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Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch

Distributed MTP3

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Distributed MTP3 (A Link Configuration)

Table Of Contents

Distributed MTP3 (A Link Configuration)

OVERVIEW

PLANNING

Prerequisites

Restrictions and Limitations

INSTALLING

CONFIGURING

ISUP Provisioning Summary Steps

ISUP Provisioning Detailed Steps

TCAP Provisioning Summary Steps

TCAP Provisioning Detailed Steps

ITP Configuration

OPERATING

Billing Fields

Measurements

Announcements

Command Responses

Tones

Cause Codes

Recoverable and Non-Recoverable Error Codes

TROUBLESHOOTING

Logging On To The ITP

DPC Unavailable

DPC User Part Unavailable

DPC Congested

Signaling Gateway Group Is Out Of Service

Signaling Gateway Failure

Signaling Gateway Process Is Out Of Service

SCTP Association Failure

SCTP Association Degraded

SCTP Association Configuration Error

M3UA Cannot Go Active

M3UA Cannot Go Standby

BTS Events and Alarms

ITP Alarms

REFERENCES

CLI Reference Guide

Related Documents


Distributed MTP3 (A Link Configuration)

Feature History

Release
Modification

Release 4.4

This feature was introduced.


This document describes the Distributed MTP3 feature for the Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch and contains the following sections.

OVERVIEW

INSTALLING

CONFIGURING

OPERATING

TROUBLESHOOTING

REFERENCES

OVERVIEW

The Cisco IP Transfer Point (ITP) is a signaling gateway used for transporting Signaling System 7 (SS7) traffic over IP (SS7oIP) networks. An ITP group is used in combination with the BTS 10200 to form the SIGTRAN signaling solution.

An ITP group is an architecture in which two Signaling Gateway Processes (SGP) are combined to form one logical Signaling Gateway. The Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch Distributed MTP3 feature uses an ITP group to provide hardware redundancy and load sharing between the BTS 10200 Softswitch and the SS7 network. The ITP accesses the SS7 network using "A" (access) links.

In the Distributed MTP3 configuration, illustrated in Figure 0-1, the combination of an SG group and an OPC on the BTS10200 is viewed as a single SS7 entity from the service provider's SS7 network.


Note Refer to http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/wirelssw/ps1862/index.html for information about the Cisco ITP.


The basic interface of the Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch to the SS7 network is shown in Figure 0-1.

Figure 0-1 Distributed MTP3 Configuration

PLANNING

This section provides information on prerequisites and limitations applicable to the Distributed MTP3 feature.

Prerequisites

The Distributed MTP3 feature is configured only for the case where the ITP connects to the PSTN through "A" links. Cisco 2651XM, 7200VXR, and 7301 routers support the ITP feature.

Restrictions and Limitations

This feature is subject to the following restrictions:

The two ITPs that act as SGPs cannot be geographically separated. They may be connected through a switch but must exist in the same location.

Each ITP-group can only represent a single point code. For each OPC on the BTS, a separate ITP-group is required unless the ITP supports multi-instance in the ITP-group architecture.

In the Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch, up to eight point codes are supported using multiple ITP-groups, one ITP-group for each OPC.

INSTALLING

There are no new, modified, or deleted requirements for installation procedures for the Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch as a result of the features covered in this document.

CONFIGURING

This section provides examples of Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch ISUP and TCAP provisioning. The provisioning example configures two signaling gateway processes (SGP) per signaling gateway (SG) and one SG per signaling gateway group (SG-group), which is different from previous SG Group provisioning for support of D-link configuration on ITPs.


Note These tasks include examples of CLI commands that illustrate how to provision the specific feature. Most of these tables have additional tokens that are not included in the examples. For a complete list of all CLI tables and tokens, refer to the Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch Command Line Interface Reference Guide.


ISUP Provisioning Summary Steps

The network in Figure 0-1 is used as the reference for provisioning SS7, ISUP, and TCAP in the following sections.

1. Define the SS7 variant—ADD USER-PART-VARIANT

2. Add a signaling gateway—ADD SG

3. Add a signaling gateway group—ADD SG-GRP

4. Create signaling gateway processes—ADD SGP

5. Assign an origination point code—ADD OPC

6. Assign a destination point code—ADD DPC

7. Add a routing key—ADD ROUTING KEY

8. Add a call control route—ADD CALL-CTRL-ROUTE

9. Create an SCTP association profile—ADD SCTP-ASSOC-PROFILE

10. Add an SCTP association—ADD SCTP-ASSOC

11. Control the SCTP association INS—CONTROL SCTP-ASSOC

12. Verify the status of the SCTP association—STATUS SCTP-ASSOC

13. Verify the status of the DPC—STATUS DPC

ISUP Provisioning Detailed Steps

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

ADD USER-PART-VARIANT
Example:
ADD USER-PART-VARIANT ID=ANSISS7_GR317;

Defines the SS7 variant.

