Cisco ATA 186 and Cisco ATA 188 Analog Telephone Adaptor Administrator's Guide for SCCP (version 3.0)
Configuring the Cisco ATA for SCCP
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Configuring the Cisco ATA for SCCP

Table Of Contents

Configuring the Cisco ATA for SCCP

Default Boot Load Behavior

Specifying a Preconfigured VLAN ID or Disabling VLAN IP Encapsulation

Steps Needed to Configure the Cisco ATA

Basic Configuration Steps in a Cisco CallManager TFTP Server Environment

Basic Configuration Steps in a Non-TFTP Server Environment

Configuring the Cisco ATA Using a TFTP Server

Setting Up the TFTP Server with Cisco ATA Software

Configurable Features and Related Parameters

Creating a Cisco ATA Default Configuration File

Creating a Configuration File for a Specific Cisco ATA

Using atapname.exe Tool to Obtain MAC Address

Using Encryption With the cfgfmt Tool

Examples of Upgrading to Stronger Encryption Key

Configuring the Cisco ATA to Obtain its Configuration File from the TFTP Server

Using a DHCP Server

Without Using a DHCP Server

Voice Configuration Menu

Using the Voice Configuration Menu

Entering Alphanumeric Values

Resetting the Cisco ATA to Factory Default Values

Cisco ATA Web Configuration Page

Resetting the Cisco ATA Using Cisco CallManager

Upgrading the SCCP Signaling Image


Configuring the Cisco ATA for SCCP


This section describes how to configure the Cisco ATA to operate with the Skinny Client Control Protocol (SCCP) signaling image and how the Cisco ATA obtains the latest signaling image.

You can configure the Cisco ATA for use with SCCP with any of the following methods:

By using the Cisco CallManager TFTP server—This is the Cisco-recommended method for deploying a large number of Cisco ATAs. This method allows you to set up a default configuration file for all Cisco ATAs in the network. Additionally, you can set up a configuration file that is unique to a specific Cisco ATA. When the Cisco ATA powers up or boots up from a reset, it automatically downloads its configuration file from the Cisco CallManager TFTP server and updates its configuration parameters.

By using manual configuration:

Voice configuration menu—This is the method you must use if the process of establishing IP connectivity for the Cisco ATA requires changing the default network configuration settings. These settings are CDP, VLAN, and DHCP. You also can use the voice configuration menu to review all IP connectivity settings. The voice configuration menu can also be used when Web access is not available.

Web-based configuration—This method is convenient if you plan to deploy a small number of Cisco ATAs in your network. To use this method, the Cisco ATA must first obtain IP connectivity, either through the use of a DHCP server or by using the voice configuration menu to statically configure IP addresses.

This section contains the following topics:

Default Boot Load Behavior—This section describes the process that the Cisco ATA follows by default when it boots up. It is very important to understand this process because, if your network environment is not set up to follow this default behavior, you need to make the applicable configuration changes. For example, by default, the Cisco ATA attempts to contact a DHCP server for the necessary IP addresses to achieve network connectivity. However, if your network does not use a DHCP server, you must manually configure various IP settings as described in this section.

Specifying a Preconfigured VLAN ID or Disabling VLAN IP Encapsulation—This section includes a table of the parameters you can configure for VLAN and CDP settings.

Steps Needed to Configure the Cisco ATA—This section provides tables that summarize the general configuration steps you must follow to configure the Cisco ATA.

Configuring the Cisco ATA Using a TFTP Server—This section describes procedures for configuring the Cisco ATA by using a Cisco CallManager TFTP server, which is the recommended configuration method for the deployment of a large number of Cisco ATAs.

Voice Configuration Menu—This section includes information on how to obtain basic network connectivity for the Cisco ATA and how to perform a factory reset if necessary.

Cisco ATA Web Configuration Page—This section shows the Cisco ATA Web configuration page and contains a procedure for how to configure Cisco ATA parameters using this interface.

Resetting the Cisco ATA Using Cisco CallManager—This section gives the procedure (via the Cisco CallManager administration web pages) for resetting the Cisco ATA so that your configuration changes take effect.

Upgrading the SCCP Signaling Image—This section provides references to the various means of upgrading your Cisco ATA signaling image.


Note The term Cisco ATA is used throughout this manual to refer to both the Cisco ATA 186 and the Cisco ATA 188, unless differences between the Cisco ATA 186 and Cisco ATA 188 are explicitly stated.


Default Boot Load Behavior

Before configuring the Cisco ATA, you need to know how the default Cisco ATA boot load process works. Once you understand this process, you will be able to configure the Cisco ATA by following the instructions provided in this section and in the sections that follow.

All Cisco ATAs are shipped with a boot load signaling-protocol image. However, because this image is not a fully functional Cisco ATA image, the Cisco ATA seeks to obtain the image-load information from the Cisco CallManager and perform a software upgrade. In addition, the Cisco ATA obtains the necessary SCCP-specific configuration files for Cisco CallManager communication and the Cisco ATA configuration file during the boot load process.

The following list summarizes the default Cisco ATA behavior during its boot-up process:

1. The Cisco ATA uses the Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) to discover which VLAN to enter. If the Cisco ATA receives a VLAN ID response from the network switch, the Cisco ATA enters that VLAN and adds 802.1Q VLAN tags to its IP packets. If the Cisco ATA does not receive a response with a VLAN ID from the network switch, then the Cisco ATA assumes it is not operating in a VLAN environment and does not perform VLAN tagging on its packets.


Note If your network environment is not set up to handle this default behavior, make the necessary configuration changes by referring to the "Specifying a Preconfigured VLAN ID or Disabling VLAN IP Encapsulation" section.


2. The Cisco ATA contacts the DHCP server to request its own IP address.


Note If your network environment does not contain a DHCP server, you need to statically configure various IP addresses so that the Cisco ATA can obtain network connectivity. For a list of parameters that you must configure to obtain network connectivity, see Table 3-7. For instructions on how to use the voice configuration menu, which you must use to perform this configuration, see the "Voice Configuration Menu" section.


3. Also from the DHCP server, the Cisco ATA requests the IP address of the Cisco CallManager TFTP server.

4. The Cisco ATA contacts the Cisco CallManager TFTP server and downloads the appropriate .xml or .cnf configuration file that allows the Cisco ATA to communicate with the correct Cisco CallManager.

5. The .xml or .cnf file that the Cisco ATA downloads includes information about which signaling image the Cisco ATA needs to function properly. The Cisco ATA finds that image on the TFTP server and automatically downloads this image along with the corresponding version of Cisco ATA release software.


