MGX 8850 Installation and Configuration, Release 1.1.10
Card and Service Configuration
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Card and Service Configuration

Table Of Contents

Card and Service Configuration

Tasks for Configuring Cards and Services

Modifying the Resource Partitioning

Sequence of Configuration Tasks

Rules for Adding Connections

Rules for Adding a DAX Connection

Rules for Adding Three-Segment Connections

Rules for Adding Management Connections

The Processor Switching Module

Configuring Synchronization for the Switch

Configuring Card-Level Parameters, Lines, and Ports

Automatic Protection Switching on the PXM1

Adding Connections on a PXM1 in a Stand-Alone Node

ATM Universal Service Module

Using the CLI to Configure the Card, Lines, and Ports

Using the CLI to Configure Inverse Multiplexing

Adding and Configuring Connections on the AUSM/B

BPX 8600-to-BPX 8600 Segment

Frame Service Module Features

Introduction

Types of Frame Service Modules

Very High Speed Frame Service Modules

Eight-Port Channelized and Unchannelized Frame Service Modules for T1 and E1

Four-Port Unchannelized Frame Service Module for V.35

Frame Service Module Features

MGX-FRSM-2CT3 Features

MGX-FRSM-2T3 and MGX-FRSM-2E3 Features

MGX-FRSM-HS2/B Features

MGX-FRSM-HS1/B Features

Eight-Port FRSM Features

Description of Connection Types on the FRSM

Frame Relay-to-ATM Network Interworking

Congestion Indication for NIW Connections

PVC Status Management

Frame Relay-to-ATM Service Interworking

Cell Loss Priority

Congestion Indication

Command and Response Mapping

Translation and Transparent Modes

Frame Forwarding

ATM/Frame-to-User Network Interface

Loss Priority Indication

Congestion Indication

Configuring Frame Relay Service

Configuring the FRSM Cards, Lines, and Ports

Adding a Frame Relay Connection

Establishing the BPX 8600-to-BPX 8600-Series Segment

Test Commands for the FRSMs

Support for Alarm Reporting

Bit Error Rate Testing on an Unchannelized T3 or E3 FRSM

Circuit Emulation Service Module for T3 and E3

Features

Cell Delay Treatment

Error and Alarm Response

Configuring Service on a T3 or E3 CESM

Configuring the Card, Lines, and Ports

Adding and Modifying Connections

Bit Error Rate Testing on a T3 or E3 CESM

Eight-Port Circuit Emulation Service Modules

Structured Data Transfer

Unstructured Data Transfer

Cell Delay Treatment

Redundancy Support for the Eight-Port CESM

Error and Alarm Response

Configuring Service on an Eight-Port CESM

Configuring the Card, Lines, and Ports

Configuring Bulk Distribution and Redundancy

Adding and Modifying Connections

Service Resource Module

Configuring Card and Line Parameters

Bulk Distribution for T1 Service

Redundancy Support by the MGX-SRM-3T3/B

Configuring Redundancy Through the Redundancy Bus

Configuring Redundancy Through the Distribution Bus

Bit Error Rate Testing Through an MGX-SRM-3T3

Pattern Test Options

Loopback Test Options


Card and Service Configuration


This chapter describes how to configure the MGX 8850 cards and the services they support. Although the presumption for this chapter is that a plan exists for your network, it reviews some of the information that supports network planning. Generic instructions for inserting and removing cards appear in ""."

The services and applicable modules described in this chapter are:

Physical and logical configuration of a broadband interface on the Processor Switching Module (PXM1) and, for a stand-alone switch, connection addition

ATM service on the MGX-AUSM/B

Frame Relay service on the following service modules:

MGX-FRSM-2CT3

MGX-FRSM-2T3E3

MGX-FRSM-HS2

MGX-FRSM-HS1/B

AX-FRSM-8T1 and AX-FRSM-8E1

Circuit emulation service on the AX-CESM-8T1 and AX-CESM-8E1

Redundancy and bulk distribution on the Service Resource Module-3T3 (MGX-SRM-3T3/B)


Note   For information on the Route Processor Module (RPM), see the Cisco Route Processor Module Installation and Configuration Guide.


Tasks for Configuring Cards and Services

This section contains a general description of the sequence of tasks for configuring the cards and their services. It also contains details on how to configure resource partitions and add local connections and three-segment connections. Detailed descriptions of these tasks for individual cards appear in subsequent sections.

Modifying the Resource Partitioning

A resource partition at the card level consists of a number of logical connections (LCNs). At the port level, a resource partition consists of a percentage of bandwidth, a DLCI or VPI/VCI range, and the number of logical connection numbers (LCNs) available to a network control application. On the PXM1, the connections are global logical connections (GLCNs). By default, all resources on a a card or logical port are available to any controller on a first-come, first-served basis. If necessary, you can modify the resource partitioning at the card level or logical port level. Port-level resource modification follows card-level modification, so the available port-level resources depend on whether and how much you change the card-level resource partitioing. You do not have to change the resource partitioning for the card before changing resource partitioning for a port.

The current network control application is Portable AutoRoute (PAR). Planning considerations should include the possibility of modifying the partitioning of resources for the interface. For example, the MGX 8850 switch has the capacity to support a Cisco Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) controller or a Private Network to Network Interface (PNNI) controller.

Sequence of Configuration Tasks

In a new switch, the common approach is to configure the same aspect for all cards at once—adding logical ports to all applicable cards, for example. In contrast, the likely sequence for installing a single card is to begin with its card-level features and continue until you have configured every connection. The common tasks for a new switch are:

1 Optionally configure the service modules (except the RPM) for redundancy. This card-level operation requires redundant cards and possibly an MGX-SRM-3T3/B.

2 Optionally configure resource partitioning for the whole card if the default partitioning does not fulfill the purpose of the card.

3 Activate physical lines.

4 Configure the line if default parameters are not appropriate.

5 Create the logical ports then modify them as needed.

6 Optionally configure resource partitions for a logical port if the default partitioning does not support the intended operation of the port.

7 Add connections then modify them as needed.

Rules for Adding Connections

This section describes the rules for adding local connections, three-segment connections, and management connections. The MGX 8850 switch can support:

Local-only, digital access and cross-connect (DAX) connections

Three-segment connections across an ATM or Frame Relay network

IP management connections (stand-alone switches only)

A management connection is an inband IP connection that lets a workstation control a local or remote MGX 8850 switch through a service module rather than the Ethernet port on a PXM-UI. Although the rules include references to CLI syntax, they also apply to the Cisco WAN Manager application.

Rules for Adding a DAX Connection

A DAX con is a connection whose endpoints for the entire connection exist on the same switch. The following apply to the MGX 8850 switch:

1 On a feeder, a DAX con can exist between different service modules or the same service module.

2 A stand-alone node supports DAX cons with one or both endpoints on the PXM1 in addition to DAX cons between service modules.

3 Either endpoint can be the master.

4 The first endpoint to add is the slave. The generic syntax is:

addcon <local parameters>

where local parameters are the port, DLCI or VPI and VCI, and mastership status. Slave is the default case, so you actually do not explicitly have to specify it. When you press Return, the system returns a connection identifier. The identifier includes the port and DLCI or VPI and VCI.

Use the identifier to specify the slave endpoint when you subsequently add the connection at the master end. The slave endpoint is specified as the remote parameters in item 5.

5 To complete the DAX con, add the master endpoint. The generic syntax is

addcon <local parameters> <remote parameters>

where local parameters are the port, DLCI or VPI and VCI, and mastership status (master in this case). The remote parameters are the items in the connection identifier that the system returned when you added the slave endpoint.

6 If the endpoint is a PXM1 port in a stand-alone node, specify the slot as 0. The addcon command is the only command in which you specify the slot number for the PXM1 as 0.

Rules for Adding Three-Segment Connections

A three-segment connection consists of a local segment on each MGX 8850 switch at the edges of the network cloud and a middle segment across the network cloud. The MGX 8850 requirements are:

1 For MGX 8850 feeders, the backbone must consist of BPX 8600-series switches.

2 For MGX 8850 stand-alone switches, the backbone switches can be either BPX 8600-series switches or switches from another manufacturer.

3 On a feeder, the local segment exists between a service module and the PXM1.

4 On a stand-alone node, the local segment can be between a service module and a port on the PXM1 or just two ports on the PXM1.

5 For the local segment, add the connection at only the master endpoint. The generic syntax is:

addcon <local parameters> <remote parameters>

where local parameters are the port, DLCI or VPI and VCI, and mastership status (master in this case). The remote parameters are the current nodename, slot, port, and VPI and VCI of the slave end. For the PXM1 endpoints, specify the slot number as 0. The addcon command is the only command in which you specify the slot number for the PXM1 as 0.

Rules for Adding Management Connections

This section describes the requirements for adding an inband ATM PVC for managing an MGX 8850 stand-alone node. A management connection lets a workstation connected through a router control either the local MGX 8850 node or a remote MGX 8850 node that has no workstation. The typical configuration has the connecting router feed an AUSM/B, FRSM, RPM, or PXM1 UNI port.

A management connection can be either a DAX con or a three-segment connection. The maximum number of management connections is eight. The DAX con exists between a service module or PXM1 UNI and port 34 of the local PXM1. PXM1 port 34 is a reserved port for management connections on a stand-alone node. The network in shows FRSMs in a feeder application.

A three-segment management connection has a:

1 Local segment between a near-end service module or PXM1 UNI and a PXM1 port in the
range 1-32.

2 Middle segment across the network cloud.

3 Local segment between a remote PXM1 port in the range 1-32 and port 34 of that same PXM1.

The path from "A" to "B" in consists of three segments. A segment exists between the FRSM and the PXM1 on each MGX 8850 switch. The middle segment exists between the BXMs at the edges of the ATM cloud and may traverse BPX 8600 via nodes in the cloud. The VPI and VCI at each BPX8600-series switch connected to an MGX 8850 feeder must match the VPI and VCI on the slave endpoint of the connected PXM1. The VPIs and VCIs at the endpoints of the middle segment do not have to match. If you use the CLI rather than the Cisco WAN Manager application, add each segment through the CLI at each switch.

Figure 6-1 Frame Relay Connection Through an MGX 8850-BPX 8600-Series Network

The Processor Switching Module

This section first describes how to activate and configure the card-level parameters, lines, and ports on the PXM1 uplink card then describes how to add connections to the PXM1 in a stand-alone node. The descriptions tell you how to:

Optionally modify the resource partitioning at the card level.

Activate a line on the uplink card. On a stand-alone node, you can activate more than one line if the uplink card has multiple lines. One physical line must be the trunk to a network routing node.

Optionally configure a clock source on the PXM1 or a service module. Note that a service module line mus tbe active before you can configure it as a clock source. Refer to the section "Configuring Synchronization for the Switch" for more information.

If the switch has a pair of SRMs for bulk distribution and you use the CLI rather than the CiscoView application, activate the SRM lines from the PXM1.

Optionally modify the resource partitioning at the port level.

Create logical ports.

On a stand-alone node, specify the cell header type. UNI cell headers typically apply where a workstation connects to a UNI port on the uplink card rather than a port on the PXM-UI card. Such an implementation is not common.

On a stand-alone node, add standard connections and optional management connections.

On a stand-alone node, configure Automatic Protection Switching (APS).

For a feeder, execute steps on the connected BPX 8600-series switch to make the feeder an available resource in the network.


Note   For a description of the bit error rate test (BERT) functions, see the section titled "Bit Error Rate Testing Through an MGX-SRM-3T3."


Configuring Synchronization for the Switch

This section defines the clock sources for the MGX 8850 switch then describes how to configure each source.

The available clock sources are as follows:

The internal clock comes from an oscillator on the PXM1. It is the default source when the switch first comes up and remains so until you specify a different clock source.

The trunk interface clock originates on a BPX 8600-series node or another vendor's switch and comes through the line on the PXM1's back card.

An external clock source comes from an external timing source and arrives at the T1 or E1 clock connector on the PXM UI. Frequently, the external device is a highly reliable, dedicated device that can provide a Stratum 2 or Stratum 3 clock. (As the subsequent configuration steps show, an additional step is necessary for an external clock source.)

A UNI interface on a service module or PXM1 UNI port can be a clock source. A line must be active before you can specify it as a clock source.

The clock types are primary, secondary, and tertiary. For example, you could configure an external clock source as the primary source, a line as a secondary source, and the internal oscillator as the tertiary source. Note that if you specify a tertiary source, it is always the internal oscillator.

After the PXM1 broadband interfaces and the service module lines have been configured, you can configure the clock sources through the CiscoView application or the CLI. If you use the CLI, execute cnfclksrc on the active PXM1 one time for each clock source:

cnfclksrc <slot.port> <clktyp>

The parameter slot.port specifies the clock source. If a service module provides the source, slot is the slot number of the card, and port is the number of the line that provides the clock.

On the PXM1:

slot is 7 regardless of where the active PXM1 resides.

port for the inband clock is always 1.

port for the external clock is always 35.

port for the UNI line (stand-alone only) depends on the number of lines you have set up on the back card.

The value for clktyp is P for primary, S for secondary, T for tertiary, or N for null. The only purpose of null is to remove the clock configuration that currently applies to the specified source (slot.port ).


Caution    Be careful not to set multiple primaries and secondaries.

For example, to configure the inband interface as the primary clock source and an external clock device as the secondary source, execute the following two commands.

For an external clock source:

popeye1r.1.8.PXM.a > cnfclksrc 7.35 P

For an internal clock source:

popeye1r.1.8.PXM.a > cnfclksrc 7.1 S

Check the configuration by executing dspclksrc.

If you have specified an external clock source, use the CiscoView application or the CLI command cnfextclk to select the T1 or E1 line and the impedance of the line. The syntax for cnfextclk is:

cnfextclk <ClockType> <Impedance>

ClockType can be 1 for T1 or 2 for E1. Impedance can be 1 for 75 ohms, 2 for 100 ohms, or 3 for 120 ohms.

Configuring Card-Level Parameters, Lines, and Ports

This section describes how to configure card-level features, activate a physical line, and configure logical elements such as a port. If necessary, refer to the section titled "Tasks for Configuring Cards and Services" for background information on these types of tasks.


Step 1 Optionally, you can modify the resource partitioning for the whole card by executing cnfcdrscprtn. You can view resource partitioning through dspcdrscprtn.

cnfcdrscprtn <number_PAR_conns> <number_PNNI_conns> <number_TAG_conns>

number_PAR_conns is the number of connections in the range 0-32767 for PAR.

number_PNNI_conns is the number in the range 0-32767 available to PNNI.

number_TAG_conns is the number of connections in the range 0-32767 for MPLS.

