Cisco UCS C22 Server Installation and Service Guide
Maintaining the Server
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Table of Contents

Maintaining the Server

Server Monitoring and Management Tools

Cisco Integrated Management Interface (Cisco IMC)

Server Configuration Utility

Status LEDs and Buttons

Front Panel LEDs

Rear Panel LEDs and Buttons

Preparing for Server Component Installation

Required Equipment

Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server

Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover

Removing and Replacing the Front Chassis Panel

Replaceable Component Locations

Serial Number Location

Color-Coded Touch Points

Installing or Replacing Server Components

Replacing Hard Drives or Solid State Drives

Drive Population Guidelines

Drive Replacement Procedure

Replacing a Front Operations Panel Board

Replacing a Drive Backplane

Replacing Fan Modules

Replacing DIMMs

Memory Performance Guidelines and Population Rules

DIMM Replacement Procedure

Replacing CPUs and Heatsinks

Special Information For Upgrades to Intel E5-2400 v2 Series CPUs

Single-CPU Restrictions

CPU Replacement Procedure

Additional CPU-Related Parts To Order With RMA Replacement Motherboards

Replacing the Motherboard RTC Battery

Replacing a PCIe Riser

Replacing a PCIe Card

PCIe Slots

Replacing a PCIe Card

Special Considerations for Cisco UCS Virtual Interface Cards

RAID Controller Card Cable Routing

Installing Multiple PCIe Cards and Resolving Limited Resources

Replacing an Internal USB Flash Drive

Internal USB Flash Drive Replacement Procedure

Enabling or Disabling the Internal USB Port

Replacing the SuperCap Power Module (RAID Backup Unit)

Installing a Trusted Platform Module

Enabling the Intel Trusted Execution Technology (TXT) Feature For the TPM

Replacing a SCU Upgrade ROM Module

Replacing a Software RAID Key Module

Replacing Power Supplies

Maintaining the Server

This chapter describes how to diagnose server system problems using LEDs. It also provides information about how to install or replace hardware components, and it includes the following sections:

Server Monitoring and Management Tools

Cisco Integrated Management Interface (Cisco IMC)

You can monitor the server inventory, health, and system event logs by using the built-in Cisco Integrated Management Controller (Cisco IMC) GUI or CLI interfaces. See the user documentation for your firmware release at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps10739/products_installation_and_configuration_guides_list.html

Server Configuration Utility

Cisco has also developed the Cisco UCS Server Configuration Utility for C-Series servers, which can aid and simplify the following tasks:

  • Monitoring server inventory and health
  • Diagnosing common server problems with diagnostic tools and logs
  • Setting the BIOS booting order
  • Configuring some RAID configurations
  • Installing operating systems

You can download the ISO from Cisco.com. See the user documentation for your version of the utility at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps10493/products_user_guide_list.html

Status LEDs and Buttons

This section describes the location and meaning of LEDs and buttons and includes the following topics:

Front Panel LEDs

Figure 3-1 shows the front panel LEDs. Table 3-1 defines the LED states.

Figure 3-1 Front Panel LEDs

 

1

Power button/Power status LED

6

Power supply status LED

2

Identification button/LED

7

Network link activity LED

3

System status LED

8

Hard drive fault LED

4

Fan status LED

9

Hard drive activity LED

5

Temperature status LED

 

Table 3-1 Front Panel LEDs, Definitions of States

LED Name
State

Power button/Power status LED

  • Off—There is no AC power to the server.
  • Amber—The server is in standby power mode. Power is supplied only to the Cisco IMC and some motherboard functions.
  • Green—The server is in main power mode. Power is supplied to all server components.

Identification

  • Off—The Identification LED is not in use.
  • Blue—The Identification LED is activated.

System status

  • Green—The server is running in normal operating condition.
  • Green, blinking—The server is performing system initialization and memory check.
  • Amber, steady—The server is in a degraded operational state. For example:

Power supply redundancy is lost.

CPUs are mismatched.

At least one CPU is faulty.

At least one DIMM is faulty.

At least one drive in a RAID configuration failed.

  • Amber, blinking—The server is in a critical fault state. For example:

Boot failed.

Fatal CPU and/or bus error is detected.

Server is in over-temperature condition.

Fan status

  • Green—All fan modules are operating properly.
  • Amber, steady—One fan module has failed.
  • Amber, blinking—Critical fault, two or more fan modules have failed.

Temperature status

  • Green—The server is operating at normal temperature.
  • Amber, steady—One or more temperature sensors have exceeded a warning threshold.
  • Amber, blinking—One or more temperature sensors have exceeded a critical threshold.

Power supply status

  • Green—All power supplies are operating normally.
  • Amber, steady—One or more power supplies are in a degraded operational state.
  • Amber, blinking—One or more power supplies are in a critical fault state.

Network link activity

  • Off—The Ethernet link is idle.
  • Green—One or more Ethernet LOM ports are link-active, but there is no activity.
  • Green, blinking—One or more Ethernet LOM ports are link-active, with activity.

Hard drive fault

  • Off—The hard drive is operating properly.
  • Amber—This hard drive has failed.
  • Amber, blinking—The device is rebuilding.

Hard drive activity

  • Off—There is no hard drive in the hard drive sled (no access, no fault).
  • Green—The hard drive is ready.
  • Green, blinking—The hard drive is reading or writing data.

Rear Panel LEDs and Buttons

Figure 3-2 shows the rear panel LEDs and buttons. Table 3-2 defines the LED states.

Figure 3-2 Rear Panel LEDs and Buttons

 

 

1

Power supply fault LED

5

10/100/1000 Ethernet dedicated management link status LED

2

Power supply AC OK LED

6

10/100/1000 Ethernet dedicated management link speed LED

3

1-Gb Ethernet link speed LED

7

Rear Identification button/LED

4

1-Gb Ethernet link status LED

 

Table 3-2 Rear Panel LEDs, Definitions of States

LED Name
State

Power supply fault

  • Off—The power supply is operating normally.
  • Amber, blinking—An event warning threshold has been reached, but the power supply continues to operate.
  • Amber, solid—A critical fault threshold has been reached, causing the power supply to shut down (for example, a fan failure or an over-temperature condition).

Power supply AC OK

  • Off—There is no AC power to the power supply.
  • Green, blinking—AC power OK, DC output not enabled.
  • Green, solid—AC power OK, DC outputs OK.

1-Gb Ethernet link speed

  • Off—link speed is 10 Mbps.
  • Amber—link speed is 100 Mbps.
  • Green—link speed is 1 Gbps.

1-Gb Ethernet link status

  • Off—No link is present.
  • Green—Link is active.
  • Green, blinking—Traffic is present on the active link.

10/100/1000 Ethernet dedicated management link speed

  • Off—link speed is 10 Mbps.
  • Amber—link speed is 100 Mbps.
  • Green—link speed is 1 Gbps.