Note If you are not using a Cisco CallManager TFTP server, you need to manually upgrade the Cisco ATA to the correct signaling image. For information on this procedure, see the "Upgrading the Signaling Image Manually" section on page 7-4.


6. The Cisco ATA looks for a Cisco ATA-specific configuration file (designated by the MAC address of the Cisco ATA and named ata<macaddress> with a possible extension) on the TFTP server and downloads this file if it exists. For information about possible configuration file names, see the "Configuration Files that the cfgfmt Tool Creates" section.

7. If the Cisco ATA does not find the MAC-address configuration file, it looks for an atadefault.cfg configuration file and downloads this file if it exists. This file can contain default values for the Cisco ATA to use.


Note When the Cisco ATA is downloading its DHCP configuration, the function button on the top panel blinks.


Specifying a Preconfigured VLAN ID or Disabling VLAN IP Encapsulation

If you want the Cisco ATA to use a preconfigured VLAN ID instead of using the Cisco Discovery Protocol to locate a VLAN, or if you want to disable VLAN IP encapsulation, refer to Table 3-1 for a reference to the parameters and bits you may need to configure. Use the voice configuration menu to configure these parameters. (See the "Voice Configuration Menu" section for instructions on using this menu.) Also, refer to Table 3-2 for a matrix that indicates which VLAN-related parameters and bits to configure depending on your network environment.


Note Bits are numbered from right to left, starting with bit 0.


Table 3-1 Parameters and Bits for Preconfiguring a VLAN ID

Parameter and Bits
Reference

OpFlags:

Bit 4—Enable the use of user-specified voice VLAN ID.

Bit 5—Disable VLAN encapsulation

Bit 6—Disable CDP discovery.

OpFlags, page 5-24

VLANSetting:

Bits 0-2—Specify VLAN CoS bit value (802.1P priority) for TCP packets.

Bits 3-5—Specify VLAN CoS bit value (802.1P priority) for Voice IP packets

Bits 18-29—User-specified 802.1Q VLAN ID

VLANSetting, page 5-11


Table 3-2 VLAN-Related Features and Corresponding Configuration Parameters 

 
OpFlags Bit 4
OpFlags Bit 5
OpFlags Bit 6
VLANSetting Bits 18-29
Feature
       

Static VLAN

1

0

1

VLAN ID

CDP-acquired VLAN

0

0

0

N/A

No VLAN

N/A

1

N/A

N/A

No CDP

N/A

N/A

1

N/A

No CDP and no VLAN

0

1

1

N/A


N/A indicates that the variable is not applicable to the feature and the setting of this variable does not affect the feature.

Example

The following procedure shows you how to configure the OpFlags and VLANSetting parameters to allow the Cisco ATA to use a user-specified VLAN ID. In this example, the voice VLAN ID is 115 (in decimal format).


Step 1 Set bits 4-6 of the OpFlags parameter to 1, 0, and 1, respectively. This setting translates to the following bitmap:

xxxx xxxx xxxx xxxx xxxx xxxx x101 xxxx

The remaining bits of the OpFlags parameter, using all default values, make up the following bitmap representation:

0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0xxx 0010

Therefore, the resulting value of the OpFlags parameter becomes the following bitmap representation:

0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0101 0010

In hexadecimal format, this value is 0x00000052.

Step 2 Set bits 18-29 of the VLANSetting parameter to voice VLAN ID 115. This setting translates to the following bitmap

xx00 0001 1100 11xx xxxx xxxx xxxx xxxx

where 000001110011 is the binary representation of the decimal value 115.

The remaining bits of the VLANSetting parameter, using all default values, make up the following representation:

00xx xxxx xxxx xx00 0000 0000 0010 1011

Therefore, the resulting value of the VLANSetting parameter becomes the following bitmap representation:

0000 0001 1100 1100 0000 0000 0010 1011

In hexadecimal format, this value is 0x01cc002b.



Note If you are using the voice configuration menu to set the parameters, you must convert hexadecimal values to decimal values. For example, the OpFlags setting of 0x00000052 is equivalent to 82 in decimal format, and the VLANSetting of 0x01cc002b is equivalent to 30146603 in decimal format.


Steps Needed to Configure the Cisco ATA

This section contains the following topics:

Basic Configuration Steps in a Cisco CallManager TFTP Server Environment

Basic Configuration Steps in a Non-TFTP Server Environment

Basic Configuration Steps in a Cisco CallManager TFTP Server Environment

Table 3-3 shows the basic steps for configuring the Cisco ATA and making it operational in a typical SCCP environment, which includes a Cisco CallManager TFTP server.

Table 3-3 Basic Steps to Configure the Cisco ATA in a Typical Cisco CallManager Environment

Action
Reference

1. Download the desired Cisco ATA release software zip file from the Cisco web site and store it on the Cisco CallManager TFTP server.

Setting Up the TFTP Server with Cisco ATA Software

2. Create a default configuration file that can be used by many Cisco ATAs in your Cisco CallManager environment.

Note You can skip this step if the Cisco ATA default parameters do not require re-configuration in your network environment.

Creating a Cisco ATA Default Configuration File

3. Configure the method with which the Cisco ATA will locate the Cisco CallManager TFTP server at boot up time.

Configuring the Cisco ATA to Obtain its Configuration File from the TFTP Server

4. Add the Cisco ATA to the Cisco CallManager.

Chapter 4, "Adding the Cisco ATA to the Cisco CallManager"

5. Power up the Cisco ATA.

 

6. Optionally, create a configuration file for a specific Cisco ATA.

Creating a Configuration File for a Specific Cisco ATA

7. If you make configuration changes to the Cisco ATA, you must reset the Cisco ATA by using the Cisco CallManager administration web pages.

Resetting the Cisco ATA Using Cisco CallManager


Basic Configuration Steps in a Non-TFTP Server Environment

Table 3-4 shows the basic steps for configuring the Cisco ATA without using the TFTP server method.

Table 3-4 Basic Steps to Configure the Cisco ATA Without Using the TFTP Server Method

Action
Reference

1. Download the desired Cisco ATA release software zip file from the Cisco web site:

a. If you are a registered CCO user. go to the following URL: http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/tablebuild.pl/ata186

b. Download the zip file that contains the software for the applicable release and signaling image you are using. The contents of each file are described next to the file name.

c. Extract the files to the desired location on your PC.


Note The file that contains the protocol signaling image has an extension of .zup.