For example, you could reserve 10,000 connections for each controller on a PXM1 with:

cnfcdrscprtn 10000 10000 10000

Step 2 Activate a line by executing addln:

addln -ds3 <slot.line> | -e3 <slot.line> | -sonet <slot.line>

-ds3 indicates a T3 line parameter follows.

-e3 indicates an E3 line parameter follows.

-sonet indicates an OC-3 or OC-12 line parameter follows.

slot is 7 or 8 for the PXM1. If the switch has a single of redundant pair of SRMs, execute addln for slots 15, 16, 31, and 32.

line has the range 1-4 but depends on the number of lines on the back card.

For a feeder, you can activate only one line. For a stand-alone, you can activate more than one line if the back card has multiple lines. One line must serve as the trunk to the ATM network. With an OC-3, T3, or E3 card, remaining lines can serve as UNI ports to CPE.

Step 3 If necessary, modify the characteristics of a line by using cnfln.

Step 4 Optionally configure a line on the PXM1 uplink cord as a clock source (cnfclksrc on the CLI). Refer to "Configuring Synchronization for the Switch."

Step 5 Configure logical ports for the physical line by executing addport. Execute addport once for each logical port. Related commands are cnfport, dspports, and delport.

addport <port_num> <line_num> <pct_bw> <min_vpi> <max_vpi>

port_num is the number for the logical port. The range is 1-32 for user-ports or 34 for inband ATM PVCs that serve as management connections.

line_num is the line number in the range 1-4 but depends on the type of uplink card.

pct_bw is the percentage of bandwidth. The range is 0-100. This parameter applies to both ingress and egress.

min_vpi is the minimum VPI value. On a feeder, the range is 0-4095. On a stand-alone node, the range is 0-255.

max_vpi is the maximum VPI value. On a feeder, the range is 0-4095. On a stand-alone node, the range is 0-255.

Using an example of 100% of the bandwidth on one logical port 1:

addport 1 1 100 1 200

where the first "1" is the logical port number; the second "1" is the line number on the PXM back card to which you are assigning this logical port number; "100" is the percentage of bandwidth this port has in both directions; and the VPI range is 1-200.

Step 6 If necessary, use cnfportrscprtn to modify port-level resources for a controller:

cnfportrscprtn <port_no> <controller> <ingress_%BW> <egress_%BW>

<min_VPI> <max_VPI> <min_VCI> <max_VCI> <max_GLCNs>

port_no is the logical port number in the range 1-32 for user-connections or 34 for inband ATM PVCs for network management.

controller is a string identifying the network controller—"PAR," "PNNI," or "TAG."

ingress_%BW is the percentage of ingress bandwidth in the range 0-100.

egress_%BW is the percentage of egress bandwidth in the range 0-100.

min_vpi is the minimum VPI in the range 0-4095.

max_vpi is the maximum VPI in the range 0-4095.

min_vci is the minimum VCI in the range 0-65535.

max_vci is the maximum VCI in the range 0-65535.

max_chans is the maximum GLCNS in the range 0-32767.

Step 7 On a stand-alone node, specify the cell header type as needed by executing cnfatmln.

cnfatmln <line_num> <type>

line_num is the line number in the range 1-4.

type is either 2 for UNI or 3 for NNI (the default).

UNI cell headers typically apply where a workstation connects through a line to a PXM UNI port (rather than a SLIP-based port on the PXM-UI card). Such an implementation is not common, so cnfatmln usually is not necessary.

Automatic Protection Switching on the PXM1

Automatic Protection Switching (APS) provides redundancy for an OC-3 or OC-12 line on the PXM1 if a failure occurs someplace other than the PXM1 front card. The failure can originate on the daughter card, uplink card, or any part of the physical line. With APS, the active PXM1 remains active and passes the cells from the failed line-path through the redundant line. The advantage of APS is that a line switchover requires significantly less time than a full PXM1 switchover. (A failure of the PXM1 front card in a redundant system causes the entire PXM card set to switch over.) As defined in GR-253, a variety of APS modalities are possible (see command summaries that follow).

The current requirements for APS service on an MGX 8850 switch are:

Redundant PXM1s (currently, the PXM1 does not support an APS configuration where the working and protection lines on the same uplink card).

A "B" version of an OC-3 or OC-12 back card (SMLR-1-622/B, and so on).

The connected network switch or CPE must also support APS.

Initial APS specification consists of the working and protection slot and line and the mode for APS. After the initial APS specification, you can configure additional APS parameters, give commands for switching lines, and display the APS configuration. The CiscoView application and CLI provide access to the APS feature. For detailed descriptions of the CLI commands, see the Cisco MGX 8850 Wide Area Edge Switch Command Reference. Note that APS is available for only the "B" versions of the SONET cards—SMLR-1-622/B, and so on. The applicable CLI commands are:

addapsln to specify the lines and mode for APS

cnfapsln to modify the following details of APS operation:

error thresholds

wait period before the PXM1 restores the working line after errors clear

unidirectional or bidirectional switchover, which specifies whether one or both directions of a line are switched when the criteria for a hard or soft failure are met for one direction

revertive recovery, where the working line automatically returns to operation after errors clear and any wait period has elapsed

enable use of K1 and K2 bytes in the line-level frame for equipment at both ends to exchange APS-related information

delapsln to delete the APS configuration

dspapsln to display the configuration for an APS-configured line

switchapsln to issue commands for line switching that:

clear previous user requests

lock out (block) line switching

manually switch to the protection line if the following are true: no errors exist, the working line is active, and your request has an equal or higher priority than the last switch request.

force a line switch regardless of existing errors the following are true: the working line is active and your request has an equal or higher priority than the last switch request.

switch all traffic to either the working lines or protection lines so you can remove a card (applies to only the currently supported configuration of 1+1 mode on two uplink cards)

To specify APS, use the following syntax:

addapsln <workline> <workingslot> <protectionline> <protectionslot> <archmode>

where workline and workingslot identify the line and slot of the APS working line, and protectionline and protectionslot identify the protection line and slot. According to GR-253, the archmode identifies the type of APS operation. The mode definition includes:

1 1+1 on one back card

2 1+1 on two back cards

3 1:1

4 Annex B

Currently, the only supported mode is 1+1 with two uplink cards (mode=2). With 1+1 APS, both the working line and the protection line carry duplicate data even though no error threshold has been exceeded or line break has occurred. This mode requires that two standard cables (rather than a Y-cable) connect at two ports on the equipment at the opposite end. With the two-card implementation, workline must be the same as protectionline.

Adding Connections on a PXM1 in a Stand-Alone Node

This section describes the CLI commands for provisioning connections on a PXM1 in a stand-alone node. Connection addition conforms to the rules for a standard connection or a management connection. (See "Rules for Adding Connections" earlier in this chapter.) In addition, this section describes the commands for modifying specific features for a connection and policing connections by way of usage parameter control (UPC).

The CLI commands correspond to functions in the Cisco WAN Manager application. The preferred CLI command is addcon. (If the application requires NSAP addressing, use addchan to add a connection and cnfchan to modify a connection. To see the syntax for these two commands, refer to the command reference.) On the PXM1 CLI:


Step 1 Execute the addcon command according to the following syntax:

addcon <port_num> <conn_type> <local_VPI> <local_VCI> <service> [CAC] [mastership] [remoteConnId]

port_no is the logical port in the range 1-32 for a user connection or 34 for a management connection.

conn_type is a number identifying the connection type—1 for VPC or 2 for VCC.

local_VPI is the local VPI in the range 0-4095.

local_VCI is the local VCI in the range 0-65535.

service is a number in the range 1-4 to specify the type of service: 1=CBR, 2=VBR, 3=ABR, and 4=UBR.

(Optional) CAC lets you turn off the loading affect of a connection on the aggregated load on a port.

mastership specifies whether the endpoint you are adding is the master or slave. 1=master. 2=slave (default). The syntax shows this parameter as optional because you need to enter it at only the master end. Slave is the default, so you do not need to specify it explicitly when entering a DAX con.

remoteConnId identifies the connection at the slave end. The format for remoteConnId is Remote_nodename.slot_num.remote_VPI.remoteVCI.


Note   The slot number of the active PXM1 is always 0 when you add a connection.


Step 2 If necessary, modify a connection by using cnfcon:

cnfcon <conn_ID> <route_priority> <max_cost> <restrict_trunk_type> [CAC]

conn_ID identifies the connection. The format is logical_port.VPI.VCI.

route_priority is the priority of the connection for re-routing. The range is 1-15 and is meaningful only in relation to the priority of other connections.

max_cost is a number establishing the maximum cost of the connection route. The range is 1-255 and is meaningful only in relation to the cost of other connections for which you specify a maximum cost.

restrict_trunk_type is a number that specifies the type of trunk for this connection. Specify 1 for no restriction, 2 for terrestrial trunk only, or 3 for satellite trunk only.

CAC optionally lets you turn on or off the addition of the loading affect of a connection to the aggregated load on a port.

Step 3 As needed, specify usage parameter control according to the connection type. Use either cnfupccbr, cnfupcvbr, cnfupcabr, or cnfupcubr. This step defines the parameters for each of these commands. Note that the parameters for cnfupcvbr and cnfupcabr are the same. Also, the polType parameter has numerous variations in accordance with ATM Forum v4.0. For a list of these variations, see after the syntax descriptions.

cnfupccbr <conn_ID> <polType> <pcr[0+1]> <cdvt[0+1]> <IngPcUtil> <EgSrvRate> <EgPcUtil>

conn_ID identifies the connection. The format is port.vpi.vci.

polType is the policing type. The choices are 4 or 5. See for a description of these types.

pcr is the peak call rate in the range 50-1412832 cps.

cdvt is the cell delay variation tolerance in the range 1-5000000 microseconds.

IngPcUtil is the percentage of utilization on the ingress. The range is 1-100.

EgSrvRate is the egress service rate. The range is 50-1412832 cps.

EgPcUtil is the percentage of utilization on the egress. The range is 1-100.

cnfupcvbr or cnfupcabr <conn_ID> <polType> <pcr[0+1] <cdvt[0+1]> <scr> <mbs> <IngPcUtil> <EgSrvRate> <EgPcUtil>

conn_ID identifies the connection. The format is port.vpi.vci.

polType is the policing type in the range 1- 5. See for a list of these types.

pcr is the peak call rate in the range 50-1412832 cps.

cdvt is the cell delay variation tolerance in the range 1-5000000 microseconds.

scr is the sustained cell rate. The range is 50-1412832 cps.

mbs is the maximum burst size. The range is 1-5000000 cells.

IngPcUtil is the percentage of utilization on the ingress. The range is 1-100.

EgSrvRate is the egress service rate. The range is 50-1412832 cps.

EgPcUtil is the percentage of utilization on the egress. The range is 1-100.

cnfupcubr <conn_ID> <polType> <pcr[0+1] < cdvt[0+1]> <IngPcUtil>

conn_ID identifies the connection. The format is port.vpi.vci.

polType is the policing type. The range is 3- 5. See for a list of these types.

pcr is the peak call rate in the range 50-1412832 cps.

cdvt is the cell delay variation tolerance in the range 1-5000000 microseconds.

IngPcUtil is the percentage of utilization on the ingress. The range is 1-100.

Table 6-1 Policing Definitions According to Policing and Connection Type

Policing by Connection Type
ATM Forum TM spec. 4.0 conformance definition
PCR Flow
(1st leaky bucket)
CLP tagging (for PCR flow)
SCR Flow
(2nd leaky bucket)
CLP tagging (for SCR flow)

CBR

polType=4

CBR.1

(PCR Policing only)

CLP(0+1)

no

off

n/a

CBR

polType=5

When policing=5 (off)

off

n/a

off

n/a

UBR

polType=3

UBR.1

when CLP setting=no

CLP(0+1)

no

off

n/a

UBR

polType=4

UBR.2

when CLP setting=yes

CLP(0+1)

no

CLP(0)

yes

UBR

polType=5

Policing is off

off

n/a

off

n/a

VBR and ABR

polType=1

VBR.1

1

CLP(0+1)

no

CLP(0+1)

no

VBR and ABR

polType=2

VBR.2

CLP(0+1)

no

CLP(0)

no

VBR and ABR

polType=3

VBR.3

CLP(0+1)

no

CLP(0)

yes

VBR and ABR

polType=4

(when Policing=4)

CLP(0+1)

no

off

n/a

VBR and ABR

polType=5

Policing is off

off

n/a

off

n/a


ATM Universal Service Module

The eight-port ATM Universal Service Module (MGX-AUSM/B-8T1 and MGX-AUSM/B-E1) is a multipurpose card set with eight T1 or E1 lines that support:

ATM UNI with high port-density for the CPE—with AUSMs in all 24 service module slots, an MGX 8850 switch can support up to 192 individual T1 or E1 lines. An individual card set can support 1000 data connections and 16 management connections.

Inverse multiplexing for ATM (IMA) that complies with ATM Forum v3.0 and v3.1—the 8-port AUSM can provide N x T1 or N x E1 logical ports up to maximum rates of 12 Mbps for T1 or
16 Mbps for E1.

Classes of service—CBR, VBR, ABR, and UBR with per-VC queuing on ingress and multiple class-of-service queues on egress.

Statistics collection.

Virtual path connections (VPCs).

Network synchronization derived from one of its lines.

Bit error rate test (BERT) functionality with loopback pattern generation and verification on individual lines or logical port. For a description of the BERT functions, see the section titled "Bit Error Rate Testing Through an MGX-SRM-3T3."

1:N redundancy for through the optional MGX-SRM-3T3/B card.

Automatic card-restore.

SNMP and TFTP to support card and connection management.

Resource partitions for individual network control applications.

Using the CLI to Configure the Card, Lines, and Ports

You can activate and configure the card, the lines, and the ports on the AUSM-series cards through the CiscoView application or the CLI. To perform connection-related tasks, use the Cisco WAN Manager application or the CLI. Refer to the documentation for these applications for task descriptions. Use the commands described in this section to:

Optionally modify resource partitioning at the card-level

Activate and configure a line

Create and configure a logical port

Optionally modify resource partitioning at the port-level

Configure usage parameters

Configure queue depths

Configure the ForeSight feature

Configure a line as a clock source

On the CLI of the AUSM/B:


Step 1 If necessary, modify the resource partitioning for the whole card by executing the cnfcdrscprtn command. You can view resource partitioning through dspcdrscprtn.

cnfcdrscprtn <number_PAR_conns | number_PNNI_conns | number_TAG_conns>

number_PAR_conns is the number of connections in the range 0-1000 for PAR.

number_PNNI_conns is the number of connections in the range 0-1000 for PNNI.

number_TAG_conns is the number of connections in the range 0-1000 for MPLS.

