Cisco 1538M 10/100 Installation and Configuration Guide
Installation and Startup
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Installation and Startup

Table Of Contents

Installation and Startup

Safety Information

EMC Regulatory Statements

U.S.A. FCC B Declaration of Conformity

Taiwan

Unpacking Your Hub

Preinstallation

Installing the Hub

Using POST to Pretest the Hub Operation

Installing Micro Hubs in a Stack

Assembling the Stacking Clip

Adding or Removing a Hub from a Stack

Connecting the Stacking Cables

Hub Stacking Guidelines

Managing the Hub Stack

Numbering Convention of Hubs in a Stack

Hot Swapping Micro Hubs

Connecting the Power Cord

Connecting Other Network Devices to the Micro Hubs

Connecting a PC, Workstation, Router, or Server

Connecting Compatible Hubs and Switches to the Hub

Connecting to the Console Port (Cisco 1538M Hubs)

Assigning IP Information to a Cisco 1538M Hub

Accessing the Management Interfaces for a Cisco 1538M

Accessing the Cisco 1538 Hub Manager

Accessing the CLI

Accessing the MIB Files through SNMP

Using FTP to Access the MIB Files

Using CCO to Access the MIB Files

Remote Monitoring

Where to Go Next


Installation and Startup


This chapter provides information you need to unpack, install, and set up your Micro Hubs.


Timesaver   You can also use the Cisco 1538 Series Micro Hub 10/100 Cabling and Start Up guide that came with your hub for quick instructions on how to install and configure your Micro Hub.


Safety Information

To ensure personal safety and protect the equipment, follow these guidelines:

Read the safety information in "."

Keep the chassis area clear and dust-free during and after installation.

Keep tools and chassis components away from walk areas.

Do not wear loose clothing that could get caught in the chassis.

Wear safety glasses when working under hazardous conditions.

Do not perform any action that creates a hazard or makes the equipment unsafe.


Warning   The ports labeled "1X" through "8X," "console," "UP," and "DOWN" are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits. Avoid connecting these circuits to telephone network voltage (TNV) circuits.



Warning   Unplug the power cord before you work on a system that does not have an on/off switch.



Warning   Do not work on the system or connect or disconnect cables during periods of lightning activity.



Warning   

Do not touch the power supply when the power cord is connected. For systems with a power switch, line voltages are present within the power supply even when the power switch is off and the power cord is connected. For systems without a power switch, line voltages are present within the power supply when the power cord is connected.



Warning   Read the installation instructions before you connect the system to its power source.



Warning   The power supply is designed to work with TN power systems.



Warning   This equipment is intended to be grounded. Ensure that the host is connected to earth ground during normal use.



Warning   When installing the unit, the ground connection must always be made first and disconnected last.



Warning   Before working on equipment that is connected to power lines, remove jewelry (including rings, necklaces, and watches). Metal objects heat up when connected to power and ground and can cause serious burns or weld the metal object to the terminals.



Warning   Ultimate disposal of this product should be handled according to all national laws and regulations.



Caution    Do not place anything on top of the hub that could block the air flow from the vents on top of the hub. Products designed specifically to interoperate with the hub and which are stacked on top of the hub with the included stacking clip will not block the air flow from the vents.


Caution    To prevent the switch from overheating, do not operate it in an area that exceeds the maximum recommended ambient temperature of 113×F (45×C). To prevent airflow restriction, allow at least 3 inches (7.6 cm) of clearance around the ventilation openings.

EMC Regulatory Statements

U.S.A. FCC B Declaration of Conformity

Responsible party:

Manager, Corporate compliance
Cisco Systems Inc.
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134
USA
(408) 526-4000

The following products:

Cisco 1538M and Cisco 1538 Micro Hub 10/100 has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules.

The FCC B warning statement for this product is in the front matter of this manual.

Taiwan

Unpacking Your Hub

Make sure that you receive all the items shown in . If any items are missing or damaged, contact your Cisco reseller.

Figure 2-1 Micro Hub Box Contents

Preinstallation

Before you begin installing the hub:

Assemble the network devices you intend to connect to the hub. These devices must support either 10BaseT or 100BaseTX. For example, the Cisco 1548M series Micro Switch 10/100 or any of the Cisco 1700 series routers are compatible devices.

Select your cabling:

To connect a compatible switch, router, server, PC, or workstation, you must supply straight-through Ethernet cables.

