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Cisco Catalyst 3750 Metro Series Switches

Release Notes for the Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1and Later

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Release Notes for the Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1 and Later

Table Of Contents

Release Notes for the Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch
Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1 and Later

Contents

Hardware Supported

Upgrading the Switch Software

Finding the Software Version and Feature Set

Deciding Which Files to Use

Archiving Software Images

Upgrading a Switch by Using the CLI

Recovering from a Software Failure

Installation Notes

New Features

New Hardware Features

New Software Features

Minimum Cisco IOS Release for Major Features

Limitations and Restrictions

Configuration

Ethernet

Fallback Bridging

HSRP

IP

IP Telephony

MAC Addressing

MPLS and EoMPLS

Multicasting

QoS

Routing

SPAN and RSPAN

Trunking

Tunneling

VLAN

Important Notes

Open Caveats

Resolved Caveats

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE5

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE2

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1

Documentation Updates

Hierarchical Policy Maps on ES EtherChannels

IP SLAs Support

Updates to the Hardware Installation Guide

Chapter 3 "Connecting the Power Supply"

Appendix A "Technical Specifications"

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines


Release Notes for the Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch
Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1 and Later


Revised June 10, 2008

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1, 12.2(35)SE2, and 12.2(35)SE5 run on the Catalyst 3750 Metro switch.

These release notes include important information about Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1, 12.2(35)SE2, and 12.2(35)SE5, and any limitations, restrictions, and caveats that apply to the releases.

Verify that these release notes are correct for your switch:

If you are installing a new switch, see the Cisco IOS release label on the rear panel of your switch.

If your switch is on, use the show version privileged EXEC command. See the "Finding the Software Version and Feature Set" section.

If you are upgrading to a new release, see the software upgrade filename for the software version. See the "Deciding Which Files to Use" section.

For the complete list of switch documentation, see the "Related Documentation" section.


Note The software documentation for this release refers to Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE, but applies to Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1 and SE2.


You can download the switch software from this site:

http://www.cisco.com/kobayashi/sw-center/sw-lan.shtml

This software release is part of a special release of Cisco IOS software that is not released on the same 8-week maintenance cycle that is used for other platforms. As maintenance releases and future software releases become available,  they will be posted to Cisco.com in the Cisco IOS software area.

Contents

This information is in the release notes:

"Hardware Supported" section

"Upgrading the Switch Software" section

"Installation Notes" section

"New Features" section

"Minimum Cisco IOS Release for Major Features" section

"Limitations and Restrictions" section

"Important Notes" section

"Open Caveats" section

"Resolved Caveats" section

"Documentation Updates" section

"Related Documentation" section

"Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines" section

Hardware Supported

Table 1 lists the supported hardware and the minimum Cisco IOS release required.

Table 1 Supported Hardware 

Switch
Description
Supported by Minimum Cisco IOS Release

Catalyst 3750 Metro 24-AC switch

24 10/100 Ethernet ports, 2 1000X standard SFP1 module slots, 2 1000X ES2 SFP slots, and field-replaceable AC power supply

Cisco IOS Release 12.1(14)AX

Catalyst 3750 Metro 24-DC switch

24 10/100 Ethernet ports, 2 1000X standard SFP module slots, 2 1000X ES SFP slots, and field-replaceable DC power supply

Cisco IOS Release 12.1(14)AX

SFP modules

1000BASE-T, 1000BASE-SX, and1000BASE-LX

1000BASE-ZX and CWDM3

100BASE-FX MMF4

1000BASE-BX

Cisco IOS Release 12.1(14)AX


Cisco IOS Release 12.1(14)AX1

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EY

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EY2

1 SFP = small form-factor pluggable

2 ES = enhanced services

3 CWDM = coarse wavelength-division multiplexer

4 MMF = multimode fiber


Upgrading the Switch Software

These are the procedures for downloading software:

"Finding the Software Version and Feature Set" section

"Deciding Which Files to Use" section

"Archiving Software Images" section

"Upgrading a Switch by Using the CLI" section

"Recovering from a Software Failure" section


Note Before downloading software, read this section for important information.


Finding the Software Version and Feature Set

The Cisco IOS image is stored as a bin file in a directory that is named with the Cisco IOS release. The image is stored on the system board flash device (flash:).

You can use the show version privileged EXEC command to see the software version that is running on your switch.

You can also use the dir filesystem: privileged EXEC command to see the directory names of other software images that you might have stored in flash memory.

Deciding Which Files to Use

The upgrade procedures in these release notes describe how to perform the upgrade by using a combined tar file. This file contains the Cisco IOS image file. To upgrade the switch through the command-line interface (CLI), use the tar file and the archive download-sw privileged EXEC command.

Table 2 lists the software filename for this software release.

Table 2 Cisco IOS Software Image Files for Catalyst 3750 Metro Switches 

Filename

Description

c3750me-i5-tar.122-35.SE5.tar

Cisco IOS image tar file.
This image has Layer 2+ and Layer 3 features.

c3750me-i5k91-tar.122-35.SE5.tar

Cisco IOS cryptographic image tar file.
This image has the Kerberos, SSH1 , SSL2 , Layer 2+, and Layer 3 features.

1 SSH = Secure Shell

2 SSL = Secure Socket Layer


Archiving Software Images

Before upgrading your switch software, make sure that you have archived copies of the current Cisco IOS release and the Cisco IOS release to which you are upgrading. You should keep these archived images until you have upgraded all devices in the network to the new Cisco IOS image and until you have verified that the new Cisco IOS image works properly in your network.

Cisco routinely removes old Cisco IOS versions from Cisco.com. See Product Bulletin 2863 for more information:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/products/sw/iosswrel/ps5187/prod_bulletin0900aecd80281c0e.
Html

You can copy the bin software image file on the flash memory to the appropriate TFTP directory on a host by using the copy flash: tftp: privileged EXEC command.


Note Although you can copy any file on the flash memory to the TFTP server, it is time consuming to copy all of the HTML files in the tar file. We recommend that you download the tar file from Cisco.com and archive it on an internal host in your network.


You can also configure the switch as a TFTP server to copy files from one switch to another without using an external TFTP server by using the tftp-server global configuration command. For more information about the tftp-server command, see the "Basic File Transfer Services Commands" section of the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference, Release 12.2 at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps1835/products_command_reference_chapter09186a00800ca744.html#wp1018426

Upgrading a Switch by Using the CLI

This procedure is for copying the tar file to the switch. You copy the file to the switch from a TFTP server and extract the files. You can download an image file and replace or keep the current image.