For example, you could reserve 300 connections for each controller on the AUSM with:

cnfcdrscprtn 300 300 300

Step 2 Activate a physical line by using addln for each of the eight lines as needed:

addln <line_number>

Step 3 Optionally, use the cnfln command to specify line coding, line length, and clock source:

cnfln <line_num> <line_code> <line_len> <clk_src> [E1-signaling]

Step 4 Execute upport to activate the logical operation of the line:

upport <port_number>, where port_number is in the range 1-8.

Step 5 If necessary, execute cnfportq to modify the egress queues:

cnfportq <port_num> <q_num> <q_algo> <q_depth> <clp_high> <clp_low> <efci_thres>

port_num

is the logical port number in the range 1-8.

q_num

is the queue number in the range 1-16. 0 is the default for addchan.

1=CBR
2=VBR
3=ABR
4=UBR

q_algo

is a number to specify the queue algorithm:

0=disable queue
1=high priority—always serve
2=best available
3=minimum guaranteed bandwidth
4=minimum guaranteed bandwidth with maximum rate shaping
5=CBR with smoothing

q_depth

is the maximum queue depth in the range 1-16000 cells.

clp_high

is the high cell loss priority in the range 1-16000 cells.

clp_low

is the low cell loss priority in the range 1-16000 cells.

efci_thres

is the EFCI threshold in the range 1-16000 cells.


Step 6 If necessary, configure resources at the port level by executing cnfportrscprtn. Use dspportrscprtn to see the current resource partitioning.

cnfportrscprtn <port_num> <controller> <ingress_%BW> <egress_%BW> <number_of_cons> <VPImin/VPImax> [VCImin/VCImax]

port_num is the port number in the range 1-8.

controller is a number representing the controller: 1=PAR, 2=PNNI, and 3=MPLS.

ingress_%BW is the percentage of ingress bandwidth in the range 0-100.

egress_%BW is the percentage of egress bandwidth in the range 0-100.

number_of_cons is the maximum number of connections on the port.

VPImin/VPImax is the minimum and maximum VPI numbers.

VCImin/VCImax is the optional specification for VCI range.

Using the CLI to Configure Inverse Multiplexing

The command sequence for configuring the IMA feature:


Step 1 addln on all constituent links.

Step 2 cnfln if necessary.

Step 3 addimagrp (or addaimgrp) to create the IMA group by using the following syntax:

addimagrp <group_num> <port_type> <list_of_links> <minNumLink>

group_num

is a number for IMA group. The range is 1-8.

port_type

is the port type: 1=UNI, 2=NN1.

list_of_links

is the list of links to be included in the group. Separate each link number by a period.

minNumLink

is the minimum number of links in the range 1-8 to form a group.


For example: the following creates IMA group 1 with lines 3, 4, and 5. The minimum is 3.

addimagrp 1 3.4.5 3

IMA-related commands are dspimagrp, dspimagrpcnt, dspimagrps, dspimainfo, and dspimalncnt. Refer to the Cisco MGX 8850 Wide Area Edge Switch Command Reference for descriptions.

Adding and Configuring Connections on the AUSM/B

You can add and modify connections through the Cisco WAN Manager or the CLI. Refer to applicable documentation if you use the WAN Manager application. This section describes how to add an ATM connection through the CLI according to the rules for adding a standard connection or a management connection in the form of either a DAX con or a three-segment connection. See "Rules for Adding Connections" earlier in this chapter.

On the CLI of the AUSM/B:


Step 1 Execute the addcon command.

When you add a connection with addcon, the system automatically assigns the next available channel number, so addcon does not require it. However, some related commands require a channel number—cnfchanfst, cnfchanq, and cnfupcabr, for example. To see the channel number after you add a connection, use dspcons.

The addcon syntax is:

addcon <port_number> <vpi> <vci> <ConType> <SrvType> [Controller_Type] [mastership] [remoteConnID]

port number

port number is in the range 1-8.

vpi

vpi has a value in the range 0-255.

vci

vci can be in the range 0-65535 for a VCC or * for a VPC.

Conn type

is the connection type: 0=VCC, and non-0 is the local ID of a VPC in the range 1-1000.

Service Type

is the service type: 1=CBR, 2=VBR, 3=ABR, and 4=UBR.

mastership

is the mastership status of the endpoint. 1=master, and 2=slave. The default is slave, so you actually do not need to type a 2.

Controller_Type

is the optional controller specification. 1=PAR (the default}.
2=SPVC (PNNI).

connID

is entered at only the master end and consists of the node name, slot number, port number, vci, and vpi of the slave end.


Step 2 To configure usage parameter control (UPC) for the connection (channel), use cnfupccbr, cnfupcvbr, cnfupcabr, or cnfupcubr. Use dspcons to obtain the channel number.

cnfupccbr <port.vpi.vci> <enable/disable> <pcr[0+1]> <cdvt[0+1]> <IngPcUtil> <EgSrvRate> <EgPcUtil>

port.vpi.vci

identifies the connection.

enable/disable

is the UPC enable: 1=disable, 2=enable.

pcr[0+1]

is the peak cell rate. Without IMA, the range is as follows:

T1, 10-3622 cells per second
E1, 10-4528 cells per second
clear E1, 10-4830 cells per second

For IMA, multiply the line rate by the number of links.

cdvt[0+1]

is the cell delay variation tolerance for cells with CLP=0 and CLP=1. The range is 1-250000 micro seconds.

IngPcUtil

is the percent utilization on the ingress. The range is 1-127. The default is 0.

EgSrvRate

is the egress service rate. Without IMA, the range is as follows:

T1, 10-3622 cells per second
E1, 10-4528 cells per second
clear E1, 10-4830 cells per second

For IMA, multiply the line rate by the number of links.

EgrPcUtil

is the percent utilization on the egress. The range is 1-127.
The default is 0.


cnfupcvbr has the same syntax and parameters as cnfupcabr

cnfupcvbr or cnfupcabr <port.vpi.vci> <enable> <pcr[0+1]> <cdvt[0+1]> <scr> <scr_police> <mbs> <IngPcUtil> <EgSrvRate> <EgPcUtil> <clp_tag>

port.vpi.vci

identifies the connection.

enable

is the enabled/disable for UPC: 1=Disable, 2=Enable.

pcr

is the peak cell rate. Without IMA, the range is as follows:

T1, 10-3622 cells per second
E1, 10-4528 cells per second
clear E1, 10-4830 cells per second

For IMA, multiply the line rate by the number of links.

cdvt

cdvt[0+1] is the cell delay variation tolerance for cells with CLP=[0+1]. The range is 1-250000 micro seconds.

scr

is the peak cell rate. Without IMA, the range is as follows:

T1, 10-3622 cells per second
E1, 10-4528 cells per second
clear E1, 10-4830 cells per second

For IMA, multiply the line rate by the number of links.

scr_police

specifies the type of scr policing: 1= CLP[0] cells,
2=CLP[0+1] cells, and 3=no SCR policing.

mbs

is the maximum burst size: the range is 1-5000 cells.

IngPcUtil

is the percent utilization on the egress. The range is 1-127. The default is 0.

EgSrvRate

is the egress service rate. Without IMA, the range is as follows:

T1, 10-3622
E1, 10-4528
clear E1, 10-4830

For IMA, multiply the line rate by the number of links.

EgrPcUtil

is the percent utilization on the ingress. The range is 1-127. The default is 0.

clp_tag

is the enable for CLP tagging: 1=disable, 2=enable.


cnfupcubr <port.vpi.vci> <enable> <pcr[0+1]> <cdvt[0+1]> <IngPc> <util> <clp_tag>

port.vpi.vci

identifies the connection.

enable

is the enabled/disable for UPC: 1=Disable, 2=Enable.

pcr

is the peak cell rate. Without IMA, the range is:

T1, 10-3622
E1, 10-4528
clear E1, 10-4830

For IMA, multiply the line rate by the number of links.

cdvt

cdvt[0+1] is the cell delay variation tolerance for cells with CLP=[0+1]. The range is 1-250000 micro seconds.

scr

is the peak cell rate. Without IMA, the range is:

T1, 10-3622
E1, 10-4528
clear E1, 10-4830

For IMA, multiply the line rate by the number of links.

scr_police

specifies the type of scr policing: 1= CLP[0] Cells,
2=CLP[0+1] cells, and 3=no SCR policing.

mbs

is the maximum burst size: the range is 1-5000 cells.

IngPc

is the percent utilization on the ingress. The range is 1-127. The default is 0.

hclp_tag

is the enable for CLP tagging: 1=disable, 2=enable.


Step 3 If the system has the ForeSight feature, use cnfchanfst to configure it.

cnfchanfst <port.vpi.vci> <enable> <fgcra_enable> <ibs> <pcr> <mcr> <icr>

port.vpi.vci

identifies the connection.

enable

is the enabled/disable for the ForeSight feature:
1=disable, 2=enable.

fgcra_enable

is the enabled/disable for the frame-based generic cell rate algorithm: 1=disable, 2=enable.

ibs

is the initial burst size in the range 0-5000 cells.

pcr

is the peak cell rate. Without IMA, the range is:

T1, 10-3622
E1, 10-4528
clear E1, 10-4830

For IMA, multiply the line rate by the number of links.

mcr

is the minimum cell rate. Without IMA, the range is:

T1, 0-3622
E1, 0-4528
clear E1, 0-4830

For IMA, multiply the line rate by the number of links.

icr

is the initial cell rate. Without IMA, the range is as follows:

T1, 0-3622
E1, 0-4528
clear E1, 0-4830

For IMA, multiply the line rate by the number of links.


Step 4 If necessary, change the queue depths by using cnfchanq.

cnfchanq <port.vpi.vci> <discard_option> <vc_q_depth> <clp_thresh_high> <clp_thresh_low | epd_threshold> <efci_thresh>

port.vpi.vci

identifies the connection.

discard_option

is either 1 for CLP hysteresis or 2 for frame-based.

vc_q_depth

is the ingress queue depth in the range 1-16000 cells.

clp_thresh_high

is the CLP high threshold in the range 1-16000 cells.

clp_thresh_low

or

epd_threshold

is the CLP low threshold in the range 1-16000 cells for CLP hysteresis-based discard.

or

is the EPD threshold in the range 1-16000 cells frame-based discard.

efci_thresh

is the EFCI threshold in the range 1-16000 cells.


BPX 8600-to-BPX 8600 Segment

For the middle segment, be sure to use the connection type as the local segments on the MGX 8850 node (CBR, VBR, ABR, or UBR). The parameters directly map from those specified at the connection endpoint.

Frame Service Module Features

This section describes the features available on each of the Frame Service Modules (FRSMs). For descriptions of how to set up these cards and add connections, see the subsequent section titled "Configuring Frame Relay Service." This section consists of:

Brief descriptions of each model of the FRSM

Lists of features shared by all FRSMs

Lists of features for individual models of the FRSM

Brief descriptions of the services

Introduction

The primary function of the FRSM is to convert between the Frame Relay-formatted data and ATM/AAL5 cell-formatted data. For an individual connection, you can configure network interworking (NIW), service interworking (SIW), ATM to Frame Relay UNI (FUNI), or frame forwarding. An FRSM converts the header format and translates the address for:

Frame Relay port number and DLCI

ATM-Frame UNI (FUNI) port number and frame address or frame forwarding port

ATM virtual connection identifier (VPI/VCI)

Types of Frame Service Modules

The models of the FRSM include eight-port T1 and E1 cards and very high-speed modules. Higher speed modules support unchannelized E3 and HSSI as well as channelized and unchannelized T3.

Very High Speed Frame Service Modules

The Very High Speed Frame Service Modules (FRSM-VHS) support Frame Relay services on T3, E3, and HSSI interfaces. Up to 24 FRSM-VHS cards in any combination can operate in the switch. They should occupy upper slots whenever possible. The FRSM-VHS group on an MGX 8850 node consists of the:

MGX-FRSM-2CT3, which provides channelized Frame Relay service for up to 4000 user connections over two T3 lines on the BNC-2T3 back card (or line module).

MGX-FRSM-2T3E3, which provides unchannelized (clear-channel) Frame Relay service for up to 2000 user connections over two T3 lines (44.736 Mbps each) or two E3 lines (34.368 Mbps each) on a BNC-2T3 or BNC-2E3 back card. The MGX-FRSM-2T3E3 can also support subrate T3 or E3 for tiered DS3 on each physical port.

MGX-FRSM-HS2, which provides unchannelized Frame Relay service for up to 2000 user-connections over two HSSI lines on the SCSI2-2HSSI back card. The maximum rate for the card is 70 Mbps. Each port can operate either as DTE or DCE with incremental rates of NxT1 or NxE1 up to 52 Mbps.

Eight-Port Channelized and Unchannelized Frame Service Modules for T1 and E1

The AX-FRSM-8T1 and AX-FRSM-8E1 provide unchannelized Frame Relay service for up to 1000 connections on 8 T1 or E1 lines. The AX-FRSM-8T1c and AX-FRSM-8E1c provide channelized service for up to 1000 connections. Fewer connections are possible with any form of LMI.

Four-Port Unchannelized Frame Service Module for V.35

The MGX-FRSM-HS1/B provides unchannelized Frame Relay service on a maximum of 200 connections across four V.35 interfaces. The maximum throughput for the card is 16 Mbps. The maximum rate on one line is 8 Mbps. Without the cost of a T3 or E3 card, the MGX-FRSM-HS1/B provides greater than T1 or E1 speeds on a port as well as a choice of 50 line rates in a range of 48 Kbps-8 Mbps.

Frame Service Module Features

This section first lists the features common to all FRSM models then lists the features of each model. All FRSMs support:

Frame Relay-to-ATM Network Interworking (NIW) as defined in FRF.5.

Frame Relay-to-ATM Service Interworking (SIW) with or without translation as in FRF.8.

Frame forwarding.

ATM Frame-UNI.

Maximum frame sizes of 4510 bytes for Frame Relay and 4096 bytes for ATM-FUNI.

Per-virtual-circuit (VC) queuing in the ingress direction (towards the Cellbus). Traffic arriving at the network on a connection has a dynamically assigned buffer at the entrance to the switch. Buffer size depends on the amount of traffic and the service-level agreement (SLA).

Advanced buffer management. When a frame arrives, the depth of the queue for the LCN is compared against the peak queue depth scaled down by a specified factor. The scale-down factor depends on the amount of congestion in the free buffer pool. As the free buffer pool begins to empty, the scale-down factor is increased, preventing an excessive number of buffers from being held up by any single LCN.