Step 2 

ADD SG
Example:
ADD SG ID=SG1; DESCRIPTION=Signaling gateway 1; 


Adds a signaling gateway.

Step 3 

ADD SG-GRP
Example:
ADD SG-GRP ID=SG-GRP1; SG1-ID=SG1; DESCRIPTION=SG group 1; 

Adds the signaling gateway to a signaling gateway group.

Step 4 

ADD SGP
Example:
ADD SGP ID=SG1-SGP1; SG-ID=SG1; DESCRIPTION=SG Process 1 for 
SG 1;

ADD SGP ID=SG1-SGP2; SG-ID=SG1; DESCRIPTION=SG Process 2 for 
SG 1;

Creates signaling gateway processes.

Step 5 

ADD OPC
Example:
ADD OPC ID=OPC1; POINT-CODE=229.1.1; DESCRIPTION=OPC 1; 
POINT-CODE-TYPE=ANSI_CHINA;

Assigns an origination point code for the Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch.

Step 6 

ADD DPC
Example:
ADD DPC ID=DPC1; POINT-CODE=250.1.10; DESCRIPTION=Remote SS7 
Point Code; POINT-CODE-TYPE=ANSI_CHINA;

ADD DPC ID=DPC2; Point-Code=250.1.50; DESCRIPTION=Remote SS7 
Point Code;


Assigns a destination point code for the SSP.

Step 7 

ADD ROUTING KEY
Example:
ADD ROUTING-KEY ID=RK1; OPC-ID=OPC1; SG-GRP-ID=SG-GRP1; 
SI=ISUP; RC=1; PLATFORM-ID=CA146;

Adds a routing key.

Step 8 

ADD CALL-CTRL-ROUTE
Example:
ADD CALL-CTRL-ROUTE ID=CCR-DPC1; DPC-ID=DPC1; 
ROUTING-KEY-ID=RK1; SI=ISUP; 
USER-PART-VARIANT=ANSISS7_GR317;

ADD CALL-CTRL-ROUTE ID=CCR-DPC2; DPC-ID=DPC2; 
ROUTING-KEY-ID=RK1; SI=ISUP; 
USER-PART-VARIANT=ANSISS7_GR317;

Adds a call control route.

Step 9 

ADD SCTP-ASSOC-PROFILE
Example:
ADD SCTP-ASSOC-PROFILE ID=SCTP-PROF1;

Creates an SCTP association profile.

Step 10 

ADD SCTP-ASSOC
Example:
ADD SCTP-ASSOC ID=SG1-SGP1-SCTP1; SGP-ID=SG1-SGP1; 
SCTP-ASSOC-PROFILE-ID=SCTP-PROF1; PLATFORM-ID=CA146; 
REMOTE-PORT=2905; REMOTE-TSAP-ADDR1=10.0.1.54; 
REMOTE-TSAP-ADDR2=10.128.1.239; DSCP=AF11; 
IP-TOS-PRECEDENCE=ROUTINE;

ADD SCTP-ASSOC ID-SG1-SGP2-SCTP1; SGP-ID=SG1-SGP2; 
SCTP-ASSOC-PROFILE-ID=SCTP-PROF1; PLATFORM-ID=CA146; 
REMOTE-PORT=2905; REMOTE-TSAP-ADDR1=10.0.1.55; 
REMOTE-TSAP-ADDR2=10.128.1.240; DSCP=AF11; 
ID-TOS-PRECEDENCE=ROUTINE;

Adds an SCTP association.

Note In the SCTP-ASSOC provisioning, the remote port should have already been configured on the ITPs to support SIGTRAN M3UA signaling traffic.

Step 11 

CONTROL SCTP-ASSOC
Example:
CONTROL SCTP-ASSOC ID=SG1-SGP1-SCTP1; MODE=FORCED; 
TARGET-STATE=INS;

CONTROL SCTP-ASSOC ID=SG1-SGP2-SCTP1; MODE=FORCED; 
TARGET-STATE=INS;

Place the SCTP-association INS

Step 12 

STATUS SCTP-ASSOC
Example:
STATUS SCTP-ASSOC ID=SG1-SGP1-SCTP1;

STATUS SCTP-ASSOC ID=SG1-SGP2-SCTP1;

Verify the status of the SCTP-association

Step 13 

STATUS DPC
Example:
STATUS DPC ID=DPC1;

STATUS DPC ID=DPC2;

Verify the status of the DPCs

TCAP Provisioning Summary Steps

The network in Figure 0-1 is used as the reference for provisioning SS7, ISUP, and TCAP in the following sections.