 

2. Manually upgrade the Cisco ATA to the correct signaling image.

Upgrading the Signaling Image Manually, page 7-4

3. Configure the Cisco ATA by using either one of the manual-configuration methods.

Voice Configuration Menu

Cisco ATA Web Configuration Page

4. Manually configure the CA0orCM0 parameter to instruct the Cisco ATA about how to register with Cisco CallManager.

CA0orCM0 and CA1orCM1, page 5-12

5. Power up the Cisco ATA.

 

Configuring the Cisco ATA Using a TFTP Server

The TFTP method of configuration is useful when you have many Cisco ATA because you can use a TFTP server for remote, batch configuration of Cisco ATAs. A TFTP server can host one unique configuration file for each Cisco ATA.

This section contains the following topics:

Setting Up the TFTP Server with Cisco ATA Software

Configurable Features and Related Parameters

Creating a Cisco ATA Default Configuration File

Creating a Configuration File for a Specific Cisco ATA

Configuring the Cisco ATA to Obtain its Configuration File from the TFTP Server

Setting Up the TFTP Server with Cisco ATA Software

This section provides the procedure for the Cisco ATA administrator to obtain the correct Cisco ATA software and set up the Cisco CallManager TFTP server with this software.

Procedure


Step 1 If you are a registered CCO user. go to the following URL: http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/tablebuild.pl/ata186

Step 2 Download the zip file that contains the software for the applicable release and signaling image you are using. The contents of each file are described next to the file name. Save the zip file onto a floppy disc.


Note The file that contains the protocol signaling image has an extension of .zup.


Step 3 Insert the floppy disc into the Cisco CallManager disc drive.

Step 4 From your computer, navigate to Start > Programs > Terminal Services > Client. The Terminal Services Client screen appears.

Step 5 In the Services field of the Terminal Services Client screen, enter the IP address of the Cisco CallManager that contains the disc you inserted. Then, click the Connect button. The Login screen appears.

Step 6 Enter your login information, then click OK. The TFTP Path screen appears.

Step 7 Click on the My Computer icon that is located within the Terminal Services Client screen, then navigate to the A: drive.

Step 8 From the A: drive, drag the zip file to the TFTP Path screen. This will extract all the files and place them onto the Cisco CallManager TFTP server.


Configurable Features and Related Parameters

Table 3-5 lists, in alphabetical order, various features that you can configure for the Cisco ATA. Table 3-5 also includes links to the related parameter that allows you to configure each of these features. Each link takes you to a detailed description of the parameter that includes its default values.

For an example of how to configure parameters for the TFTP Server configuration method, see the "Creating a Cisco ATA Default Configuration File" section.

Table 3-5 Configurable Features and Related Parameters 

Configurable Features
Related Parameters

Audio Media Features

Low bit-rate codec selection (G.723.1, G.729)

Silence suppression

RTP media port configuration

Audio level of FXS ports

Audio Media Parameters

LBRCodec, page 5-13

AudioMode, page 5-16

MediaPort, page 5-14

FXSInputLevel, page 5-20, FXSOutputLevel, page 5-20

Caller ID format

CallerIdMethod, page 5-17

Debug and Diagnostics

NPrintf, page 5-37, TraceFlags, page 5-38, SyslogIP, page 5-38, SyslogCtrl, page 5-39

Fax Services Features

Fax services mode selection

Named Signalling Event (NSE) payload type for fax pass-through

Fax Services Parameters

AudioMode, page 5-16, ConnectMode, page 5-21

ConnectMode, page 5-21

Hook-flash detection timing configuration

SigTimer, page 5-23

Mid-call service format—Bellcore, Cisco VG248 or Cisco ATA

ConnectMode, page 5-21

Network-related Features

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP)—on/off

DHCP configuration

DNS configuration

DNS name resolution

Static IP configuration

VLAN configuration

Network-related Parameters

OpFlags, page 5-24

DHCP, page 5-8, OpFlags, page 5-24

DNS1IP, page 5-10, DNS2IP, page 5-11

OpFlags, page 5-24

StaticIp, page 5-9, StaticRoute, page 5-9, StaticNetMask, page 5-10

OpFlags, page 5-24, VLANSetting, page 5-11

SCCP Terminal-related Features

Cisco CallManager 3.0 support

Cisco IOS Telephony Solution (ITS) support

Domain name in Cisco CallManager environment

Static Cisco CallManager configuration

Terminal FXS lines

SCCP Terminal-related Parameters

ConnectMode, page 5-21

ConnectMode, page 5-21

Domain, page 5-15

CA0orCM0 and CA1orCM1, page 5-12

EPID0orSID0 and EPID1orSID1, page 5-13

User Interface and TFTP Features

User interface password

TFTP Configuration

TFTP Encryption key

Web configuration—enable/disable

User Interface and TFTP Parameters

UIPassword, page 5-3

UseTFTP, page 5-4, TftpURL, page 5-4, OpFlags, page 5-24

EncryptKey, page 5-6, EncryptKeyEx, page 5-7

OpFlags, page 5-24

Packet Precedence Features

Type of Service (ToS) configuration

802.1P Class of Service (Cos) Bit configuration

Packet Precedence Parameters

TOS, page 5-25

VLANSetting, page 5-11

Polarity settings for FXS ports

Polarity, page 5-19

Tone format: BusyTone, CallWaitTone
DialTone, DialTone2, ReorderTone, RingBackTone and AlertTone parameters

Tone Configuration Parameters, page 5-26

Tone parameters—Using Network Locale option versus using Cisco ATA tone parameters

ConnectMode, page 5-21—Bit 0

Version control of Cisco ATA configuration file

CFGID—Version Parameter for Cisco ATA Configuration File, page 5-40


Creating a Cisco ATA Default Configuration File

The Cisco ATA release-software zip files includes a file called atadefault.cfg, which is a binary file that contains all the default parameters for the Cisco ATA. However, you likely will need to create your own atadefault.cfg file to contain the default settings that you want Cisco ATAs in your environment to use. For information on each configuration parameter, including all default values, see Chapter 5, "Parameters and Defaults."

Use the text file called sk_example.txt as a basis for creating your default file. The sk_example.txt file is included in the software-release zip file and contains all default values. This file is shown without its annotations in the "Configuration Text File Template" section on page 5-2.

The following procedure illustrates how to create the Cisco ATA default configuration file, convert it to the required binary format that the Cisco ATA can read, and store it on the TFTP server so that the Cisco ATA will download it during the boot-up process:

Procedure


Step 1 Make a copy of the sk_example.txt file and rename it atadefault.txt.

Step 2 Make the desired configuration changes by editing the atadefault.txt file, then save the file.