10/100/1000 Ethernet dedicated management link status

  • Off—No link is present.
  • Green—Link is active.
  • Green, blinking—Traffic is present on the active link.

Identification

  • Off—The Identification LED is not in use.
  • Blue—The Identification LED is activated.

Preparing for Server Component Installation

This section describes how to prepare for component installation, and it includes the following topics:

Required Equipment

The following equipment is used to perform the procedures in this chapter:

  • Number 2 Phillips-head screwdriver
  • Electrostatic discharge (ESD) strap or other grounding equipment such as a grounded mat

Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server

The server can run in two power modes:

  • Main power mode—Power is supplied to all server components and any operating system on your drives can run.
  • Standby power mode—Power is supplied only to the service processor and the cooling fans and it is safe to power off the server (remove power cords) from this mode.

You can invoke a graceful shutdown or an hard shutdown by using either of the following methods:

  • Use the Cisco IMC management interface.
  • Use the Power button on the server front panel. To use the Power button, follow these steps:

Step 1 Check the color of the Power Status LED (see the “Front Panel LEDs” section).

  • Green—the server is in main power mode and must be shut down before it can be safely powered off. Go to Step 2.
  • Amber—the server is already in standby mode and can be safely powered off. Go to Step 3.

Step 2 Invoke either a graceful shutdown or a hard shutdown:


Caution To avoid data loss or damage to your operating system, you should always invoke a graceful shutdown of the operating system.

  • Graceful shutdown—Press and release the Power button. The operating system performs a graceful shutdown and the server goes to standby mode, which is indicated by an amber Power Status LED.
  • Emergency shutdown—Press and hold the Power button for 4 seconds to force the main power off and immediately enter standby mode.

Step 3 Disconnect the power cords from the power supplies in your server to completely power off the server.


 

Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover

To remove or replace the top cover of the server, follow these steps:


Tip You do not have to remove the cover to replace hard drives or the power supply.



Step 1 Remove the top cover (see Figure 3-3):

a. Loosen the captive thumbscrew screw that secures the rear edge of the cover to the chassis.

b. Push the cover toward the server rear about one-half inch (1.27 cm), until it stops.

c. Lift the cover straight up from the server and set it aside.

Step 2 Replace the top cover:

a. Place the cover on top of the server about one-half inch (1.27 cm) behind the lip of the front chassis panel. The cover should sit flat.


Note The flanges on the top cover must slide underneath the front chassis panel.


b. Slide the top cover toward the front chassis panel, sliding the flanges on the top cover underneath the front chassis panel.

c. Tighten the captive thumbscrew that secures the rear edge of the cover to the chassis.

Figure 3-3 Removing the Top Cover or Front Chassis Panel

 

1

Front panel lip

4

Top cover

2

Front chassis panel

5

Top cover thumbscrew

3

Front chassis panel securing screws
(two, one on each side of the panel)


 

Removing and Replacing the Front Chassis Panel

To remove or replace the front chassis panel of the server, follow these steps:


Tip Remove this panel only if you are instructed to do so in a procedure in this book.



Step 1 Remove the front chassis panel (see Figure 3-3):

a. Remove the top cover from the server as described in Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover.


Note If you have a newer version of the server, the front chassis panel has no screws but instead lifts off after the top cover is removed. If you have an older version of the server that has screws on the front chassis panel, continue with the following steps.


b. Use a #2 Phillips-head screwdriver to remove the two screws that secure the front chassis panel to the chassis (see Figure 3-3).

c. Push the panel toward the server rear about one-half inch (1.27 cm), until its front flanges are free from the front panel lip.

d. Lift the panel straight up from the server and set it aside.

Step 2 Replace the front chassis panel:

a. Set the front chassis panel back in place, about one-half inch (1.27 cm) behind the front panel lip.


Note The flanges on the panel must slide under the front chassis lip.


b. Slide the front chassis panel toward the front chassis lip, sliding the flanges on the panel underneath the front chassis lip.


Note If you have a newer version of the server, the front chassis panel has no screws but is instead held in place by spring-clips. If you have an older version of the server that has screws on the front chassis panel, continue with the following steps.


c. Replace the two screws that secure the panel to the chassis (see Figure 3-3).

d. Replace the top cover to the server as described in Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover.


 

Replaceable Component Locations

This section shows the locations of the components that are discussed in this chapter. The view in Figure 3-4 is from the top down with the top cover, front chassis panel, and air baffle removed.

Figure 3-4 Replaceable Component Locations

 

1

Drives (hot-swappable,
accessed through front panel)

9

RTC battery on motherboard

2

Front operations panel board

10

PCIe riser 2 (PCIe slot 2)

3

Drive backplane

11

Trusted platform module socket on motherboard (not visible under PCIe riser 2)

4

Cooling fans (five)

12

Power supply
(accessed through rear panel)

5

DIMM slots on motherboard (twelve)

13

Integrated SAS RAID connectors on motherboard

(left to right, SCU_Port 0, SCU_Port 1)

6

CPUs and heatsinks (two)

14

SW RAID 5 key header on motherboard

7

PCIe riser 1 (PCIe slot 1)

15

RAID SCU option ROM header on motherboard

8

Internal USB 2.0 port
(on motherboard under PCIe riser 1)

16

Mounting point for SuperCap power module (RAID backup unit)

Serial Number Location

The serial number for the server is printed on a label on the top of the server, near the front.

Color-Coded Touch Points

This server has color-coded touch points that indicate thumbscrews and latches on replaceable and hot-swappable components.

  • Hot-swappable components have green plastic touch points. This includes the power supplies. (Exceptions are the drive trays on the front panel, which are hot-swappable but not green).
  • Some replaceable but non-hot-swappable components have light-blue plastic touch-points.

Installing or Replacing Server Components


Warning Blank faceplates and cover panels serve three important functions: they prevent exposure to hazardous voltages and currents inside the chassis; they contain electromagnetic interference (EMI) that might disrupt other equipment; and they direct the flow of cooling air through the chassis. Do not operate the system unless all cards, faceplates, front covers, and rear covers are in place.
Statement 1029



Warning Class 1 laser product.
Statement 1008



Caution When handling server components, wear an ESD strap to avoid damage.


Tip You can press the Identification button on the front panel or rear panel to turn on a flashing Identification LED on the front and rear panels of the server. This allows you to locate the specific server that you are servicing when you go to the opposite side of the rack. You can also activate these LEDs remotely by using the Cisco IMC interface. See the “Status LEDs and Buttons” section for locations of these LEDs.


This section describes how to install and replace server components, and it includes the following topics:

Replacing Hard Drives or Solid State Drives

This section includes the following information:

Drive Population Guidelines

The server has two different drive backplane options:

  • The Small Form Factor version can hold up to eight 2.5-inch drives.
  • The Large Form Factor version can hold up to four 3.5-inch drives.

The drive-bay numbering is shown in Figure 3-5 and Figure 3-6.

