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Release Notes for Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 for Cisco IOS Release 12.0W5

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Release Notes for Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 for Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27)

Table Of Contents

Release Notes for Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 for Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27)

Contents

Introduction

System Requirements

Memory Defaults

Hardware Supported

Features Supported

Features Not Supported

Determining the Software Version

Version and Part Number

New Features and Changed Information

Features in Release 12.0(25)W5(27d)

Features in Release 12.0(25)W5(27c)

Features in Release 12.0(25)W5(27b)

Features in Release 12.0(25)W5(27a)

Features in Release 12.0(25)W5(27)

Features in Release 12.0(18)W5(22b)

New Features in 12.0(18)W5(22a)

Local Proxy ARP

RADIUS Server

CEF Load Balancing on Gigabit Ethernet Ports

New Features in 12.0(14)W5(20)

New Features in 12.0(10)W5(18e)

New Features in 12.0(7)W5(15d)

New Features in 12.0(7)WX5(15a)

Limitations and Restrictions

Caveats

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27d)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27d)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27c)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27c)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27b)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27b)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(18)W5(22b)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(18)W5(22b)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(18)W5(22a)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(18)W5(22a)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(14)W5(20)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(14)W5(20)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(10)W5(18e)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(10)W5(18e)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(7)W5(15d)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(7)W5(15d)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(7)Wx5(15a)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(7)Wx5(15a)

Error Messages

Related Documentation

Service and Support

Software Configuration Tips on the Cisco TAC Home Page

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco.com

Ordering Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco Technical Support Website

Submitting a Service Request

Definitions of Service Request Severity

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information


Release Notes for Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 for Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27)


September 12, 2005

Current Release:
12.0(25)W5(27d)

Previous release: 12.0(25)W5(27c), 12.0(25)W5(27b), 12.0(25)W5(27a), 12.0(25)W5(27), 12.0(18)W5(22b), 12.0(18)W5(22a), 12.0(14)W5(20), 12.0(10)W5(18e), 12.0(7)W5(15d)

This publication describes the current Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switches software features and caveats for Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27d).

Contents

This publication contains the following sections:

Introduction

Version and Part Number

System Requirements

New Features and Changed Information

Limitations and Restrictions

Caveats

Error Messages

Related Documentation

Service and Support

Obtaining Documentation

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Introduction

The Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers are high-performance Layer 3 switch routers that share the same software image. The Catalyst 2948G-L3 is a multiprotocol 10/100/1000 Ethernet switch router. The Catalyst 4908G-L3 is a multiprotocol Gigabit Ethernet switch router.

A Layer 3 switch router performs the following three major functions:

Packet switching

Route processing

Intelligent network services

Compared to other routers, Layer 3 switch routers process more packets faster by using application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) hardware instead of microprocessor-based engines. Layer 3 switch routers also improve network performance with two software functions, route processing and intelligent network services.

System Requirements

This section describes the system requirements for Release 12.0(25)W5(27d) and includes the following sections:

Memory Defaults

Hardware Supported

Features Supported

Features Not Supported

Determining the Software Version

Version and Part Number

Memory Defaults

Table 1 lists the default Flash and DRAM memory defaults for the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers.

Table 1 Default Memory by Platform

Layer 3 Switch Router
Flash Memory
DRAM

Catalyst 2948G-L3

16 MB

64 MB

Catalyst 4908G-L3

16 MB

64 MB


Hardware Supported

Table 2 lists the interfaces that the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and the Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers support.

Table 2 Interfaces Supported by Platform

Layer 3 Switch Routers
Interface Types
No. of Ports

Catalyst 2948G-L3

10/100 Mbps Fast Ethernet—UTP

48

1 Gbps Gigabit Ethernet

2

Catalyst 4908G-L3

1 Gbps Gigabit Ethernet

8


Features Supported

Table 3 lists the software features of the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers.

Table 3 Feature Set for the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 Switch Routers 

Layer 1 Features

10/100BASE-TX half duplex and full duplex (Catalyst 2948G-L3 only)

1000BASE-SX,-LX, and long haul (-LX/LH, -ZX) full duplex

Layer 2 Bridging Features

Layer 2 transparent bridging

Layer 2 MAC1 learning, aging, and switching by hardware

Spanning Tree Protocol (IEEE 802.1D) per bridge group

Maximum of 16 active bridge groups supported

Up to 4000 MAC addresses

Integrated routing and bridging (IRB)

VLAN2 features

ISL3 -based VLAN trunking

IEEE 802.1Q-based VLAN trunking

Layer 3 Routing, Switching, and Forwarding

IP, IPX, and IP multicast routing and switching between Ethernet ports

Constrained multicast flooding (CMF)

QoS-based forwarding based on IP precedence

Load balancing among equal cost paths, based on source and destination IP and IPX4 addresses

CEF5 load balancing on Gigabit Ethernet ports using tunnel and universal load balancing algorithms

Layer 2 entries, IP routing, IP multicast routing, and Novell IPX routing share the 24 KB CAM6 on the Catalyst 2948G-L3 switch router and the 32 KB CAM on the Catalyst 4908G-L3switch router

Up to 18,000 IP routes

Up to 20,000 IP host entries

Up to 20,000 IPX routes

Up to 20,000 IPX host entries

Up to 12,000 IP multicast route entries

Access Control Lists (Gigabit Ethernet ports)

RADIUS7 server support

IP uplink redirect

Supported Routing Protocols

RIP8 and RIP II

IGRP9

EIGRP10

OSPF11

IPX RIP and EIGRP

PIM12 —sparse and dense mode

Secondary addressing

Static routes

Classless interdomain routing (CIDR)