Step 3 Convert the atadefault.txt file to a binary file by running the cfgfmt.exe tool, which is bundled with the Cisco ATA software.


Note If you wish to encrypt the binary file for security reasons, see the "Using Encryption With the cfgfmt Tool" section. If you encrypt the file using the EncryptKeyEx parameter, the resulting binary file will be called atadefault.cfg.x; if not encrypted with the EncryptKeyEx parameter the resulting binary file name will be atadefault.cfg.


The syntax of the cfgfmt program follows:

Syntax

cfgfmt [Encryption options] -sccp -tptag.dat input-text-file output-binary-file

Encryption options are described in the "Using Encryption With the cfgfmt Tool" section.

sccp is the protocol you are using, which you must specify so that the cfgfmt tool will include only the applicable protocol in the converted output binary file.

The ptag.dat file, provided with the Cisco ATA software version you are running, is used by cfgfmt.exe to format a text input representation of the parameter/value pairs to its output binary representation. Be sure this file resides in the same directory from which you are running the cfgfmt program.

input-text-file is the input text file representation of the Cisco ATA configuration file.

output-binary-file is the final output binary file that Cisco ATA uses as the TFTP configuration file.

Example

cfgfmt -sccp -tptag.dat atadefault.txt atadefault

Step 4 Store the binary configuration file in the TFTP server root directory, overwriting the atadefault.cfg file that came bundled with the release-software download.

During the boot-up process, the Cisco ATA will download the output file as its configuration file unless it first finds a Cisco ATA-specific configuration file named for the MAC address of the Cisco ATA. (If you want to create a MAC-address configuration file for a specific Cisco ATA, see the "Creating a Configuration File for a Specific Cisco ATA" section.)


Note If you want to make configuration changes after boot up, repeat the process of creating or editing the text file containing the desired parameters, then converting the text file to the binary file and storing the binary file on the TFTP server. For the configuration changes to take effect, reset the Cisco ATA. (See the "Resetting the Cisco ATA Using Cisco CallManager" section.)



Creating a Configuration File for a Specific Cisco ATA

Once you have booted up the Cisco ATA, you may decide that you want to create a configuration file that is specific to one Cisco ATA.

The following procedure illustrates how to create a Cisco ATA-specific configuration file, convert it to the required binary format that the Cisco ATA can read, and store it on the TFTP server so that the Cisco ATA will download it as soon as you reset the Cisco ATA.

Procedure


Step 1 Open the atadefault.txt file that you created when you developed your own default file. Find the parameters whose values you want to change for this specific Cisco ATA. Copy only these parameters into a new text file. Save the new text file with the following name:

ata<macaddress>.txt

where macaddress is the non-dotted hexadecimal version of the MAC address of the Cisco ATA you are configuring. This non-dotted hexadecimal MAC address is labeled on the bottom of most Cisco ATAs next to the word "MAC." The file name must be exactly 15 characters long. (However, if this filename is supplied by the DHCP server, the name can be as long as 31 characters and can be any name with printable ASCII characters.)

If necessary, you can obtain the non-dotted hexadecimal MAC address by using the atapname.exe command. For information on using the atapname.exe command, see the "Using atapname.exe Tool to Obtain MAC Address" section. That section includes an example of a dotted decimal MAC address and its corresponding non-dotted hexadecimal address.


Note The ata<macaddress>.txt file should contain only those parameters whose values you are changing from their defaults. Parameter values in the ata<macaddress> configuration file will overwrite any manually configured values (values configured through the web or voice configuration menu) when the Cisco ATA powers up or resets.


Example

You might want to change the values of the following parameters, whose default values are shown first:

LBRCodec:3
AudioMode:0x00350035

You could change the values as follows:

LBRCodec:0
AudioMode:0x00350034

Step 2 Save your changes.

Step 3 Run the cfgfmt.exe tool, which is bundled with the Cisco ATA software, on the ata<macaddress>.txt text file to generate the binary configuration file. If you wish to encrypt the binary file, see the "Using Encryption With the cfgfmt Tool" section.

The syntax of the cfgfmt program follows:

Syntax

cfgfmt [Encryption options] -sccp -tptag.dat input-text-file output-binary-file

Encryption options are described in the "Using Encryption With the cfgfmt Tool" section.

sccp is the protocol you are using, which you must specify so that the cfgfmt tool will include only the applicable protocol in the converted output binary file.

The ptag.dat file, provided with the Cisco ATA software version you are running, is used by cfgfmt.exe to format a text input representation of the parameter/value pairs to its output binary representation. Be sure this file resides in the same directory from which you are running the cfgfmt program.

input-text-file is the input text file representation of the Cisco ATA configuration file.

output-binary-file is the final output binary file that Cisco ATA uses as the TFTP configuration file.

Example

cfgfmt -sccp -tptag.dat ata0a141e28323c.txt ata0a141e28323c

This example is based on a Cisco ATA MAC address of 10.20.30.40.50.60, which converts to the two-digit, lower-case hexadecimal representation of each integer as 0a141e28323c.

Step 4 Store all binary configuration file(s) in the TFTP server root directory. For information about possible configuration file names, see the "Configuration Files that the cfgfmt Tool Creates" section.

Step 5 Reset the Cisco ATA using the Cisco CallManager. (See the "Resetting the Cisco ATA Using Cisco CallManager" section on page 3-23.)

After being reset, the Cisco ATA will download this ata<macaddress> binary configuration file as its unique configuration file. This file takes precedence over the atadefault.cfg file. If the Cisco ATA finds an ata<macaddress> file on the TFTP server, the Cisco ATA does not look for the atadefault.cfg file.


Using atapname.exe Tool to Obtain MAC Address

This bundled tool is useful for converting the dotted decimal version of the Cisco ATA MAC address (available on the Cisco ATA Web configuration page or from the voice configuration menu code 24#) to its default Cisco ATA profile name. This name has the following format:

ataxxxxxxxxxxxx

where each xx is the two-digit, lower-case hexadecimal representation of each integer in the dotted, decimal version of the Cisco ATA MAC address. This is the name you use for the unique Cisco ATA binary configuration file.

The following command and output show an example of this command.

Command Example

atapname.exe 10.20.30.40.50.60

Command Output

ata0a141e28323c


Note The same functionality is available from the voice configuration menu (voice menu code 84#), which will announce the Cisco ATA profile name.


Using Encryption With the cfgfmt Tool

The EncryptKey or EncryptKeyEx parameter can be used to encrypt binary files that are transferred over TFTP. You can change encryption keys for each Cisco ATA so that only one specific Cisco ATA can decode the information.