Multiple, priority-level queuing to support class of service on the egress. The FRSM services egress queues according to a weighted priority. The priority depends on the percentage of logical port bandwidth needed by all connections of a particular type on a port. The FRSM supports a:

High-priority queue

Real-time Variable Bit Rate (rt-VBR) queue

Common queue for non-real-time Variable Bit Rate (nrt-VBR) and ABR connections

UBR queue

Initial burst per channel. After a period of silence, the FRSM sends a configurable number of bytes at a peak service rate.

The ForeSight option (except on MGX-FRSM-HS1/B V.35). This Cisco mechanism for managing congestion and optimizing bandwidth monitors the utilization of ATM trunks. It proactively adjusts the bandwidth for connections to avoid queuing delays and cell discards.

Consolidated Link Layer Management (CLLM), an out-of-band mechanism to transport congestion related information to the far end.

Dual leaky bucket policing. Within the basic parameters such as committed burst, excess burst, and CIR, incoming frames go into two buckets: those to be checked for compliance with the committed burst rate and those to be checked for compliance with the excess burst rate. Frames that overflow the first bucket go into the second bucket. The buckets "leak" by a certain amount to allow for policing without disruption or delay of service.

Standards-based management tools. Each FRSM supports SNMP, TFTP for configuration and statistics collection, and a command line interface. The Cisco WAN Manager application provides full graphical user interface support for connection management. The CiscoView application provides equipment management.

MGX 8800-series network management functions, including image download, configuration upload, statistics, telnet, UI, SNMP, trap, and MIBs.

OAM features: OAM F5 AIS, RDI, end-to-end or segment loopback as well as LMI and Enhanced LMI (ANNEX A, ANNEX D, Strata LMI).

Hot swappable redundancy (see sections for individual FRSM card types).

Resource partitioning at the card level or port level.

Bit error rate test (BERT) functions for all card types except the HSSI card types. For a description of BERT on the MGX-FRSM-2T3E3, see the forthcoming section titled "Bit Error Rate Testing on an Unchannelized T3 or E3 FRSM." Running a BERT session on an MGX-FRSM-2CT3 or an eight-port FRSM requires a set of MGX-SRM-3T3s in the system. For a description of BERT on these cards, see the section titled "Bit Error Rate Testing Through an MGX-SRM-3T3."

MGX-FRSM-2CT3 Features

The specific features are:

Up to 4000 user-connections

Two T3 lines

Up to 256 logical ports

Logical port speed from DS0 56 Kbps through DS1 1.536 Mbps

Support for five Class of Service (CoS) queues (high priority, rt-VBR, nrt-VBR, ABR, UBR)

1:1 redundancy through Y-cable redundancy (no Service Resource Module required)

MGX-FRSM-2T3 and MGX-FRSM-2E3 Features

The specific features are:

Up to 2000 user-connections

Two T3 or E3 lines coinciding with two logical ports

ADC Kentrox and Digital Link methods for supporting fractional T3 or E3 ports

Maximum possible number of DLCIs per port by using the Q.922 two-octet header format

Support for five Class of Service (CoS) queues (high priority, rt-VBR, nrt-VBR, ABR, UBR)

1:1 redundancy through Y-cable redundancy (no Service Resource Module required)

Fractional T3 speeds available through either the Digital Link or ADC Kentrox method

MGX-FRSM-HS2/B Features

The specific features are:

Up to 2000 user-connections

Maximum 2 logical ports

Two HSSI lines with configurable line speeds in multiples of 56 Kbps or 64 Kbps

Selectable DTE or DCE mode for each port

In DCE mode, per port clock speeds of NxT1 and NxE1 up to 52 Mbps

Various DTE/DCE loopback operations

Maximum possible number of DLCIs per port by using the Q.922 two-octet header format.

1:1 redundancy through a Y-cable

MGX-FRSM-HS1/B Features

The specific features and characteristics are:

Up to 200 data connections

In addition to data connections, support for:

LMI according to ITU-T Q.333 Annex A and ANSI T1.617 Annex D

OAM messaging

Total card throughput of 16 Mbps

Maximum of 8 Mbps per line

Choice of DTE or DCE mode for each line

A maximum frame size of 4510 bytes

One-to-one mapping between a logical port and a physical line

Support for metallic (internal) loopback (ITU-T type 1)

V.35-specific alarms (in addition to standard alarms such as LOS, and so on):

Inactive DCD and CTS signals in DTE mode (red alarm).

Inactive RTS signal in DCE mode (red alarm).

Selected line type (through cnfln on the CLI, for example) and the attached cable are incompatible (red alarm).

Disconnected cable, such as a disconnect at the far end (creating LOS, a red alarm).

No cable attached (a red alarm)

Support for ANSI/EIA/TIA-613-1993 and ANSI/EIA/TIA-612-1993


Note   The MGX-FRSM-HS1/B does not support the ForeSight feature.


Eight-Port FRSM Features

The specific features are:

Up to 1000 user-connections.

Fractional FRSMs support a single 56-Kbps or multiple 64-Kbps user-ports (FR-UNI, FR-NNI, FUNI, and frame forwarding) per T1 or E1 line. Channelized FRSMs (AX-FRSM-8T1c and AX-FRSM-8E1c) support multiple 56 Kbps or N x 64 Kbps user-ports per line up to the physical line bandwidth limit.

Bulk distribution for T1 only through the MGX-SRM-3T3. See the "Service Resource Module" section in this chapter.

Redundancy support: the MGX-SRM-3T3 can provide 1:N redundancy for T1 or E1 operation. If the FRSM uses an SMB-8E1 back card, 1:1 redundancy is also available through Y-cabling.

Description of Connection Types on the FRSM

The following sections describe NIW, SIW, FUNI, and frame forwarding. Topics include translation and congestion management.

Frame Relay-to-ATM Network Interworking

FR-ATM network interworking (NIW) supports a permanent virtual connection (PVC) between two Frame Relay users over a Cisco network or a multi-vendor network. The traffic crosses the network as ATM cells. To specify NIW for a connection, add the connection with a channel type of "network interworking." For an illustration of a BPX 8620 network with NIW connections, see .

Figure 6-2 BPX 8620 Network with NIW Connections

In addition to frame-to-cell and DLCI-to-VPI/VCI conversion, the NIW feature maps cell loss priority (CLP) and congestion information from Frame Relay-to-ATM formats. Subsequent sections contain the details. You can modify the CLP and congestion indicators for individual connections.

Congestion Indication for NIW Connections

You can modify the CLP and congestion indicators for individual connections. On the CLI., use the cnfchanmap command. In the Frame Relay-to-ATM direction, you can configure each Frame Relay-ATM NIW connection for one of the following CLP-to-DE mapping schemes:

DE bit in the Frame Relay frame is mapped to the CLP bit of every ATM cell generated by the segmentation process.

CLP is always 0.

CLP is always 1.

In the ATM-to-Frame Relay direction, you can configure each Frame Relay/ATM NIW connection for one of the following CLP-to-DE mapping schemes:

If at least one ATM cell from a frame has CLP=1, the DE field of the Frame Relay frame is set.

No mapping from CLP to DE.

Congestion on the Frame Relay/ATM network interworking connection is flagged by the EFCI bit. The EFCI setting depends on the direction of the traffic. In the Frame Relay-to-ATM direction, EFCI is always set to 0. In the ATM-to-Frame Relay direction, the FECN bit of the Frame Relay frame is set if the EFCI field in the last received ATM cell of a segmented frame is set.

PVC Status Management

The management of ATM layer and FR PVC status management can operate independently. The PVC status from the ATM layer is used when determining the status of the FR PVC. However, no direct actions of mapping LMI A bit to OAM AIS is performed.

Frame Relay-to-ATM Service Interworking

By specifying a service interworking (SIW) channel type when you add a Frame Relay PVC to an FRSM, all data is subject to SIW translation and mapping in both the Frame Relay-to-ATM and ATM-to-Frame Relay directions. A BPX 8620 network with SIW connections appears in .

Figure 6-3 BPX 8600-Series Network with SIW Connections

In , an MGX 8850 node on the right has three Frame Relay SIW connections terminating on an FRSM. Three far-end terminations for these connections appear in other parts of :

ATM FUNI (framed UNI) port on an FRSM

ATM UNI port on an RPM

ATM UNI port on a BPX 8600-series BXM card

In addition to frame-to-cell and DLCI-to-VPI/VCI conversion, SIW maps cell loss priority and congestion data between the Frame Relay and ATM formats and is FRF.8-compliant. It provides full support for routed and bridged PDUs, transparent and translation modes, and VP translation.

Cell Loss Priority

In addition to frame-to-cell and DLCI-to-VPI/VCI conversion, the SIW feature maps cell loss priority (CLP) and congestion information from the Frame Relay format to the ATM format for an individual connection. You can also modify the CLP and congestion indicators for a connection. On the CLI, use cnfchanmap for these tasks. In the Frame Relay-to-ATM direction, you can specify the discard eligibility (DE)-to-cell loss priority (CLP) mapping for an SIW connection:

The DE bit in a frame maps to the CLP bit of every ATM cell resulting from segmentation.

CLP is always 0.

CLP is always 1.

In the ATM-to-Frame Relay direction, you can specify a CLP-to-DE mapping scheme for an individual connection:

If one or more ATM cells belonging to a frame has a CLP=1, the DE field of the Frame Relay frame is set.

DE is always 0.

DE is always 1.

Congestion Indication

This section describes congestion indictors. You can modify the CLP and congestion indicators for a connection. On the CLI, use the cnfchanmap command. In the Frame Relay-to-ATM direction for an individual SIW connection, you can configure the mapping for Forward Explicit Congestion Notification (FECN)-to-Explicit Forward Congestion Indicator (EFCI) schemes:

FECN bit in the Frame Relay frame is mapped to the EFCI bit of every ATM cell generated by the segmentation process of the frame.

EFCI is always 0.

EFCI is always 1.

In the ATM-to-Frame Relay direction, service interworking connections use the following EFCI to FECN/BECN mapping schemes:

If the EFCI bit in the last ATM cell of a segmented frame received is set to 1, the FECN of the Frame Relay frame is set to 1.

BECN is always set to 0.

Command and Response Mapping

The FRSM provides command and response mapping in both directions:

In the Frame Relay-to-ATM direction, the FRSM maps the C/R bit of the received Frame Relay frame to the CPCS-UU least significant bit of the AAL5 CPCS PDU.

In the ATM-to-Frame Relay direction, the FRSM maps the least significant bit of the CPCS-UU to the C/R bit of the Frame Relay frame.

Translation and Transparent Modes

Each service interworking (SIW) connection can exist in either translation or transparent mode. In translation mode, the FRSM translates protocols between the FR NLPID encapsulation (RFC 1490) and the ATM LCC encapsulation (RFC 1483). In transparent mode, the FRSM does not translate. Translation mode support includes address resolution by transforming address resolution protocol (ARP, RFC 826) and inverse ARP (inARP, RFC 1293) between the Frame Relay and ATM formats.

Frame Forwarding

You can configure an individual port for frame forwarding. Frame forwarding is the same as standard Frame Relay except that the FRSM:

Does not interpret the two-byte Q.922 header.

Maps all received frames to a specific connection if it exists, otherwise it discards the frames.

Does not map between DE and CLP or between FECN and EFI.

Does not support statistics for "Illegal header count" or "Invalid DLCI."

Does generate statistics for "Discarded frame count due to no connection."

ATM/Frame-to-User Network Interface

All FRSMs support the ATM Frame User-to-Network Interface (FUNI). When a frame arrives from the FUNI interface, the FRSM removes the 2-byte FUNI header and segments the frame into ATM cells by using AAL5. In the reverse direction, the FRSM assembles ATM cells from the network into a frame by using AAL5, adds a FUNI header to the frame, and sends it to the FUNI port.

Loss Priority Indication

The FRSM maps the loss priority indication for both directions:

In the FUNI to ATM direction, the FRSM maps the CLP bit in the FUNI header to the CLP bit of every ATM cell that it generates for the FUNI frame.

In the ATM-to-FUNI direction, the FRSM always sets the CLP bit in the FUNI header to 0.

Congestion Indication

The FRSM maps congestion indication in both directions:

In the FUNI-to-ATM direction, it sets EFCI to 0 for every ATM cell it generates by segmentation.

In the ATM-to-FUNI direction, it sets the CN bit in the FUNI header to 1 if the EFCI field in the last ATM cell of a received, segmented frame is 1. The two reserve bits (the same positions as C/R and BECN in Frame Relay header) are always 0.

Configuring Frame Relay Service

This section first describes how to configure the FRSM card, lines, and ports, then describes how to add connections. The descriptions are for the CLI execution of the tasks. You can also configure the FRSM card, lines, and ports by using the CiscoView application. Refer to the CiscoView documentation for the directions. Also, the easiest way to add connections is by using the Cisco WAN Manager application. For full details of how to set up a connection through the WAN Manager GUI, refer to the Cisco WAN Manager Operations manual.

Configuring the FRSM Cards, Lines, and Ports

This section describes how to configure card-level parameters—including Y-cable redundancy where applicable, physical lines, and logical ports on the FRSM-series cards.


Step 1 If necessary, modify the resource partitioning for the whole card by executing the cnfcdrscprtn command. You can view resource partitioning through dspcdrscprtn.

cnfcdrscprtn <number_PAR_conns | number_PNNI_conns | number_TAG_conns>

number_PAR_conns is the number of connections in the range 0-1000 available to the PAR controller.

number_PNNI_conns is the number of connections in the range 0-1000 available to a PNNI controller.

number_TAG_conns is the number of connections in the range 0-1000 available to the Tag controller.

For example, you could reserve 300 connections for each controller on the FRSM with:

cnfcdrscprtn 300 300 300

Step 2 If the physical line is not yet active, use the addln command to activate it. The only argument addln takes is the line number.

Step 3 If necessary, modify a line on the MGX-FRSM-2CT3, MGX-FRSM-HS2/B, MGX-FRSM-HD1/B, AX-FRSM-8T1 or AX-FRSM-8E1 by using cnfln.

To change the line parameters on an MGX-FRSM-2CT3, MGX-FRSM-2T3E3, or MGX-FRSM-2E3, use cnfds3ln. Note that both cnfln and cnfds3ln apply to the MGX-FRSM-2CT3 but apply to different features. Refer to the Cisco MGX 8850 Wide Area Edge Switch Command Reference for the syntax of the line modification commands on all cards except the MGX-FRSM-HS1/B.

The syntax for cnfln on the MGX-FRSM-HS1/B is:

cnfln <line_num> <line_type> <line_rate>

line_num has the range 1-4.

line_type is a number that specifies the mode and must match the 12IN1 cable connected to the port: 1=DTE. 2=DCE. 3=DTE_ST (V.35 only).


Note   If no cable is attached, the system lets you specify any line type, but the Alarm LED on the front card turns from yellow to red.


line_rate is a number in the range 1-50. The number corresponds to the bits per second for the line. (The range of line rates is 48 Kbps-52 Mbps.) See .

