Cisco IE 2000 Switch Hardware Installation Guide
Overview
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 1.8MB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 7.8MB) | Feedback

Product Overview

Table Of Contents

Product Overview

Switch Models

Front Panel

10/100BASE-T Downlink Ports

Power over Ethernet Ports

10/100BASE-T Uplink Ports

10/100/1000BASE-T Uplink Ports

100 Mb/s SFP Module Uplink Slots

100/1000 Mb/s SFP Module Uplink Slots

Dual-Purpose Fast Ethernet Uplink Ports

Dual-Purpose Gigabit Ethernet Uplink Ports

Power Connectors

PoE Power Connector

Alarm Connector

Management Ports

LEDs

Express Setup LED

System LED

USB-Mini Console LED

Alarm LEDs

Power Status LEDs

Port Status LEDs

Dual-Purpose Port LEDs

PoE Status LED

Flash Memory Card

Rear Panel

Management Options

Network Configurations


Product Overview


This switch provides a rugged and secure switching infrastructure for harsh environments. It is suitable for industrial Ethernet applications, including factory automation, intelligent transportation systems (ITSs), substations, oil and gas installations, and other deployments in harsh environments.

You can connect this switch to office networking devices such as Cisco IP phones, Cisco Wireless Access Points workstations, and other devices such as servers, routers, and other switches. In industrial environments, you can connect any Ethernet-enabled industrial communication devices, including programmable logic controllers (PLCs), human-machine interfaces (HMIs), drives, sensors, video devices, traffic signal controllers, and intelligent electronic devices (IEDs).

You can mount the switch on a DIN rail in an industrial enclosure. Its components are designed to withstand extremes in temperature, vibration, and shock that are common in an industrial environment.

The chapter includes the following topics:

Switch Models

Front Panel

Rear Panel

Management Options

Network Configurations

Switch Models

Table 1-1 lists and describes the switch models.

Table 1-1 Switch Descriptions 

Model
Description
Software Image

Cisco IE-2000-4T-L

4 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 10/100BASE-T uplink ports

LAN Lite

Cisco IE-2000-4T-B

4 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 10/100BASE-T uplink ports

LAN Base

Cisco IE-2000-4T-G-L

4 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 10/100/1000BASE-T uplink ports

LAN Lite

Cisco IE-2000-4T-G-B

4 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 10/100/1000BASE-T uplink ports

LAN Base

Cisco IE-2000-4TS-L

4 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 100 Mb/s SFP (small form-factor pluggable) module uplink slots

LAN Lite

Cisco IE-2000-4TS-B

4 10/100BASE-T Ethernet ports
2 100 Mb/s SFP module uplink slots

LAN Base

Cisco IE-2000-4TS-G-L

4 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 100/1000 Mb/s SFP module uplink slots

LAN Lite

Cisco IE-2000-4TS-G-B

4 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 100/1000 Mb/s SFP module uplink slots

LAN Base

Cisco IE-2000-8TC-L

8 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 Fast Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

LAN Lite

Cisco IE-2000-8TC-B

8 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 Fast Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

LAN Base

Cisco IE-2000-8TC-G-L

8 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 Gigabit Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

LAN Lite

Cisco IE-2000-8TC-G-B

8 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 Gigabit Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

LAN Base

Cisco IE-2000-8TC-G-E

8 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 Gigabit Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

Supports the IEEE-1588 standard for synchronizing clocks. Can enable NAT by license upgrade.

LAN Base with 1588

Cisco IE-2000-8TC-G-N

8 10/100BASE-T downlink ports
2 Gigabit Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

Supports the IEEE-1588 standard for synchronizing clocks and Network Address Translation (NAT)

LAN Base with 1588 and NAT

Cisco IE-2000-16TC-L

16 10/100BASE-T downlink ports,

2 Fast Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

2 100 Mb/s SFP module uplink slots

LAN Lite

Cisco IE-2000-16TC-B

16 10/100BASE-T downlink ports

2 Fast Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

2 100 Mb/s SFP module uplink slots

LAN Base

Cisco IE-2000-16TC-G-L

16 10/100BASE-T downlink ports

2 Gigabit Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

2 100 Mb/s SFP module uplink slots

LAN Lite

Cisco IE-2000-16TC-G-E

16 10/100BASE-T downlink ports

2 Gigabit Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

2 100 Mb/s SFP module uplink slots

Supports the IEEE-1588 standard for synchronizing clocks. Can enable NAT by license upgrade.