Cisco strongly recommends using the EncryptKeyEx parameter for encryption because this parameter provides a stronger encryption than the EncryptKey parameter that was used in Cisco ATA software releases prior to release 2.16.

You must use version 2.3 of the cfgfmt configuration-file generation tool to use the new EncryptKeyEx parameter. This tools comes bundled with Cisco ATA software version 3.0. To verify that you have version 2.3 of the cfgfmt tool type the following command:

cfgfmt

The version number of the cfgfmt tool will be returned.

You can configure the EncryptKeyEx parameter by using the Cisco ATA Web configuration page or by using the TFTP configuration method. (For more information, see the "EncryptKeyEx" section on page 5-7.)

You can configure the EncryptKey parameter by using the Cisco ATA Web configuration page, the voice configuration menu, or by using the TFTP configuration method. (For more information, see the "EncryptKey" section on page 5-6.)

By default, the Cisco ATA-specific ata<macaddress> configuration file(s) are not encrypted. If encryption is required, however, you must manually configure the EncryptKeyEx or EncryptKey parameter before you boot up the Cisco ATA so that the TFTP method is secure. The Cisco ATA uses the RC4 cipher algorithm for encryption.


Note Because the factory-fresh ATA cannot accept encrypted configuration files, the first unencrypted file, if intercepted, can easily be read. (You would still have to know the data structure format in order to decode the binary information from the unencrypted file.) Therefore, the new encryption key in the unencrypted file can be compromised.



Note For security reasons, Cisco recommends that you set the UIPassword parameter (if desired) in the configuration file and not by using one of the manual configuration methods.


This section contains the following topics:

Configuration Files that the cfgfmt Tool Creates

cfgfmt Tool Syntax and Examples

Configuration Files that the cfgfmt Tool Creates

The number of output binary configuration files that the Cisco ATA produces is dependent on two factors:

Which encryption key parameter is used—EncryptKey or EncryptKeyEx

The total size of the binary output

Table 3-6 shows the names of the binary files that can be generated. One, two or four files can be generated.


Note <macaddress> in Table 3-6 is the MAC address of the Cisco ATA.



Note If you are creating an atadefault configuration file, the generated binary file name will be atadefault.cfg.x if you encrypt the text file with the EncryptKeyEx parameter; the binary file name will be atadefault.cfg if you do not use the EncryptKeyEx parameter to encrypt the text file.


Table 3-6 Configuration Files that the Cisco ATA May Generate 

 
Total Binary Output Size Less Than or Equal to 2,000 Bytes
Total Binary Output Size Greater Than 2,000 Bytes
Value of EncryptKeyEx Parameter
   

0

ata<macaddress>

ata<macaddress>

ata<macaddress>.ex

Non-zero

ata<macaddress>

ata<macaddress>.x

ata<macaddress>

ata<macaddress>.ex

ata<macaddress>.x

ata<macaddress>.xex



Note Place all generated binary configuration files onto the TFTP server.


cfgfmt Tool Syntax and Examples

The syntax of the cfgfmt tool follows:

Syntax

cfgfmt [options] input output

Syntax Definitions—Options

-eRc4Passwd—This option directs the Cisco ATA to use Rc4Passwd as the key (up to eight hexadecimal characters) to encrypt or decrypt the input text file. However, if the Cisco ATA EncryptKey parameter in the input text file is not 0, then the value of that parameter is used to encrypt the output binary file, and Rc4Passwd is ignored. The -e portion of this option means that the Cisco ATA will use the weaker encryption method.

-E—This option directs the Cisco ATA to not use the value of the EncryptKey parameter, as set in the input text file, to encrypt the output binary configuration file.

-xRc4Passwd—This option directs the Cisco ATA to use Rc4Passwd, which must be a hexadecimal string of as many as 64 characters, as the key to encrypt or decrypt the input text file. However, if the Cisco ATA EncryptKeyEx parameter in the input text file is not 0, then the value of that parameter is used to encrypt the output binary file, and Rc4Passwd is ignored. The -x portion of this option means that the Cisco ATA will use the stronger encryption method.

-X—This option directs the Cisco ATA to not use the value of the EncryptKeyEx parameter, as set in the input text file, to encrypt the output binary configuration file.

-tPtag.dat—This file, provided with the Cisco ATA software version you are running, is used by the cfgfmt tool to format a text input representation of the parameter/value pairs to its output binary representation. Be sure this file resides in the same directory from which you are running the cfgfmt program.

-sip—Specify this tag if you are using the SIP protocol so that the cfgfmt tool will include only the SIP protocol parameters in the converted output binary file.

-h323—Specify this tag if you are using the H.323 protocol so that the cfgfmt tool will include only the H.323 protocol parameters in the converted output binary file.

-mgcp—Specify this tag if you are using the MGCP protocol so that the cfgfmt tool will include only the MGCP protocol parameters in the converted output binary file.

-sccp—Specify this tag if you are using the SCCP protocol so that the cfgfmt tool will include only the SCCP protocol parameters in the converted output binary file.

-g—This tag omits sensitive parameters in an ata<macaddress> file that was created with a version of the cfgfmt tool prior to version 2.3.

Some parameters, specified in the ptag.dat file used by the cfgfmt tool, are marked as sensitive information (these parameters could include UIPassword, UID, PWD0). These parameters are not included in the output binary file if the -g switch is specified in the cfgfmt syntax.

Syntax Definitions—Required Parameters

Input—This is the input text file representation of the Cisco ATA configuration file.

Output—This is the final output binary file that Cisco ATA uses as the TFTP configuration file.

Syntax examples

The cfgfmt.exe syntax affects how the EncryptKeyEx or EncryptKey parameters are used, as shown in the following examples. In these examples, input-text-file is the ata<macaddress>.txt file that you will convert to binary to create the ata<macaddress> configuration file(s) for the Cisco ATA; output-binary-file is that binary ata<macaddress> file, and Secret is the encryption key.

cfgfmt -sccp -tptag.dat input-text-file output-binary-file

If input-text-file sets the Cisco ATA EncryptKey parameter to 0, then output-binary-file is not encrypted. If the input-text-file sets EncryptKey to a non-zero value, then output-binary-file is encrypted with that value.

cfgfmt -X -sccp -tptag.dat input-text-file output-binary-file

This is an example of how you might perform encryption on a first-time Cisco ATA.