Figure 3-5 Drive Numbering, Small Form Factor

 

Figure 3-6 Drive Numbering, Large Form Factor

 

Observe these drive population guidelines for optimum performance:

  • When populating drives, add drives to the lowest-numbered bays first.
  • Keep an empty drive blanking tray in any unused bays to ensure proper air flow.
  • You can mix hard drives and SSDs in the same server. However, You cannot configure a logical volume (virtual drive) that contains a mix of hard drives and SSDs. That is, when you create a logical volume, it must contain all hard drives or all SSDs.

Drive Replacement Procedure

To replace or install a hot-pluggable hard drive, follow these steps:


Tip You do not have to shut down or power off the server to replace hard drives or solid state drives (SSDs) because they are hot-pluggable.



Step 1 Remove the drive that you are replacing or remove a blank drive tray from the bay:

a. Press the release button on the face of the drive tray. See Figure 3-7.

b. Grasp and open the ejector lever and then pull the drive tray out of the slot.

c. If you are replacing an existing drive, remove the four drive-tray screws that secure the drive to the tray and then lift the drive out of the tray.

Step 2 Install a new drive:

a. Place a new drive in the empty drive tray and install the four drive-tray screws.

b. With the ejector lever on the drive tray open, insert the drive tray into the empty drive bay.

c. Push the tray into the slot until it touches the backplane, then close the ejector lever to lock the drive in place.

Figure 3-7 Replacing Hard Drives

 

1

Ejector lever

3

Drive tray securing screws (4)

2

Release button


 

Replacing a Front Operations Panel Board

The front operations panel board contains the front panel LEDs, Power and Identification buttons, and the front USB ports.

To replace a front operations panel board, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove the front operations panel board that you are replacing. See Figure 3-9:

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Remove the front chassis panel as described in Removing and Replacing the Front Chassis Panel.

e. Disconnect the two ribbon cables from the front operations panel board.

To disconnect the ribbon cables, open their hinged connectors.

f. Use a #2 Phillips-head screwdriver to remove the two screws that secure the board to the chassis.

g. Slide the board back from the front panel openings until the keyed slots on the front corners of the board can be lifted over the chassis pegs.

h. Lift the board up and off the pegs and remove it from the chassis.

Step 2 Replace a front operations panel board:

a. Set the board in place with the keyed slots in the front corners of the board over the two chassis pegs.


Note When you slide the board forward in the next step, be careful to align the LED light-pipes on the board with the openings in the server front panel.


b. Slide the board forward to lock the keyed slots onto the pegs.

c. Replace the two screws that secure the board to the chassis.

d. Reconnect the two ribbon cables to the board.

Open a hinged connector and insert the end of a ribbon cable squarely into the connector until it stops, and then close the hinged connector.


Note The side of the cable end that is colored blue should face upward.


e. Replace the front chassis panel.

f. Replace the top cover.

g. Replace the server in the rack, replace cables, and then power on the server by pressing the Power button.

Figure 3-8 Replacing the Front Operations Panel Board

 

1

Hinged ribbon-cable connectors (two)

2

Securing screws (two)

Replacing a Drive Backplane


Note The Small Form Factor (eight-drive) and Large Form Factor (four-drive) backplanes are factory-configurable options. When replacing a backplane, you must replace it only with the same version of the backplane.


To install or replace a drive backplane, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove the drive backplane that you are replacing. See Figure 3-9:

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Remove the front chassis panel as described in Removing and Replacing the Front Chassis Panel.

e. Remove all drives from the server.


Tip Label the drives as you remove them to aid replacement.


f. Disconnect all cables from the backplane.


Tip Label the cables as you disconnect them to aid replacement.


g. Disconnect the two ribbon cables from the front operations panel board and pull them out of the opening in the backplane assembly to provide clearance.

To disconnect the ribbon cables, open their hinged connectors.

h. Use a #2 Phillips-head screwdriver to remove the four screws that secure the backplane to the chassis (see Figure 3-9).


Note Two of the backplane screws secure the backplane to the chassis floor; the other two securing screws are accessed from the outside of the server, one on each side.


i. Lift straight up on the backplane to disengage it from its guides on the chassis walls.

Step 2 Install a new drive backplane:

a. Set the backplane in place and then slide it down within the guides on the chassis walls until it sits on the chassis floor.

b. Replace the four screws that secure the backplane to the chassis (see Figure 3-9).

c. Thread the two front operation panel ribbon cables back through the opening in the backplane assembly.

d. Reconnect the two ribbon cables to the front operations panel board.

Open a hinged ribbon-cable connector and insert the end of a ribbon cable squarely into the connector until it stops, and then close the hinged connector.


Note The side of the ribbon cable end that is colored blue should face upward.


e. Reconnect all cables to the backplane, including all RAID controller cables and all power cables.

f. Replace all drives to the server.

g. Replace the front chassis panel.

h. Replace the top cover.

i. Replace the server in the rack, replace cables, and then power on the server by pressing the Power button.

Figure 3-9 Replacing the Drive Backplane

 

1

Front panel control board cable connectors

3

Location of opening in backplane assembly for front operations panel ribbon cables

2

Backplane securing screw locations (two on backplane assembly and two on exterior sides)


 

Replacing Fan Modules

The five fan modules in the server are numbered as follows when you are facing the front of the server (also see Figure 3-11). The fan numbering as designated by the server’s Cisco IMC software is also listed. For example, FAN 1 is designated as SYS_FAN2 in the software.

Figure 3-10 Fan Module Numbering

 

FAN 1
SYS_FAN2

FAN 2
SYS_FAN3

FAN 3
SYS_FAN4

FAN 4
SYS_FAN5

FAN 5
SYS_FAN6

 

To replace or install a fan module, follow these steps:


Caution The fans in the Cisco UCS C22 server are not hot-swappable.


Step 1 Remove a fan module that you are replacing (see Figure 3-11):

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Remove the internal air baffle from the server to provide access to the fan-cable connectors on the motherboard.

e. Disconnect the fan module’s cable from its motherboard connector.

f. Grasp the fan module and lift straight up to free it from the chassis. Carefully free the fan module cable from the fan-tray clips to avoid damaging it.

Step 2 Install a new fan module:

a. Set the new fan module in place, aligning its four rubber pegs with the slots in the fan tray. See Figure 3-11.

b. Connect the fan’s cable to the motherboard connector. Reroute the cable into the cable clips on the fan tray.

c. Replace the air baffle and the top cover.

d. Replace the server in the rack.

Figure 3-11 Replacing Fan Modules

 

1

Rubber alignment pegs
(four on each fan module)

2

Fan-cable connector on motherboard
(one for each fan module)


 

Replacing DIMMs

This section includes the following topics:


Caution DIMMs and their sockets are fragile and must be handled with care to avoid damage during installation.


Caution Cisco does not support 3rd-party DIMMs. Using non-Cisco DIMMs in the server might result in system problems or damage to the motherboard.


Note To ensure the best server performance, it is important that you are familiar with memory performance guidelines and population rules before you install or replace memory.