LAN Base with 1588

Cisco IE-2000-16TC-G-N

16 10/100BASE-T downlink ports

2 Gigabit Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

Supports the IEEE-1588 standard for synchronizing clocks and Network Address Translation (NAT).

LAN Base with 1588 and NAT

Cisco IE-2000-16TC-G-X

16 10/100BASE-T downlink ports

2 Gigabit Ethernet uplink ports, and 2 100 Mb/s SFP module uplink slots

Supports the IEEE-1588 standard for synchronizing clocks.

Can enable NAT by license upgrade.

LAN Base with 1588 and conformal coat

Cisco IE-2000-16PTC-G-E

12 10/100BASE-T downlink ports

2 Gigabit Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

4 Power over Ethernet (PoE) ports

Note The four PoE ports can operate as PoE or as PoE+ if sufficient external power source is provided.

Supports the IEEE-1588 standard for synchronizing clocks.

Can enable NAT by license upgrade.

LAN Base with 1588

Cisco IE-2000-16PTC-G-L

12 10/100BASE-T downlink ports

2 Gigabit Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

4 Power over Ethernet (PoE) ports

Note The four PoE ports can operate as PoE or as PoE+ if sufficient external power source is provided.

LAN Lite

Cisco IE-2000-16PTC-G-NX

12 10/100BASE-T downlink ports

2 Gigabit Ethernet dual-purpose uplink ports

4 Power over Ethernet (PoE) ports

Note The four PoE ports can operate as PoE or as PoE+ if sufficient external power source is provided.

Note Supports the IEEE-1588 standard for synchronizing clocks and Network Address Translation (NAT).

LAN Base with 1588 and conformal coat


Front Panel

This section describes the front panel components. See Table 1-1.

10/100BASE-T Ethernet ports

10/100/1000 uplink ports (available on some models).

Dual-purpose ports (available on some models).

SFP module slots (available on some models).

PoE/PoE+ ports (available on some models). See Power over Ethernet Ports.

RJ-45 console port

USB mini-Type B (console) port

LEDs

Power connectors

Alarm connector

Flash memory card slot

The following figures depict the components available on the various models in this product family. Not all models are illustrated.

Figure 1-1 Cisco IE-2000-4TS-L Front Panel View

1
10/100 Ethernet ports (downlink ports)
6
Power connector DC-B
2

SFP module slots (uplink ports)

7
Alarm connector
3
USB mini-Type B (console) port
8
Protective ground connection
4
RJ-45 console port
9
Flash memory card slot
5
Power connector DC-A
   

Figure 1-2 Cisco IE-2000-8TC-L Front Panel

1
10/100 Ethernet ports (downlink ports)
6
Power connector DC-B
2
Dual-purpose ports (uplink ports)
7
Alarm connector
3
USB mini-Type B (console) port
8
Protective ground connection
4
RJ-45 console port
9
Flash memory card slot
5
Power connector DC-A
   

Figure 1-3 Cisco IE-2000-16TC-L Front Panel View

1
10/100 Ethernet ports (downlink ports)
6
Power connector DC-B
2
Dual-purpose ports (uplink ports)
7
Alarm connector
3
USB mini-Type B (console) port
8
Protective ground connection
4
RJ-45 console port
9
Flash memory card slot
5
Power connector DC-A
10
SFP module slots

Figure 1-4 Cisco IE-2000-16PTC-G-E Switch Front Panel View

1
10/100 Ethernet ports (downlink ports)
6
Power connector DC-B
2
Dual-purpose ports (uplink ports)
7
Alarm connector
3
USB mini-Type B (console) port
8
Protective ground connection
4
RJ-45 console port
9
Flash memory card slot
5
Power connector DC-A
10
PoE power connector

10/100BASE-T Downlink Ports

You can set the 10/100BASE-T downlink ports to operate at 10 or 100 Mb/s in full-duplex or half-duplex mode. You can also set these ports for speed and duplex autonegotiation in compliance with IEEE 802.3AB. (The default setting is autonegotiate.) When set for autonegotiation, the port senses the speed and duplex settings of the attached device and advertises its own capabilities. If the connected device also supports autonegotiation, the switch port negotiates the best connection (that is, the fastest line speed that both devices support, and full-duplex transmission if the attached device supports it) and configures itself accordingly. In all cases, the attached device must be within 328 feet (100 meters). 100BASE-TX traffic requires Category 5 cable. 10BASE-T traffic can use Category 3 or Category 4 cables.

When connecting the switch to workstations, servers, routers, and Cisco IP phones, make sure that the cable is a straight-through cable.