1. Add a signaling gateway—ADD SG

2. Add a signaling gateway group—ADD SG-GRP

3. Add a signaling gateway process—ADD SGP

4. Add an OPC—ADD OPC

5. Configure the LRN assigned to the POP—CHANGE POP

6. Assign a DPC—ADD DPC

7. Add an SCCP Network—ADD SCCP NETWORK

8. Add a subsystem profile—ADD SUBSYSTEM PROFILE

9. Add a subsystem—ADD SUBSYSTEM

10. Add a routing key—ADD ROUTING KEY

11. Add an SCTP association profile—ADD SCTP ASSOCIATION PROFILE

12. Add an SCTP association—ADD SCTP ASSOCIATION

13. Add an SCCP route—ADD SCCP ROUTE

14. Add an SLHR profile—ADD SLHR PROFILE

15. Add an SLHR—ADD SLHR

16. Add CA-Config—ADD CA_CONFIG

17. Control the SCTP associations INS—CONTROL SCTP-ASSOCIATION

18. Control the subsystems UIS—CONTROL SUBSYSTEM

19. Verify the SCTP association status—STATUS SCTP-ASSOC

20. Verify the subsystem status—STATUS SUBSYSTEM

21. Verify the DPC status—STATUS DPC

TCAP Provisioning Detailed Steps

If SG, SG-GRP, SGP, and OPC provisioing has already been performed for ISUP, you do not need to repeat Steps 1-4.

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

ADD SG
Example:
ADD SG ID=SG1; DESCRIPTION=Signaling gateway; 

Adds a signaling gateway.

Step 2 

ADD SG-GRP
Example:
ADD SG-GRP ID=SG-GRP1; SG1-ID=SG1; DESCRIPTION=SG group 1; 

Adds a signaling gateway group.

Step 3 

ADD SGP
Example:
ADD SGP ID=SG1-SGP1; SG-ID=SG1; DESCRIPTION=SG Process1 for 
SG1;

ADD SGP ID=SG1-SGP2; SG-ID=SG1; DESCRIPTION=SG Process 2 for 
SG1;

Creates signaling gateway processes.

Step 4 

ADD OPC
Example:
ADD OPC ID=OPC1; POINT-CODE=229.1.1; DESCRIPTION=OPC1;

Assigns an origination point code for the Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch.

Step 5 

CHANGE POP
Example:
CHANGE POP ID=69; OPC-ID=OPC1; MY_LRN=4692559999;

Configures the local routing number (LRN).

Step 6 

ADD DPC
Example:
ADD DPC ID=STP1; POINT-CODE=250.1.1; DESCRIPTION=STP1;

Adds the destination point code, the alias point code for the mated STP pair.

Step 7 

ADD SCCP NETWORK
Example:
ADD SCCP-NW ID=1; NET-IND=NATIONAL; SUB_SVC=NATIONAL; 
HOP-COUNT=3;

Adds an SCCP network.

Step 8 

ADD SUBSYSTEM PROFILE
Example:
ADD SUBSYSTEM-PROFILE ID=SS_LNP; PLATFORM-ID=FSAIN205; 
DESCRIPTION=LNP SUBSYSTEM;

ADD SUBSYSTEM-PROFILE ID=SS_800A; PLATFORM-ID=FSAIN205; 
DESCRIPTION=AIN 800 SUBSYSTEM;

ADD SUBSYSTEM-PROFILE ID=SS_CNAM; PLATFORM-ID=FSPTC235; 
DESCRIPTION=CNAM SUBSYSTEM;

Adds a subsystem profile for each subsystem.

Note For software Release 4.4 Q09 and earlier, use: ADD SUBSYSTEM-PROFILE ID=SS_CNAM; PLATFORM-ID=FSAIN205; DESCRIPTION=CNAM SUBSYSTEM;

Step 9 

ADD SUBSYSTEM 
Example:
ADD SUBSYSTEM ID=SS_LNP; OPC-ID=OPC1; LOCAL-SSN=247; 
REMOTE-SSN=247; SCCP-NW-ID=1; SCCP_VERSION=ANS92; 
TCAP_VERSION=ANS92; APPLICATION_VERSION=AIN01;

ADD SUBSYSTEM ID=SS_800A; OPC-ID=OPC1; LOCAL-SSN=248; 
REMOTE-SSN=248; SCCP-NW-ID=1; SCCP_VERSION=ANS92; 
TCAP_VERSION=ANS92; APPLICATION_VERSION=AIN01;

ADD SUBSYSTEM ID=SS_CNAM; OPC-ID=OPC1; LOCAL-SSN=232; 
REMOTE-SSN=232; SCCP-NW-ID=1; SCCP_VERSION=ANS92; 
TCAP_VERSION=ANS92; APPLICATION_VERSION=IN1;

Adds subsystems.