Download the software from Cisco.com to your management station by following these steps:


Step 1 Use Table 2 to identify the file that you want to download.

Step 2 Download the software image file from Cisco.com.

Go to this URL and log in to download the appropriate files:

http://www.cisco.com/kobayashi/sw-center/sw -lan.shtml

To download the files, click the link for your switch platform, and then follow the links on the page to select the correct tar image file.

Step 3 Copy the image to the appropriate TFTP directory on the workstation, and make sure that the TFTP server is properly configured.

For more information, see Appendix B in the software configuration guide for this release.

Step 4 Log in to the switch through the console port or a Telnet session.

Step 5 Check your VLAN 1 configuration by using the show interfaces vlan 1 privileged EXEC command, and verify that VLAN 1 is part of the same network as the TFTP server. (Check the Internet address is line near the top of the display.)

Step 6 Download the image file from the TFTP server to the switch. If you are installing the same version of software that is currently on the switch, overwrite the current image by using this privileged EXEC command:

archive download-sw /overwrite /reload tftp:[[//location]/directory]/image-name.tar

The /overwrite option overwrites the software image in flash memory with the downloaded one.

The /reload option reloads the system after downloading the image unless the configuration has been changed and not been saved.

For //location, specify the IP address of the TFTP server.

For /directory/image-name.tar, specify the directory (optional) and the image to download. Directory and image names are case sensitive.

This example shows how to download an image from a TFTP server at 198.30.20.19 and to overwrite the image on the switch:

Switch# archive download-sw /overwrite tftp://198.30.20.19/c3750me-i5-tar.122-35.SE2.tar

You can also download the image file from the TFTP server to the switch and keep the current image by replacing the /overwrite option with the /leave-old-sw option.


Recovering from a Software Failure

Switch software can be corrupted during an upgrade, by downloading the wrong file to the switch, and by deleting the image file. In all of these cases, the switch does not pass the power-on self-test (POST), and there is no connectivity. You can use the Xmodem protocol to recover from these failures.

For detailed recovery procedures, see the "Troubleshooting" chapter in the software configuration guide for this release.

Installation Notes

You can assign IP information to your switch by using these methods:

The Express Setup program as described in the Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Getting Started Guide.

The CLI-based setup program as described in the Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Hardware Installation Guide.

The DHCP-based autoconfiguration as described in the Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Software Configuration Guide.

Manually assigning an IP addresses described in the Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Software Configuration Guide.

New Features

These are the new supported hardware and the new software features provided this release:

"New Hardware Features" section

"New Software Features" section

New Hardware Features

For a list of all supported hardware, see the "Hardware Supported" section.

New Software Features

These are the new software features for Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1:

Support for the IEEE 802.3ah Ethernet OAM protocol discovery, link monitoring, remote fault detection, and remote loopback features

Enhanced object tracking for HSRP

Support for hierarchical policy maps on EtherChannels containing ES ports

Support for Multicast VLAN Registration (MVR) over trunk ports to allow you to configure a trunk port as an MVR receiver port

Minimum Cisco IOS Release for Major Features

Table 3 lists the minimum software release required to support the major features on the Catalyst 3750 Metro switch.


Note Features not included in the table are available in all releases. You can see a list of features from the first release at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps5532/products_configuration_guide_chapter09186a00801ee872.html


Table 3 Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Features and the Minimum Cisco IOS Release Required 

Feature
Minimum Cisco IOS Release Required

MVR over trunk port (MVRoT) support

12.2(35)SE1

Hierarchical QoS on ES EtherChannels

12.2(35)SE1

Enhanced object tracking for HSRP

12.2(35)SE1

Ethernet OAM IEEE 802.3ah protocol

12.2(35)SE1

Ethernet OAM CFM (IEEE 802.1ag) and E-LMI

12.2(25)SEG

NSF awareness

12.2(25)SEG

MST based on the IEEE 802.1s standard

12.2(25)SEG

SCP

12.2(25)SEG

Per VLAN MAC learning disable

12.2(25)SEG

DHCP Option-82 configurable remote Id and circuit ID

12.2(25)SEE

H-VPLS

12.2(25)SED

IEEE 802.1x restricted VLANs

12.2(25)SED

IEEE 802.1x accounting and MIBs (IEEE8021-PAE-MIB and CISCO-PAE-MIB)

12.2(25)EY

DHCP snooping with the option-82 information option

12.2(25)EY

DHCP snooping binding database configuration

12.2(25)EY

Dynamic ARP inspection

12.2(25)EY

EtherChannel guard

12.2(25)EY

Flex Links

12.2(25)EY

IGMPv3 snooping

12.2(25)EY

IGMP throttling

12.2(25)EY

IP source guard

12.2(25)EY

MultipleVPN Routing/Forwarding (Multi-VRF) CE

12.2(25)EY

Private VLAN

12.2(25)EY

SFP diagnostic management interface

12.2(25)EY

SSHv2 server application (cryptographic images only)

12.2(25)EY

SSL Version 3.0 for secure HTTP communication (cryptographic images only)

12.2(25)EY

Smartports macros

12.2(25)EY

Auto-QoS

12.2(25)EY

VLAN-based QoS and dual-level hierarchical policy maps on SVIs

12.2(25)EY

Matching the CoS of the inner tag for IEEE 802.1Q tunneling traffic.

12.2(25)EY

Applying hierarchical service policies in the inbound direction on an ES port.

12.2(25)EY

Storm control enhancements

12.2(25)EY

SFP diagnostic management interface

12.2(25)EY

Unicast MAC address filtering

12.2(25)EY

QoS egress priority queue

12.1(14)AX2

QoS DSCP transparency

12.1(14)AX2

Point-to-point Layer 2 protocol tunneling

12.1(14)AX1

Flex Link Preemptive Switchover

12.2(25)SEE

OSPF nonbroadcast and point-to-multipoint networks

12.2(25)SEE


Limitations and Restrictions

You should review this section before you begin working with the switch. These are known limitations that will not be fixed, and there is not always a workaround. Some features might not work as documented, and some features could be affected by recent changes to the switch hardware or software.

"Configuration" section

"Ethernet" section

"Fallback Bridging" section

"HSRP" section

"IP" section

"IP Telephony" section

"MAC Addressing" section

"MPLS and EoMPLS" section

"Multicasting" section

"QoS" section

"Routing" section

"SPAN and RSPAN" section

"Trunking" section

"Tunneling" section

"VLAN" section

Configuration

These are the configuration limitations:

A static IP address might be removed when the previously acquired DHCP IP address lease expires.