You can use the mdix auto interface configuration command in the command-line interface (CLI) to enable the automatic medium-dependent interface crossover (auto-MDIX) feature. When the auto-MDIX feature is enabled, the switch detects the required cable type for copper Ethernet connections and configures the interfaces accordingly. For configuration information for this feature, see the switch software configuration guide or the switch command reference.

Power over Ethernet Ports

On certain models of the IE 2000 switch, four of the 10/100BASE-T ports are available as PoE ports. The four ports can operate as PoE (IEEE 802.3af) ports or can be configured to operate as PoE+ (IE 802.at) ports. Each PoE port requires 15.4 Watts of power while PoE+ requires 30 Watts. A 54VDC /1.2Amp power source (65W) can support 4 PoE ports or 2 PoE+ ports.

Cable lengths of up to 328 ft (100 m) are supported.

10/100BASE-T Uplink Ports

The IEEE 802.3u 10/100BASE-T uplink ports provide full-duplex 10, 100 Mb/s connectivity over Category 5 unshielded twisted pair (UTP) copper cabling. The default setting is autonegotiate. The cable can be up to 100 m (0.1 km) in length.

10/100/1000BASE-T Uplink Ports

The IEEE 802.3u 10/100/1000BASE-T uplink ports provide full-duplex 10, 100 or 1000 Mb/s connectivity over Category 5 unshielded twisted pair (UTP) copper cabling. The default setting is autonegotiate. The cable can be up to 100 m (0.1 km) in length.

100 Mb/s SFP Module Uplink Slots

The IEEE 802.3u 100 Mb/s SFP module uplink slots provide full-duplex 100 Mb/s connectivity over multi-mode (MM) fiber cables or single-mode (SM) fiber cables. These ports use a SFP fiber-optic transceiver module that accepts a dual LC connector. Check the SFP specifications for the cable type and length.

100/1000 Mb/s SFP Module Uplink Slots

The IEEE 802.3u 100 Mb/s SFP module uplink slots provide full-duplex 100 or 1000 Mb/s connectivity over multi-mode (MM) fiber cables or single-mode (SM) fiber cables. These ports use a SFP fiber-optic transceiver module that accepts a dual LC connector. Check the SFP specifications for the cable type and length.

Dual-Purpose Fast Ethernet Uplink Ports

You can configure the dual-purpose Fast Ethernet uplink ports on the switch as either 10/100BASE-T ports or as 100 Mb/s SFP-module ports. You can set the 10/100 ports to autonegotiate, or you can configure them as fixed 10 or 100 Mb/s ports.

By default, the switch selects the medium for each dual-purpose port (10/100BASE-T or SFP). When a link is achieved on one media type, the switch disables the other media type until the active link goes down. If links are active on both media, the SFP-module port has priority, but you can use the media-type interface configuration command to manually designate the port as an RJ-45 port or an SFP port.

You can configure the speed and duplex settings consistent with the selected media type. For information on configuring interfaces, see the switch software configuration guide.

Dual-Purpose Gigabit Ethernet Uplink Ports

You can configure the dual-purpose Gigabit Ethernet uplink ports on the switch as either 10/1001000BASE-T ports or as 100/1000 Mb/s SFP-module ports. You can set the 10/100/1000BASE-T ports to autonegotiate, or you can configure them as fixed 10, 100, or 1000 Mb/s (Gigabit) Ethernet ports.

By default, the switch selects the medium for each dual-purpose port (10/100/1000BASE-T or SFP). When a link is achieved on one media type, the switch disables the other media type until the active link goes down. If links are active on both media, the SFP-module port has priority, but you can use the media-type interface configuration command to manually designate the port as an RJ-45 port or an SFP port.

You can configure the speed and duplex settings consistent with the selected media type. For information on configuring interfaces, see the switch software configuration guide.

SFP Modules

The SFP modules are switch Ethernet SFP modules that provide connections to other devices. These field-replaceable transceiver modules provide the uplink interfaces. The modules have LC connectors for fiber-optic connections.


Note The Cisco IE 2000 switch does not support copper SFP modules.