Step 10 

ADD ROUTING KEY
Example:
ADD ROUTING-KEY ID=RK_LNP; OPC-ID=OPC1; SG-GRP-ID=SG-GRP1; 
SI=SCCP; RC=4402; PLATFORM_ID=FSAIN205; SSN-ID=SS_LNP;

ADD ROUTING-KEY ID=RK_800A; OPC-ID=OPC1; SG-GRP-ID=SG-GRP1; 
SI=SCCP; RC=4403; PLATFORM_ID=FSAIN205; SSN-ID=SS_800A;

ADD ROUTING-KEY ID=RK_CNAM; OPC-ID=OPC1; SG-GRP-ID=SG-GRP1; 
SI=SCCP; RC=4404; PLATFORM_ID=FSPTC235; SSN-ID=SS_CNAM;

Adds routing keys.

Step 11 

ADD SCTP ASSOCIATION PROFILE
Example:
ADD SCTP-ASSOC-PROFILE ID=SCTP-PROF2; 

Adds an SCTP association profile.

Step 12 

ADD SCTP ASSOCIATION
Example:
ADD SCTP-ASSOC ID=SG1-SGP1-SCTP2; SGP-ID=SC1-SGP1; 
SCTP-ASSOC-PROFILE-ID=SCTP_PROF2; REMOTE_PORT=14001; 
REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR1=10.0.1.54; REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR2=10.128.1.239; 
PLATFORM_ID=FSAIN205; 

ADD SCTP-ASSOC ID=SG1-SGP2-SCTP2; SGP-ID=SG1-SGP2; 
SCTP-ASSOC-PROFILE-ID=SCTP_PROF2; REMOTE_PORT=14001; 
REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR1=10.0.1.55; REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR2=10.128.1.240; 
PLATFORM_ID=FSAIN205; 

ADD SCTP-ASSOC ID=SG1-SGP1-SCTP3; SGP-ID=SG1-SGP1; 
SCTP-ASSOC-PROFILE-ID=SCTP_PROF2; REMOTE_PORT=14035; 
REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR1=10.0.1.54; 
REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR2=10.128.1.239PLATFORM_ID=FSPTC235; 

ADD SCTP-ASSOC ID=SG1-SGP2-SCTP3; SGP-ID=SG1-SGP2; 
SCTP-ASSOC-PROFILE-ID=SCTP_PROF2; REMOTE_PORT=14035; 
REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR1=10.0.1.55; REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR2=10.128.1.240; 
PLATFORM_ID=FSPTC235; 

Adds SCTP associations.

Note In the SCTP-assoc provisioning, the remote port should have already been configured on the ITPs to support the SIGTRAN SUA signaling traffic from the FSAIN and FSPTC Feature Servers.

Step 13 

ADD SCCP ROUTE
Example:
ADD SCCP-ROUTE OPC-ID=OPC1; DPC-ID=STP1; SSN-ID=SS_LNP; 
RK-ID=RK_LNP;

ADD SCCP-ROUTE OPC-ID=OPC1; DPC-ID=STP1; SSN-ID=SS_800A; 
RK-ID=RK_800A;

ADD SCCP-ROUTE OPC-ID=OPC1; DPC-ID=STP1; SSN-ID=SS_CNAM; 
RK-ID=RK_CNAM;

Adds SCCP routes.

Step 14 

ADD SLHR PROFILE
Example:
ADD SLHR-PROFILE ID=SLHR_LNP; DESCRIPTION=SERVICE LOGIC HOST 
ROUTING TABLE FOR AIN LNP SERVICE;

ADD SLHR-PROFILE ID=SLHR_800A; DESCRIPTION=SERVICE LOGIC 
HOST ROUTING TABLE FOR AIN 800 SERVICE;

ADD SLHR-PROFILE ID=SLHR_CNAM; DESCRIPTION=SERVICE LOGIC 
HOST ROUTING TABLE FOR IN1 CNAM SERVICE;

Adds SLHR profiles.