Memory Performance Guidelines and Population Rules

This section describes the type of memory that the server requires and its effect on performance. The section includes the following topics:

DIMM Slot Numbering

Figure 3-12 shows the numbering of the DIMM slots.

Figure 3-12 DIMM Slots and CPUs

 

DIMM Population Rules

Observe the following guidelines when installing or replacing DIMMs:

  • Each CPU supports three memory channels.

CPU1 supports channels A, B, and C.

CPU2 supports channels D, E, and F


Note In a single-CPU system, the maximum number of DIMMs is six (only the slots supported by CPU1).


  • Each channel has two DIMM slots (for example, channel A = slots A1 and A2).

A channel can operate with one or two DIMMs installed.

If a channel has only one DIMM, populate slot 0 first (the blue slot).

  • When both CPUs are installed, populate the DIMM slots of each CPU identically.

Fill blue slots in the channels first: A1, D1, B1, E1, C1, F1

Fill black slots in the channels second: A2, D2, B2, E2, C2, F2

  • In a single-CPU configuration, populate the channels for CPU1 only. Any DIMM installed in a DIMM socket for which the CPU is absent is not recognized.
  • Although 1600 MHz DIMMs can be run in Power Savings Mode (1.35 V operation), 1600 MHz operation is supported only when the DDR mode is set to Performance Mode (see “Enabling Low-Voltage DIMM Operation.”) A 1600 MHz DIMM set to Power Savings Mode operates at 1066 MHz.
  • Observe the DIMM mixing rules shown in Table 3-3 .

 

Table 3-3 DIMM Mixing Rules

DIMM Parameter Mixed
Mix Within Single Channel?
Mix Across Multiple Channels?

DIMM size (4, 8, 16 GB)

Yes—can be different sizes in the channel.

Yes—Can be different sizes in server.

DIMM speed (1333 or 1600 MHz)

No—Must be same speed in
channel.

No—Must be the same speed in server.

DIMM type (RDIMM, UDIMM)

No—Must be same type in channel.

No—Must be the same type in server.

  • Memory mirroring reduces the amount of memory available by 50% because only one of the two populated channels provides data. When memory mirroring is enabled, DIMMs must be installed in sets of 2 or 4, as described in Memory Mirroring.
  • Note the following restrictions when using UDIMMs. Even though a UDIMM might be rated at 1600 MHz, actual operational speeds are slower because of the Intel implementation.

In Performance Mode (1.5 V operation), UDIMMs run at 1333 MHz in 1 DPC configurations or at 1066 MHz in 2 DPC configurations.

In Power Saving Mode (1.35 V operation), UDIMMs run at 1333 MHz in 1 DPC configurations or at 1066 MHz in 2 DPC configurations.

Enabling Low-Voltage DIMM Operation

You can enable low voltage (1.35 V) DIMM operation for all DIMMs in the server. There is a setting in the BIOS Setup utility that you can use to change the DDR memory mode to Power Saving mode, as described in the following procedure:


Step 1 Enter the BIOS setup utility by pressing the F2 key when prompted during bootup.

Step 2 Select the Advanced tab.

Step 3 Select Low Voltage DDR Mode.

Step 4 In the pop-up window, select either Power Saving or Performance Mode:

  • Power Saving Mode–Prioritizes low-voltage memory operation.
  • Performance Mode–Prioritizes performance memory operation. If you mix low-voltage DIMMs with standard DIMMs, the system defaults to this setting.

Step 5 Press F10 to save your changes and exit the setup utility.


 

Memory Mirroring

When memory mirroring is enabled, the memory subsystem simultaneously writes identical data to two channels. If a memory read from one of the channels returns incorrect data due to an uncorrectable memory error, the system automatically retrieves the data from the other channel. A transient or soft error in one channel does not affect the mirrored data, and operation continues unless there is a simultaneous error in exactly the same location on a DIMM and its mirrored DIMM. Memory mirroring reduces the amount of memory available to the operating system by 50% because only one of the two populated channels provides data.

If you choose to enable memory mirroring, population is different for single-CPU configurations and two-CPU configurations. Populate the DIMM slots in the order shown in either Table 3-4 or Table 3-5 .

 

Table 3-4 Memory Mirroring DIMM Population, Single-CPU

Number of DIMMs
per CPU
CPU 1 Population
CPU2 Population

2

A1; B1

CPU2 slots not available

4

A1, B1; A2, B2

CPU2 slots not available

 

Table 3-5 Memory Mirroring DIMM Population, Two CPUs

Number of DIMMs
per CPU
CPU 1 Population
CPU2 Population

2

A1; B1

D1; E1

4

A1, B1; A2, B2

D1, E1; D2, E2

DIMM Replacement Procedure

To install a DIMM assembly, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove the DIMM that you are replacing:

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Remove the internal air baffle from the server to provide access to the DIMM slots.

e. Open the ejector levers at both ends of the DIMM slot, then lift the DIMM out of the slot.

Step 2 Install a new DIMM:


Note Before installing DIMMs, refer to the population guidelines. See Memory Performance Guidelines and Population Rules.


f. Align the new DIMM with the empty slot on the motherboard. Use the alignment key in the DIMM slot to correctly orient the DIMM.

g. Push down evenly on the top corners of the DIMM until it is fully seated and the ejector levers on both ends lock into place.

h. Replace the air baffle and the top cover.

i. Replace the server in the rack, replace cables, and then power on the server by pressing the Power button.


 

Replacing CPUs and Heatsinks

This server has two CPU sockets. Each CPU supports three DIMM channels (six DIMM slots). See Figure 3-12. This section includes the following topics:

Special Information For Upgrades to Intel E5-2400 v2 Series CPUs


Note Do not upgrade your Cisco UCS C22 server to Intel E5-2400 v2 Series CPUs if you use the server integrated under Cisco UCS Manager control. Cisco UCS C22 servers that have Intel E5-2400 v2 Series CPUs are not supported with Cisco UCS Manager integration at this time.



Caution You must upgrade your server firmware to the required minimum level before you upgrade to Intel E5-2400 v2 Series CPUs. Older firmware versions cannot recognize the new CPUs and this results in a non-bootable server.

The minimum software and firmware versions required for the server to support Intel E5-2400 v2 Series CPUs are as follows:

 

Table 3-6 Minimum Requirements For Intel E5-2400 v2 Series CPUs

Software or Firmware
Minimum Version

Server Cisco IMC

1.5(5)

Server BIOS

1.5(5)

Cisco UCS Manager (UCSM-managed system only)

Not supported at this time.

Do one of the following actions:

  • If your server’s firmware and/or Cisco UCS Manager software are already at the required levels shown in Table 3-6 , you can replace the CPU hardware by using the procedure in this section.
  • If your server’s firmware and/or Cisco UCS Manager software is earlier than the required levels, use the instructions in the Cisco UCS C-Series Servers Upgrade Guide for Intel E5-2600 v2 Series CPUs to upgrade your firmware. After you upgrade the software, return to the procedure in this section to replace the CPU and heatsink hardware.