This problem occurs under these conditions:

When the switch is booted without a configuration (no config.text file in flash memory).

When the switch is connected to a DHCP server that is configured to give an address to it (the dynamic IP address is assigned to VLAN 1).

When an IP address is configured on VLAN 1 before the dynamic address lease assigned to VLAN 1 expires.

The workaround is to reconfigure the static IP address. (CSCea71176)

On a switch running Cisco IOS Release 12.1(14)AX, when the show interface privileged EXEC is entered on a port that is running IEEE 802.1Q, inconsistent statistics from ports running IEEE 802.1Q might be reported.

The workaround is to upgrade to Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EY or later. (CSCec35100)

When you change a port from a nonrouted port to a routed port or the reverse, the applied auto-QoS setting is not changed or updated when you verify it by using the show running interface or show mls qos interface user EXEC commands.

These are the workarounds:

1. Disable auto-QoS on the interface.

2. Change the routed port to a nonrouted port or the reverse.

3. Re-enable auto-QoS on the interface. (CSCec44169)

The DHCP snooping binding database is not written to flash or a remote file in any of these situations:

When the Network Time Protocol (NTP) is configured, but the NTP clock is not synchronized. You can check the clock status by entering the show NTP status privileged EXEC command and verifying that the network connection to the NTP server and peer work correctly.

The DHCP snooping database file is manually removed from the file system. After enabling the DHCP snooping database by configuring a database URL, a database file is created. If the file is removed manually from the file system, the DHCP snooping database does not create another database file. You need to disable the DHCP snooping database and enable it again to create the database file.

The URL for the configured DHCP snooping database was replaced because the original URL is not accessible. The new URL might not take effect after the timeout of the old URL.

No workaround is necessary; these are the designed behaviors. (CSCed50819)

When dynamic ARP inspection is enabled on a switch or switch stack, ARP and RARP packets greater than 2016 bytes are dropped by the switch or switch stack. This is a hardware limitation.

However, when dynamic ARP inspection is not enabled and jumbo MTU is configured, ARP and RARP packets are correctly bridged in hardware. (CSCed79734)

When connected to some third-party devices that send early preambles, a switch port operating at 100 Mbps full duplex or 100 Mbps half duplex might bounce the line protocol up and down. The problem is observed only when the switch is receiving frames.

The workaround is to configure the port for 10 Mbps and half duplex or to connect a hub or a nonaffected device to the switch. (CSCed39091)

Dynamic ARP inspection log entries might be lost after a switch failure. Any log entries that are still in the log buffer (have not been output as a system message) on a switch that fails will be lost.

When you enter the show ip arp inspection log privileged EXEC command, the log entries from all switches in the stack are moved to the switch on which the command was entered.

There is no workaround. (CSCed95822)

When port security is enabled on an interface in restricted mode and the switchport block unicast interface command has been entered for that interface, MAC addresses are incorrectly forwarded when they should be blocked.

The workaround is to enter the no switchport block unicast interface configuration command for that specific interface. (CSCee93822)

The Catalyst 3750 Metro switch does not learn its own MAC address on Layer 2 interfaces. For example: Ports 1/0/1 and 1/0/2 belong to VLAN x, port 1/0/3 is a Layer 3 port with an IP address that belongs to the subnet of VLAN x, and ports 1/0/2 and 1/0/3 are connected. In this case, a host connected to port 1/0/1 cannot ping port 1/0/3. The switch does not update the CAM table and does not use the MAC address of port 1/0/3 in the CAM table for port 1/0/2.

The workaround is to statically configure the MAC address of port 1/0/3 in the CAM table of the switch bound to port 1/0/2 by using the mac address-table static mac-addr vlan vlan-id interface fastethernet1/0/2 global configuration command. (CSCee87864)

A traceback error occurs if a crypto key is generated after an SSL client session.

There is no workaround. This is a cosmetic error and does not affect the functionality of the switch. (CSCef59331)

When enhanced services (ES) interfaces in an EtherChannel are carrying Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic and more routes are configured than are supported in the SDM template, messages similar to the following might appear when the interface is shut down and brought back up:

2d20h: %PLATFORM_UCAST-3-LB: PI<->PD handles out of sync for Adj 222.1.1.1 LB -Traceback= 252620 A919CC A847E0 A85BE0 A927FC AA2D28 A965E0 A89C08 A78744 B08F48 ADF504 ADDC4C AE3460 AD25CC B94AA0 B94F20

There is no workaround. (CSCeh13477)

Ethernet

This is the Ethernet limitation:

SNAP-encapsulated IP packets are dropped without an error message being reported at the interface. The switch does not support SNAP-encapsulated IP packets. There is no workaround. (CSCdz89142)

Fallback Bridging

These are the fallback bridging limitations:

If a bridge group contains a VLAN that has a static MAC address configured, all non-IP traffic in the bridge group with this MAC address destination is sent to all ports in the bridge group.

The workaround is to remove the VLAN from the bridge group or to remove the static MAC address from the VLAN. (CSCdw81955)

Known unicast (secured addresses) are flooded within a bridge group under this condition: If secure addresses are learned or configured on a port and the VLAN on this port is part of a bridge group, non-IP traffic destined to the secure addresses is flooded within the bridge group.

The workaround is to disable fallback bridging. To remove an interface from a bridge group and to remove the bridge group, use the no bridge-group bridge-group interface configuration command. Another workaround is to disable port security on all ports in all VLANs participating in fallback bridging by using the no switchport port-security interface configuration command. (CSCdz80499)

HSRP

These are the Hot Standby Routing Protocol (HSRP) limitations:

When the active switch fails in a switch cluster that uses HSRP redundancy, the new active switch might not contain a full cluster member list.

The workaround is to ensure that the ports on the standby cluster members are not in the spanning-tree blocking state. To verify that these ports are not in the blocking state, see the "Configuring STP" chapter in the software configuration guide. (CSCec76893)

HSRP does not function on multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) interfaces.

There is no workaround. Do not configure HSRP on MPLS interfaces. (CSCeg76540)

IP

These are the IP limitations:

The switch does not create an adjacency table entry when the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) timeout value is 15 seconds and the ARP request times out.

The workaround is to set an ARP timeout value higher than 120 seconds. (CSCea21674)

When the rate of received DHCP requests exceeds 2,000 packets per minute for a long time, the response time might be slow when you are using the console.