Step 15 

ADD SLHR
Example:
add slhr ID=SLHR_LNP;  opc-id=OPC1; dpc-id=STP1; 
ssn-id=SS_LNP; gtt-req=Y; tt=11; GTT_ADDR_TYPE=CDPN; 
GTT_ADDR=3;

add slhr ID=SLHR_800A; opc-id=OPC1; dpc-id=STP1; 
ssn-id=SS_800A; gtt-req=Y; tt=8; GTT_ADDR_TYPE=CDPN; 
GTT_ADDR=3;

add slhr ID=SLHR_CNAM; opc-id=OPC1; dpc-id=STP1; 
ssn-id=SS_CNAM; gtt-req=Y; tt=5; GTT_ADDR_TYPE=CLGN; 
GTT_ADDR=3;

Adds SLHRs.

Step 16 

ADD CA_CONFIG
Example:
add CA-Config type=DEFAULT-TOLL-FREE-SLHR-ID; 
datatype=string; value=slhr_800a;

add CA-Config type=DEFAULT-LNP-SLHR-ID; datatype=string; 
value=slhr_lnp;

add CA-Config type=DEFAULT-LIDB-SLHR-ID; datatype=string; 
value=slhr_cnam;

add CA-Config type=SCP-RESPONSE-TMR; datatype=integer; 
value=6;

 

Step 17 

CONTROL SCTP-ASSOCIATION
Example:
control sctp-assoc id=SG1-SGP1-SCTP2; target-state=INS; 
mode=FORCED;

control sctp-assoc id=SG1-SGP2-SCTP2; target-state=INS; 
mode=FORCED;

control sctp-assoc id=SG1-SGP1-SCTP3; target-state=INS; 
mode=FORCED;

control sctp-assoc id=SG1-SGP2-SCTP3; target-state=INS; 
mode=FORCED;

Places the SCTP associations INS.

Step 18 

CONTROL SUBSYSTEM
Example:
control subsystem id=SS_LNP;  opc-id=OPC1; target-state=UIS;  
mode=FORCED;

control subsystem id=SS_800A; opc-id=OPC1; target-state=UIS;  
mode=FORCED;

control subsystem id=SS_CNAM; opc-id=OPC1; target-state=UIS;  
mode=FORCED;

Places the subsystems UIS.

Step 19 

STATUS SCTP-ASSOC
Example:
status sctp-assoc id=SG1-SGP1-SCTP2;
status sctp-assoc id=SG1-SGP2-SCTP2;
status sctp-assoc id=SG1-SGP1-SCTP3;
status sctp-assoc id=SG1-SGP2-SCTP3;

Verifies the status of the SCTP associations.

Step 20 

STATUS SUBSYSTEM
Example:
status subsystem id=SS_LNP;  opc-id=opc;
status subsystem id=SS_800A; opc-id=opc;
status subsystem id=SS_CNAM; opc-id=opc;

Verifies the status of the subsystems.

Step 21 

STATUS DPC
Example:
status dpc STP1;
status dpc STP2;

Verifies the status of the DPCs on both Feature Servers.

ITP Configuration

For information about configuring the Cisco ITP to communicate with the Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch, see the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps5012/products_feature_guide_chapter09186a008022d96a.html

OPERATING

This section explains how this feature affects the following operational areas:

Billing Fields

Measurements

Announcements

Command Responses

Tones

Cause Codes

Recoverable and Non-Recoverable Error Codes

Billing Fields

There are no new, modified, or deleted billing fields related to the feature described in this document.

Measurements

There are no new, modified, or deleted measurements related to the feature described in this document.

Announcements

There are no new, modified, or deleted announcements related to the feature described in this document.

Command Responses

There are no new, modified, or deleted command responses related to the feature described in this document.

Tones

There are no new, modified, or deleted command responses related to the feature described in this document.

Cause Codes

There are no new, modified, or deleted command responses related to the feature described in this document.

Recoverable and Non-Recoverable Error Codes

There are no new, modified, or deleted error codes related to the feature described in this document.

TROUBLESHOOTING

This section describes the corrective actions to take when one of the following alarms is raised. It is general SS7 troubleshooting information and is not specific only to Distributed MTP3.

DPC Unavailable

DPC User Part Unavailable

DPC Congested

Signaling Gateway Group Is Out Of Service

Signaling Gateway Failure

Signaling Gateway Process Is Out Of Service

SCTP Association Failure

SCTP Association Degraded

SCTP Association Configuration Error

M3UA Cannot Go Active

M3UA Cannot Go Standby

It also lists the BTS Events and Alarms revised as a result of this feature.

The following CLI commands are useful to query and clear these alarms:

show alarm type=signaling;
clear alarm id=<alarm-id>;
subscribe alarm-report type=signaling;

For further information about Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch alarms, refer to the Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch Operations and Maintenance Guide.