Table 6-2 Supported Lines rates on the MGX-FRSM-HS1/B

1-50 Correspond to Line Rates in Kbps.

1=48000

2=56000

3=64000

4=112000

5=128000

6=168000

7=192000

8=224000

9=256000

10=280000

11=320000

12=336000

13=384000

14=392000

15=448000

16=512000

17=768000

18=1024000

19=1536000

20=1544000

21=1792000

22=1920000

23=1984000

24=2048000

25=3097000

26=3157000

27=4096000

28=4645000

29=4736000

30=6195000

31=6315000

32=7744000

33=7899000

34=8192000

35=9289000

36=9472000

37=10240000

38=10890000

39=11059000

40=12390000

41=12629000

42=13897000

43=14222000

44=14336000

45=15488000

46=15799000

47=16384000

48=20025000

49=2498600

50=52000000


The possible errors for cnfln are:

One or more parameters are invalid.

Line does not exist (has not been added).

Loopback or BERT is on.

An active port already exists on this line.

Step 4 If the logical port does not exist or is not the appropriate type (Frame Relay, FUNI, or frame forwarding), execute addport to create the appropriate type of port. If the logical port already exists and needs no modification (cnfport), you can add connections by performing the tasks in "Adding a Frame Relay Connection." The parameters for addport depend on the type of FRSM:

For MGX-FRSM-2T3, MGX-FRSM-2E3, or MGX-FRSM-HS2/B:

addport <port_num> <line_num> <port_type>

port_num is the logical port number in the range 1-2. The mapping between a logical port and a line is one-to-one for these cards. Note that the maximum committed information rate (CIR) on each line for these cards is 1-44210000 bps for MGX-FRSM-2T3, 1-34010000 bps for MGX-FRSM-2E3, and 1-51840000 bps for MGX-FRSM-HS2. Specify CIR with addcon (or addchan if necessary).

line_num is the physical line number in the range 1-2.

port_type is a number representing the mode of operation for the logical port:
1 for Frame Relay; 2 for FUNI mode-1a; or 3 for frame forwarding.

For an MGX-FRSM-2CT3:

addport <port_num> <line_num> <ds0_speed> <begin_slot> <num_slot>
<port_type>

port_num is the logical port number in the range 1-256. When you subsequently add a connection through the preferred command addcon or the addchan command (which requires NSAP format), you must indicate a logical port by using this singular port_num regardless of the number of DS0s. (You can add 1-24 DS0s to a single port_num through the other addport parameters.)

line_num is the DS1 number in the range 1-56 to which you assign the DS0 when both lines are active. If you activate only one line, the range is 1-28. You can assign up to 24 contiguous DS0s to one DS1. Each physical line supports up to 28 DS1s. The number of DS0s cannot span more than DS1.

ds0_speed is a number representing the DS0 speed: 1 for 56 Kbps or
2 for 64 Kbps.

begin_slot is the beginning DS0 timeslot in 1 base. For example, on port number 50, you could specify begin_slot to be 9 then specify num_slot to be in the range 1-16.

num_slot is the number of DS0s in the associated DS1. Note that the number of DS0s cannot be such that the logical port spans more than DS1.

port_type is a number representing the mode of operation for the logical port:
1 for Frame Relay; 2 for FUNI mode-1a; and 3 for frame forwarding.

For MGX-FRSM-HS1/B

addport <port_num> <port_type>

port_num is the port number in the range 1-4.

port_type is a number representing the type of frame interface technology for the logical port: 1 for Frame Relay; 2 for FUNI mode-1a; or 3 for frame forwarding.

For AX-FRSM-8T1 and AX-FRSM-8E1:

addport <port_num> <line_num> <ds0_speed> <begin_slot> <num_slot> <port_type>

port_num is the logical port number in the range of either 1-192 for T1 or 1-248 for E1. When you subsequently add a connection through the preferred command addcon or the addchan command (which requires NSAP format), you must indicate a logical port by using this singular port_num regardless of the number of DS0s. (You can add 1-24 DS0s to a single line through the other addport parameters.)

line_num is the physical line number in the range 1-8.

ds0_speed is a number representing the DS0 speed: 1 for 56 Kbps or
2 for 64 Kbps.

begin_slot is the beginning DS0 timeslot in 1 base. For example, on port number 50, you could specify begin_slot to be 9 then specify num_slot to be in the range 1-16.

num_slot is the consecutive DS0s that each connection on port_num has.

port_type is a number representing the mode of operation for the logical port:
1 for Frame Relay; 2 for FUNI mode-1a; and 3 for frame forwarding.

Step 5 Modify as needed the signaling on a port by executing cnfport.

cnfport <port_num> <lmi_sig> <asyn> <elmi> <T391> <T392> <N391> <N392> <N393>

port_num is the logical port number with a range that depends on the type of FRSM:

For the MGX-FRSM-2CT3, 1-56

For a channelized AX-FRSM-8T1, 1-192

For a channelized AX-FRSM-8E1, 1-248

For the unchannelized cards, the range equals the number of lines.

lmi_sig specifies the LMI signaling. 1=Other, 2=None, 3=StrataLMI, 4=AnnexAUNI, 5=AnnexDUNI, 6=AnnexANNI, 7=AnnexDNNI LMI signalling, N=none, S=StrataLMI, and au=AnnexAUNI.

asyn enables asynchronous updates: (y)es or (n)o

elmi enables Enhanced LMI: (N or n) disable (Y or y) enable

T391 sets the T391 timer. The range is 5-30 seconds. It sets the interval in seconds for NNI status polling. The default is 10.

T392 sets the T392 timer. The range is 5-30 seconds. It sets the interval in seconds for UNI status polling. The default is 15.

N391 sets the N391 counter-the number of UNI/NNI polling cycles. The range is 1-255. The default is 6.

N392 sets the N392 counter-the threshold for UNI/NNI errors. The range is 1-10. The default is 3.

N393 sets the N393 counter-the UNI/NNI threshold for monitored events. The range is 1-10 and must be greater than the value of N392. The default is 4.

Step 6 Configure resources for the port as needed by executing cnfportrscprtn. To see the partitioning, use dspportrscprtn. The description has a high and low-bandwidth version:

cnfportrscprtn <port_num> <controller> <percent BW> <low DLCI> <high DLCI> <max LCN>

For FRSM-VHS and the MGX-FRSM-HS1/B cards:

port_num is the port number in the range 1-2 for MGX-FRSM-2T3E3 and MGX-FRSM-HS2, 1-4 for MGX-FRSM-HS1/B, or 1-256 for MGX-FRSM-2CT3.

controller is a number representing the controller: 1=PAR, 2=PNNI, and 3=Tag.

percent BW is the percentage of the bandwidth in the range 0-100 and applies to both egress and ingress.

low DLCI is in the range 0-1023.

high DLCI is in the range 0-1023.

max LCN is the maximum number of logical connections available to the controller on this port. The ranges are 1-4000 for MGX-FRSM-2CT3, and 1-2000 for MGX-FRSM-2T3E3 and MGX-FRSM-HS2.

For AX-FRSM-8T1 or AX-FRSM-8E1:

port_num is the logical port number in the range 1-192 for T1 or 1-248 for E1.

controller-name is PAR, PNNI, or TAG.

percent BW is the percentage of the bandwidth in the range 0-100 and applies to both egress and ingress.

low DLCI is in the range 0-1023.

high DLCI is in the range 0-1023.

max LCN is the maximum number of logical connections available to the controller on this port. The range is 1-1000.


Note   The following step applies to Y-cable redundancy for the MGX-FRSM-2T3E3. For 1:N redundancy on the eight-port FRSMs, refer to "Redundancy Support by the MGX-SRM-3T3/B."


Step 7 Optionally configure Y-cable redundancy if you have connected the lines of adjacent MGX-FRSM-2T3 or MGX-FRSM-2E3 cards through a Y-cable. The applicable commands are addred, dspred, and delred. These commands run on the PXM1 rather than the service module, so you must change to the PXM1 CLI to execute them:

addred <redPrimarySlotNum> <redSecondarySlotNum> <redType>

redPrimarySlotNum is the slot number of the primary card. The possible numbers are 1-6, 9-14, 17-22, and 25-30.

redSecondarySlotNum is the slot number of the primary card. The possible numbers are 1-6, 9-14, 17-22, and 25-30.

redType is the type of redundancy. Enter a 1 for 1:1 Y-cable redundancy.

Use the display commands dspcd, dspln, and so on to check the configuration and status.

Adding a Frame Relay Connection

This section describes how to add a Frame Relay connection according to the rules for adding a standard connection or a management connection in the form of either a DAX con or a three-segment connection. See "Rules for Adding Connections" earlier in this chapter.


Step 1 Add a connection by using addcon. If the application requires the NSAP form for the endpoint, use addchan as described in the command reference.

The system automatically assigns the next available channel number, so the addcon command does not require it. However, some related commands require a channel number. To see the channel number after you add a connection, use dspcons.

On the FRSM-VHS cards (2CT3, 2T3E3, or HS2):

addcon <port> <DLCI> <cir> <chan_type> <egress_service_type> [CAC] <controller_type> <mastership> [connID] <controllerID>

port is the logical port number on the MGX-FRSM-2CT3 in the range 1-256. On the MGX-FRSM-2T3E3 and MGX-FRSM-HS2, the range is 1-2. (See addport step if necessary.)

DLCI is the DLCI number in the range 0-1023 (2CT3/2T3/2E3/HS2).

cir is the committed information rate in one of the following ranges:
for 2CT3, 1-1536000 bps; for 2T3, 1-44210000 bps; 2E3, 1-34010000 bps; and
for HS2, 1-51840000 bps.

chan_type specifies the type of connection: 1=NIW, 2=SIW-transparent mode;
3=SIW with translation; 4=FUNI, and 5=frame forwarding.

egress_service_type is a number that specifies the type of queue on the egress:
1=high priority; 2=real-time VBR, 3=nonreal-time VBR; 4=ABR; and 5=UBR.

CAC optionally enables connection admission control; 1=enable. 2=disable (default). With CAC enabled, the system adds the resource consumption represented by adding the connection to the total resources consumed on a logical port.

controller_type is the controller type for signaling connections: 1 (the default) specifies a PVC and applies to PAR. 2 specifies a SPVC and applies to PNNI.

mastership indicates if this end of the connection is master or slave: 1=master, 2=slave.

connID is the connection identifier at the remote end. It appears in the syntax as an optional parameter because it is mandatory only when you add the connection at the master end. See "Rules for Adding Connections" at the beginning of this chapter. connID can have one the following formats according to the slave endpoint:

Nodename.SlotNo.PortNo.DLCI

Nodename.SlotNo.PortNo.ControllerId.DLCI

Nodename.SlotNo.PortNo.VPI.VCI for ATM endpoint

controllerID is a number indicating the type of network control application:
1=PAR, 2=PNNI, 3=MPLS

For AX-FRSM-8T1 and AX-FRSM-8E1:

addcon <port> <DLCI> <cir> <chan_type> [CAC] <controller_type> <mastership> <connID> <controllerID>

port is the logical port number in the range 1-192 for T1 or 1-248 for E1. (See addport step if necessary.)

DLCI is the DLCI number in the range 0-1023.

cir is the committed information rate in one of the following ranges:
for T1, 0-1536000 bps for T1; for E1, 0-2048000 bps.

chan_type specifies the type of connection: 1=NIW, 2=SIW-transparent mode;
3=SIW with translation; 4=FUNI, and 5=frame forwarding.

CAC optionally enables connection admission control: 1=enable. 2=disable (default).

controller_type is the controller type for signaling: 1=PVC (PAR), the default, 2=SPVC (PNNI).

mastership indicates if this end of the connection is master or slave: 1=master, 2=slave.

connID is the connection identifier at the remote end and can have one the following formats according to the type of card at the slave endpoint:

NodeName.SlotNo.PortNo.DLCI

NodeName.SlotNo.PortNo.ControllerId.DLCI

NodeName.SlotNo.PortNo.VPI.VCI for ATM endpoint

If the remote end is a PXM1, the port number can be in the range 1-32 for user connections or 34 for inband management connections (stand-alone node only).

controllerID is a number indicating the type of network control application:
1=PAR, 2=PNNI, 3=TAG.

For MGX-FRSM-HS1/B:

addcon <port_number> <DLCI> <CIR> <chan_type> <CAC> <Controller_type> <mastership> <connID>

port_number is the logical port in the range 1-4.

DLCI is the DLCI in the range 0-1023.

CIR specifies the committed information rate. The range is 1-10000000 bps (although the V.35 version supports a maximum of 8 Mbps sustained).

chan_type is a number that identifies the channel type: 1=NIW. 2=transparent SIW. 3=SIW with translation. 4=FUNI. 5=frame forwarding.

CAC enables connection admission control.

Controller_type identifies the network control application. The only valid type is the default of 1 (PAR).

specifies the mastership status of this end of the connection. 1=master. 2=slave.

mastership indicates the mastership status for this end of the connection. 1=master. 2=slave.

connID is the "remote" connection identifier from the slave end if you need to enter it at the master end. See "Rules for Adding Connections" for an explanation. The possible formats are:

NodeName.SlotNo.PortNo.DlCI

NodeName.SlotNo.PortNo.ControllerId.DlCI for Frame Relay end point

NodeName.SlotNo.PortNo.VPI.VCI for ATM end point.

Where ControllerId can be 1 (PAR), 2 (PNNI), or 3 (TAG)

Step 2 Modify a connection as needed by executing cnfcon. See the command line Help or the command reference for the parameters for individual card types.

Step 3 If necessary, modify the CLP and congestion indicator fields by using cnfchanmap. Use dspchanmap to check this configuration for a connection.

cnfchanmap <chan_num> <chanType> <FECN/EFCI> <DE to CLP> <CLP to DE>

chan_num

is the channel (connection) number. The ranges are:

2CT3, 16-4015
2T3, 2E3, HS2, 16-2015
HS1, 16-215
T1, E1, 16-1015

chanType

is a number in the range 1-5 indicating the service type for
the connection.

1=NIW
2=SIW in transparent mode
3=SIW in translation mode
4=FUNI
5=frame forwarding

FECN/EFCI

is a number in the range 1-2 that specifies the mapping between FECN and EFCI fields.

1=map EFCI (SIW only)
2=set EFCI to 0

DE to CLP

is a number in the range 1-3 that specifies the DE to CLP mapping.

1=map DE to CLP
2=set CLP to 0
3=set CLP to 1

CLP to DE

is a number in the range 1-4 that specifies the CLP to DE mapping.