For information on cabling the hub to a compatible network device, see "Connecting a PC, Workstation, Router, or Server" on page 2-17 or the "Connecting Compatible Hubs and Switches to the Hub" on page 2-19. For more information on straight-through Ethernet cable, see "Straight-Through vs. Crossover Ethernet Cable" on page B-3.

To stack up to four Micro Hubs, use the stacking cable included with each hub to connect each hub through its UP and DOWN connectors.

For information on cabling the hub to another Micro Hub, see "Installing Micro Hubs in a Stack" on page 2-8.

To connect a compatible hub or switch in a daisy-chain connection, you must supply either a straight-through (for port 5) or crossover Ethernet cable.

For information on cabling the hub to a compatible hub or switch, see "Connecting Compatible Hubs and Switches to the Hub" on page 2-19. For more information on straight-through Ethernet cable, see "Straight-Through vs. Crossover Ethernet Cable" on page B-3.

Installing the Hub

These are the major steps for installing your Micro Hub:

1 Verify that the hub is operational by running the power-on self-test (POST).


Timesaver   If you are installing more than one Micro Hub, complete the next two steps. If you are installing only one hub, skip these steps.


2 Install the hubs in a stack.

3 Connect the stacking cables to the hubs.

4 Connect power to the hub.

5 Connect other network devices to the hub.


Timesaver   If you have at least one Cisco 1538M managed hub and plan to use the management features, complete the next two steps. If you do not plan to manage your Micro Hubs, skip these steps.


6 Connect the console port of a managed Micro Hub to a terminal or PC to monitor and configure the stack.

7 Access the Micro Hub management interface.

Using POST to Pretest the Hub Operation

Before installing and cabling the hub, you might want power up the hub and verify that it is operational.

To power up the hub, connect one end of the AC power cord to the AC power connector on the hub and the other end of the cord to a power outlet (see ).

The hub begins the power-on self-test (POST) after power up. POST consists of the nine individual tests listed in . The port LEDs show which test the hub is executing. As each test executes, a port LED turns green. For example, if the LED for port 4 is green, the boot code test (test 1) is being executed. On the hub, the port LED for port 4 turns green first, followed by ports 3, 2, 1, 8, 7, and so on. The LED turns off after the test completes. The POWER LED is solid amber until POST completes.

When POST completes, the following conditions can exist (if other devices are not connected to the hub):

All POST tests passed—If the POWER LED is green and all of the port LEDs are off, no problems were detected. The hub is fully operational.

Nonfatal failure(s) detected—If the POWER LED is amber and the hub is functional, POST detected one or more nonfatal failures. Although the hub is still operational and can forward packets, it might not operate optimally. Refer to the POST failure message displayed on the diagnostic console screen, identifying the nonfatal failure(s) detected (as described in the "Understanding POST Results" section).

Fatal failure(s) detected—POST stops when it encounters a fatal failure. If the POWER LED is amber and a port LED is blinking green, POST detected a fatal failure. The hub is not operational, but the blinking port LED indicates which test failed.

You should inform your system administrator if one or more nonfatal failures are detected. Contact your Cisco representative or reseller for support if any fatal failures are detected.

The "Understanding POST Results" section provides additional information, including the possible causes of nonfatal and fatal failures.

Installing Micro Hubs in a Stack

Up to four Micro Hubs can be stacked and connected through the rear panel UP and DOWN ports. Each hub comes with a stacking clip and a screw. Before using the clip, you must assemble the clip and the screw, as shown in .


Timesaver   If you are using only one hub, go directly to "Connecting the Power Cord" section.


Assembling the Stacking Clip

After pushing the screw into the stacking clip, use the clip as shown in .

Figure 2-2 Assembling the Stacking Clip and Fastener

Adding or Removing a Hub from a Stack

shows how to stack Micro Hubs, and shows how to remove them from a stack.

Figure 2-3 Stacking Compatible Hubs

To unstack hubs that are connected with the stacking clip, follow the instructions in .

Figure 2-4 Removing a Hub from the Stack


Caution    If the unit you are removing is a managed hub and there is no secondary managed hub in the stack, you lose manageability for the entire hub stack. If the removed managed hub is mounted between two operating units, the Ethernet segment is split into two separate segments when the stacking cables are disconnected.

For additional information about repeater types and collision domains, see "Repeater Types" on page A-1. "Ethernet Cable Specifications" on page B-3 provides additional information about Ethernet network guidelines.

Connecting the Stacking Cables

You can interconnect hubs via the stacking connectors on the rear panel of the hubs. These interconnected hubs then appear to the rest of the network and to the management interface as a single logical repeater.