Logging On To The ITP

Some of the following troubleshooting sections require you to log on to the ITP. To log on, you require an associated console server or direct access through a console cable. You also need the username and password for the ITP. Troubleshooting will require that you are in enable mode. To get into enable mode, type enable after logging in. You will be prompted for the enable password.

DPC Unavailable

Alarm Type: Signaling(23)

Alarm Level: Major

This alarm indicates that the BTS1200 is unable to communicate with the specific DPC in the PSTN. Use the following steps to determine if the problem is a communication problem between the BTS and IPC or if it is a communication problem between the ITP and the DPC:


Step 1 Determine if there is an active Signaling Gateway Group Out Of Service alarm. This will occur if communication between the BTS and the SG group has been lost. If so, go to the "Signaling Gateway Group Is Out Of Service" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 2.

Step 2 Determine if there is an active M3UA Cannot Go Active alarm. This will occur if, at the time of startup or failover, the BTS10200 Softswitch is unable to communicate with any of the SGs. If so, go to the "M3UA Cannot Go Active" section. Otherwise, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Valid communication probably exists between the BTS and the ITP at the M3UA layer. A communications problem exists between the ITP and the DPC that is unavailable. To determine this:

a. Log on to the ITP

b. Get in enable mode

c. Enter show cs7 route. The response will tell you if the associated DPC is accessible or not and will look similar to the following:

va-2651-82#show cs7route
Destination      Prio          Linkset Name                  Route
--------------- ------  ------------------------------  ------------------------------
229.123.2/24     INACC        1 lset1chn                      UNAVAIL

d. Determine if the problem is at the linkset level by entering show cs7 link. If the ITP indicates that the DPC is available, there is a mismatch between the ITP and the BTS reporting. Contact the Cisco TAC for assistance.

Step 4 Check whether the DPC has been removed from the BTS database. Enter show call-ctrl-route at the BTS CLI prompt to see if the DPC is in any of the routes. If not, the alarm was raised before the associated routes were deleted. In this case, manually clear the alarm.

Step 5 If you are still unable to resolve the problem, contact the Cisco TAC.


DPC User Part Unavailable

Alarm Type: Signaling(116)

Alarm Level: Major

This alarm indicates that a layer 4 user part protocol, such as ISUP, is unavailable at the DPC in the PSTN. Contact your SS7 service provider for assistance.

DPC Congested

Alarm Type: Signaling

Alarm Level: Minor

This alarm indicates that the DPC in the PSTN is receiving more traffic than it can process. If the network type is National, as is usually the case in the United States, there will also be a level of congestion associated with the alarm. The ITP should continually communicate to the DPC in the PSTN to determine if congestion has abated.

If this alarm does not clear or keeps reappearing after clearing, contact your SS7 service provider for assistance.

Signaling Gateway Group Is Out Of Service

Alarm Type: Signaling(110)

Alarm Level: Critical

This alarm indicates that after communication to the SG group was UP, is was subsequently lost. Communication to associated SGs are down, which also indicates that communication to all SGPs are down. Refer to the "Signaling Gateway Failure" section to determine why the associated SGs are down.

Signaling Gateway Failure

Alarm Type: Signaling(113)

Alarm Level: Major

This alarm indicates that communication at the M3UA layer between the BTS and the SG has failed. M3UA communication to all SGPs that make up the SG are unavailable. Refer to the "Signaling Gateway Process Is Out Of Service" section to determine why the associated SGPs are down.

Signaling Gateway Process Is Out Of Service

Alarm Type: Signaling(114)

Alarm Level: Major

This alarm indicates that communication at the M3UA layer between the BTS and the SGP has failed. If there is also an SCTP Association Failure alarm present, go to the "SCTP Association Failure" section. Otherwise, the problem is at the M3UA layer. Contact Cisco TAC for assistance.

SCTP Association Failure

Alarm Type: Signaling(109)

Alarm Level: Major

This alarm indicates that the BTS is unable to communicate with an SGP at the SCTP protocol level. Use the following steps to determine the source of the problem.


Step 1 Determine if the SCTP association has been taken out of service:

a. Enter the following command on the CLI command line:

status sctp-assoc id=<sctp-assoc-name>;

If the response shows ADMIN STATE is ADMIN_OOS, the SCTP association has been taken administratively out of service. Proceed to substep b.

b. Enter the following command to put the SCTP association back in service:

control sctp-assoc id=<sctp-assoc-name>; mode=forced; target-state=INS;

c. If the ADMIN STATE is ADMIN_INS, determine if the SCTP association has been taken out of service on the ITP. Attempt to log on to the ITP. If you cannot log on to the ITP, proceed to Step 2.If you are able to log on to the ITP, proceed to Substep d.

d. Check the state of the associated ASP by entering the following command:

sho cs7 asp

The ITP will issue a response similar to the following:

ASP Name     AS Name     State           Type     RMT Port     Remote IP Addr      SCTP

---------------   --------------   --------          --------   ----------------  ----------------------    ------------

hrn11asp       hrn11bts     shutdown    M3UA     11146        10.0.5.13

If the state shows down, proceed to Step 2.