The workaround is to use rate limiting on DHCP traffic to prevent a denial of service attack from occurring. (CSCeb59166)

IP Telephony

These are the IP telephony limitations:

Some access point (AP)-350 devices are incorrectly discovered as IEEE 802.3af Class 1 devices. These APs should be discovered as Cisco pre-standard devices. The show power inline user EXEC command shows the AP-350 as an IEEE Class 1 device.

The workaround is to power the AP by using an AC wall adaptor. (CSCin69533)

After changing the access VLAN on a port that has IEEE 802.1x enabled, the IP phone address is removed. Because learning is restricted on IEEE 802.1x capable ports, it takes approximately 30 seconds before the address is relearned.

There is no workaround. (CSCea85312)

MAC Addressing

This is the MAC addressing limitation:

When a MAC address is configured for filtering on the internal VLAN of a routed port, incoming packets from the MAC address to the routed port are not dropped. (CSCeb67937)

MPLS and EoMPLS

These are the multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) and Ethernet over MPLS (EoMPLS) limitations:

Port-based Ethernet over Multiprotocol Label Switching (EoMPLS) sessions do not function if the incoming port is configured as an Inter-Switch Link (ISL) trunk.

The workaround is to configure the incoming ports as an IEEE 802.1Q trunk or as an access port. (CSCeb44014)

The display for the show mpls ldp neighbor ipaddr-of-neighbor detail user EXEC command always shows the targeted hello holdtime value as infinite.

The workaround is to use the show mpls ldp parameter user EXEC command to see the configured value. (CSCeb76775)

When MPLS is enabled, traceroute is not supported.

There is no workaround. (CSCec13655)

When an enhanced-services (ES) port is configured as a trunk port and the switch is using VLAN-based EoMPLS, if the VLAN has been cleared from the trunks on the ES ports, packets destined to IP addresses 224.0.0.xxx might not be sent over the EoMPLS tunnel.

The workaround is to allow the EoMPLS VLAN on the trunk on the ES ports. (CSCsc42814)

Multicasting

These are the multicasting limitations:

The switch does not support tunnel interfaces for unicast routed traffic. Only Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP) tunnel interfaces are supported for multicast routing.

Nonreverse-path forwarded (RPF) IP multicast traffic to a group that is bridged in a VLAN is leaked onto a trunk port in the VLAN even if the port is not a member of the VLAN group, but it is a member in some other VLAN group. Unnecessary traffic is sent on the trunk port and needlessly reduces the bandwidth of the port.

There is no workaround because non-RPF traffic is continuous in certain topologies. As long as the trunk port is a member on a trunk port in at least one VLAN, this problem for the non-RPF traffic occurs. (CSCdu25219)

If the number of multicast routes and Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) groups are more than the maximum number in the Switch Database Management (SDM) template shown with the show sdm prefer global configuration command, the traffic received on unknown groups is flooded in the received VLAN even though the show ip igmp snooping multicast-table privileged EXEC command output shows otherwise.

The workaround is to reduce the number of multicast routes and IGMP snooping groups to less than the maximum supported value. (CSCdy09008)

IGMP filtering is applied to packets that are forwarded through hardware. It is not applied to packets that are forwarded through software. Hence, with multicast routing enabled, the first few packets are sent from a port even when IGMP filtering is set to deny those groups on that port.

There is no workaround. (CSCdy82818)

When you use the ip access-group interface configuration command with a router access control list (ACL) to deny access to a group in a VLAN, multicast data to the group that is received in the VLAN is always flooded in the VLAN regardless of IGMP group membership in the VLAN. This provides access to directly connected clients, if any, in the VLAN.

The workaround is to not apply a router ACL configured to deny access to a VLAN interface. Apply the security through other means; for example, apply VLAN maps to the VLAN instead of using a router ACL for the group. (CSCdz86110)

(Catalyst 3750 switches) When IP Protocol-Independent Multicast (PIM) is enabled on a tunnel interface, the switch incorrectly displays the Multicast is not supported on tunnel interfaces error message. IP PIM is not supported on tunnel interfaces.

There is no workaround. (CSCeb75366)

If an IGMP report packet has two multicast group records, the switch removes or adds interfaces depending on the order of the records in the packet:

If the ALLOW_NEW_SOURCE record is before the BLOCK_OLD_SOURCE record, the switch removes the port from the group.

If the BLOCK_OLD_SOURCE record is before the ALLOW_NEW_SOURCE record, the switch adds the port to the group.

There is no workaround. (CSCec20128)

When IGMP snooping is disabled and you enter the switchport block multicast interface configuration command, IP multicast traffic is not blocked.

The switchport block multicast interface configuration command is only applicable to non-IP multicast traffic.

There is no workaround. (CSCee16865)

Incomplete multicast traffic can be seen under either of these conditions:

You disable and then re-enable IP multicast routing on an interface.

A switch mroute table temporarily runs out of resources and recovers later.

The workaround is to enter clear ip mroute privileged EXEC command on the interface. (CSCef42436)

When more multicast groups are configured than are supported by the selected Switch Database Management (SDM) template, Layer 2 multicast traffic is flooded on one or more multicast groups.

There is no workaround. (CSCef67261)

QoS

These are the Quality of Service (QoS) limitations:

Some switch queues are disabled if the buffer size or threshold level is set too low with the mls qos queue-set output global configuration command. The ratio of buffer size to threshold level should be greater than ten to avoid disabling the queue.

The workaround is to choose compatible buffer sizes and threshold levels. (CSCea76893)

When traffic with different class of service (CoS) values is sent into a IEEE 802.1Q tunnel, only the CoS 0 statistics increment in the show mls qos interface user EXEC command display.

There is no workaround. (CSCeb75230)

The bandwidth interface configuration command is not supported at the interface level, but it appears in the CLI.

There is no workaround. (CSCeb80223)

The random-detect interface configuration command is not supported at the interface level, but it appears in the CLI.

There is no workaround. (CSCeb80300)

The display for the show policy-map interface user EXEC command shows zeros for the counters associated with class-map match criteria.

There is no workaround. (CSCec08205)

The priority policy-map class configuration command cannot be configured for the default traffic class in a policy map.

The workaround is to configure explicit matches for traffic that requires priority treatment. (CSCec38901)

Modifying a QoS class within a very large service policy that is attached to an enhanced-services (ES) port can cause high CPU utilization and an unresponsive CLI for an excessive period of time.