Single-CPU Restrictions

The minimum configuration is that the server must have at least CPU1 installed. Install CPU1 first, then CPU2 (see Figure 3-12).

The following restrictions apply when using a single-CPU configuration:

  • The maximum number of DIMMs is six (only the slots controlled by CPU1 are active).
  • PCIe slot 2 is unavailable.

CPU Replacement Procedure


Caution CPUs and their motherboard sockets are fragile and must be handled with care to avoid damaging pins during installation. The CPUs must be installed with heatsinks and their thermal pads to ensure proper cooling. Failure to install a CPU correctly might result in damage to the server.


Caution The Pick-and-Place tools used in this procedure are required to prevent damage to the contact pins between the motherboard and the CPU. Do not attempt this procedure without the required tools, which are included with each CPU option kit. If you do not have the tool, you can order a spare (Cisco PID UCS-CPU-EN-PNP).

To install or replace a CPU heatsink and CPU, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove the CPU and heatsink that you are replacing:

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Remove the internal air baffle from the server to provide access to the CPUs.

e. Use a #2 Phillips-head screwdriver to loosen the four captive screws that secure the heatsink and then lift it off of the CPU.


Note Alternate loosening each screw evenly to avoid damaging the heatsink or CPU.


f. Unclip the CPU retaining latch, then open the hinged CPU cover plate. See Figure 3-13.

Figure 3-13 CPU Socket Latches

 

1

Heatsink screws (four)

4

Hinged CPU cover plate

2

Heatsink

5

CPU

3

CPU retaining latch

Step 2 Remove a protective cap or an old CPU from the socket (if present):

  • If you are removing an old CPU, skip to Step 3.
  • If you are installing a new CPU to a socket that was shipped empty, the socket has a protective cap that is intended to prevent bent contact pins. Use the tool as shown in Figure 3-14 to grasp the protective cap and then pivot to remove the cap.

Figure 3-14 Protective Cap Removal Tool

 

Step 3 Remove an old CPU:

a. Set the Pick-and-Place tool on the CPU in the socket, aligning the arrow on the tool with the registration mark on the socket (the small triangular mark). See Figure 3-15.

b. Press the top button on the tool to grasp the installed CPU.

c. Lift the tool and CPU straight up.

d. Press the top button on the tool to release the old CPU on an anti-static surface.

Figure 3-15 Removing or Inserting a CPU

 

1

Arrow on tool

2

Registration mark on CPU socket

Step 4 Insert the new CPU into the Pick-and-Place tool:

a. Remove the new CPU from the packaging and place it on the pedestal that is included in the kit. Align the registration mark on the corner of the CPU with the arrow on the corner of the pedestal (see Figure 3-16).

b. Set the Pick-and-Place tool on the CPU pedestal, aligning the arrow on the tool with the arrow on the corner of the pedestal. Make sure that the tabs on the tool are fully seated in the slots on the pedestal.

c. Press the top button on the tool to grasp and lock in the CPU.

d. Lift the tool and CPU straight up off the pedestal.

Figure 3-16 CPU and Pick-and-Place Tool on Pedestal

 

1

Arrow marks for alignment

Step 5 Install a new CPU:

a. Set the Pick-and-Place tool with CPU over the empty CPU socket on the motherboard.


Note Align the arrow on the top of the tool with the registration mark (small triangle) that is stamped on the metal of the CPU socket, as shown in Figure 3-15.


b. Press the top button on the tool to set the CPU into the socket. Remove the empty tool.

c. Close the hinged CPU cover plate.

d. Clip down the CPU retaining latch. See Figure 3-13.

Step 6 Install a heatsink:


Caution The heatsink must have a new, undamaged thermal pad on the heatsink-to-CPU surface to ensure proper cooling. If you are replacing a heatsink that was previously used, you must remove the old thermal pad. If you are installing a new heatsink, skip to step d. below.

a. Apply an alcohol-based cleaning solution to the old thermal pad and let it soak for a least 15 seconds.

b. Wipe all of the old thermal pad off the old heatsink using a soft cloth that will not scratch the heatsink surface.

c. Apply thermal grease from an included syringe to the top of the CPU.

Apply about 2 cubic centimeters of grease (about half the syringe contents) to the top of the CPU in the pattern that is shown in Figure 3-17.


Note If you do not have a syringe of thermal grease, you can order a spare
(Cisco PID UCS-CPU-GREASE).


Figure 3-17 Thermal Grease Application Pattern

 

d. For a new heatsink, peel the protective film from the thermal pad that is on the bottom of the new heatsink.


Note Do not apply a syringe of thermal grease if you are installing a new heatsink that already has a pre-applied thermal pad.


e. Align the heatsink captive screws with the motherboard standoffs, then use a Number 2 Phillips-head screwdriver to tighten the captive screws evenly.


Note Alternate tightening each screw evenly to avoid damaging the heatsink or CPU.


f. Replace the top cover.

g. Replace the server in the rack, replace cables, and then power on the server by pressing the Power button.


 

Additional CPU-Related Parts To Order With RMA Replacement Motherboards

When a return material authorization (RMA) of the motherboard or CPU is done on a Cisco UCS C-series server, there are additional parts that might not be included with the CPU or motherboard spare bill of materials (BOM). The TAC engineer might need to add the additional parts to the RMA to help ensure a successful replacement.

  • Scenario 1—You are re-using the existing heatsinks:

Heat sink cleaning kit (UCSX-HSCK=)

Thermal grease kit for C22 (UCS-CPU-GREASE=)

Intel CPU Pick-n-Place tool for EP CPUs (UCS-CPU-EN-PNP=)

  • Scenario 2—You are replacing the existing heatsinks:

Heat sink (UCSC-HS-EN-M3=)

Heat sink cleaning kit (UCSX-HSCK=)

Intel CPU Pick-n-Place tool for EP CPUs (UCS-CPU-EN-PNP=)

A CPU heatsink cleaning kit is good for up to four CPU and heatsink cleanings. The cleaning kit contains two bottles of solution, one to clean the CPU and heatsink of old thermal interface material and the other to prepare the surface of the heatsink.

New heatsink spares have preinstalled thermal interface material covered by a small sheet of plastic. It is important to clean the old thermal interface material off of the CPU prior to installing the heatsinks. Therefore, when ordering new heatsinks it is still necessary to order the heatsink cleaning kit at a minimum.

Replacing the Motherboard RTC Battery


Warning There is danger of explosion if the battery is replaced incorrectly. Replace the battery only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions. [Statement 1015]


The real-time clock (RTC) battery retains system settings when the server is disconnected from power. The battery type is Panasonic CR2032 or equivalent.