You can use any combination of the supported SFP modules:

Table 1-2 Supported SFP Models

Type of SFP Module
Model

Rugged and Industrial SFPs

-40 to 185°F (-40 to 85°C)

GLC-SX-MM-RGD with digital optical monitoring (DOM) support

GLC-LX-SM-RGD with DOM support

GLC-ZX-SM-RGD with DOM support

Commercial SFPs

32 to 158°F (0 to 70°C)

GLC-SX-MM

GLC-LH-SM

GLC-BX-U with DOM support

GLC-BX-D with DOM support

CWDM-SFP with DOM support

DWDM-SFP with DOM support

Extended temperature SFPs

23 to 185°F (-5 to 85°C)

SFP-GE-S with DOM support

SFP-GE-L with DOM support

SFP-GE-Z with DOM support

GLC-SX-SMD

GLC-LH-SMD

GLC-EX-SMD


For the most up-to-date list of supported SFP models for Cisco Industrial Ethernet switches, see http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/interfaces_modules/transceiver_modules/compatibility/matrix/OL_6981.html#wp138176

For installation instructions, see your SFP module documentation and the "Installing and Removing SFP Modules" section.

For cable specifications, see the "SFP Module Cables" section.

Power Connectors

You connect the DC power to the switch through the front panel connectors. The switch has a dual-feed DC power supply; two connectors provide primary and secondary DC power (DC-A and DC-B). The DC power connectors are near the top right of the front panel. See Figure 1-1. Each power connector has an LED status indicator.

The switch power connectors are attached to the switch chassis. Each power connector has screw terminals for terminating the DC power (see Figure 1-5). All connectors are attached to the switch front panel with the provided captive screws.

The power connector labeling is on the panel. The positive DC power connection is labeled "+", and the return connection is labeled "-".

Figure 1-5 Power Connector

The switch can operate with a single power source or with dual power sources. When both power sources are operational, the switch draws power from the DC source with the higher voltage. If one of the two power sources fail, the other continues to power the switch.

PoE Power Connector

The IE 2000 switch models with PoE capability (IE-2000-16PTC-G-E, IE-2000-16PTC-G-L, and IE-2000-16PTC-G-NX) are equipped with an additional DC input terminal block. This DC terminal block allows the connection of a second power supply (see the "Power over Ethernet Ports" section), or a second input from site source DC power to operate the PoE ports. The PoE terminal block accepts 48 VDC or 54 VDC at 2.5 A.

Alarm Connector

You connect the alarm signals to the switch through the alarm connector. The switch supports two alarm inputs and one alarm output relay. The alarm connector is on the bottom right of the front panel. See Figure 1-2.

The alarm connector provides six alarm wire connections. The connector is attached to the switch front panel with the provided captive screws.

Figure 1-6 Alarm Connector

Both alarm input circuits can sense if the alarm input is open or closed. The alarm inputs can be activated for environmental, power supply, and port status alarm conditions. From the CLI, you can configure each alarm input as an open or closed contact.

The alarm output circuit is a relay with a normally open and a normally closed contact. The switch is configured to detect faults that are used to energize the relay coil and change the state on both of the relay contacts: normally open contacts close, and normally closed contacts open. The alarm output relay can be used to control an external alarm device, such as a bell or a light.

See the switch software configuration guide for instructions on configuring the alarm relays.

For more information about the alarm connector, see "Cable and Connectors."

Management Ports

You can connect the switch to a PC running Microsoft Windows or to a terminal server through either the RJ-45 console port or the USB mini-Type B console port, also referred to as the USB-mini console port. These ports use the following connectors:

RJ-45 console port uses an RJ-45-to-DB-9 female cable.

USB-mini console port (5-pin connector) uses a USB Type A-to-5-pin mini-Type B cable.

The USB-mini console interface speeds are the same as the RJ-45 console interface speeds.

To use the USB-mini console port, you must install the Cisco Windows USB device driver on the device that is connected to the USB-mini console port and that is running Microsoft Windows.


Note For information about downloading the Cisco USB device driver, see the "Installing the Cisco Microsoft Windows USB Device Driver" section.


With the Cisco Windows USB device driver, connecting and disconnecting the USB cable from the console port does not affect Windows HyperTerminal operations. Mac OS X or Linux require no special drivers.


Note The 5-pin mini-Type B connectors resemble the 4-pin mini-Type B connectors, but they are not compatible. Use only the 5-pin mini-Type B. See Figure 1-7.


Figure 1-7 USB Mini-Type B Port

The configurable inactivity timeout reactivates the RJ-45 console port if the USB-mini console port is activated, but no input activity occurs for a specified time period. When the USB-mini console port deactivates due to a timeout, you can restore its operation by disconnecting and reconnecting the USB cable. For information on using the CLI to configure the USB-mini console interface, see the switch software guide.