The workaround is to detach the service policy from the port while making the modifications and then to re-attach the service policy. (CSCec75945)

When packets are queued for egress on an enhanced-services (ES) port due to the application of a QoS service policy, they consume packet buffer memory on the switch. If many queues are simultaneously congested and are unable to drain, packet loss can occur in either direction (ingress or egress) due to the lack of buffer memory.

If this becomes a problem, you can change switch behavior by using the queue-limit policy-map class configuration command at the class level to set shorter queue depths. Each shaper has an associated buffer queue with a default depth of 128 packets.

For example:

Switch(config)# policy-map cos2-policy
Switch(config-pmap)# class cos2
Switch(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth 50000
Switch(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 32

The point at which buffer memory is exhausted depends on the number of queues, the sizes of the queued packets, and whether or not the traffic pattern being sent to the switch allows the queues to drain at all.

Upgrading your switch to Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EY or later greatly reduces the possibility of this situation happening, although it can still occur with some configurations and traffic patterns. (CSCed83886)

When auto-QoS is enabled on the switch, priority queuing is not enabled. Instead, the switch uses shaped round robin (SRR) as the queuing mechanism. The auto-QoS feature is designed on each platform based on the feature set and hardware limitations, and the queuing mechanism supported on each platform might be different.

There is no workaround. (CSCee22591)

Routing

These are the routing limitations:

The switch does not support tunnel interfaces for unicast routed traffic. Only Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP) tunnel interfaces are supported for multicast routing.

A route map that contains an ACL with a DSCP clause cannot be applied to a Layer 3 interface. The switch rejects this configuration and issues an error message that shows that the route map is unsupported.

There is no workaround. (CSCea52915)

A spanning-tree loop might occur if all of these conditions are true:

Port security is enabled with the violation mode set to protected.

The maximum number of secure addresses is less than the number of switches connected to the port.

There is a physical loop in the network through a switch whose MAC address has not been secured, and its BPDUs cause a secure violation.

The workaround is to change any one of the listed conditions. (CSCed53633)

SPAN and RSPAN

These are the SPAN and Remote SPAN (RSPAN) limitations:

An egress SPAN copy of routed unicast traffic might show an incorrect destination MAC address on both local and remote SPAN sessions. This limitation does not apply to bridged packets. The workaround for local SPAN is to use the replicate option.

There is no workaround for a remote SPAN session. This is a hardware limitation. (CSCdy72835)

Egress SPAN routed packets (both unicast and multicast) show the incorrect source MAC address. For remote SPAN packets, the source MAC address should be the MAC address of the egress VLAN, but instead the packet shows the MAC address of the remote SPAN (RSPAN) VLAN. For local SPAN packets with native encapsulation on the destination port, the packet shows the MAC address of VLAN 1. This problem does not appear with local SPAN when the encapsulation replicate option is used and does not apply to bridged packets.

The workaround is to use the encapsulate replicate keywords in the monitor session global configuration command. This is a hardware limitation. (CSCdy81521)

During periods of very high traffic and when two RSPAN source sessions are configured, the VLAN ID of packets in one RSPAN session might overwrite the VLAN ID of the other RSPAN session. Packets intended for one RSPAN VLAN are incorrectly sent to the other RSPAN VLAN. This problem does not affect RSPAN destination sessions.

The workaround is to configure only one RSPAN source session. (CSCea72326)

The egress-SPAN data rate might degrade when fallback bridging or multicast routing is enabled. The amount of degradation depends on the processor loading. Typically, the switch can process egress-SPAN at up to 40,000 packets per second (64-byte packets). When the total traffic being monitored is below this limit, there is no degradation. However, if the traffic exceeds the limit, only a portion of the source stream is monitored. When this occurs, this console message appears: Decreased egress SPAN rate.

In all cases, normal traffic is not affected; the degradation limits only how much of the original source stream can be monitored. If fallback bridging and multicast routing are disabled, egress-SPAN monitoring is not degraded.

There is no workaround. If possible, disable fallback bridging and multicast routing. If possible, use ingress-SPAN to observe the same traffic. (CSCeb01216)

Some IGMP report and query packets with IP options might not be ingress-span monitored. Packets that are susceptible to this problem are IGMP packets with 4 bytes of IP options (IP header length of 24). Examples of such packets are IGMP reports and queries having the router alert IP option. Ingress-span monitoring of such packets is not accurate and can vary with traffic rate. Typically, very few or none of these packets are monitored.

There is no workaround. (CSCeb23352)

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP), VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP), and Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP) packets received from a SPAN source are not sent to the destination interfaces of a local SPAN session.

The workaround is to use the monitor session session_number destination {interface interface-id encapsulation replicate} global configuration command for a local SPAN session. (CSCed24036)

Trunking

These are the trunking limitations:

The switch treats frames received with mixed encapsulation (IEEE 802.1Q and Inter-Switch Link [ISL]) as frames with FCS errors, increments the error counters, and causes the port LED to blink amber. This happens when an ISL-unaware device receives an ISL-encapsulated packet and forwards the frame to an IEEE 802.1Q trunk interface.

There is no workaround. (CSCdz33708)

IP traffic with IP options set is sometimes leaked on a trunk port. For example, a trunk port is a member of an IP multicast group in VLAN X but is not a member in VLAN Y. If VLAN Y is the output interface for the multicast route entry assigned to the multicast group and an interface in VLAN Y belongs to the same multicast group, the IP-option traffic received on an input VLAN interface other than one in VLAN Y is sent on the trunk port in VLAN Y. This is because the trunk port is forwarding in VLAN Y, even though the port has no group membership in VLAN Y.

There is no workaround. (CSCdz42909)

For trunk ports or access ports configured with IEEE 802.1Q tagging, inconsistent statistics might appear in the show interfaces counters privileged EXEC command output. Valid IEEE 802.1Q frames of 64 to 66 bytes are correctly forwarded even though the port LED blinks amber, and the frames are not counted on the interface statistics.

There is no workaround. (CSCec35100).