To replace or install the motherboard CMOS battery, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove the RTC battery (see Figure 3-18):

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Locate the RTC battery. See Figure 3-18.

e. Gently remove the battery from the holder on the motherboard. Pull the retaining clip in the battery holder away from the battery to provide clearance.

Step 2 Install an RTC battery:

a. Gently insert the battery into the holder and inside the retaining clip.


Note The positive side of the battery marked “3V+” should face upward.


b. Push the battery into the socket until it is fully seated.

c. Replace the top cover.

d. Replace the server in the rack, replace cables, and power on the server by pressing the Power button.

Figure 3-18 Replacing the Motherboard RTC Battery

 

1

RTC battery holder on motherboard


 

Replacing a PCIe Riser

The server contains two toolless PCIe risers for horizontal installation of PCIe cards. See Table 3-7 for a description of the PCIe slots on each riser.


Note PCIe riser 2 (slots 2) is not available in single-CPU configurations.


Figure 3-19 Rear Panel, Showing PCIe Slots

 

To install or replace a PCIe riser, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove the PCIe riser that you are replacing (see Figure 3-20):

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Lift straight up on both ends of the PCIe riser to disengage its circuit board from the socket on the motherboard.

e. If the riser has a card installed, remove the card from the riser.

Step 2 Install a new PCIe riser:

a. If you removed a card from the old PCIe riser, install the card to the new riser (see Replacing a PCIe Card).

b. Position the PCIe riser over its socket on the motherboard and over the chassis alignment features (see Figure 3-20). The metal shell of the riser has alignment tabs that fit into slots in the chassis.

c. Carefully push down on both ends of the PCIe riser to fully engage its circuit board connector with the socket on the motherboard.

d. Replace the top cover.

e. Replace the server in the rack, replace cables, and then power on the server by pressing the Power button.

Figure 3-20 Replacing the PCIe Riser

 

1

Chassis alignment points for PCIe riser 1

2

Chassis alignment points for PCIe riser 2


 

Replacing a PCIe Card


Caution Cisco supports all PCIe cards qualified and sold by Cisco. PCIe cards not qualified or sold by Cisco are the responsibility of the customer. Although Cisco will always stand behind and support the C-Series rack-mount servers, customers using standard, off-the-shelf, third-party cards must go to the third-party card vendor for support if any issue with that particular third-party card occurs.

This section includes the following topics:

PCIe Slots

The server contains two toolless PCIe risers for horizontal installation of PCIe cards. See Figure 3-21 and Table 3-7 for a description of the PCIe slots on these risers.


Note In a single-CPU system, PCIe riser 2 (slot 2) is not available.


Figure 3-21 Rear Panel, Showing PCIe Slots

 

 

Table 3-7 PCIe Expansion Slots

Slot Number
Electrical
Lane Width
Connector Length
Card Length1
Card Height 2
NCSI3 Support

1 (on riser 1)

Gen-3 x16

x16 extended

1/2 length

Full-height

Yes4

2 (on riser 2)

Gen-3 x16

x16 connector

1/2 length

1/2 height

No

1.This is the supported length because of internal clearance.

2.This is the size of the rear panel opening.

3.Network Communications Services Interface protocol

4.Slot 1 can operate when the server is in standby power mode.


Note In single-CPU configurations, only PCIe slot 1 can be used.


Replacing a PCIe Card


Note If you are installing a Cisco UCS Virtual Interface Card, there are prerequisite considerations. See Special Considerations for Cisco UCS Virtual Interface Cards.



Note If you are installing a RAID controller card, see RAID Controller Considerations for more information about supported cards and cabling.


To install or replace a PCIe card, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove a PCIe card (or a blank filler panel) from the PCIe riser:

a. Shut down and power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in the “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Remove any cables from the ports of the PCIe card that you are replacing.


Tip Label the cables when you disconnect them to aid correct connection to the new card.


e. Lift straight up on both ends of the PCIe riser to disengage it from the socket on the motherboard.

f. Pull evenly on both ends of the PCIe card to remove it from the socket on the PCIe riser.

If the riser has no card, remove the blanking panel from the rear opening of the riser.

Step 2 Install a new PCIe card:

a. Align the new PCIe card with the empty socket on the PCIe riser.


Note Align and insert the card’s rear panel tab into the riser’s rear panel opening at the same time you align the card with the empty socket.


b. Push down evenly on both ends of the card until it is fully seated in the socket.

c. Ensure that the card rear panel tab sits flat against the PCIe riser rear panel opening.

d. Position the PCIe riser over its socket on the motherboard and over the alignment features (see Figure 3-20).

e. Carefully push down on both ends of the PCIe riser to fully engage its circuit board connector with the socket on the motherboard.

f. Replace the top cover.

g. Replace the server in the rack, replace cables, then power on the server by pressing the Power button.

h. If the card that you replaced was a RAID controller, continue with Restoring RAID Configuration After Replacing a RAID Controller.


 

Special Considerations for Cisco UCS Virtual Interface Cards

Table 3-8 describes the requirements for the supported Cisco UCS virtual interface cards (VICs).

 

Table 3-8 Cisco UCS C22 Requirements for Virtual Interface Cards

Virtual Interface Card (VIC)
Number of VICs Supported in Server
Slots That Support VICs5
Primary Slot For UCS Integration or Cisco Card NIC Mode
Minimum Cisco IMC Firmware
Minimum VIC Firmware For Use With UCS Integration
Minimum Nexus OS on an Upstream Nexus Fabric Interconnect
Cisco UCS VIC P81E6

N2XX-ACPCI01

1

PCIE 1

PCIE 1

1.4(5)

2.0(2)

5.0

Cisco UCS VIC 1225

UCSC-PCIE-CSC-02

1

PCIE 1

PCIE 1

1.4(6)

2.1(0)

5.0

Cisco UCS VIC1225T

UCSC-PCIE-C10T-02

1

PCIE 1

PCIE 17

1.5(1)

2.1(1)

5.0

Cisco UCS VIC1285

UCSC-PCIE-C40Q-02

1

PCIE 1

PCIE 1

1.5(4)

2.2(1b)

5.0

5.See PCIe Slots.

6.See note below.

7.The Cisco UCS VIC1225T is not supported for UCS integration at this time.


Note The Cisco UCS VIC P81E is not supported in the C22 Large Form Factor version of the server.


RAID Controller Card Cable Routing

If the PCIe card that you are installing or replacing is a RAID controller card, see RAID Controller Considerations for required cables and cable routing guidelines.

See also Replacing the SuperCap Power Module (RAID Backup Unit) for instructions on installing a RAID backup unit for a RAID controller card.

Installing Multiple PCIe Cards and Resolving Limited Resources

When a large number of PCIe add-on cards are installed in the server, the system may run out of the following resources required for PCIe devices:

  • Option ROM memory space
  • 16-bit I/O space

The topics in this section provide guidelines for resolving the issues related to these limited resources.