Interconnecting hubs differs from cascaded hubs that are connected via the standard 10/100 ports on the rear of the hub. The connected hubs then appear to the rest of the network and to the management interface as two logical repeaters.


Note   The "Concepts" section provides additional information about repeater types, logical repeaters, collision domains, and other helpful concepts.


shows how to attach the stacking cables to a stack of Micro Hubs.

Figure 2-5 Connecting Micro Hubs in a Stack

Hub Stacking Guidelines

Use the following guidelines when connecting the stacking cables:

Install no more than four Micro Hubs in a stack, even if one or more hubs is powered down.

No more than two Cisco 1538M managed hubs can be in a stack. The upper management hub is the primary management hub; the lower is the secondary management hub.


Note   If you have a stack that has two management hubs and you remove one management hub from the stack, it will have the same IP address as the stack. Avoid IP conflict by changing the IP address of the removed management hub before you reuse it and connect it to another hub stack in the network.


The top hub always has its UP connector open, and the bottom hub always has its DOWN connector open.

Never connect an UP connector to an UP connector or a DOWN connector to a DOWN connector. UP always connects to DOWN, and DOWN always connects to UP.


Note   If you incorrectly stack the hubs, no electrical damage occurs; however, management functions might not perform properly, and erroneous management information might be created.


Align the cable connector pins with the stacking connector holes, and position the cable connector horizontally before slowly inserting it into the stacking connector.


Caution    Be sure that the cable connector is properly aligned with the stacking connector. Inserting the connector at an angle damages the pins, making the cable unusable.

Managing the Hub Stack

You need at least one Micro Hub per three interconnected hubs (one hub stack) if you want to manage the stack. A second Micro Hub in the stack can act as a redundant stack manager in case the primary manager fails.

If a hub stack has more than one management hub, the upper management hub in the stack is the primary management hub. The lower management hub is the secondary management hub.

To manage the hub stack, you can use the system information (such as the IP, CDP, and SNMP information) assigned to the primary management hub. The primary management hub also stores the port settings of each hub in the stack. If the primary management hub becomes inactive or is disconnected from the stack, the secondary management hub becomes the primary management hub and uses the same stack information.


Note   Do not install three or more Cisco 1538M hubs in a stack. No electrical damage occurs; however, management functions might not perform properly, and erroneous management information might be created.


If a stack has only one management hub and another management hub is added to the stack, the system information from the management hub that has the longest system-up time is used by the topmost management hub. This happens if the new management hub is added either above or below the preexisting management hub.

If you replace the only management hub in the stack with a different management hub, the stack will use the settings of the newly installed management hub.


Caution    If you are removing a management hub and there is no secondary management hub in the stack, you lose manageability for the entire hub stack. In addition, if the removed management hub is mounted between two operating hubs, you split the Ethernet segment into two separate segments when the stacking cables are disconnected.

For information on managing the hub stack through the hub manager, see the "Managing the Hub Segments" section.

Numbering Convention of Hubs in a Stack

The physical position of the hubs in the hub stack and the stacking cable connections between hubs determine how they appear to the management interface. The FastHub management interface uses a hub-numbering convention, assigning numbers from top to bottom—the hub at the top of the stack is Group 1, the hub below Group 1 is Group 2, and so on. If you have four hubs in a stack and you remove Group 3 and connect the stacking cable from Group 2 to Group 4, Group 4 is renumbered as Group 3.

Hot Swapping Micro Hubs

Micro Hubs can be added to or removed from the hub stack without powering down any hub in the stack. This function is referred to as hot swapping. The stack reconfigures itself in approximately 30 seconds. During this period, all packets received by the hub stack are dropped. However, the end-station protocols retransmit the lost packets; no connections are lost, and there is no degradation in network performance. If a management hub is present, all configured system parameters are retained; however, all network-related statistics are cleared.


Caution    If you are removing a management hub and there is no secondary management hub in the stack, you lose manageability for the entire hub stack. In addition, if the removed management hub is mounted between two operating hubs, you split the Ethernet segment into two separate segments when the stacking cables are disconnected.


Note   If you keep a hub interconnected to the stack but only power down that hub, the hubs above and below that powered-down hub will still communicate with each other. However, you will not be able to manage that hub, and it will not be displayed from the hub manager.



Note   If you have a stack that has two management hubs and you remove one management hub from the stack, it will have the same IP address as the stack. Avoid IP conflict by changing the IP address of the removed management hub before you reuse it and connect it to another hub stack in the network.