When a trunk interface is converted to an IEEE 802.1Q tunnel, a traceback error message similar to the following might appear:

3d20h: %PLATFORM_UCAST-3-LB: PI<->PD handles out of sync for Adj 222.1.1.1 LB -Traceback= 252620 A9204C A84E60 A86260 A92E7C AA36A0 AA3520 A96C60 A8A288 A78DC4 B095C8

There is no workaround. This does not affect switch functionality. (CSCeh20081)

Tunneling

This is the tunneling limitation:

VLAN mappings can be configured on a per-interface basis. A different set of mappings can be configured on each an enhanced-services (ES) interface. The per-interface VLAN mappings remain in effect even when the ES ports are bundled in an EtherChannel. For example, if you map Gigabit Ethernet 1/1/1 to VLAN 20 through VLAN 50 and Gigabit Ethernet 1/1/2 to VLAN 20 through VLAN 70, traffic on VLAN 20 leaving the switch through the ES port bundle should be load-balanced across the individual ES interfaces. However, some of that traffic is incorrectly translated to VLAN 50, and some is incorrectly translated to VLAN 70.

The workaround is to configure identical VLAN mappings on both ES ports if they are going to be bundled into an EtherChannel. (CSCec49520)

VLAN

These are the VLAN limitations:

If the number of VLANs times the number of trunk ports exceeds the recommended limit of 13,000, the switch can halt.

The workaround is to reduce the number of VLANs or trunks. (CSCeb31087)

A CPUHOG message sometimes appears when you configure a private VLAN. Enable port security on one or more of the ports affected by the private VLAN configuration.

There is no workaround. (CSCed71422)

When you apply a per-VLAN QoS per-port policer policy-map to a VLAN SVI, the second-level (child) policy-map in use cannot be re-used by another policy-map.

The workaround is to define another policy-map name for the second-level policy-map with the same configuration to be used for another policy-map. (CSCef47377)

Important Notes

These are the important notes related to this software release:

The behavior of the no logging on global configuration command changed in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EY and later. In software releases earlier than Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EY, both of these command pairs disabled logging to the console:

the no logging on and then the no logging console global configuration commands

the logging on and then the no logging console global configuration commands

In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SE and later, you can only use the logging on and then the no logging console global configuration commands to disable logging to the console. (CSCec71490)

Beginning with Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EY, ISL encapsulation is supported only on standard ports and not on an enhanced-services (ES) ports. The ES ports support only IEEE 802.1Q encapsulation and the switchport trunk encapsulation interface configuration command is no longer available on these ports. When you are upgrading a switch from Cisco IOS Release 12.1(14)AX to Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EY or later, during the initial configuration process, the switchport trunk encapsulation option is rejected on ES ports, and an error message appears. You can ignore this error message. If you save the new configuration by using the copy running-config startup-config privileged EXEC command and later re-install the Cisco IOS Release 12.1(14)AX image, the trunk encapsulation method originally configured on ES ports is lost, and the ES ports use the default encapsulation method, which is to negotiate.

In Cisco IOS Release 12.1(14)AX and earlier, port-based EoMPLS sessions could only be configured on switch ports. In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EY and later, port-based EoMPLS sessions can only be configured on routed ports.


Note This change is handled automatically during an upgrade to Cisco IOS 12.2(25)EY or later, but if a configuration is written to NVRAM and the switch is then reloaded with Cisco IOS 12.1(14)AX, the new-style configuration is lost.


Beginning with Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EY, you must specify the encapsulation type when using the xconnect interface configuration command.


Note This change is handled automatically during an upgrade to Cisco IOS 12.2(25)EY or later, but if a configuration is written to NVRAM and the switch is then reloaded with Cisco IOS 12.1(14)AX, the new-style configuration is lost.


Open Caveats

These are the Cisco IOS severity-3 open configuration caveats in this software release:

CSCsf15232

When you configure an interface for ISL encapsulation and enable Ethernet OAM remote-loopback, the interface does not go into remote-loopback mode.

The workaround is to use dot1q interfaces for the Ethernet OAM remote-loopback.

CSCsg63499

The trust ip-precedence class configuration command is not supported in a hierarchical service policy on an enhanced-services (ES) port. However, this command is not rejected by the switch.

There is no workaround.

CSCsh00105

On a Catalyst 3750 Metro switch running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)SEG1, when a VLAN interface is associated with a VPN routing/forwarding (VRF) table, an internal VLAN is configured. This internal VLAN is incorrectly displayed when you enter the show IP interface brief privileged EXEC command. You should not delete the internal VLAN, though the CLI allows it.

There is no workaround.

Resolved Caveats

These sections describe the caveats have been resolved in these releases:

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE5

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE2

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE5

CSCed87897

The output of the show ip route privileged EXEC command now correctly displays the default gateway.

CSCsf12082

Certain Cisco Catalyst 6500 Series and Cisco 7600 Router devices that run branches of Cisco IOS based on 12.2 can be vulnerable to a denial of service vulnerability that can prevent any traffic from entering an affected interface. For a device to be vulnerable, it must be configured for Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) Sham-Link and Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) Virtual Private Networking (VPN). This vulnerability only affects Cisco Catalyst 6500 Series or Catalyst 7600 Series devices with the Supervisor Engine 32 (Sup32), Supervisor Engine 720 (Sup720) or Route Switch Processor 720 (RSP720) modules. The Supervisor 32, Supervisor 720, Supervisor 720-3B, Supervisor 720-3BXL, Route Switch Processor 720, Route Switch Processor 720-3C, and Route Switch Processor 720-3CXL are all potentially vulnerable.

OSPF and MPLS VPNs are not enabled by default.

This advisory is posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20080326-queue.shtml.

CSCsh89429

The switch no longer reloads when the write core privileged EXEC command is entered when testing a core dump configuration and FTP is selected as the file transfer protocol.

CSCsi74508

A switch no longer displays this error message when reading from or writing to the configuration file:

%DATACORRUPTION-1-DATAINCONSISTENCY: write of 11 bytes to 10 bytes 
-Traceback= 0x41186A90 0x411A3960 0x411C1F88 0x413C24B8 0x4031EEDC 0x4032D144 
0x411C3974 0x41193D9C 0x4119420C 0x411DF55C 0x411C70AC 0x411E3184 0x425590F4 
0x4254BD7C 0x421B5CE0 0x421B5CC4

CSCsi94450

When DHCP snooping is enabled on a VLAN, the broadcast DHCP request is now correctly sent over the trusted port and the connected hosts correctly receive their IP addresses.

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE2

These are the Cisco IOS caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.2.(35)SE2:

CSCsb12598

Cisco IOS device may crash while processing malformed Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) packets. In order to trigger these vulnerabilities, a malicious client must send malformed packets during the SSL protocol exchange with the vulnerable device.