Resolving Insufficient Memory Space to Execute Option ROMs

The system has very limited memory to execute PCIe legacy option ROMs, so when a large number of PCIe add-on cards are installed in the server, the system BIOS might not able to execute all of the option ROMs. The system BIOS loads and executes the option ROMs in the order that the PCIe cards are enumerated (Slot 1, Slot 2, Slot 3, etc.).

If the system BIOS does not have sufficient memory space to load any PCIe option ROM, it skips loading that option ROM, reports a system event log (SEL) event to the Cisco IMC controller and reports the following error in the Error Manager page of the BIOS Setup utility:

ERROR CODE SEVERITY INSTANCE DESCRIPTION
146 Major N/A PCI out of resources error.
Major severity requires user
intervention but does not
prevent system boot.

 

To resolve this issue, disable the Option ROMs that are not needed for system booting. The BIOS Setup Utility provides the setup options to enable or disable the Option ROMs at the PCIe slot level for the PCIe expansion slots and at the port level for the onboard NICs. These options can be found in the BIOS Setup Utility Advanced → PCI Configuration page.

  • Guidelines for RAID controller booting:

If the server is configured to boot primarily from RAID storage, make sure that the option ROMs for the slots where your RAID controllers installed are enabled in the BIOS, depending on your RAID controller configuration.

If the RAID controller does not appear in the system boot order even with the option ROMs for those slots are enabled, the RAID controller option ROM might not have sufficient memory space to execute. In that case, disable other option ROMs that are not needed for the system configuration to free up some memory space for the RAID controller option ROM.

  • Guidelines for onboard NIC PXE booting:

If the system is configured to primarily perform PXE boot from onboard NICs, make sure that the option ROMs for the onboard NICs to be booted from are enabled in the BIOS Setup Utility. Disable other option ROMs that are not needed to create sufficient memory space for the onboard NICs.

Resolving Insufficient 16-Bit I/O Space

The system has only 64 KB of legacy 16-bit I/O resources available. This 64 KB of I/O space is divided between the CPUs in the system because the PCIe controller is integrated into the CPUs. This server BIOS has the capability to dynamically detect the 16-bit I/O resource requirement for each CPU and then balance the 16-bit I/O resource allocation between the CPUs accordingly during the PCI bus enumeration phase of the BIOS POST.

When a large number of PCIe cards are installed in the system, the system BIOS might not have sufficient I/O space for some PCIe devices. If the system BIOS is not able to allocate the required I/O resources for any PCIe devices, the following symptoms have been observed:

  • The system might get stuck in an infinite reset loop.
  • The BIOS might appear to hang while initializing PCIe devices.
  • The PCIe option ROMs might take excessive time to complete, which appears to lock up the system.
  • PCIe boot devices might not be accessible from the BIOS.
  • PCIe option ROMs might report initialization errors. These errors are seen before the BIOS passes control to the operating system.
  • The keyboard might not work.

To work around this problem, rebalance the 16-bit I/O load using the following methods:

1. Physically remove any unused PCIe cards.

2. If the system has one or more Cisco virtual interface cards (VICs) installed, disable the PXE boot on the VICs that are not required for the system boot configuration by using the Network Adapters page in the Cisco IMC WebUI to free up some 16-bit I/O resources. Each VIC uses a minimum 16 KB of 16-bit I/O resource, so disabling PXE boot on Cisco VICs would free up some 16-bit I/O resources that can be used for other PCIe cards that are installed in the system.

Replacing an Internal USB Flash Drive

The server has one internal USB 2.0 socket on the motherboard that you can use with a USB thumb drive for additional storage. The server can be ordered with an optional blank 8-GB Cisco USB Flash Drive pre-installed in the internal USB port.

This section includes the following topics:

Internal USB Flash Drive Replacement Procedure

To install or replace an internal USB flash drive, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove the USB flash drive that you are replacing. See Figure 3-22:

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Remove PCIe riser 1 to provide access to the USB flash drive socket that is on the motherboard (see Figure 3-22).

See Replacing a PCIe Riser for more information.

e. Pull the USB flash drive from the slot.

Step 2 Install a USB flash drive:

a. Insert the USB flash drive into the socket.

b. Replace PCIe riser 1 to the server.

See Replacing a PCIe Riser for more information.

c. Replace the top cover.

d. Replace the server in the rack, replace cables, and then power on the server by pressing the Power button.

Figure 3-22 Internal USB Flash Drive Socket (USB 2.0)

 

1

Cisco USB flash drive socket on motherboard


 

Enabling or Disabling the Internal USB Port

The factory default is for all USB ports on the server to be enabled. However, the internal USB port can be enabled or disabled in the server BIOS. To enable or disable the internal USB port, follow these steps:


Step 1 Enter the BIOS Setup utility by pressing the F2 key when prompted during bootup.

Step 2 Navigate to the Advanced tab.

Step 3 On the Advanced tab, select USB Configuration.

Step 4 On the USB Configuration page, select USB Ports Configuration.

Step 5 Scroll to USB Port: Internal, press Enter, and then select either Enabled or Disabled from the pop-up menu.

Step 6 Press F10 to save and exit the utility.


 

Replacing the SuperCap Power Module (RAID Backup Unit)

This server supports installation of one SuperCap power modules (SCPMs). The SCPM mounts inside a bracket that is next to the cooling fans (see Figure 3-23).

The SCPM is supported only when using the LSI MegaRAID-CV controller card. This supercap module provides approximately 3 years of backup for the disk write-back cache DRAM in the case of sudden power loss by offloading the cache to the NAND flash.

To replace the RAID backup unit, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove an SCPM (see Figure 3-23).

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in the “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Disconnect the cable from the existing SCPM.

e. Slide the SCPM free of the clips on the bracket (see Figure 3-23).

Step 2 Install a new SCPM:

a. Slide the new SCPM into the clips on the bracket.

b. Connect the cable from the RAID controller to the new SCPM.

c. Replace the top cover.

d. Replace the server in the rack, replace cables, and then power on the server by pressing the Power button.

Figure 3-23 Replacing an SCPM

 

1

SCPM bracket


 

Installing a Trusted Platform Module

The trusted platform module (TPM) is a small circuit board that attaches to a motherboard socket. The socket location is on the motherboard, below PCIe riser 2 (see Figure 3-24).


Note For security purposes, the TPM is installed with a one-way screw. It cannot be removed with a standard screwdriver.


To install a trusted platform module (TPM), follow these steps:


Step 1 Prepare the server for component installation.

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in the “Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover” section.

d. Remove PCIe riser 2 to provide access to the TPM socket that is on the motherboard (see Figure 3-24).

See Replacing a PCIe Riser for more information.

Step 2 Install a TPM (see Figure 3-24):

a. Locate the TPM socket on the motherboard, as shown in Figure 3-24.

b. Align the connector that is on the bottom of the TPM circuit board with the motherboard TPM socket. Align the screw hole and standoff on the TPM board with the screw hole adjacent to the TPM socket.

c. Push down evenly on the TPM to seat it in the motherboard socket.

d. Install the single one-way screw that secures the TPM to the motherboard.

e. If you removed PCIe riser 2, replace it now.

f. Replace the top cover.

g. Replace the server in the rack, replace cables, and then power on the server by pressing the Power button.