The -X (uppercase) option means that any value specified for the Cisco ATA EncryptKeyEx parameter in input-text-file is ignored. However, because Secret is not specified in this example, output-binary-file is not encrypted. Nevertheless, the EncryptKeyEx parameter and its value, if specified in input-file-text, will be included in output-binary-file for possible encryption at a later time. The next time the Cisco ATA fetches the configuration file from the TFTP server, the file will be encrypted with Secret.

cfgfmt -X -xSecret -sccp -tptag.dat input-text-file output-binary-file

This is an example of changing the encryption key from one key to another key.

The -X (uppercase) option means that any value specified for the Cisco ATA EncryptKeyEx parameter in input-text-file is ignored and the output-binary-file is encrypted with the Secret key. However, the EncryptKeyEx parameter and its value, if specified in input-text-file, will be included in output-binary-file.

Examples of Upgrading to Stronger Encryption Key

This section contains two examples of how you would upgrade your Cisco ATA configuration to use the stronger encyrption method if the current Cisco ATA firmware version was a version earlier than version 2.16.2. Versions earlier than 2.16.2 do not support the stronger EncryptKeyEx parameter.

Example 1

In this example, the Cisco ATA has not yet been deployed, but its firmware version is earlier than 2.16.2. Therefore, the Cisco ATA will upgrade to to firmware version 3.0 to use the EncryptKeyEx parameter as its encryption key.

The Cisco ATA in this example has a MAC address of 102030405060.

Perform the following steps:

Procedure


Step 1 Create a file called ata102030405060.txt by using the applicable example.txt file provided with the Cisco ATA software. (For example, for SCCP, the example.txt file is called sk_example.txt.)

Step 2 Modify the ata102030405060.txt file with desired parameter values. The value of the EncryptKey parameter should be 0.

Step 3 Set the value of the EncryptKeyEx parameter to the chosen encryption key with which you want the output binary file to be encrypted. In the EncryptKeyEx parameter specified in the configuration file, you can also restrict the EncryptKeyEx value to apply only to the Cisco ATA with a particular MAC address. For example, if the chosen key value is 231e2a7f10bd7fe, you can specify EncryptKeyEx as:

EncryptKeyEx:231e2a7f10bd7fe/102030405060

This means that only the Cisco ATA with the MAC address 102030405060 will be allowed to apply this EncryptKeyEx value to its internal configuration.

Step 4 Update the upgradecode parameter to instruct the Cisco ATA to upgrade to firmware version 3.0 by means of TFTP configuration. The upgradecode parameter is described in Chapter 7, "Upgrading the Cisco ATA Signaling Image."

Step 5 Run the cfgfmt tool as follows:

cfgfmt -g ata102030405060.txt ata102030405060

This will generate the following two binary configuration files:

ata102030405060

ata102030405060.x

ata102030405060 is unencrypted.

ata102030405060.x is encrypted with EncryptKeyEx value.

Step 6 Place these two files on the TFTP server that the Cisco ATA will contact for its configuration files.

When the Cisco ATA powers up, it will obtain its IP address from the DHCP server. If the DHCP server specifies the TFTP server address, the Cisco ATA will contact the TFTP server obtained from DHCP because the Cisco ATA is not preconfigured with a TFTP server address. The boot process is as follows:

a. The Cisco ATA downloads the configuration file ata102030405060 from the TFTP server.

b. The Cisco ATA applies parameter values in the file ata102030405060 to its internal configuration while ignoring the EncryptKeyEx parameter (because the older version of the Cisco ATA does not yet recognize the EncryptKeyEx parameter).

c. The Cisco ATA upgrades to the 3.0 firmware load.

d. The Cisco ATA reboots.

e. The Cisco ATA again downloads the configuration file ata102030405060.

f. The Cisco ATA applies the value of the EncryptKeyEx parameter to its internal configuration.

g. The Cisco ATA reboots.

h. The Cisco ATA EncryptKeyEx value is in effect, so from this point forward the Cisco ATA will download the ata102030405060.x file at each reboot and each time the value configured in the CfgInterval parameter expires.



Note Although EncryptKeyEx is encrypted in the ata<macaddress> file, and the ata<macaddress> file does not contain other sensitive information, Cisco recommends that for absolute security you pre-configure the Cisco ATA as described in this example for a private network. Alternatively, you should remove ata<macaddress> once EncryptKeyEx takes effect.


Example 2

In this example, a new Cisco ATA has already been deployed (with the EncryptKey value set) with a firmware version earlier than 2.16.2. The Cisco ATA needs to be upgraded to version 2.16.2 firmware or greater to use EncryptKeyEx parameter to encrypt its configuration file.

In this scenario, you would follow the same procedure as in Example 1, except that you would need to set the EncryptKey value to the previously configured EncryptKey value. The difference is that the ata<macaddress> file is now encrypted with EncryptKey because the Cisco ATA expects the ata<macaddress> file to be encrypted with EncryptKey. The Cisco ATA can then begin using the ata<macaddress>.x file that is encrypted with the EncryptKeyEx parameter.

Configuring the Cisco ATA to Obtain its Configuration File from the TFTP Server

This section describes three methods from which to choose how the Cisco ATA contacts the TFTP server to obtain its configuration file:

Using a DHCP Server

The Cisco ATA contacts the DHCP server, which provides the IP address of the TFTP server

The Cisco ATA uses the DHCP server but the DHCP server does not know about TFTP server

Without Using a DHCP Server


Note In the rare instance where no TFTP server is used, you must manually configure the CA0orCM0 parameter to instruct the Cisco ATA about how to register with Cisco CallManager. For this scenario, see the "CA0orCM0 and CA1orCM1" section on page 5-12.


Using a DHCP Server

When using a DHCP server, configuration settings vary depending on whether or not the DHCP server is under the control of the Cisco ATA system administrator or the service provider. The simplest configuration is when the DHCP server is under the control of the Cisco ATA administrator, in which case the DHCP server provides the IP address of the TFTP server. Depending on who controls the DHCP server, follow the applicable configuration procedure:

Procedure if DHCP Server is Under Control of Cisco ATA Administrator

Procedure if DHCP Server is not Under Control of Cisco ATA Administrator

This section also includes the topic:

Other DHCP Options You Can Set


Note If no DHCP server is found and the Cisco ATA is programmed to find one, the function button continues to blink.


Procedure if DHCP Server is Under Control of Cisco ATA Administrator

Procedure


Step 1 On the DHCP server, set one of the following three options:

DHCP option 150 (TFTP server IP address and, if applicable, IP address of alternate TFTP server).

DHCP field siaddr (TFTP server IP address). This field can be used by systems such as Cisco Integrated Communications Services (ICS).