LEDs

You can use the LEDs to monitor the switch status, activity, and performance. Figure 1-8 and Figure 1-9 show the front panel LEDs.

Figure 1-8 LEDs on the Cisco IE 2000 Switch

1
Alarm LEDs
6
Power connector DC-B LED
2
USB mini-Type B (console) port LED
7
10/100BASE-T downlink port LEDs
3
Express Setup LED
8
SFP module slot LEDs
4
System LED
9
Dual-purpose uplink port LEDs
5
Power connector DC-A LED
   


Note On IE 2000 switches with PoE support, the two SFP ports and the associated LEDs are replaced by a PoE DC-input terminal block and a PoE LED. See Table 1-10 for the PoE LED colors and meanings.


Express Setup LED

The Express Setup LED displays the express setup mode for the initial configuration. Table 1-3 lists the LED colors and their meanings.

Table 1-3 Setup LED 

Color
Setup Status

Off (dark)

Switch is configured as a managed switch.

Solid green

Switch is operating normally.

Blinking green

Switch is in initial setup, in recovery, or initial setup is incomplete.

Solid red

Switch failed to start initial setup or recovery because there is no available switch port to which to connect the management station. Disconnect a device from a switch port, and then press the Express Setup button.


System LED

The System LED shows whether the system is receiving power and is functioning properly.

Table 1-4 lists the system LED colors and their meanings.

Table 1-4 System LED  

Color
System Status

Off

System is not powered on.

Blinking green

Boot fast is in progress.

Green

System is operating normally.

Red

Switch is not functioning properly.


USB-Mini Console LED

The USB-mini console LED shows which console port is in use. See Figure 1-8 for the LED location.

If you connect a cable to a console port, the switch automatically uses that port for console communication. If you connect two console cables, the USB-mini console port has priority. Table 1-5 describes the system LED colors and their meanings.

Table 1-5 USB-Mini Console Port LED

Color
Description

Green

USB-mini console port is active.

RJ-45 console port LED is not active.

Off

Port is not active.

RJ-45 console port is active.


Alarm LEDs

Table 1-6 and Table 1-7 list the alarm LED colors and their meanings.

Table 1-6 Alarm OUT Status LED 

Color
System Status

Off

Alarm OUT is not configured, or the switch is off.

Green

Alarm OUT is configured, no alarm detected.

Blinking red

Switch has detected a major alarm.

Red

Switch has detected a minor alarm.


Table 1-7 Alarm IN1 and IN2 Status LEDs

Color
System Status

Off

Alarm IN1 or IN2 not configured.

Green

Alarm IN1 or IN2 configured, no alarm detected.

Blinking red

Major alarm detected.

Red

Minor alarm detected.


Power Status LEDs

The switch can operate with one or two DC power sources. Each DC input has an associated LED that shows the status of the corresponding DC input. If power is present on the circuit, the LED is green. If power is not present, the LED color depends on the alarm configuration. If alarms are configured, the LED is red when power is not present; otherwise, the LED is off.

If the switch has dual power sources, the switch draws power from the power source with the higher voltage. If one of the DC sources fails, the alternate DC source powers the switch, and the corresponding power status LED is green. The power status for the failed DC source is either off or red, depending on the alarm configuration.

Table 1-8 lists the power status LED colors and meanings.

Table 1-8 Power Status LEDs 

Color
System Status

Green

Power is present on the associated circuit, system is operating normally.

Off

Power is not present on the circuit, or the system is not powered up.

Red

Power is not present on the associated circuit, and the power supply alarm is configured.



Note The Power A and Power B LEDs show that power is not present on the switch if the power input drops below the low valid level. The power status LEDs only show that power is present if the voltage at the switch input exceeds the valid level.


For information about the power LED colors during the boot fast sequence, see the "Verifying Switch Operation" section.

Port Status LEDs

Each 10/100BASE-T downlink port, 10/100BASE-T uplink port, 10/100/1000BASE-T uplink port, dual-purpose uplink port, and SFP Module uplink slot has a port status LED, also called a port LED, as shown in Figure 1-8 and Figure 1-9. Table 1-9 displays LED information about the switch and the individual ports.

Table 1-9 Port Status LEDs 

Color
System Status
Off
No link.
Solid green
Link present.
Blinking green
Activity. Port is sending or receiving data.
Alternating green-amber
Link fault. Error frames can affect connectivity, and errors such as excessive collisions, CRC errors, and alignment and jabber errors are monitored for a link-fault indication.
Solid amber
Port is not forwarding. The port was disabled by management, an address violation, or STP.
Note After a port is reconfigured, the port LED can remain amber for up to 30 seconds while STP checks the switch for possible loops.