Connecting the Power Cord

Connect power and turn the hub on as shown in for each hub in the stack.


Warning   A voltage mismatch can cause equipment damage and may pose a fire hazard. If the voltage indicated on the label is different from the power outlet voltage, do not connect the hub to that receptacle.


Figure 2-6 Connecting the Power Cord

After turning the hub on, check the hub front panel to make sure that certain LEDs are on as shown in .

Figure 2-7 Checking the PWR LED


Warning   This product relies on the building's installation for short-circuit (overcurrent) protection. Ensure that a fuse or circuit breaker no larger than 120 VAC, 15A U.S. (240 VAC, 10A international) is used on the phase conductors (all current-carrying conductors).


Connecting Other Network Devices to the Micro Hubs

You can connect the following types of devices to the hub workstation ports labeled 1 through 8:

Network devices, such as PCs, workstations, routers, or servers

Compatible 10BaseT or 100BaseTX hubs and switches

This section describes how to connect these devices to the hub.

Connecting a PC, Workstation, Router, or Server

Connect network devices such as PCs, workstations, routers, or servers to the hub ports labeled 1 through 8, as shown in . The network device must have a 10BaseT or 100BaseTX network interface card (NIC) to connect to the Micro Hub.

For more information about what kind of Ethernet cable to use, see the "Ethernet Cable Specifications" on page B-3.


Note   If you plan to connect a switch or another hub to your Micro Hub, reserve port 5 to connect to other hubs and switches without requiring the use of a crossover cable.


Figure 2-8 Connecting a PC, Workstation, or Server

After connecting a network device to the hub, check the corresponding port LED (labeled 1 through 8) on the front panel. The color and blinking pattern of the LED (shown in ) indicates the activity for the corresponding hub port.

Figure 2-9 Checking the Port LEDs

Connecting Compatible Hubs and Switches to the Hub

Connect compatible 10/100-Mbps hubs or switches to the hub through port 5, as shown in .


Note   Hubs connected in this way cannot be managed by a Cisco 1538M in the same stack. A Cisco 1538M hub can only manage hubs connected through the stacking ports.


Figure 2-10 Connecting a Compatible 10/100-Mbps Hub or Switch

For more information about what kind of Ethernet cable to use, see the "Ethernet Cable Specifications" on page B-3.

After connecting a hub or switch to port 5, check the LED labeled 5 on the front panel (see ). The color and blinking pattern of the LED indicate activity for port 5.

Figure 2-11 Checking Port 5 LEDs and Activity

Connecting to the Console Port (Cisco 1538M Hubs)


Timesaver   This section applies only to the Cisco 1538M managed hub; the Cisco 1538 manageable hub does not have a console port.


To connect the RJ-45 console port of a managed hub to a management station or modem, you must use the supplied RJ-45-to-RJ-45 rollover console cable and the appropriate adapter and follow these steps.


Note   The rollover console cable and a RJ-45-to-DB-9 female DTE adapter are supplied with the hub. If your management station requires a different adapter—such as a RJ-45-to-DB-25 female DTE or RJ-45-to-DB-25 male DCE adapter—you must provide it.



Step 1 Configure the hub console port settings to match the management station or modem. These are the default settings of the console port:

9600 baud

8 data bits

1 stop bit

No parity

No flow control

You can change the console port characteristics of the hub from the web-based (see the "Changing the System Configuration" section) or by using the terminal command from the CLI.


Note   Make sure the settings of the console port and the management station or the modem match.


Step 2 Connect one end of the supplied rollover console cable to the console port, as shown in .


Caution   
Do not connect an actual telephone line, an ISDN line, or an Ethernet cable to this console port. Damage to the hub can result. Make sure you use the supplied RJ-45-to-RJ-45 rollover cable and adapters to connect the console port to the management station or modem.

Figure 2-12 Connecting a Managed Hub to a Terminal or PC

Step 3 Attach the appropriate adapter, such as the supplied RJ-45-to-DB-9 female DTE adapter (labeled Terminal), to a management station or modem.


Note   If you are connecting the hub to a Sun workstation (or to a management station with a female DB-25 serial connector), use a male-to-male gender changer to attach the supplied RJ-45-to-RJ-45 rollover cable and a RJ-45-to-DB-25 female DTE adapter to the management station.


Step 4 Connect the other end of the supplied rollover cable to the adapter.

Connector and cabling specifications for the console port are in the "."

Now that the hub is connected to a management station, you can assign IP information to the hub (see the "Assigning IP Information to a Cisco 1538M Hub" section).