Successful repeated exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities may lead to a sustained Denial-of-Service (DoS); however, vulnerabilities are not known to compromise either the confidentiality or integrity of the data or the device. These vulnerabilities are not believed to allow an attacker will not be able to decrypt any previously encrypted information.

Cisco IOS is affected by the following vulnerabilities:

Processing ClientHello messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsb12598

Processing ChangeCipherSpec messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsb40304

Processing Finished messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsd92405

Cisco has made free software available to address these vulnerabilities for affected customers. There are workarounds available to mitigate the effects of these vulnerabilities.

This advisory is posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-SSL.shtml.


Note Another related advisory has been posted with this advisory. This additional advisory also describes a vulnerability related to cryptography that affects Cisco IOS. This related advisory is available at the following link: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-crypto.shtml.


A combined software table for Cisco IOS is available to aid customers in choosing a software releases that fixes all security vulnerabilities published as of May 22, 2007. This software table is available at the following link: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-cry-bundle.shtml.

CSCsd85587

A vulnerability has been discovered in a third party cryptographic library which is used by a number of Cisco products. This vulnerability may be triggered when a malformed Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) object is parsed. Due to the nature of the vulnerability it may be possible, in some cases, to trigger this vulnerability without a valid certificate or valid application-layer credentials (such as a valid username or password).

Successful repeated exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities may lead to a sustained Denial-of-Service (DoS); however, vulnerabilities are not known to compromise either the confidentiality or integrity of the data or the device. These vulnerabilities are not believed to allow an attacker will not be able to decrypt any previously encrypted information.

The vulnerable cryptographic library is used in the following Cisco products:

Cisco IOS, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsd85587

Cisco IOS XR, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsg41084

Cisco PIX and ASA Security Appliances, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCse91999

Cisco Unified CallManager, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsg44348

Cisco Firewall Service Module (FWSM)

This vulnerability is also being tracked by CERT/CC as VU#754281.

Cisco has made free software available to address this vulnerability for affected customers. There are no workarounds available to mitigate the effects of the vulnerability.

This advisory is posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-crypto.shtml.


Note Another related advisory is posted together with this Advisory. It also describes vulnerabilities related to cryptography that affect Cisco IOS. A combined software table for Cisco IOS only is available at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-cry-bundle.shtml and can be used to choose a software release which fixes all security vulnerabilities published as of May 22, 2007. The related advisory is published at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-SSL.shtml.


CSCsd92405

Cisco IOS device may crash while processing malformed Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) packets. In order to trigger these vulnerabilities, a malicious client must send malformed packets during the SSL protocol exchange with the vulnerable device.

Successful repeated exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities may lead to a sustained Denial-of-Service (DoS); however, vulnerabilities are not known to compromise either the confidentiality or integrity of the data or the device. These vulnerabilities are not believed to allow an attacker will not be able to decrypt any previously encrypted information.

Cisco IOS is affected by the following vulnerabilities:

Processing ClientHello messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsb12598

Processing ChangeCipherSpec messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsb40304

Processing Finished messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsd92405

Cisco has made free software available to address these vulnerabilities for affected customers. There are workarounds available to mitigate the effects of these vulnerabilities.

This advisory is posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-SSL.shtml.


Note Another related advisory has been posted with this advisory. This additional advisory also describes a vulnerability related to cryptography that affects Cisco IOS. This related advisory is available at the following link: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-crypto.shtml.


A combined software table for Cisco IOS is available to aid customers in choosing a software releases that fixes all security vulnerabilities published as of May 22, 2007. This software table is available at the following link: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-cry-bundle.shtml.

CSCsh17190

On a Catalyst 3750 Metro switch running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)SEG1 or later, memory leaks caused by MPLS tagged equal-cost routes going out the ES ports have been fixed and they no longer cause low memory conditions on the switch.

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1

These are the Cisco IOS caveats resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2.(35)SE1:

CSCsd12172

When the switch is running Ethernet over multiprotocol label switching (EoMPLS) in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)SED, the switch virtual interface (SVI) service policy now polices data traffic according to its defined policy.

CSCsd79916

When IEEE 802.1x authentication was configured on a voice VLAN port, the switch did not forward traffic if the attached PC was configured for both machine authentication and user authentication.

An authenticated 802.1X port might not have forwarded traffic in these conditions:

The port is assigned to a voice VLAN.

The PC is configured for both machine authentication and user authentication.

The machine-initiated and user-initiated authentications result in different VLANs being assigned to the port.

CSCsd87350

When you enter the show policy-map interface interface-id input privileged EXEC command, the service policy counters are now correct. The counters no longer show a zero and do not increment even when traffic is passing through the policy map on the interface.

CSCsd97102

When you configure a hierarchical Quality of Service (QoS) service policy on an enhanced-services (ES) interface, and then enter the show policy-map interface privileged EXEC command, the bridge protocol data units (BPDUs) shown in the output are no longer misclassified in a class with a Layer 3 match.

CSCsd97378

When a nonhierarchical service policy is attached to an enhanced-services (ES) interface, traffic classes, including access-group matches, can now be dynamically added to the service policy. An error message no longer appears, and the class can now be removed from the policy as long as it is attached to the interface.

CSCse14774

If a switch is connected to a third-party router through an EtherChannel and the EtherChannel is running in Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) mode, the interfaces in the EtherChannel no longer fail after you enter the switchport trunk native vlan vlan-id interface configuration command to change the native VLAN from VLAN 1 (the default) to a different VLAN ID.

CSCse21219

If a Putty client is used to change the configuration to a device with SSH, the switch no longer stops responding to incoming traffic, such as SSH, Telnet, or ping packets.

CSCse30660

When a hierarchical service policy is applied to a trunk interface, the way that the BPDUs are classified no longer depends on whether or not the native VLAN on that trunk interface is explicitly added to the allowed VLAN list.

CSCse56039

The automatic medium-dependent-interface crossover (Auto-MDIX) feature now works correctly when configured on enhanced services (ES) ports.

CSCse60259 (glovblom)

The trap sent for ciscoEnvMonRedundantSupplyNotification no longer appears to be corrupted by showing noSuchInstance.

CSCsf04754

Multiple Cisco products contain either of two authentication vulnerabilities in the Simple Network Management Protocol version 3 (SNMPv3) feature. These vulnerabilities can be exploited when processing a malformed SNMPv3 message. These vulnerabilities could allow the disclosure of network information or may enable an attacker to perform configuration changes to vulnerable devices. The SNMP server is an optional service that is disabled by default. Only SNMPv3 is impacted by these vulnerabilities. Workarounds are available for mitigating the impact of the vulnerabilities described in this document.