1=map CLP to DE
2=set DE to 0
3=set DE to 1
4=ignore CLP (NIW only)


Step 4 To check statistics for a connection, use dspchstats as needed.

Establishing the BPX 8600-to-BPX 8600-Series Segment

For a three-segment connection, establish a BPX 8600-to-BPX 8600-series (middle) segment. Execute addcon at one of the BPX 8600-series nodes, as follows.

For slot and port number, specify slot and port of the BXM connected to MGX 8850 node.

For VPI and VCI, specify the VPI and VCI at the endpoint on the PXM1.

For Nodename, use the name of the BPX 8600-series switch at the far end of the connection.

For Remote Channel, specify the slot and port number of the BXM port attached to the
MGX 8850 node at the far end. Specify the VPI as the slot number of the remote MGX 8850 FRSM connected to the BPX 8600-series switch, and specify VCI as the LCN of the Frame Relay connection at the remote MGX 8850 node.

Specify the type of connection. Enter ATFST if the ForeSight feature is operating and ATFR if this feature is not operating.

Specify the other addcon bandwidth parameters such as MCR, PCR, %Util, and so on.

Minimum Cell Rate (MCR) is only used with the ForeSight feature (ATFST connections).

MCR and Peak Cell Rated (PCR) should be specified according to the following formulae.

MCR=CIR *3/800 cells per second.

PCR=AR * 3/800 cells per second but less than or equal to 6000.
AR=Frame Relay port speed in bps.

For example:

AR equals 64K, PCR=237, or
AR speed equals 256K, PCR=950, or
AR speed equals 1536K, PCR=5703


For example,

The preceding MCR and PCR formulae are predicated on a relatively small frame size of 100 octets, and even smaller frame sizes can result in worse-case scenarios. For example:

For a frame size of 64 octects the PCR formula becomes:

PCR=AR * 2/512 cells per sec

For a frame size of 43 octects the PCR formula becomes:

PCR=AR * 2/344 cells per sec


% Util should be set to the same value as that used for the Frame Relay segments of the connection.

Test Commands for the FRSMs

To check the state of cards, lines, ports, queues, and connections, use the display commands (dsp...) and addchanloop. The following commands are available for testing the FRSMs (see the Cisco MGX 8850 Wide Area Edge Switch Command Reference for descriptions):

addlnloop, cnflnloop, and dellnloop are line-level, diagnostic commands that require the service level user privilege.

addchanloop and delchanloop are standard user commands for looping on a channel.

tstcon checks the integrity of a connection.

tstdelay measures the round trip delay on a connection.

Support for Alarm Reporting

The FRSM cards support card and line-level alarm reporting. Use the CiscoView application or the CLI to view current alarms. The CLI commands are dspalmcnt, dspalm, and dspalms. These commands require a switch to identify the interface type. Note that "-x21" applies to both V.35 and X.21 interfaces. See the command reference for syntax and alarm descriptions.

Bit Error Rate Testing on an Unchannelized T3 or E3 FRSM

The MGX 8850 switch can perform a bit error rate test (BERT) on one active line at a time on the MGX-FRSM-2T3 or MGX-FRSM-2E3. This type of testing disrupts service because it requires the tested path to be in loopback mode. You can configure a BERT session and perform related tasks through the CiscoView application or the CLI.

The MGX 8850 bus structure supports one BERT session per upper or lower bay of the card cage, so the switch can run a maximum of two sessions at once. When you specify the target slot through the CiscoView application or the acqdsx3bert command on the CLI, the system determines if a BERT configuration already exists in the bay that has the specified slot. If no BERT configuration exists in the bay, the display presents a menu for the BERT parameters.

The CLI commands (whose functions correspond to CiscoView selections) are:

acqdsx3bert to determine if other BERT sessions exist in the bay

cnfdsx3bert to specify a pattern for the BERT test

startdsx3bert to start a BERT test (after resetting BERT counters)

moddsx3bert to inject multi-rate errors into the BERT bit stream

dspdsx3bert to display the parameters and results of the current test

deldsx3bert to end the current test (and retain the values in the BERT counters)

See the Cisco MGX 8850 Wide Area Edge Switch Command Reference for command details.


Note   When a BERT session begins, all the connections on the line go into alarm and return to normal when you end the test. Consequently, the test may result in a large number of traps and other types of traffic (such as AIS).


Circuit Emulation Service Module for T3 and E3

The main function of the Circuit Emulation Service Module (CESM) is to provide a constant bit rate (CBR) service. The CESM converts data streams into CBR AAL1 cells according to the CES-IS specifications of the ATM Forum for unstructured transport across an ATM network. Unstructured transport means the CESM does not interpret or modify framing bits, so a high-speed CESM creates a single data pipe The most common application is legacy support for digitized voice from a PBX or video from a codec. Using circuit emulation, a company can expand its data communication network without specific voice or video cards to meet its voice or teleconferencing requirements.

The higher speed CESM uses a T3 or E3 line. The card set consists of an MGX-CESM-T3 or MGX-CESM-E3 front card and either a BNC-2T3 or BNC-2E3 back card. In this CESM application, only one line on the two-port back card is operational. Furthermore, it supports one logical port and one logical connection (as a data pipe) on the line and runs at the full T3 or E3 rate. Although the typical connection setup is the three-segment connection across an ATM network, the CESM can support a DAX connection. Up to 26 CESM card sets can operate in an MGX 8850 node.

Features

The MGX-CESM-T3 or MGX-CESM-E3 provide the following:

Unstructured data transfer at 44.736 Mbps (1189980 cells per second) for T3 or 34.368 Mbps (91405 cells per second) for E3

Synchronous timing by either a local clock sourced on the PXM1 or loop timing (transmit clock derived from receive clock on the line)

1:1 redundancy is through a Y-cable

Programmable egress buffer size (in the form of cell delay variation)

Programmable cell delay variation tolerance (CDVT)

Per VC queuing for the transmit and receive directions

An idle code suppression option

Bit count integrity when a lost AAL1 cell condition arises

Alarm state definitions per G.704

Trunk conditioning by way of framed AIS for T3 and unframed, alternating 1s and 0s for E3

On-board bit error rate testing (BERT)

Cell Delay Treatment

You can configure a tolerable variation in the cell arrival time (CDVT) for the receive buffer. After an underrun, the receiver places the contents of the first cell to arrive in a receive buffer then plays it out at least one CDVT value later. The maximum cell delay and CDVT (or jitter) are:

For T3

Cell delay of 4 msec

CDVT of 1.5 msec in increments of 125 microseconds

For E3

Cell delay of 2.9 msec

CDVT of 2 msec in increments of 125 microseconds

Error and Alarm Response

When it detects a loss of signal (LOS) alarm, the CESM notifies the connected CPE in the upstream direction after an integration period. The CESM continues to emit cells at the nominal rate but sets the ATM cell payload with an appropriate data pattern as specified by the ATM Forum CES V2.0 specification. Also, an OAM cell with RDI code goes to the far end to indicate out-of-service. The significance of the different types of alarms appears in .

Table 6-3 CESM Errors and Alarms

Error
Alarm
Type
Down stream
Up Stream
Comments

Link Failure (RX)

Blue (LOS)

AIS—OAM cells

none

Data cells According to ATM-Forum CES-IS V 2.0

Receive RAI

Yellow

None

None

 

Receive LOF

 

n/a

n/a

Not applicable.

Receive AIS

Blue (AIS)

AIS (link)

FERF OAM cells

AIS—done over the T3/E3 link by sending the AIS data over the T3/E3 link.


Configuring Service on a T3 or E3 CESM

This section first describes the steps for configuring the card, line, and port-level parameters for an MGX-CESM-T3 and MGX-CESM-E. It then describes how to add a connection. If necessary, refer to the section titled "Tasks for Configuring Cards and Services" for background information on these types of tasks. Use either the CLI or the CiscoView application to set up the card and line parameters. Use either the CLI or the Cisco WAN Manager application to add connections. The fundamental tasks and applicable CLI commands appear in the following list. For a complete list of CLI commands that apply to the CESM cards, use the Help command on the CLI of the card or refer to the tables at the front of the Cisco MGX 8850 Wide Area Edge Switch Command Reference.

Optionally configure Y-cable redundancy at the card level (addred on the CLI).

Optionally modify resource partitioning at the card level (cnfcdrscprtn)

Activate a physical line (addln on the CLI) and optionally configure the line (cnfln) for line coding, line length, and clock source.

Activate the functioning of the logical port on a physical line (addport)

Optionally modify resource partitioning at the port level (cnfportrscprtn)

Add the connections by using addcon (or addchan if NSAP addressing is necessary)

Configure the connection for CDVT, cell loss integration period, and egress buffer size by using cnfcon (or cnfchan if NSAP addressing is necessary).

Configuring the Card, Lines, and Ports

This section describes how to configure parameters for the card, line, and port through the CLI. If you use the CiscoView application, refer to CiscoView documentation. The command sequence is:


Step 1 addln <line number>

where line number is 1. You can modify line characteristics with cnfln.

Step 2 Optionally execute cnfln to modify line characteristics:

cnfln <line_num> <line_code> <line_len> <clk_src>

line_num is 1.

line_code is a number to specify line coding: 1 for B3ZS (T3), and 2 for HDB3 (E3)

line_len is a number that specifies the line length: 1 for up to 225 feet, and 2 for more than 225 feet

clk_src is a number that specifies the clock source: 1 for local clock sourced on the PXM1, and 2 for looped clock

Step 3 Use dspln or dsplns to check the line. For dspln, the valid line number is 1.

Step 4 Create a logical port with addport:

addport <port_num> <line_num>

port_num is the logical port number and is always 1

line_num is the number of the physical line and is always 1.

Step 5 Configure resources at the port level as needed by executing cnfportrscprtn:

cnfportrscprtn <port_num> <controller_name>

port_num is the logical port number and is always 1.

controller_name is the name of the network control application. Enter one of the following strings: PAR, PNNI, or MPLS.

Step 6 Optionally configure Y-cable redundancy if you have connected the lines of adjacent CESMs through a Y-cable. The applicable commands are addred, dspred, and delred. These commands run on the PXM1 rather than the service module, so you must change to the PXM1 CLI to execute them:

addred <redPrimarySlotNum> <redSecondarySlotNum> <redType>

redPrimarySlotNum is the slot number of the primary card. The possible numbers are 1-6, 9-14, 17-22, and 25-30.

redSecondarySlotNum is the slot number of the primary card. The possible numbers are 1-6, 9-14, 17-22, and 25-30.

redType is the type of redundancy. Enter a 1 for 1:1 Y-cable redundancy.

Adding and Modifying Connections

Use either the Cisco WAN Manager application or the CLI to add or modify connections. If you use the WAN Manager application, refer to the Cisco WAN Manager Operations Guide.

This section describes how to add a connection to a PXM1 in a stand-alone node according to the rules for a standard connection or a management connection in the form of either a three-segment connection or a DAX con. See "Rules for Adding Connections" earlier in this chapter. The preferred command is addcon. If the application requires NSAP addressing, use addchan to add the connection and cnfchan if you need to modify it. Refer to the command reference for the syntax. On the CESM CLI:


Step 1 Add a connection by executing addcon. (Alternatively, you can use addchan if your application requires the NSAP format of endpoint specification.) Execute addcon at both ends of the connection—unless the remote endpoint is on port 34 of a PXM1 (see the note at the end of this step).

The syntax for addcon is:

addcon <port_num> [mastership [remoteConnId] ]

port_num is the logical port number and is always 1.

mastership indicates whether this endpoint is the master or slave. 1=master.
2=slave (default).

remoteConnId is the identification for the connection at the slave end. The format is nodename.slot_number.port_number.vpi.vci. For the MGX-CESM-T3 and MGX-CESM-E3, the vpi and vci are typically 0 or 1.


Note   For the channel number, the system always returns the number 32 for the high speed CESM. If you execute dspchan, use the channel number 32 to see details about the channel (or dspchans—and no arguments—to see high level details about the channel). In contrast, the dspcon command takes the port number 1 to identify the connection even though it shows the same information as dspchan.


Step 2 Optionally, you can use cnfcon to modify the connection.

cnfcon <port_num> <CDVT> <CellLossIntegPeriod> <bufsize>

port_num is the port number and is always 1.

CDVT is a tolerable variation for the arrival time of cells. For T3, the range is 125-1447 micro seconds in 125-microsecond increments. For E3, the range is 125-1884 micro seconds in 125-microsecond increments.

CellLossIntegrationPeriod is the amount of time a connection can be in an error condition before an alarm is declared. The range is 1000-65535 milli seconds.

bufsize is the egress buffer size in bytes. You can let the CESM compute the size by entering 0 for bufsize or enter the number of bytes up to a maximum of 16224.

Step 3 Optionally, you can use cnfswparms on a BPX 8600-series switch to configure connection parameters for the network segment of a three-segment connection. For a stand-alone application, use whatever means are supported by the backbone switches.

cnfswparms <chan_num> <mastership> <vpcflag> <conn_service_type> (=cos)
<route_priority> <max_cost> <restrict_trunk_type> <pcr> <mcr> <pct_util>

chan_number is the channel (connection) number and is always 32.

mastership specifies the current endpoint as master or slave. 1=master. 2=slave (default)

vpcflag indicates whether the connection is a VPC or a VCC: 1=VPC, and 2=VCC.

conn_service_type selects the type of service for the connection: 1=cbr, 2=vbr, 3 is not used, 4=ubr, 5=atfr, 6=abrstd, and 7=abrfst.

route_priority is the priority of the connection for re-routing. The range is 1-15 and is meaningful only in relation to the priority of other connections.

max_cost is a number establishing the maximum cost of the connection route. The range is 1-255 and is meaningful only in relation to the cost of other connections.

restrict_trunk_type is a number that specifies the type of trunk this connection can traverse. The numbers are 1 for no restriction, 2 for terrestrial trunk only, and 3 for satellite trunk only.

pcr is the peak cell rate in cells per second (cps). For T3, the maximum is 118980 cps. For E3, the maximum is 91405 cps.

mcr is the minimum cell rate. The range is 1-65535 cells per second.

pct_util is the percent utilization in the range 1-100.

Bit Error Rate Testing on a T3 or E3 CESM

An active MGX-CESM-T3 or MGX-CESM-E3 can perform a bit error rate test (BERT). Each of these cards contains its own BERT controller, so BERT sessions can run on any number of these cards in the system. However, only one user at a time can run BERT on a card. BERT disrupts service because it requires the tested path to be in loopback mode.