Step 3 Enable the TPM:

a. Watch during bootup for the F2 prompt, and then press F2 to enter BIOS setup.

b. Log into the BIOS Setup utility with your BIOS Administrator password.

c. On the BIOS Setup utility screen, select the Advanced tab.

d. Select Trusted Computing to open the TPM Security Device Configuration screen.

e. Change TPM SUPPORT to Enabled .

f. Press F10 to save your settings and reboot the server.

Step 4 Verify that the TPM is now enabled.

a. Watch during bootup for the F2 prompt, and then press F2 to enter BIOS setup.

b. Log into the BIOS Setup utility with your BIOS Administrator password.

c. Select the Advanced tab.

d. Select Trusted Computing to open the TPM Security Device Configuration screen.

e. Verify that TPM SUPPORT is Enabled.


Note If you want to use the Intel Trusted Execution Technology (TXT) feature, it must be enabled in the server BIOS as described in Enabling the Intel Trusted Execution Technology (TXT) Feature For the TPM.


Figure 3-24 TPM Socket Location on Motherboard

 

1

TPM socket and screw-hole on motherboard (under PCIe riser 2)

2

PCIe riser 2


 

Enabling the Intel Trusted Execution Technology (TXT) Feature For the TPM

Intel TXT provides greater protection for information that is used and stored on the business server. A key aspect of that protection is the provision of an isolated execution environment and associated sections of memory where operations can be conducted on sensitive data, invisibly to the rest of the system. Likewise, Intel TXT provides for a sealed portion of storage where sensitive data such as encryption keys can be kept, helping to shield them from being compromised during an attack by malicious code.

To enable the TXT feature, follow these steps:


Step 1 Verify that a TPM is now installed and enabled in the server:

a. Either attach a VGA monitor and USB keyboard to the server, or log in remotely to the Cisco IMC interface of the server and open a virtual KVM console window.

b. Reboot the server.

c. Watch during bootup for the F2 prompt, and then press F2 to enter BIOS setup.

d. Log in to the BIOS Setup utility with your BIOS Administrator password.


Note You must be logged in as the BIOS administrator to perform this procedure. If you have not done so already, set a BIOS administrator password on the Security tab of the BIOS Setup utility.


e. Select the Advanced tab.

f. On the Advanced tab, select Trusted Computing to open the TPM Security Device Configuration screen.

g. Verify that TPM SUPPORT is Enabled . If it is not, set TPM SUPPORT to Enabled.

h. Press Escape to return to the BIOS Setup utility Advanced tab.

Step 2 Enable the Intel Trusted Execution Technology (TXT) feature:

a. On the Advanced tab, select Intel TXT(LT-SX) Configuration to open the Intel TXT(LT-SX) Hardware Support screen.


Note The Intel Trusted Execution Technology feature can be enabled only when the server has a TPM installed on the TPM header.


b. Set TXT Support to Enabled .

Step 3 On the same screen, verify that the Intel Virtualization Technology (VT) and the Intel VT for Directed I/O (VT-d) features are enabled (the factory default).

a. On the Intel TXT(LT-SX) Hardware Support screen, verify that VT-d Support and VT Support are both listed as Enabled .

If they are already enabled, skip to Step 4.

If VT-d Support and VT Support are not enabled, continue with the next steps to enable them.

b. Press Escape to return to the BIOS Setup utility Advanced tab.

c. On the Advanced tab, select Processor Configuration to open the Processor Configuration screen.

d. Set Intel (R) VT and Intel (R) VT-d to Enabled.

Step 4 Press F10 to save your changes and exit the BIOS Setup utility.

Step 5 Verify that the Intel TXT, VT, and VT-d features are enabled:

a. Reboot the server.

b. Watch during bootup for the F2 prompt, and then press F2 to enter BIOS setup.

c. Select the Advanced tab.

d. Select Intel TXT(LT-SX) Configuration and verify that TXT Support, VT-d Support, and VT Support are Enabled.


 

Replacing a SCU Upgrade ROM Module

To remove and replace a module, use the following procedure.


Step 1 Prepare the server for component installation:

a. Power off the server as described in Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover.

Step 2 Remove the SCU upgrade ROM module:

a. Locate the module on the motherboard (see Figure C-1).

b. Grasp the printed circuit board of the module and lift it from the header.


Note The module has a small retention feature that must have clearance from the header before the module can be pulled up. Tilt the module back, then pull up as shown in Figure 3-25.


Step 3 Install a new SCU upgrade ROM module:

a. Align the module with the pins in the motherboard header.

b. Gently press down on the module until it is seated and the retention feature locks into the header.

Figure 3-25 SCU Upgrade ROM Module Retention Feature

 

1

Printed circuit board on module

3

Motherboard header

2

Retention feature on module

4

Retention feature in installed position


 

For more information about using the module and embedded RAID, see Embedded RAID Controller.

Replacing a Software RAID Key Module

To remove and replace a software RAID key module, use the following procedure.


Step 1 Prepare the server for component installation:

a. Power off the server as described in Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server.

b. Slide the server out the front of the rack far enough so that you can remove the top cover. You might have to detach cables from the rear panel to provide clearance.


Caution If you cannot safely view and access the component, remove the server from the rack.

c. Remove the top cover as described in Removing and Replacing the Server Top Cover.

Step 2 Remove the software RAID key module:

a. Locate the module on the motherboard (see Figure C-1).

b. Grasp the printed circuit board of the module and lift it from the header.


Note The module must have clearance from the retention clip on the header before the module can be pulled up. Open the retention clip, then pull up as shown in Figure 3-26.


Step 3 Install a new software RAID key module:

a. Align the module with the pins in the motherboard header.

b. Gently press down on the module until it is seated and the retention clip locks over the module.

Figure 3-26 Software RAID Key Module Retention Feature

 

1

Printed circuit board on module

3

Motherboard header

2

Retention feature on motherboard header

4

Retention feature in installed position


 

For more information about using the module and embedded RAID, see Embedded RAID Controller.

Replacing Power Supplies

The server has one power supply.

To replace or install a power supply, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove the power supply that you are replacing (see Figure 3-27):

a. Power off the server as described in the “Shutting Down and Powering Off the Server” section.

b. Remove the power cord from the power supply that you are replacing.

c. Grasp the power supply handle while pinching the release lever towards the handle.

d. Pull the power supply out of the bay.

Step 2 Install a new power supply:

a. Grasp the power supply handle and insert the new power supply into the empty bay.

b. Push the power supply into the bay until the release lever locks.

c. Connect the power cord to the new power supply.

d. Press the Power button to return the server to main power mode.

Figure 3-27 Removing and Replacing Power Supplies

 

1

Power supply handle

2

Power supply release lever