Standard DHCP option 66 (TFTP server name and, if applicable, name of alternate TFTP server).

If you use DHCP option 150, the Cisco ATA will ignore the DHCP siaddr field and DHCP option 66. If DHCP option 150 is not used, the Cisco ATA next looks for the DHCP field siaddr. If neither DHCP option 150 nor the siaddr field are available, the Cisco ATA looks for DHCP option 66. If you use DHCP option 66 or the DHCP siaddr field, you must turn off DHCP option 150 or set its value to 0.


Note You can turn off the DHCP option 150 request by using the Cisco ATA OpFlags parameter (see the "OpFlags" section on page 5-24).


Step 2 Make sure to use default values for the following Cisco ATA parameters:

TftpUrl=0

AlttftpURL=0

UseTftp=1

DHCP=1

CA0orCM0=0

This completes the parameter settings and DHCP options you need to configure for this procedure. The Cisco ATA will contact the DHCP server for the IP address of the TFTP server that contains the Cisco ATA configuration file.


Note If you are configuring an alternate TFTP server, you can choose to configure its IP address or URL with the AlttftpURL parameter (see the "AlttftpURL" section on page 5-5) instead of with DHCP option 150. In this situation, the AlttftpURL will not be 0, as indicated in Step 2 of this procedure.



Procedure if DHCP Server is not Under Control of Cisco ATA Administrator

This is the procedure to use if the DHCP server is not under the control of the Cisco ATA administrator, which means that the URL of the TFTP server must be manually configured.

Procedure


Step 1 Using the voice configuration menu, set the parameter TftpURL to the IP address or URL of the TFTP server. For more information on setting the TftpURL parameter, see the "TftpURL" section on page 5-4. For information about using the Cisco ATA voice configuration menu, see the "Voice Configuration Menu" section.


Note If you are not using a DHCP server to provide the TFTP server location, you must manually configure the TftfURL. You can do this by using the voice configuration menu without first obtaining network connectivity for the Cisco ATA. If you want to configure this value using the Web configuration page, you first must obtain network connectivity by using the voice configuration menu to statically configure IP address information (see the "Voice Configuration Menu" section).


Step 2 If you have an alternate TFTP server that you also want to configure with the Cisco ATA configuration process, set the AlttftpURL parameter to the IP address or URL of the alternate TFTP server. For more information about the AlttftpURL parameter, see the "AlttftpURL" section on page 5-5.

Step 3 Use the default value of 1 for the Cisco ATA parameter DHCP.

Step 4 Use the default value of 1 for the Cisco ATA parameter UseTftp.

Step 5 Use the default value of 0 for the Cisco ATA parameter CA0orCM0.

This completes the parameter settings you need to configure for this procedure. The Cisco ATA will contact the manually configured TFTP server that contains the Cisco ATA configuration file.


Other DHCP Options You Can Set

The following parameters can also be configured with DHCP:

Boot file name of DHCP header—The ata<macaddress> binary Cisco ATA configuration file, which can have a maximum of 31 characters and can be any name with printable ASCII characters

Client PC address

DHCP option 1—Client Subnet Mask

DHCP option 3—Routers on the client's subnet

DHCP option 6—One or two Domain Name servers


Note DHCP options 43 and 60 are set by the Cisco ATA. Option 43 specifies the protocol and option 60 identifies the vendor class of the Cisco ATA box.


Without Using a DHCP Server

Use the following procedure if you are not using a DHCP server in your environment but are still using a TFTP server to obtain the Cisco ATA configuration file:

Procedure


Step 1 Set the DHCP parameter to 0.

Step 2 Set the UseTftp parameter to 1.

Step 3 Set the Cisco ATA parameter TftpURL to the IP address or URL of the TFTP server. For more information on setting the TftpURL parameter, see the "TftpURL" section on page 5-4.


Note If you are not using a DHCP server to provide the TFTP server location, you must manually enter the TftpURL using either the voice configuration menu or the web configuration page.


Step 4 If applicable, set the Cisco ATA parameter AlttftpURL to the IP address or URL of the alternate TFTP server. For more information about the AlttftpURL parameter, see the "AlttftpURL" section on page 5-5.

Step 5 If you have not already done so, statically configure the following parameters using the voice configuration menu (see the "Voice Configuration Menu" section). These are the parameters you need to configure for the Cisco ATA to obtain network connectivity:

StaticIP

StaticRoute

StaticNetMask

Other parameters that are normally supplied by DHCP may be provided statically by configuring their values. These parameters are:

DNS1IP

DNS2IP

Domain

This completes the parameter settings you need to configure in order for the Cisco ATA to contact the TFTP server (without using DHCP) that will contain the configuration file for the Cisco ATA.


Voice Configuration Menu

The main reasons to use the voice configuration menu are to establish IP connectivity for the Cisco ATA if a DHCP server is not being used in your network environment, and to reset the Cisco ATA to its factory values if necessary. You can also use the voice configuration menu if you need to configure a small number of parameters or if the web interface and TFTP configuration are not available.


Note Do not use the voice configuration menu to attempt to change any values that you configured by means of the TFTP configuration file method. Whenever the Cisco ATA resets, it downloads its ata<macaddress> configuration file or atadefault.cfg default configuration file from the TFTP server, and the values in either of these files will overwrite the values of any corresponding parameters configured with the voice configuration menu.


See Chapter 5, "Parameters and Defaults," for a complete list of parameters and their definitions. Also see Table 3-5 for an alphabetical listing of configurable features and references to their corresponding parameters.

This section contains the following topics:

Using the Voice Configuration Menu

Entering Alphanumeric Values

Resetting the Cisco ATA to Factory Default Values

Using the Voice Configuration Menu

To manually configure the Cisco ATA by using the voice configuration menu and the telephone keypad, perform the following steps:

Procedure


Step 1 Connect an analog touch-tone phone to the port labeled Phone 1 on the back of the Cisco ATA.

Step 2 Lift the handset and press the function button located on the top of the Cisco ATA. You should receive the initial voice configuration menu voice prompt.

Step 3 Using the telephone keypad, enter the voice menu code for the parameter that you want to configure or the command that you want to execute, then press #. For a list of voice menu codes, see Appendix B, "Voice Menu Codes."

Table 3-7 lists the menu options that you need to configure basic IP connectivity for the Cisco ATA, after which you can use the Cisco ATA web configuration page to configure additional parameters.


Note If you are using the voice configuration menu to statically configure the Cisco ATA IP address, you must disable DHCP by setting its value to 0.


Table 3-7 Parameters that Provide Basic IP Connectivity for the Cisco ATA  

Voice Menu Number
Features

1

StaticIP—IP address of the Cisco ATA.