Assigning IP Information to a Cisco 1538M Hub

After you install the hub and connect it to a management station, you can assign IP information to the hub. IP information identifies the hub to the network and is required to manage and monitor the hub through the Cisco 1538 Hub Manager, the CLI, or SNMP.

You can assign IP information to the hub by either:

Following the hub start-up prompts displayed from a terminal emulation program on your management station. This section provides information on using these start-up prompts.

or

Using Cisco ConfigMaker if your management station is a PC running Microsoft Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT 4.0. For information about Cisco ConfigMaker, refer to the Cisco ConfigMaker software.

You should contact your system administrator for the following information:

Hub IP address

Subnet mask (netmask)

Default gateway (router)

To assign IP information to the hub, follow these steps:


Step 1 From your management station, start the terminal emulation program.

After POST completes, the Continue with configuration dialog? prompt appears on the management station, and you can then follow the prompts to assign IP information to the hub. If the Continue with configuration dialog? prompt does not appear, see the "" chapter.

Step 2 From the terminal or PC, enter Y:

Continue with configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Y 

Step 3 Enter the IP address (for example: 10.1.105.20):

Enter IP address: 10.1.105.20 

Step 4 Enter the subnet mask (IP netmask) (for example: 255.255.255.0):

Enter IP netmask: 255.255.255.0 

Step 5 Enter the IP address of the default gateway (for example: 10.1.105.254):

Enter IP default gateway: 10.1.105.254

Note   If the management station from which the Cisco 1538 Hub Manager is used is not on the same IP subnet as the hub, you must also assign a default gateway (the router for the local subnet).


The following information is displayed:

The following configuration command script was created:
ip address 10.1.105.20 255.255.255.0
ip default-gateway 10.1.105.254
!
end 

Step 6 Enter Y:

Use this configuration? [yes/no]: Y 

The following information is displayed:

Building configuration...
Use the enabled mode `configuration' command to modify this 
configuration.

Press RETURN to get started.

Pressing Return opens a CLI session.

Step 7 Exit from the terminal session.

You can now use the hub with its default values or configure and monitor it by using the Cisco 1538 Hub Manager, the CLI, or SNMP and the MIB files.

Accessing the Management Interfaces for a Cisco 1538M

After you assign IP information to the hub, you can access the hub management interfaces. This section provides information for accessing the Cisco 1538 Hub Manager, the CLI, and SNMP and MIB files.

Accessing the Cisco 1538 Hub Manager

To access the hub manager, all you need is the IP information of the hub (and the password if one has been assigned). IP information for the hub is usually assigned when the hub is first started up after installation. (See the "Assigning IP Information to a Cisco 1538M Hub" section.)


Note   You can access the hub manager from a PC connected to one of the 10/100 ports. Therefore, make sure that you do not disable or otherwise misconfigure the port through which you are communicating with the hub. You might want to write down the port number to which you are connected. Make changes to the hub IP information with care.


To access the hub manager, follow these steps:


Step 1 Start Netscape Communicator (4.03 or higher) or Microsoft Internet Explorer (4.01 or higher).

Step 2 Ensure that the following browser features are enabled:

Java

JavaScript

Set the caching of pages to Every time in Communicator or
Every visit to the page
in Internet Explorer.

Step 3 Enter the IP address of the hub in the Location field if you are using Communicator (the Address field if you are using Internet Explorer) to display the hub manager (Figure 2-13).

Figure 2-13


Note   You can bookmark the hub IP address to retrieve the hub manager for later use. If you are using Communicator, choose the Communicator menu option, and select Bookmarks > Add Bookmark. If you are using Internet Explorer, choose the Favorites menu option, and select Add to Favorites. Do not use the right mouse button to bookmark the hub IP address; doing so only saves the specific frame (image) of the hub manager page.


Accessing the CLI

You can access the CLI

From a console terminal connected to the hub console port. For more information, see the "Connecting to the Console Port (Cisco 1538M Hubs)" section.

Through a Telnet session from a remote host by entering the telnet command and the name or IP address of the hub.

Through a Telnet session by clicking Telnet on the .

When you access the CLI and a password has been defined, the following prompt is displayed:

Cisco Systems Console
Enter Password:

Enter the password. The hostname> prompt is displayed after you enter the correct password.

For complete information about the CLI, refer to the Cisco 1538 Series Micro Hub 10/100 Command Reference.

Accessing the MIB Files through SNMP

You can access the hub MIB files through SNMP. The following MIB files contain variables that can be set or read to provide information about the hub and the traps generated by the hub.