Dual-Purpose Port LEDs

Figure 1-9 shows the LEDs on a dual-purpose port. You can configure each port as either a 10/100/1000BASE-T port through the RJ-45 connector or as an SFP module, but not both at the same time. The LEDs show how the port is being used (Ethernet or SFP module).

The LED colors have the same meanings as described in Table 1-9.

Figure 1-9 Dual-Purpose Port LEDs

1

Dual-purpose port LEDs


PoE Status LED

The PoE STATUS LED is located on the front panel of the IE 2000 switch models that are equipped with PoE ports.The LED displays the functionality and status of the PoE ports. The LED colors and meanings are listed in Table 1-10.

Table 1-10 PoE Status LED Colors and Meanings

Color
PoE Status

Off

PoE is off. If the powered device is receiving power from a non-PoE power source, the port LED is off even if the powered device is connected to the switch port.

Green

PoE is on. The port LED is green only when the PoE port is providing power.

Alternating green and amber

PoE is denied because providing power to the powered device will exceed the switch power capacity.

Flashing amber

PoE is off due to a fault.


Caution Noncompliant cabling or powered devices can cause a PoE port fault. Use only standard-compliant cabling to connect Cisco prestandard IP Phones and wireless access points or IEEE 802.3af-compliant devices. You must remove any cable or device that causes a PoE fault.

Amber

PoE for the port is disabled. (PoE is enabled by default.)


Flash Memory Card

The switch supports a flash memory card that makes it possible to replace a failed switch without reconfiguring the new switch. The slot for the flash memory card is on the front of the switch. See Figure 1-10.

The flash card is hot swappable and can be accessed on the front panel. A cover protects the flash card and holds the card firmly in place. The cover is hinged and closed with a captive screw. This prevents the card from coming loose and protects against shock and vibration.


Note For more information on inserting and removing the flash memory card, see the "Installing or Removing the Flash Memory Card (Optional)" section.


Figure 1-10 Flash Memory Card Slot


Note The replacement SD card part number is SD-IE-1GB.


Rear Panel

The rear panel of the switch has a latch for installation on a DIN rail. See Figure 1-11. The latch is spring-loaded to move down to position the switch over a DIN rail and return to the original position to secure the switch to a DIN rail.

Figure 1-11 Cisco IE 2000 Switch Rear Panel

1

Latch


Management Options

The switch supports these management options:

Cisco Network Assistant

Cisco Network Assistant is a PC-based network management GUI application optimized for LANs of small- and medium-sized businesses. Using the GUI, you can configure and manage switch clusters or standalone switches. Cisco Network Assistant is available at no cost and can be downloaded from this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps5931/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

For information on starting the Cisco Network Assistant application, see the Getting Started with Cisco Network Assistant guide on Cisco.com.

Device Manager

You can use Device Manager, which is in the switch memory, to manage individual and standalone switches. This web interface offers quick configuration and monitoring. You can access Device Manager from anywhere in your network through a web browser. For more information, see the getting started guide and the Device Manager online help.

Cisco IOS CLI

The switch CLI is based on Cisco IOS software and is enhanced to support desktop-switching features. You can fully configure and monitor the switch. You can access the CLI either by connecting your management station directly to the switch management port, or a console port, or by using Telnet from a remote management station. See the switch command reference on Cisco.com for more information.

Cisco Prime LAN Management Solution 4.2

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/net_mgmt/ciscoworks_lan_management_solution/4.2/device_support/table/lms42sdt.html#Cisco IE 2000 Series Switches

SNMP network management

You can manage switches from a SNMP-compatible management station that is running platforms such as HP OpenView or SunNet Manager. The switch supports a comprehensive set of Management Information Base (MIB) extensions and four Remote Monitoring (RMON) groups. See the switch software configuration guide on Cisco.com and the documentation that came with your SNMP application for more information.

Common Industrial Protocol

The Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) management objects are supported. The Cisco IE 2000 can be managed by CIP-based management tools, allowing the user to manage an entire industrial automation system with one tool.

PROFINET TCP/IP and RT

This switch supports PROFINET TCP/IP and RT and can be managed by Siemens' automation software such as STEP 7.

Network Configurations

See the switch software configuration guide on Cisco.com for network configuration concepts and examples of using the switch to create dedicated network segments and interconnecting the segments through Gigabit Ethernet connections.