-IP telecommunications devices, such as private branch exchanges (PBXs) by using trunk signaling protocols and voice gateways.

This section covers the following topics:

Cisco Unified Communications Manager Trunk Configuration

Transferring Calls Between Trunks

Dependency Records for Trunks and Associated Route Groups

Trunk Configuration Checklist

Where to Find More Information

Cisco Unified Communications Manager Trunk Configuration

Trunk configuration in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration depends on the network design and call-control protocols that are used in the IP WAN. All protocols require that either a signaling interface (trunk) or a gateway be created to accept and originate calls. For some IP protocols, such as MGCP, you configure trunk signaling on the gateway. You specify the type of signaling interface when you configure the gateway in Cisco Unified Communications Manager. For example, to configure QSIG connections to Cisco Unified Communications Manager, you must add an MGCP voice gateway that supports QSIG protocol to the network. You then configure the T1 PRI or E1 PRI trunk interface to use the QSIG protocol type. For more information about configuring gateways, see the "Understanding Cisco Unified Communications Manager Voice Gateways" section on page 40-1.

Related Topics

Trunks and Gatekeepers in Cisco Unified Communications Manager

Trunk Types in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration

Trunks and Gatekeepers in Cisco Unified Communications Manager

In addition to using gateways to route calls, you can configure trunks in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration to function in either of the following ways:

Gatekeeper-Controlled Trunks

Non-Gatekeeper-Controlled Trunks

Gatekeeper-Controlled Trunks

Gatekeepers that are used in a distributed call-processing environment provide call routing and call admission control for Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters. Intercluster trunks that are gatekeeper-controlled can communicate with all remote clusters. Similarly, an H.225 trunk can communicate with any H.323 gatekeeper-controlled endpoints including Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters. Route patterns or route groups can route the calls to and from the gatekeeper. In a distributed call-processing environment, the gatekeeper uses the E.164 address (phone number) and determines the appropriate IP address for the destination of each call, and the local Cisco Unified Communications Manager uses that IP address to complete the call.

For large distributed networks where many Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters exist, you can avoid configuring individual intercluster trunks between each cluster by using gatekeepers.

When you configure gatekeeper-controlled trunks, Cisco Unified Communications Manager creates a virtual trunk device. The gatekeeper changes the IP address of this device dynamically to reflect the IP address of the remote device. Specify these trunks in the route patterns or route groups that route calls to and from the gatekeeper.

Refer to Cisco Unified Communications Solution Reference Network Design (SRND) for more detailed information about gatekeeper configuration, dial plan considerations when using a gatekeeper, and gatekeeper interaction with Cisco Unified Communications Manager.

Non-Gatekeeper-Controlled Trunks

With no gatekeepers in the distributed call-processing environment, you must configure a separate intercluster trunk for each remote device pool in a remote cluster that the local Cisco Unified Communications Manager can call over the IP WAN. You also configure the necessary route patterns and route groups to route calls to and from the various intercluster trunks. The intercluster trunks statically specify the IP addresses of the remote devices.

Related Topics

Trunk Types in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration

Trunk Configuration Checklist

Trunk Types in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration

Your choices for configuring trunks in Cisco Unified Communications Manager depend on whether the IP WAN uses gatekeepers to handle call routing. Also, the types of call-control protocols that are used in the call-processing environment determine trunk configuration options.

You can configure these types of trunk devices in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration:

H.225 Trunk (Gatekeeper Controlled)

Intercluster Trunk (Gatekeeper Controlled)

Intercluster Trunk (Non-Gatekeeper Controlled)

SIP Trunk

H.225 Trunk (Gatekeeper Controlled)

In an H.323 network that uses gatekeepers, use an H.225 trunk with gatekeeper control to configure a connection to a gatekeeper for access to other Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters and to H.323 devices. An H.225 trunk can communicate with any H.323 gatekeeper-controlled endpoint. When you configure an H.323 gateway with gatekeeper control in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration, use an H.225 trunk. To choose this method, use Device > Trunk and choose H.225 Trunk (Gatekeeper Controlled).

You also configure route patterns and route groups to route calls to and from the gatekeeper. For more information, see the "Gatekeepers and Trunks" section on page 8-6.