RFC1213-MIB.my contains the MIB II (RFC 1213).

ETHERLIKE-MIB.my contains the Ethernet Transmission MIB (RFC 1643).

CISCO-CDP-MIB.my contains the CDP MIB.

SNMP-REPEATER-MIB.my contains the standard MIB for managing the hub.

RMON-MIB.my contains the RFC 1757 RMON (Groups 1, 2, 3, and 9). More information about RMON and the RMON groups is provided in the "Remote Monitoring" section.

CISCO-SIBU-SIMPLE-UPGRADE-MIB.my contains the MIB module for upgrading the firmware on Cisco low-end devices.

CISCO-SIBU-MANAGERS-MIB.my contains the MIB module for management interfaces on the Cisco 1538M hubs.

CISCO-SIBU-STACKABLE-DUAL-SPEED-HUB-MIB.my contains the MIB module that extends the REPEATER-MIB to manage Cisco low-end stackable repeater products.

If you are going to manage the hub by using SNMP and the MIB files, the Read and Write community strings need to be set. To do this, you can either

Use the default community strings

Read community string. The default is public.

Write community string. The default is private.

Assign community strings by using the or by using the snmp-server community command on the CLI.


Note   Wait approximately 30 seconds for the changes to be saved to permanent storage before turning off the hub, or the changes might not be saved.


You can obtain a copy of the MIB files in the following ways:

Using File Transfer Protocol (FTP) to access the ftp.cisco.com server.

Using Cisco Connection Online (CCO) to access the cisco.com server.

Using FTP to Access the MIB Files

To obtain a MIB file, follow these steps:


Step 1 Use FTP to access the server ftp.cisco.com.

Step 2 Log in with the username anonymous.

Step 3 Enter your e-mail name when prompted for the password.

Step 4 At the ftp> prompt, change directories to /pub/MIBs.

Step 5 Use the get README command to display the readme file listing available files.

Step 6 Use the get MIB_filename command to get a copy of the MIB file.

Using CCO to Access the MIB Files

To access the MIB files from CCO, click Software & Support to display the Software Center site.

CCO serves a wide variety of users through two interfaces that are updated and enhanced simultaneously: a character-based version and a multimedia version that resides on the World Wide Web (WWW). The character-based CCO supports Zmodem, Kermit, Xmodem, FTP, and Internet e-mail, and it is excellent for quick access to information over lower bandwidths. The WWW version of CCO provides richly formatted documents with photographs, figures, graphics, and video, as well as hyperlinks to related information.

You can access CCO in the following ways:

WWW:  http://www.cisco.com

WWW:  http://www-europe.cisco.com

WWW:  http://www-china.cisco.com

Telnet:  cco.cisco.com

Modem:  From North America, 408 526-8070; from Europe, 33 1 64 46 40 82. Use the following terminal settings: VT100 emulation; data bits: 8; parity: none; stop bits: 1; and connection rates up to 28.8 kbps.

For a copy of CCO's Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), contact cco-help@cisco.com. For additional information, contact cco-team@cisco.com.

Remote Monitoring

The Remote Monitoring (RMON) MIB is used by network managers to monitor remote devices. An RMON implementation consists of a software probe that continually collects statistics about a LAN and a management station that communicates with the probe. The probe transfers information to the management station on request or when a predefined threshold is crossed.

The hub supports four RMON groups () as defined in RFC 1757. Default statistic rows are created for each port when you start the hub. You can obtain information about the four supported groups by using any SNMP management application.

Table 2-1 RMON Groups and Their Functions

Group Name
Description

Statistics

This group collects traffic and error statistics for a specific interface. For example, you could use this group to determine how many error packets have been seen on a given port.

Statistics from this group can be used by the history group to record historical views of network performance. A statistics row is established by default for each hub port.

History

This group periodically samples the counters generated by the statistics group. This information can be used to establish baseline information regarding network activity. You can define the intervals you want to record information for, and you can define how many of the samples are to be stored.

Note   RMON statistics gathering has a maximum limit of 50 history buckets per historyControlTable entry.

Alarm

This group generates alarms according to user-defined thresholds. You could, for example, configure RMON to generate an alarm when alignment errors on a port exceeded a predefined limit. Rising and falling thresholds can be defined, and the events group can generate traps and automated responses based on the alarms.

Event

This group sends traps to the management station based on information (alarms) received from the alarm group.


Where to Go Next

Now that you have installed the hub and, if you have a managed hub, assigned IP information to the hub, continue to "," for configuration and monitoring information.