2

StaticRoute—Default gateway for the Cisco ATA to use.

10

StaticNetMask—Subnet mask of the Cisco ATA.

20

DHCP—Set value to 0 to disable the use of a DHCP server; set value to 1 to enable DHCP.

21

Review the IP address of the Cisco ATA.

22

Review the default router for the Cisco ATA to use.

23

Review subnet mask of the Cisco ATA.


Step 4 Follow the voice prompts and enter the appropriate values, then press the # key.


Note Use the * key to indicate a delimiter (dot). For example, to enter an IP address of 192.168.3.1, you would enter 192*168*3*1 on your telephone keypad.



Note When entering values for a field that contains a hexadecimal value, you must convert the hexadecimal value to a decimal value in order to enter it into the voice configuration menu system. For example, to enter the hexadecimal value 0x6A, you would enter the number 106 on the telephone keypad.


The voice configuration menu repeats the value you entered, then prompts you to press one of the following keys:

1=Change your entered value

2=Review your entered value

3=Save your entered value

4=Review the current saved value

Step 5 Cisco strongly recommends that you set a password. Use the voice menu code 7387277 (SETPASS) to configure a password through the voice configuration menu, after which you are prompted for the password whenever you attempt to change a parameter value.

Step 6 After completing the configuration through the voice configuration menu, press the # key to exit.

Step 7 Hang up the telephone. The Cisco ATA configuration refreshes. The function button fast-blinks when the refresh is completed.


Entering Alphanumeric Values

Some voice configuration menu options require you to enter alphanumeric characters. Alphanumeric entry differs from numeric entry because you must press # after each character selected.

If you need to enter an alphanumeric value, the voice prompt tells you to enter an alphanumeric value; otherwise, enter a numeric value (0 to 9).

Table 3-8 lists the keys on a telephone keypad and their respective alphanumeric characters.

Using Table 3-8 as a guide, enter the appropriate number key on the telephone keypad as many times as needed to select the number, letter, or symbol required. For example, to enter 58sQ, you would enter:

5 # 8 # 7 7 7 7 7 # 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 # #

Table 3-8 Alphanumeric Characters  

Key
Alphanumeric Characters

1

1 ./_\ @*space return +-!,?|~^#=$"`'%<>[] :;{}()&

2

2 a b c A B C

3

3 d e f D E F

4

4 g h i G H I

5

5 j k l J K L

6

6 m n o M N O

7

7 p q r s P Q R S

8

8 t u v T U V

9

9 w x y z W X Y Z

0

0


Resetting the Cisco ATA to Factory Default Values

It is possible that you may, under some circumstances, want to reset the Cisco ATA to its factory default values. For example, this is the only way to recover a forgotten password without contacting your Cisco representative.

To perform a factory reset, you must use the voice configuration menu and follow these steps:

Procedure


Step 1 Press the function button on the Cisco ATA.

Step 2 Press the digits 322873738 (FACTRESET) then press # on the telephone keypad.

Step 3 Press * on your telephone keypad to confirm that you want to reset the Cisco ATA, then hang up the phone.


Cisco ATA Web Configuration Page

You can use the Cisco ATA web configuration page in a non-TFTP configuration environment, or in a TFTP configuration environment as a read-only record of individual customer parameters.

Figure 3-1 shows an example of the Cisco ATA web configuration page, which displays all configurable parameters.


Note Do not use the web configuration page to attempt to change any values that you configured by means of the TFTP configuration file method. Whenever the Cisco ATA resets, it downloads its ata<macaddress> configuration file or atadefault.cfg default configuration file from the TFTP server, and the values in either of these files will overwrite the values of any corresponding parameters configured with the Web configuration method.


Figure 3-1 Cisco ATA Web Configuration Page

You can access the web configuration page from any graphics-capable browser, such as Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape. This provides easy initial access to the Cisco ATA configuration within the administrator's private network.

Follow these steps to set parameters using the web configuration page:

Procedure


Step 1 Make sure that your PC and the Cisco ATA are already networked and visible to each another.

Step 2 Open your web browser.

Step 3 Enter the URL for your configuration page. The default URL for the web server is:

http://IP Address/dev

For example, the configuration page for a Cisco ATA with the IP address 192.168.3.225 is:

http://192.168.3.225/dev

Step 4 Select the values for the items that you want to configure. See Chapter 5, "Parameters and Defaults," for a complete list of parameters and their definitions. Also see Table 3-5 for an alphabetical listing of configurable features and references to their corresponding parameters.


Note Cisco strongly recommends that you set a password. Use the UIPassword parameter to configure a password, after which you are prompted for the password whenever you attempt to change a parameter value. Configuration parameters cannot be accessed through the voice configuration menu if the password contains one or more letters and can be changed only by using the web interface or the TFTP configuration method.


Step 5 Click apply to save your changes.

The Cisco ATA automatically refreshes its configuration.

Step 6 Close your web browser.


Resetting the Cisco ATA Using Cisco CallManager

Whenever you make configuration changes to the Cisco ATA, you must reset the Cisco ATA using the Cisco CallManager for these configuration changes to take effect. To reset the Cisco ATA, use the following procedure:

Procedure


Step 1 Go to the main Cisco CallManager Administration screen.

Step 2 Using voice configuration menu code 21, review the Cisco ATA IP address.

Step 3 From the Device pull-down menu, select Phone. The Find and List Phones screen appears.

Step 4 In the area next to the Find button, enter a portion or all of the Cisco ATA MAC address, then press Find. The Find and List Phones screen reappears, and now contains the Cisco ATAs that match the find criteria you entered in the previous screen.

Step 5 Click the icon of the Cisco ATA that you would like to reset. The Phone Configuration screen appears.

Step 6 Click the Reset Phone button on the Phone Configuration screen. The Reset Device pop-up window appears.

Step 7 Click Reset.

Step 8 A confirmation box appears. Click OK.


Upgrading the SCCP Signaling Image

For instructions on how to upgrade the Cisco ATA to the most recent SCCP signaling image, refer to the following list:

To use the recommended Cisco CallManager TFTP method of upgrading any or all Cisco ATAs at one time, see the "Upgrading the Signaling Image Via Cisco CallManager" section on page 7-2.

In the rare instance that you are not using the Cisco CallManager TFTP to configure the Cisco ATA and to obtain software upgrades, you must manually upgrade to the latest signaling image immediately after the Cisco ATA boots up. In this case, see the "Upgrading the Signaling Image Manually" section on page 7-4.