Intercluster Trunk (Gatekeeper Controlled)

In a distributed call-processing network with gatekeepers, use an intercluster trunk with gatekeeper control to configure connections between clusters of Cisco Unified Communications Manager systems. Gatekeepers provide call admission control and address resolution for intercluster calls. A single intercluster trunk can communicate with all remote clusters. To choose this method, use Device > Trunk and choose Inter-Cluster Trunk (Gatekeeper Controlled) in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration.

You also configure route patterns and route groups to route the calls to and from the gatekeeper. In this configuration, the gatekeeper dynamically determines the appropriate IP address for the destination of each call, and the local Cisco Unified Communications Manager uses that IP address to complete the call

For more information about gatekeepers, see the "Gatekeepers and Trunks" section on page 8-6.

Intercluster Trunk (Non-Gatekeeper Controlled)

In a distributed network that has no gatekeeper control, you must configure a separate intercluster trunk for each device pool in a remote cluster that the local Cisco Unified Communications Manager can call over the IP WAN. The intercluster trunks statically specify the IP addresses or host names of the remote devices.To choose this method, use Device > Trunk and choose Inter-Cluster Trunk (Non-Gatekeeper Controlled) in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration.


Note You must specify the IP addresses of all remote Cisco Unified Communications Manager nodes that belong to the device pool of the remote non-gatekeeper-controlled intercluster trunk.


You also configure the necessary route patterns and route groups to route calls to and from the intercluster trunks.

SIP Trunk

In a call-processing environment that uses Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), use SIP trunks to configure a signaling interface with Cisco Unified Communications Manager for SIP calls. SIP trunks (or signaling interfaces) connect Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters with a SIP proxy server. The SIP signaling interface uses requests and responses to establish, maintain, and terminate calls (or sessions) between two or more endpoints. For more information about SIP and configuring SIP trunks, see the "SIP and Cisco Unified Communications Manager" section on page 42-2.

To configure a SIP trunk in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration, choose Device > Trunk and then SIP Trunk. For information on configuration tasks, see the "SIP Trunk Configuration Checklist" section on page 42-19.


Tip You must also configure route groups and route patterns that use the SIP trunks to route the SIP calls.


Related Topics

Blocking Transfer Capabilities by Using Service Parameters

Dependency Records for Trunks and Associated Route Groups

Transferring Calls Between Trunks

Using Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration, you can configure trunks as OnNet (internal) trunks or OffNet (external) trunks by using Trunk Configuration or by setting a clusterwide service parameter. Used in conjunction with the clusterwide service parameter, Block OffNet to OffNet Transfer, the configuration determines whether calls can be transferred over a trunk.

To use the same trunk to route both OnNet and OffNet calls, associate the trunk with two different route patterns. Make one trunk OnNet and the other OffNet with both having the Allow Device Override check box unchecked.

Configuring Transfer Capabilities Using Trunk Configuration

Using Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Trunk Configuration, you can configure a trunk as OffNet or OnNet. The system considers calls that are coming to the network through that trunk as OffNet or OnNet, respectively. Use the Trunk Configuration window field, Call Classification, to configure the trunk as OffNet, OnNet, or Use System Default. See Table 43-1 for description of these settings.

The Route Pattern Configuration window provides a drop-down list box called Call Classification, which allows you to configure a route pattern as OffNet or OnNet. When Call Classification is set to OffNet and the Allow Device Override check box is unchecked, the system considers the outgoing calls that use this route pattern as OffNet (if configured as OnNet and check box is unchecked, outgoing calls are considered OnNet).

You can use the same trunk to route both OnNet and OffNet calls by associating the trunk with two different route patterns: one OnNet and the other OffNet, with both having the Allow Device Override check box unchecked. For outgoing calls, the outgoing device setting classifies the call as either OnNet or OffNet by determining whether the Allow Device Override check box is checked.

In route pattern configuration, if the Call Classification is set as OnNet, the Allow Device Override check box is checked, and the route pattern is associated with an OffNet Trunk, the system considers the outgoing call as OffNet.

Table 43-1 Trunk Configuration Call Classification Settings

Setting Name
Description

OffNet

This setting identifies the trunk as being an external trunk. When a call comes in from a trunk that is configured as OffNet, the outside ring gets sent to the destination device.