If the state is inactive, the ASP is probably on the standby BTS, which is normal.

If the ASP on the active BTS is inactive, proceed to Step 7.

If the state is not one of the above, contact the Cisco TAC.

Step 2 Determine if the problem is due to an IP address or port configuration mismatch between the ITP and the BTS.

a. Determine the BTS configured values for the BTS IP address and port in the/opt/OptiCall/CA146/bin/platform.cfg file. Go to this directory and enter:

cat platform.cfg | grep mdl

The response will look similar to the following:

Args=-t 1 -h mgcp-HRN11CA.hrndevtest.cisco.com -p 11146 -mdldir ../mdl -mdltracedir 
../mdltrace -mdltestmode 0 -mdlloadmdo 0 -mdltriggertimer 200 -mdlgarbagetimer 5146 
-resetcics 1 -fcmtimer 900 -fcmparalleljobs 4

The local IP port number is shown directly after the -p option.

b. The local IP addresses that are used by the BTS are derived from theDNS name that is given after the -h option. Determine the IP addresses that are associated with the DNS name by entering the following command:

nslookup <DNS NAME>

The response will look similar to the following:

Server:  hrnbtsjs-1.cisco.com
Address:  10.82.70.199
Name:    mgcp-HRN11CA.hrndevtest.cisco.com
Addresses:  10.0.5.136, 10.128.1.147

The BTS configured local IP addresses are given in the Addresses: line.

c. Determine the ITP configured values of the ITP BTS IP addresses and port Log on to the ITP, get into enable mode, and enter the following command:

show run

Push enter until the ASP configurations are displayed. You see a line similar to the following which will show you the ITP configured values for the BTS IP addresses of the SCTP association:

cs7 asp hrn11asp 11146 2905 m3ua
remote-ip 10.0.5.136
remote-ip 10.128.1.147

The number after the ASP name, hrn11asp, is the port number that the ITP has configured for the BTS side of the SCTP association. The two remote-ip addresses are the addresses that the ITP has configured for the BTS side of the SCTP association. Make sure all of these values match the values found in Steps 2A and 2B. If they don't, fix the configuration. If they do, proceed to step 2D.

d. Determine the BTS configured values for the ITP IP addresses and port. At the BTS CLI prompt, enter the following command:

show sctp-assoc id-<SCTP assoc id>;

You will see a response similar to the following:

REMOTE_PORT=2905
REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR1=10.0.1.54
REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR2=10.128.1.239

e. Determine the ITP configured values of the ITP BTS IP addresses and port number. Log on to the ITP, change to enable mode, and enter show run. Hit enter until the M3UA or SUA configuration is displayed. You will see a response similar to the following:

cs7 m3ua 2905
local-ip 10.0.1.54
local-ip 10.128.1.239

Verify that these are the same values as found in Substep D. If not, fix the configuration. If they match, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3 Determine if any Ethernet connections on the BTS have been either pulled or cut or communication has been lost to the IP router. In the platform.log, look for the following ERROR message: "All the IP interfaces are faulty!!" If this message is found, repair the Ethernet connections of the BTS. If not, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Determine if the problem is an IP routing issue.

a. To verify what has been provisioned in the BTS for the destination IP interfaces of the SCTP association, at a CLI prompt, enter:

show sctp-association id=<sctp-assoc-id> 

You will see a response similar to the following:

REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR1=10.0.1.54
REMOTE_TSAP_ADDR2=10.128.1.239

b. Issue the ping command to each of the destination IP addresses. If the ITP does not respond to at least one of the pings, there is an IP routing problem that has disabled SCTP communication. Contact the Cisco TAC for assistance. If the ITP responds to at least one ping command, proceed to Step 5.