The CLI commands (whose functions correspond to CiscoView selections) appear in the following list. The correct order of task execution is crucial for obtaining valid results. With the exception of dspdsx3bert, you must execute the commands in the order they appear in the following list. You can execute dspdsx3bert before, during, or after a session. Because the order of execution is crucial, read the command descriptions whether you use the CiscoView application or the CLI.

acqdsx3bert determines if another user currently is running a BERT session on the card.

startdsx3bert starts a BERT test (after resetting BERT counters).

cnfdsx3bert specifies a pattern for the BERT test.

moddsx3bert injects multi-rate errors into the BERT bit stream.

deldsx3bert ends the current test (and retains the values in the BERT counters). This command also resets the status of current users that acqdsx3bert detects.

dspdsx3bert displays the parameters and results of the current test. You can execute this command at any time.

See the Cisco MGX 8850 Wide Area Edge Switch Command Reference for command details.


Note   When a BERT session begins, all the connections on the line go into alarm and return to normal when you end the test. Consequently, the test may result in a large number of traps and other types of traffic (such as AIS).


Eight-Port Circuit Emulation Service Modules

The main function of the Circuit Emulation Service Module (CESM) is to provide a constant bit rate (CBR) circuit emulation service by converting data streams into CBR AAL1 cells for transport across an ATM network. The CESM supports the CES-IS specifications of the ATM Forum.

The eight-port CESM lets you configure individual physical ports for structured or unstructured data transfer. The card sets consist of an AX-CESM-8T1 or AX-CESM-8E1 front card and one of the following back cards:

RJ48-8T1

R-RJ48-8T1 for supporting 1:N redundancy through the optional MGX-SRM-3T3/B

RJ48-8E1

R-RJ48-8E1 for supporting 1:N redundancy through the optional MGX-SRM-3T3/B

SMB-8E1

Structured Data Transfer

If you configure an individual port for structured data transfer, the eight-port CESM supports:

Synchronous timing.

Superframe or Extended Superframe for T1.

N x 64 Kbps, fractional DS1/E1 service (contiguous time slots only). You can map an
N x 64-Kbps channel to any VC.

CAS robbed bit for T1 (ABCD for ESF and SF frames) and CAS for E1 (channel 16).

CCS channel as a transparent data channel.

A choice of partial-fill payload sizes.

Idle detection and suppression for 64-Kbps CAS connections.

Loopback diagnostics on a line or a connection (addlnloop, tstcon, and tstdelay commands).

Bit error rate test (BERT) functionality with loopback pattern generation and verification on individual lines or logical port. For a description of the BERT functions, see the section titled "Bit Error Rate Testing Through an MGX-SRM-3T3."

Unstructured Data Transfer

If you configure an individual port for unstructured data transfer, the eight-port CESM supports:

Synchronous or asynchronous timing at T1 (1.544 Mbps) or E1 (2.048 Mbps) rates. For asynchronous timing, you can select its basis as either SRTS and adaptive clock recovery.

The special port type framingOnVcDisconnect. This port type prevents a remote-end CPE from going to LOF by placing a line in remote loopback mode when the CESM determines that a connection deletion or suspension occurred at the network-side ATM interface.

Ability to detect and display a yellow alarm for the ESF framing on a T1 line.

Loopback diagnostics on a line or a connection (addlnloop, tstcon, and tstdelay commands).

Bit error rate test (BERT) functionality with loopback pattern generation and verification on individual lines. For a description of BERT functions, see the section "Bit Error Rate Testing Through an MGX-SRM-3T3."

Cell Delay Treatment

For each connection, you can configure a tolerable variation in the cell arrival time (CDVT) according to the expected reliability of the route. The CDVT applies to the receive buffer. After an underrun, the receiver places the contents of the first cell to arrive in a receive buffer then plays it out at least one CDVT value later. For each VC, the maximum cell delay and CDVT (or jitter) are:

For T1

Cell delay of 48 msec

CDVT of 24 msec in increments of 125 microseconds

For E1

Cell delay of 64 msec

CDVT of 32 msec in increments of 125 microseconds

Redundancy Support for the Eight-Port CESM

The AX-CESM-8T1 and AX-CESM-8E1 can have 1:N redundancy support but with some variations between the T1 and E1 modes of operation. The type of redundancy and the type of back card are interdependent. See "Service Resource Module" for more details. In general:

With an RJ48-8T1, an MGX-SRM-3T3 can provide 1:N redundancy through the distribution bus or the redundancy bus.

With an RJ48-8E1, an MGX-SRM-3T3 can provide 1:N redundancy through the redundancy bus.

Back card requirements for the MGX-SRM-3T3 and service modules vary, as follows:

If you are using the MGX-SRM-3T3 for bulk distribution of T1 channels, the CESMs do not use back cards, but each MGX-SRM-3T3/B must have an MGX-BNC-3T3-M back card. (Bulk distribution is not available for E1 operation.)

If the MGX-SRM-3T3/B supports T1 or E1 1:N redundancy through the redundancy bus (no bulk distribution), the MGX-SRM-3T3/B does not require a back card, but the N CESM primary cards must have one redundant version of the back card.

Error and Alarm Response

When it detects a loss of signal (LOS) alarm, the CESM notifies the connected CPE in the upstream direction after an integration period. The CESM continues to emit cells but sets the ATM cell payload with an appropriate data pattern as specified by the ATM Forum CES V2.0 specification. Also, an OAM cell with RDI code goes to the far end to indicate out-of-service. See .

Table 6-4 CESM Errors and Alarms

Error
Alarm
Type
Down stream
Up Stream
Comments

Link Failure (RX)

Blue (LOS)

AIS—OAM cells

none

Data cells According to ATM-Forum CES-IS V 2.0

Receive RAI

Yellow

None

None

 

Receive LOF

 

n/a

n/a

.

Receive AIS

Blue (AIS)

AIS (link)

FERF OAM cells

AIS over the T1 link or alternating 1s and 0s E1 link.


Configuring Service on an Eight-Port CESM

This section describes the steps for setting up a CESM and adding connections. The maximum number of connections is 248 on the MGX-CESM/B-8E1 and 192 on the MGX-CESM/B-T1. Use either the CLI or the Cisco WAN Manager application to set up a CESM and add connections. The following list shows the fundamental tasks and applicable CLI commands:

Optionally configure redundancy at the card level (addred and possibly addlink on the PXM1)

Optionally modify resource partitions at the card level (cnfcdrscprtn)

Activate a physical line (addln) and optionally configure the line (cnfln)

Create logical ports for structured data transport on a physical line (addport)

Optionally modify resource partitions at the port level (cnfportrscprtn)

Add connections by using addcon (or addchan if NSAP addressing is necessary)

For CESM-related commands, see the list of service module commands at the beginning of the Cisco MGX 8850 Wide Area Edge Switch Command Reference. Also, each command description in the command reference lists related commands. For example, it shows display commands that relate to addition commands.

Configuring the Card, Lines, and Ports

This section describes how to configure parameters for the card, lines, and ports through the CLI. If you use the CiscoView application, refer to the CiscoView documentation. On the CLI, the command sequence is:


Step 1 addln <line number>

where line number is in the range 1-8. You can modify line characteristics with cnfln.

Step 2 Optionally execute cnfln to modify line characteristics from the defaults. (Use dspln or dsplns to check). The syntax for cnfln is:

cnfln <line_num> <line_code> <line_len> <clk_src> [E1-signaling]

line_num is a line number in the range 1-8.

line_code is a number that specifies the line coding: 2=B8ZS (T1), 3=HDB3 (E1), and
4=AMI (T1/E1)

line_len is the line length: 10-15 for T1, 8 for E1 with SMB line module, 9 for E1 with RJ48 line module

clk_src is a number specifying the clock source: 1 for loop clock, 2 for local clock

E1-signalling specifies the E1 signaling. The possible entries are:

CAS, which specifies CAS and no CRC

CAS_CRC, which specifies CAS with CRC

CCS, which specifies CCS and no CRC

CCS_CRC, which specifies CCS with CRC

CLEAR: CLEAR channel

Step 3 Create a logical port with addport if the application requires N x 64-Kbps channels:

addport <port_num> <line_num> <begin_slot> <num_slot> <port_type>

port_num is the logical port number in the range 1-192 for T1 or 1-248 for E1

line_num is the number of the physical line in the range 1-8.

begin_slot is the beginning timeslot number in the frame: for T1, 1-24. For E1 2-32 with CCS signaling or 2-16 and 17-32 with CAS signaling.

num_slot is the number of timeslots in the frame for the current port (port_num).

port_type is: 1=structured, 2=unstructured, 3=framing on VC disconnect.

Step 4 Configure resources at the port level as needed by executing cnfportrscprtn:

cnfportrscprtn <port_num> <controller_name>

port_num is the logical port number in the range 1-192 for T1 or 1-248 for E1.

controller_name is the name of the network control application. Enter one of the following strings: PAR, PNNI, or MPLS.

Configuring Bulk Distribution and Redundancy

You can configure either bulk distribution alone, redundancy alone, or both of these features according to the restrictions in "Redundancy Support for the Eight-Port CESM." On the CLI of the PXM1, execute addlink for bulk distribution (T1 only) before you execute addred for redundancy. To configure bulk distribution:

Execute addlink to create the links:

addlink <T3 line number> <T1 line number> <Target Slot number> <Slot line number>

T3 line number

is the MGX-SRM-3T3/B line number in the format slot.line. The slot can be 15 or 31. The range for port is 1-3

T1 line number

is the starting T1 line number within the T3 line. The range for the T1 line number is 1-28.

Target Slot number

is slot number for the T1 service module.

Slot line number

is T1 line number in the range 1-8.


Execute addred:

addred <redPrimarySlotNum> <redSecondarySlotNum> <RedType>

redPrimarySlotNum

is the primary slot. For the redundancy bus (no bulk distribution), valid slot numbers are 1-6, 9-14, 17-22, and 25-30. With bulk distribution of T1 channels, do not specify 9, 10, 26, or 26.

redSecondarySlotNum

is the secondary slot. For the redundancy bus (no bulk distribution), valid slot numbers are 1-6, 9-14, 17-22, and 25-30. With bulk distribution of T1 channels, do not specify 9, 10, 26, or 26.

RedType

is the type of redundancy. A 1 specifies 1:1 for E1 with SMB connectors. A 2 specifies 1:N for T1 or E1.


Adding and Modifying Connections

Use either the Cisco WAN Manager application or the CLI to add or modify connections. If you use the WAN Manager application, refer to the Cisco WAN Manager Operations Guide.

This section describes how to add a connection to a PXM1 in a stand-alone node according to the rules for a standard connection or a management connection in the form of either a three-segment connection or a DAX con. See "Rules for Adding Connections" earlier in this chapter. The preferred command is addcon. If the application requires NSAP addressing, use addchan to add the connection and cnfchan if you need to modify it. Refer to the command reference for the syntax. On the CESM CLI:


Step 1 Add a connection through the preferred command addcon. (Alternatively, you can use addchan if your application requires the NSAP format of endpoint specification.)

Execute addcon at both ends of the connection—unless the remote endpoint is on port 34 of a PXM1 (see the note at the end of this step). The maximum number of connections for the AX-CESM-8T1 is 248 and 192 for the AX-CESM-8E1. Note that, because you can add only one connection per port, addcon does not request a connection number.

The system automatically assigns the next available channel number, so the addcon command does not require it. However, some related commands require a channel number. To see the channel number after you add a connection, use dspcons.

The syntax for addcon is:

addcon <port_num> <sig_type> <partial_fill> <cond_data> <cond_signalling> [controller_type] [mastership] [remoteConnId]

port_num is the logical port number. This port must already exist (see addport).

sig_type is a number indicating the type of signaling: 1 specifies basic signaling,
2 specifies E1 CAS, 3 specifies ds1SFCAS (DS1 Superframe CAS), and 4 specifies ds1ESFCAS (DS1 Extended Superframe CAS).

partial_fill is a number representing the number of bytes in a cell. It can be either 0 to specify that the cell must contain 48 bytes or a non-0 value that fixes the number of bytes in each cell. For structured E1, the partial_fill range is 20-47 bytes. For structured T1, the range is 25-47 bytes. Unstructured T1 or E1 can be 33-47 bytes.

cond_data is the conditioning data in case of loss of signal (LOS). It is always 255 for unstructured data transfer or 0-255 for structured data transfer. For a voice connection, the larger the cond_data value, the louder the hiss heard in case of LOS.

cond_signalling is the string of condition signaling bits that you specify with a decimal number in the range 0-15, where, for example, 15=1111, and 0=0000. These bits represent the ABCD signaling to the line or network when an underflow occurs.

mastership indicates whether this endpoint is the master or slave. 1=master.
2=slave (default).

remoteConnId is the identification for the connection at the slave end. The format is nodename.slot_number.port_number.vpi.vci.

Step 2 Optionally, you can use cnfcon to modify an individual connection. This command requires a channel number. If you add a connection by using addcon, you do not need to specify a channel number because the system automatically uses the next available number. To obtain the channel number for cnfcon, execute dspcons.

cnfcon <port_num> <CDVT> <CLIP> <bufsize> <cbrclkmode> <isenable> <exttrigis>

port_num is the port number.

CDVT is a tolerable variation for the arrival time of cells. For T1, the range is 125-24000 micro seconds. For E1, the range is 125-26000 micro seconds. Both require 125-microsecond increments.

CLIP is CellLossIntegrationPeriod, an amount of time a connection can be in an error condition before an alarm is declared. The range is 1000-65535 milli seconds.

bufsize is the egress buffer size in bytes. These buffers are used for tolerating variations in the cell delay. The size can be automatically computed, or you can enter a specific size in bytes.

cbrclkmode is the clock mode for a circuit emulation connection. The values are 1-3. 1 is synchronous. 2 is SRT. 3 is adaptive. SRT and adaptive are asynchronous clocking schemes.

isenable is a flag to enable the idle code (ABCD signalling bits) based cell suppression feature on a connection. If you enable this feature, idle suppression logic is activated so that suppression begins when valid idle ABCD bits are detected. This feature is valid for only single DS0 connections. Possible values are 1 to enable and 2 to disable.

exttrigis is an enable for an external idle suppression trigger. With this feature enabled, the logic forcefully suppresses cells on a single DS0 connection. Enter a 1 to disable idle suppression or a 2 to enable idle suppression.