OnNet

This setting identifies the trunk as being an internal trunk. When a call comes in from a trunk that is configured as OnNet, the inside ring gets sent to the destination device.

Use System Default

This setting uses the Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusterwide service parameter Call Classification.


Configuring Transfer Capabilities by Using Call Classification Service Parameter

To configure all trunks to be OffNet (external) or OnNet (internal), perform the following two steps:

1. Use the Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusterwide service parameter Call Classification.

2. Configure individual trunks to Use System Default in the Call Classification field that is on the Trunk Configuration window.

Blocking Transfer Capabilities by Using Service Parameters

Block transfer restricts the transfer between external devices, so fraudulent activity gets prevented. You can configure the following devices as OnNet (internal) or OffNet (external) to Cisco Unified Communications Manager:

H.323 gateway

MGCP FXO trunk

MGCP T1/E1 trunk

Intercluster trunk

SIP trunk

If you do not want OffNet calls to be transferred to an external device (one that is configured as OffNet), set the Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusterwide service parameter, Block OffNet to OffNet Transfer, to True.

If a user tries to transfer a call on an OffNet trunk that is configured as blocked, a message displays on the user phone to indicate that the call cannot be transferred.

Related Topics

Route Pattern Configuration, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

Gateway Configuration, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

Trunk Configuration, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

Dependency Records for Trunks and Associated Route Groups

To find route groups that use a specific trunk, choose Dependency Records from the Related Links drop-down list box that is provided on the Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Trunk Configuration window. The Dependency Records Summary window displays information about route groups that are using the trunk. To find more information about the route group, click the route group, and the Dependency Records Details window displays. If the dependency records are not enabled for the system, the dependency records summary window displays a message.

For more information about Dependency Records, refer to "Accessing Dependency Records", in the Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide.

Related Topics

Trunk Configuration Checklist

Trunk Types in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration

Trunk Configuration Checklist

Table 43-2 provides an overview of the steps that are required to configure trunk interfaces in Cisco Unified Communications Manager, along with references to related procedures and topics.

Table 43-2 Trunk Configuration Checklist 

Configuration Steps
Procedures and Related Topics

Step 1 

Gather the endpoint information, such as IP addresses or host names, that you need to configure the trunk interface.

Cisco Unified Communications Solution Reference Network Design (SRND)

Step 2 

For gatekeeper-controlled trunks, configure the gatekeeper.

For SIP trunks, perform proxy configuration.

Gatekeeper and Trunk Configuration Checklist, page 8-10

SIP Trunk Configuration Checklist, page 42-19

Step 3 

Add the appropriate trunks in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration.

H.225 trunks (gatekeeper controlled)

Intercluster trunks (gatekeeper controlled)

Intercluster trunks (non-gatekeeper controlled)

SIP trunks

Configuring a Trunk, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

Trunk Configuration Settings, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

SIP Trunk Configuration Checklist, page 42-19

Step 4 

Configure the gatekeeper-controlled intercluster trunks or H.225 trunks to specify gatekeeper information.

Configure the non-gatekeeper-controlled trunks with the IP address or host name for the remote Cisco Unified Communications Manager server.

Trunk Configuration Settings, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

Step 5 

Configure a route pattern or route group to route calls to each gatekeeper-controlled trunk.

Configure a route pattern or route group to route calls to each non-gatekeeper-controlled trunk.

Route Pattern Configuration,Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

Route Group Configuration, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

SIP Trunk Configuration Checklist, page 42-19

Step 6 

Reset the trunk interface to apply the configuration settings.

Resetting a Trunk, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

Related Topics

Cisco Unified Communications Manager Trunk Configuration

Trunks and Gatekeepers in Cisco Unified Communications Manager

Trunk Types in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration

Dependency Records for Trunks and Associated Route Groups

Where to Find More Information

Related Topics

Gatekeepers and Trunks, page 8-6

Cisco Voice Gateways, page 40-1

Gateways, Dial Plans, and Route Groups, page 40-15

Understanding Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), page 42-1

Trunk Configuration, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

Gatekeeper Configuration, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration Guide

Additional Cisco Documentation

Cisco Unified Communications Solution Reference Network Design (SRND)

Configuring Cisco Unified Communications Voice Gateways