Step 5 The previous step determined that the ITP is reachable from the BTS. Now determine if the BTS is reachable from the ITP.

a. Log on to the ITP and get into enable mode.

b. To find the BTS SCTP association endpoint IP addresses, enter show run.

c. Press enter until the ASP configurations are displayed. You will see information similar to the following:

cs7 asp hrn11asp 11146 2905 m3ua
remote-ip 10.0.5.136
remote-ip 10.128.1.147

The two remote IP addresses are the addresses that the ITP has configured for the BTS side of the SCTP associations.

d. Issue the ping command to each of the destination IP addresses. If the BTS does not respond to at least one of the pings, there is an IP routing problem that has disabled SCTP communication. Contact the Cisco TAC for assistance. If the BTS responds to at least one ping command, proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Take the SCTP association administratively out of service and then in service on the BTS side.

a. Issue the following commands at the BTS CLI prompt:

control sctp-assoc id=<sctp-assoc-name>; mode=forced; target-state=OOS;
control sctp-assoc id=<sctp-assoc-name>; mode=forced; target-state=INS;

b. Check if the SCTP association has come back into service by entering the following CLI command:

status sctp-assoc id=<sctp-assoc-name>;

You will see a response similar to one of the following:

OPER STATE -> SCTP-ASSOC out of service

or

OPER STATE -> SCTP-ASSOC in service

If the OPER STATE still shows that the SCTP association is out-of-service, proceed to Step 7.

Step 7 Take the SCTP association administratively out of service and then in service on the ITP side.

a. Log on to the ITP and enter enable mode.

b. Get into configure mode by entering configure terminal.

c. Enter the following commands to attempt to bounce the SCTP association back in service:

va-2651-82(config)#cs7 asp hrn11asp
va-2651-82(config-cs7-asp)#shut
va-2651-82(config-cs7-asp)#no shut
va-2651-82(config-cs7-asp)#end

d. Determine if the SCTP association has come back in service by entering the following command:

status sctp-assoc id=<sctp-assoc-name>;

The output will be similar to one of the following:

OPER STATE -> SCTP-ASSOC out of service

<OR>

OPER STATE -> SCTP-ASSOC in service

If the OPER STATE still shows that the SCTP association is out-of-service, proceed to Step 8.

Step 8 The problem is probably an SCTP communication issue that will have to be debugged at the SCTP protocol level. Please contact the Cisco TAC for assistance.


SCTP Association Degraded

Alarm Type: Signaling(111)

Alarm Level: Major (Changed from Minor)

This alarm indicates that one of the two sides of the multi-homed SCTP connection is down. Communication will still exist of the other side of the multi-homed connection is up. Refer to SCTP Association Failure, or contact the Cisco TAC for assistance.

SCTP Association Configuration Error

Alarm Type: Signaling(112)

Alarm Level: Minor

This alarm indicates that a provisioning error is preventing the BTS from properly configuring the SCTP association.


Step 1 Look at the platform.log file for an error message with the following string: MIM CFG

Step 2 Refer to Step 2 of the SCTP Association Failure section to verify that your IP addresses and ports are properly configured on the BTS.

Step 3 If you are still experiencing problems, contact the Cisco TAC for assistance.


M3UA Cannot Go Active

Alarm Type: Signaling( )

Alarm Level: Major

This alarm is raised at initial startup or during failover by the BTS node that is trying to go into Active mode. It occurs when this BTS node is unable to communicate properly with any ITPs to tell them that all active call traffic should now be routed towards this BTS. See the Signaling Gateway Process Is Out Of Service section to determine why the BTS is unable to communicate with any of the ITPs at the M3UA layer.

M3UA Cannot Go Standby

Alarm Type: Signaling(121 )

Alarm Level: Major

This alarm is raised during startup by the BTS node that is trying to go into Standby mode. See the Signaling Gateway Process Is Out Of Service section to determine why the BTS is unable to communicate with any of the ITPs at the M3UA layer.

BTS Events and Alarms

The level of the following alarm was changed for this feature.

SIGNALING #111

SCTP Association Degraded (one of two IP connections down)

Level

MAJOR

Threshold/Throttle

100 / 0

Data Reported

N/A

Probable Cause

One of the two sides of the multi-homed SCTP connection is down. Communication still exists if the other side of the multi-homed connection is up.

Corrective Action

Contact the Cisco TAC to resolve the issue.


ITP Alarms

For information regarding ITP alarming, refer to the Cisco Signaling Gateway Manager (SGM) tool at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/wirelssw/ps2153/index.html

REFERENCES

The following sections provide references related to Distributed MTP3 feature.

CLI Reference Guide

There are no new, modified, or deleted CLI commands or tokens related to the feature described in this document.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Release Notes, Release 4.4

Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch Release Notes for Release 4.4

System Overview

Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch System Description, Release 4.4

Provisioning

Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch Provisioning Guide,Release 4.1, 4.2, and 4.4

CLI Commands

Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch Command Line Interface Reference Guide, Software Releases 4.1, 4.2, 4.4.1, and 4.4

Operations and Maintenance

Cisco BTS 10200 Softswitch Operations and Maintenance Guide