Step 3 Optionally, you can configure connection parameters for the network segment of a three-segment connection:

cnfswparms <chan_num> <mastership> <vpcflag> <conn_service_type> (=cos)
<route_priority> <max_cost> <restrict_trunk_type> <pcr> <mcr> <pct_util>

chan_number is the connection in the range 32-279.

mastership specifies the current endpoint as master or slave. 1=master. 2=slave (default)

vpcflag indicates whether the connection is a VPC or a VCC: 1=VPC, and 2=VCC.

conn_service_type selects the type of service for the connection: 1=cbr, 2=vbr, 3 is not used, 4=ubr, 5=atfr, 6=abrstd, and 7=abrfst.

route_priority is the priority of the connection for re-routing. The range is 1-15 and is meaningful only in relation to the priority of other connections.

max_cost is a number establishing the maximum cost of the connection route. The range is 1-255 and is meaningful only in relation to the cost of other connections.

restrict_trunk_type is a number that specifies the type of trunk this connection can traverse. The numbers are 1 for no restriction, 2 for terrestrial trunk only, and 3 for satellite trunk only.

pcr is the peak cell rate.

mcr is the minimum cell rate. The range is 1-65535 cells per second.

pct_util is the percent utilization in the range 1-100.

Service Resource Module

This section describes how to use the features of the T3 version of the Service Resource Module (MGX-SRM-3T3/B). This multipurpose card can provide:

De-mulitplexing of T3 service called bulk distribution.

1:N redundancy support for service modules with T1 or E1 lines.

Bit error rate testing (BERT) for T3, E3, T1, E1, fractional T1, or subrate operation with loopback pattern generation and verification on individual lines or logical port. For a description of the BERT functions, see the section titled "Bit Error Rate Testing Through an MGX-SRM-3T3."

An MGX-SRM-3T3/B installation requires at least one card set in the upper bay of the card cage and one card set in the lower bay. Each set services one half of the backplane. The PXM1 in slot 7 controls the SRMs in slots 15 and 31. The PXM1 in slot 8 controls the redundant SRMs in slots 16 and 32. If the switch has SRMs with redundant PXM1s, the SRMs must occupy all the reserved slots for this feature—15, 16, 31, and 32.

Configuring Card and Line Parameters

You can configure card and line-level parameters for an SRM through the CiscoView application or the CLI on the PXM1 (not the SRM itself. For descriptions of the commands, see the Cisco MGX 8850 Wide Area Edge Switch Command Reference. The CLI commands that apply to the SRM are:

addln

delln

cnfln

dspln

dsplns

addlmiloop

dellmiloop

cnfsrmclksrc

dspsrmclksrc

dspalm

dspalms

dspalmcnt

clralmcnt

clralm

dspalmcnt

addlink

dsplink

dellink

addred

dspred

delred

Bulk Distribution for T1 Service

The MGX-SRM-3T3/B supports a de-mulitplexing function called bulk distribution. With bulk distribution, the MGX-SRM-3T3/B converts traffic from its T3 lines to T1 channels and sends the data streams across the distribution bus to the appropriate service modules. The benefit of this feature is that the number of T1 cables and back cards is greatly reduced. Applicable service modules are the MGX-AUSM/B-8T1, AX-FRSM-8T1, and AX-CESM-8T1.

At its MGX-BNC-3T3-M back card, the MGX-SRM-3T3/B connects to an external multiplexer. The multiplexer connects to the T1 lines from user-equipment and places the data streams on T3 lines to the MGX-SRM-3T3/B. Each T3 line can contain 28 T1 channels. An individual MGX-SRM-3T3/B can support 10 card slots, so the maximum number of T1 channels it can process is 80.

Linking the MGX-SRM-3T3/B to a destination card causes the switch to take CPE traffic through the MGX-SRM-3T3/B rather than the T1 card's line module. Linkage is a card-level condition. If you link just one T1 channel on a service module to the MGX-SRM-3T3/B, the back card on the service module becomes inoperative, so you must link all other T1 ports on that service module to the MGX-SRM-3T3/B if you want them to operate. Linking T1 ports into a group does not form an N X T1 channel. Each T1 channel remains a distinct T1 channel. Furthermore, a group belongs to one slot, so it cannot include T1 channels belonging to another card.

For a description of how the MGX-SRM-3T3/B supports redundancy for linked channels, see the section "Redundancy Support by the MGX-SRM-3T3/B" in this chapter.

Before configuring bulk distribution on an SRM, perform the following tasks:

1 Activate the lines (addln on the CLI).

2 Optionally configure the lines (cnfln on the CLI).

3 Display the state of the lines (dspln and dsplns on the CLI).

To link T1 ports on a service module to a T3 line on an MGX-SRM-3T3/B:

Execute addlink on the active PXM1. Related commands are dsplink and dellink.

addlink <T3 line number> <T1 slot> <NumberOfT1s> <TargetSlotLineNum>

T3 line number

is the line number in the format slot.line, where slot is 15 or 31 (regardless of whether redundant SRMs exist in slots 16 and 32), and the range for line is 1-3.

T1 slot

is the start T1 line number within the T3 line (range 1-28).

NumberOfT1s

is the slot number of the T1 service module. Target Slot number can be 1-6, 11-14, 17-22, or 27-30.

TargetSlotLineNum

is the T1 line number in the linked card slot. The range is 1-8.


Redundancy Support by the MGX-SRM-3T3/B

The MGX-SRM-3T3/B can provide redundancy to service modules with T1 or E1 lines. For E1 or T1 modules, it can provide redundancy through the redundancy bus. For T1 modules only, it can provide redundancy through the distribution bus. The redundancy and distribution buses impose different requirements, but the common requirement is that all primary and secondary cards supported by a particular MGX-SRM-3T3/B must reside on the same level of the card cage as that SRM.

The need for back cards and the choice of bus for redundancy support depends on whether the MGX-SRM-3T3/B must provide bulk distribution:

With bulk distribution, the T1 service modules do not use back cards. The MGX-SRM-3T3/B uses the distribution bus to support redundancy.

Without bulk distribution, the supported service modules must have back cards. The redundant card set requires a special redundancy back card (the R-RJ48-8T1 or R-RJ48-8E!). The primary card sets use standard back cards (RJ48-8T1 or RJ48-8E1).

With redundancy provided by the SRM, no Y-cables are necessary because the MGX-SRM-3T3/B itself passes the traffic to the redundant front card if a failure necessitates switchover. Conversely, any card with 1:1 redundancy supported by Y-cabling does not require an SRM. For example, the FRSM-VHS cards have 1:1 redundancy through a Y-cable. The MGX-SRM-3T3/B redundancy feature is particularly important for cards that do not have Y-cable redundancy—the T1 and E1 service modules.

Configuring Redundancy Through the Redundancy Bus

For redundancy that utilizes the redundancy bus, the characteristics are:

Both the primary and the redundant front cards must have back cards. The secondary back card must be the version specifically designed to be redundant cards. Examples are the R-RJ48-8T1 and R-RJ48-8E1, where the first "R" means redundant.

An MGX-SRM-3T3/B can redirect traffic for only one failed card at a time regardless of the number of redundant groups you have configured to rely on that MGX-SRM-3T3/B for redundancy.

To configure redundancy through the redundancy bus:


Step 1 Execute addred on the active PXM1:

addred <redPrimarySlotNum> <redSecondarySlotNum> <RedType>

where:

redPrimarySlotNum

is slot number of the slot containing the primary card.
The slot numbers are 1-6, 9-14, 17-22, and 25-30.

redSecondarySlotNum

is slot number of the slot containing the secondary card
of the card pair. The ranges are 1-6, 9-14, 17-22, and 25-30.

RedType

is a number that specifies the type of redundancy. Enter a 1 to specify 1:1 redundancy. Enter a 2 to specify 1:N redundancy. Only an SRM can support 1:N redundancy.


Step 2 Check the redundancy status for all cards by using dspred.

To remove redundancy, use delred.

Configuring Redundancy Through the Distribution Bus

Redundancy by way of the distribution bus applies to T1 channels you linked for bulk distribution. For a redundancy configuration on the MGX-SRM-3T3/B that utilizes the distribution bus:

No back cards are necessary.

The MGX-SRM-3T3/B can support multiple switchovers for different 1: N redundancy groups.

Slots 9, 10, 15, or 26 are not supported.

Before you specify redundancy with bulk distribution, linkage must exist between a T3 line on the MGX-SRM-3T3/B and a primary service module with the T1 lines. No linkage should exist on the secondary service module. To configure redundancy through the CLI:


Step 1 Execute addred on the active PXM1:

addred <redPrimarySlotNum> <redSecondarySlotNum> <RedType>

where:

redPrimarySlotNum

is slot number of the slot containing the primary card. Permissible slot numbers are in the range 1-6, 11-14, 17-22, and 27-30.

redSecondarySlotNum

is slot number of the slot containing the secondary card of the card pair. Permissible slot numbers are in the range 1-6, 11-14, 17-22, and 27-30.

RedType

is a number that specifies the type of redundancy. Enter a 1 to specify 1:1 redundancy. Enter a 2 to specify 1:N redundancy. Only an SRM can support 1:N redundancy.


Step 2 Check the redundancy status for all cards by using dspred.

To remove redundancy, use delred.

Bit Error Rate Testing Through an MGX-SRM-3T3

The MGX 8850 switch can perform a bit error rate test (BERT) on an active line or port. This type of testing disrupts service because a BERT session requires the tested path to be in loopback mode. In addition, the pattern test replaces user-data in the path with the test pattern. The applicable line types and variations for a DS1 are:

A T1 or E1 line

Fractional portions of a T1 line that add up to a DS1

A single 56-Kbps or 64-Kbps DS0

A DS0 bundle consisting of N x 64-Kbps DS0s

With a set of MGX-SRM-3T3/B cards in the system, you can initiate a BERT session on an MGX-FRSM-2CT3 or any eight-port service module. (In contrast, the MGX-FRSM-2T3E3, MGX-CESM-T3, and MGX-CESM-E3 do not use the MGX-SRM-3T3/B for BERT. See the sections for these service modules in this chapter for applicable BERT.)

The MGX 8850 bus structure supports one BERT session per upper or lower bay, so the switch can run a maximum of two sessions at once. When you specify the target slot through the CiscoView application or the CLI, the system determines if a BERT configuration already exists in that bay. After the system determines that no BERT configuration exists in the applicable bay, the display presents a menu for the BERT parameters.

The CLI commands (whose functions correspond to CiscoView selections) are:

cnfbert to configure and start a test

modbert to inject errors into the BERT bit stream

dspbert to display the parameters and results of the current test

delbert to end the current test


Note   When a BERT session begins, all connections on a line or port go into alarm and return to normal when the test ends. Consequently, the test may result in other types of traffic (such as AIS).


During configuration, the parameter display or menu items depend first on the card type and whether the test medium is a physical line or a logical port. Subsequent choices are test type, test patterns, loopback type, and so on. See the Cisco MGX 8850 Wide Area Edge Switch Command Reference for details on cnfbert and the other BERT commands. The concatenation of menu to menu is extensive, so this section contains tables of menu selections based on the card types and the test type.

The test type can be pattern, loopback, or DDS seek. The choice of test type leads to further menu displays. Following the tables of menu choices, the remaining sections define the parameters in these menu choices.

For AX-FRSM-8T1, AX-CESM-8T1, and MGX-FRSM-2CT3, see pattern tests and for loopback tests.

For AX-FRSM-8E1 and AX-CESM-8E1, see for pattern tests and for loopback tests.

For MGX-AUSM-8T1, see for pattern tests and for loopback tests.

For MGX-AUSM-8E1, see for pattern and loopback tests.

Table 6-5

Test Medium
Medium Type
Device to Loop
BERT Pattern

Port

Port with N timeslots (can also submit to the DDS seek test)

v54

all patterns

Port with one 64-Kbps timeslot (can also submit to the DDS seek test)

latch or v54

all patterns

Port with one 56-Kbps timeslot (can also submit to the DDS seek test)

noLatch

latch or v54

29 or 211

all patterns

Line

n/a

in-band/ESF or metallic

all patterns


Pattern Test for AX-FRSM-8T1, AX-CESM-8T1, and MGX-FRSM-2CT3

Table 6-6

Test Medium
Medium Type
Loopback

Port

Port with N timeslots (can also submit to the DDS seek test)

far end or remote

Port with one 64-Kbps timeslot (can also submit to the DDS seek test)

far end or remote

Port with one 56-Kbps timeslot (can also submit to the DDS seek test)

far end or remote

Line

n/a

metallic, far end, or remote


Loopback Test for AX-FRSM-8T1, AX-CESM-8T1, and MGX-FRSM-2CT3

Table 6-7

Test Medium
Medium Type
Device to Loop
BERT Pattern

Port

any

none

all patterns

Line

n/a

metallic

all patterns


Pattern Test for AX-FRSM-8E1 and AX-CESM-8E1

Table 6-8

Test Medium
Medium Type
Loopback

Port

any

remote loopback

Line

n/a

metallic or remote


Loopback Test for AX-FRSM-8E1 and AX-CESM-8E1

Table 6-9

Test Medium
Medium Type
Device to Loop
BERT Pattern

Line

n/a

in-band/ESF

all patterns


Pattern Test for MGX-AUSM-8T1

Table 6-10

Test Medium
Medium Type
Loopback

Line

n/a

far end, remote, or metallic


Loopback Test for MGX-AUSM-8T1

Table 6-11

Test Medium
Medium Type
Device to Loop
BERT Pattern

Line

n/a

none

all patterns


Pattern Test for MGX-AUSM-8E1

Table 6-12

Test Medium
Medium Type
Loopback

Line

n/a

remote or metallic


Loopback Test for MGX-AUSM-8E1

Pattern Test Options

The pattern test options consist of the device to loop and the pattern. This section lists the device options and patterns that appear in the menus. Refer to the preceding tables as needed. The device to loop options identify the type of device that participates in the test:

noLatch is a device that does not latch the data. It can be a:

Non-latching office channel unit (OCU) that consists of one device

Non-latching OCU that consists of a chain of devices

Non-latching channel service unit (CSU)

Non-latching data service unit (DSU)

Latch is a device that can latch the data and can be a:

Latching DS0-DP drop device

Latching DS0-DP line device

Latching office channel unit (OCU)

Latching channel service unit (CSU)

Latching data service unit (DSU)

Latching HL96 device

in-band/ESF

v54 is a polynomial loopback

metallic is a local loopback within the service module and does not involve an external device

The available patterns are:

1 All 0s

2 All 1s

3 Alternating 1-0 pattern

4 Double 1-0 pattern

5 215-1 pattern

6 220-1 pattern

7 220-1 QRSS pattern

8 223-1 pattern

9 1 in 8 pattern

10 3 in 24 pattern

11 DDS-1 pattern

12 DDS-2 pattern

13 DDS-3 pattern

14 DDS-4 pattern

15 DDS-5 pattern

16 29 pattern

17 211 pattern

Loopback Test Options

The loopback tests do not monitor the integrity of the data but rather the integrity of the path. The type of loopback indicates the direction of test data transmission. The choices are:

far end means the service module transmits data to the CPE and receives the data back

remote means the service module receives data from the CPE and loops back to the CPE

metallic means the service module receives data from the network and loops it back to the network