The United States Computer Emergency Response Team (US-CERT) has assigned Vulnerability Note VU#878044 to these vulnerabilities.

Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) identifier CVE-2008-0960 has been assigned to these vulnerabilities.

This advisory will be posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20080610-snmpv3.shtml

CSCsf99684

On a Catalyst 3750 Metro switch running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)SEG or SEG1, enabling VLAN-based EoMPLS on a VLAN that has per-VLAN MAC Learning disabled no longer results in a traceback. The EoMPLS tunnel can now correctly be established.

CSCsg19089

When the switch is running MPLS VPN, tagged IP traffic entering an MPLS uplink port with an unresolved next hop is now correctly routed to the CPU for Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) resolution.

CSCsg20488

ES trunk ports now correctly tag frames on the native VLAN when the global option vlan dot1q tag native is configured.

CSCsg30232

A timing issue that caused Catalyst 3750 Metro switches running some configurations to fail to boot successfully has been corrected.

CSCsg64371

The output for the show policy-map interface privileged EXEC command now correctly shows drop counters for classes with set actions configured.

CSCsg78650

The output of the show policy-map privileged EXEC command when entered for the ES ports now correctly shows the number of packets dropped in classes with priority queuing enabled.

Documentation Updates

This section contains these documentation updates:

Hierarchical Policy Maps on ES EtherChannels

IP SLAs Support

Updates to the Hardware Installation Guide

Hierarchical Policy Maps on ES EtherChannels

In the software configuration guide in Chapter 32, "Configuring QoS," the maximum shaping limit is no longer limited to 1 Gigabit if an absolute parameter policy is used, but instead it depends on the link status. The implicit shaper is now 1 Gigabit if one ES link is up and 2 Gigabits if both links are up.

Note that if there are child policies under a parent shaper that contain absolute bandwidth configurations and these policies become invalid because of ES link status changes, the entire policy is removed. Absolute values are not changed internally as percentage values are. If you want to configure an EtherChannel policy for a redundant application so that all policies would hold true no matter what the link state, there are two options:

Configure a policy without a shaper (since the switch supports only absolute shapers) and enter all bandwidth and policing in percentages. This way, the percentages will stay the same and the actual values will be automatically adjusted based on ES link status.

Configure an absolute parameter policy that allows a combination of shaping, bandwidth and policing at various layers, making sure that all policies are derived with an implicit 1 Gigabit shaper. One easy way to do this is to force one ES link down and make sure that the other one is UP. Then configure and attach a policy. If that policy is accepted and attached, this will remain the same if either link is down or if both links are up. The best effort traffic, or traffic that does not match the policy will occupy the remaining bandwidth.

IP SLAs Support

The Catalyst 3750 Metro switch includes partial support for Cisco IOS IP Service Level Agreements (IP SLAs) to provide advanced network service monitoring information and collect data pertaining to SLAs verification. The switch can initiate and reply jitter probes. However, the traffic does not follow the queuing configuration that is applied to customer traffic. All locally originated traffic always goes to the same egress queue on the switch port, regardless of the ToS setting for the IP SLAs probe. We recommend the use of an external shadow router to measure latency and packet drop rate (PDR) across the switch.

For performance testing purposes, this configuration was validated:

1. Two switches connected back-to-back.

2. No protocols running on the switch CPUs, including STP.

3. Jitter probe send and receive rate:

a. 50 bidirectional probes sent with each probe consisting of up to 50 packets sent at 1-second intervals.

b. Probes started with a 1-second stagger between each probe.

For information about IP SLAs on Cisco routers, see this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/application/pdf/en/us/guest/products/ps6602/c1244/cdccont_0900aecd804fb392.pdf

Updates to the Hardware Installation Guide

These sections list updates to the hardware installation guide:

Chapter 3 "Connecting the Power Supply"

Appendix A "Technical Specifications"

Chapter 3 "Connecting the Power Supply"

Preparing for Installation

Locate the terminal block plug that ships with the DC power supply.

Obtain these necessary tools and equipment:

Ratcheting torque screwdriver with a Phillips head that exerts up to 15 pound-force inches (lbf-in.) of pressure

Panduit crimping tool with optional controlled cycle mechanism (model CT-700, CT-720, CT-920, CT-920CH, CT-930, or CT-940CH)

6-gauge copper ground wire (insulated or noninsulated)

Four leads of 18-gauge copper wire. The DC terminal block also accepts 12-28 AWG copper wire.


Note We recommend that you use 18 AWG copper wiring for Network Equipment Building Systems (NEBS) installations. This guideline follows the standard guidelines for DC power wiring in the Central Office.


Wire-stripping tools for stripping 6- and 18-gauge wires

Appendix A "Technical Specifications"

These are the correct weights for the Catalyst 3750 Metro switches:

Catalyst 3750 Metro 24-AC switch with one AC power supply: 12.1 lb (5.5 kg)

Catalyst 3750 Metro 24-AC switch with two AC power supplies: 14.0 lb (6.35 kg)

Catalyst 3750 Metro 24-DC switch with one DC power supply: 12.0 lb (5.44 kg)

Catalyst 3750 Metro 24-DC switch with two DC power supplies: 13.8 lb (6.26 kg)

Related Documentation

These documents provide information about the switch and are available from this Cisco.com site:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps5532/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

You can order printed copies of documents with a DOC-xxxxxx= number from the Cisco.com sites listed in the "Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines" section.

Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Getting Started Guide (order number DOC-7817431=)

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch
(order number DOC-7817432=)

Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Software Configuration Guide (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Command Reference (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch System Message Guide (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Catalyst 3750 Metro Switch Hardware Installation Guide (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Cisco Small Form-Factor Pluggable Modules Installation Notes (order number DOC-7815160=)

These compatibility matrix documents are available from this Cisco.com site:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/modules/ps5455/products_device_support_tables_list.html

Cisco Gigabit Ethernet Transceiver Modules Compatibility Matrix (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Cisco 100-Megabit Ethernet SFP Modules Compatibility Matrix (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Cisco Small Form-Factor Pluggable Modules Compatibility Matrix (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Compatibility Matrix for 1000BASE-T Small Form-Factor Pluggable Modules (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

For information on obtaining documentation, obtaining support, providing documentation feedback, security guidelines, and also recommended aliases and general Cisco documents, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html