Local Proxy ARP13

BGP (Border Gateway Protocol)

Bundling of up to four FEC ports

Fast EtherChannel (FEC) Features (Catalyst 2948G-L3 only)

Load balancing among equal cost paths, based on source and destination IP and IPX14 addresses

CEF15 load balancing on Gigabit Ethernet ports using tunnel and universal load balancing algorithms

Load sharing for bridged traffic based on MAC address

ISL on the FEC

Fast EtherChannel (FEC) Features (Catalyst 2948G-L3 only) (continued)

IRB on the FEC

IEEE 802.1Q trunking on the FEC

Up to 16 active FEC port channels

Note The Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch router does not have Fast Ethernet interfaces, which can be assigned to an EtherChannel.

 
 
Gigabit EtherChannel (GEC) Features

Bundling of the two Gigabit Ethernet ports on the Catalyst 2948G-L3 switch router and up to four active GEC port channels on the Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch router

Load balancing among equal cost paths, based on source and destination IP and IPX16 addresses

CEF17 load balancing on Gigabit Ethernet ports using tunnel and universal load balancing algorithms

Load sharing for bridge traffic based on MAC address

ISL suppported on the external GEC

IRB on the GEC

IEEE 802.1Q trunking on the GEC

One active GEC18 port channel on the Catalyst 2948G-L3 switch router and up to four active GEC port channels on the Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch router

Additional Protocols and Features

Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) support on Ethernet ports

Cisco Group Management Protocol (CGMP) server support

DHCP19 relay

HSRP20 over 10/100 Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, FEC, GEC, and Bridge Virtual Interface (BVI)

ICMP21

IGMP22

SAP and IPX SAP23 filtering

IRB24 routing mode support

SNMP25

Per-port QoS26 rate-limiting and shaping

1 MAC = Media Access Control

2 VLAN = Virtual LAN

3 ISL = Inter-Switch Link

4 IPX = Internet Packet Exchange

5 CEF = Cisco Express Forwarding

6 CAM = content addressable memory

7 RADIUS=Remote Authentication Dial-in User Service

8 RIP = Routing Information Protocol

9 IGRP = Interior Gateway Routing Protocol

10 EIGRP = Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol

11 OSPF = Open Shortest Path First

12 PIM = Protocol Independent Multicast

13 ARP = Address Resolution Protocol

14 IPX = Internet Packet Exchange

15 CEF = Cisco Express Forwarding

16 IPX = Internet Packet Exchange

17 CEF = Cisco Express Forwarding

18 GEC = Gigabit EtherChannel

19 DHCP = Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

20 HSRP = Hot Standby Router Protocol

21 ICMP = Internet Control Message Protocol

22 IGMP = Internet Group Management Protocol

23 IPX SAP = Internet Packet Exchange Service Advertisement Protocol

24 IRB = Integrated Routing and Bridging Protocol

25 SNMP = Simple Network Management Protocol

26 QoS = Quality of Service


Features Not Supported

Table 4 lists some of the features not supported on the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and the Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers.

Table 4 Features Not Supported on the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and the Catalyst 4908G-L3 Switch Routers

Features Not Supported

Layer 2 source MAC address filtering with standard Access Control List (ACL)

User Datagram Protocol (UDP) turbo flooding

Port-based snooping (SPAN)

DEC spanning tree

Per packet load balancing

AppleTalk 1 and 2 routing

AppleTalk Routing Table Maintenance Protocol (RTMP)

AppleTalk Update-based Routing Protocol (AURP)

CGMP over BVI

Policy Base Routing (PBR)

Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE)

PIM over tunnel interfaces


Determining the Software Version

The Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers share the same software version. To determine the version of the Cisco IOS software currently running on your switch router, log in to the switch router and enter the show version EXEC command.

Version and Part Number

Table 5 lists the features and license numbers for each platform.

Table 5 Features and License Numbers by Platform

Platform
Features Included
License Number

Catalyst 2948G-L3

OSPF, IGRP, EIGRP

FR2948GL3-IP

Catalyst 2948G-L3

IPX

FR2948GL3-IPX

Catalyst 4908G-L3

IPX

FR4908GL3-IPX


New Features and Changed Information

This section lists the new features available in each release.

Features in Release 12.0(25)W5(27d)

There are no new features in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27d).

Features in Release 12.0(25)W5(27c)

There are no new features in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27c).

Features in Release 12.0(25)W5(27b)

There are no new features in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27b).

Features in Release 12.0(25)W5(27a)

There are no new features in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27a).

Features in Release 12.0(25)W5(27)

There are no new features in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27).

Features in Release 12.0(18)W5(22b)

There are no new features in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(18)W5(22b).

The 12.0(18)W5(22b) release contains important fixes. If you are currently running 12.0(18)W5(22a) or any earlier release you should migrate to the 12.0(18)W5(22b) release.

New Features in 12.0(18)W5(22a)

Software release 12.0(18)W5(22a) supports the following new features:

Local Proxy ARP

RADIUS Server

CEF Load Balancing on Gigabit Ethernet Ports

Local Proxy ARP

The local proxy ARP feature allows the route processor to respond to ARP requests for IP addresses within a subnet where normally no routing is required. With the local proxy ARP feature enabled, the route processor responds to all ARP requests for IP addresses within the subnet and forwards all traffic between hosts in the subnet. Use this feature only on subnets where hosts are intentionally prevented from communicating directly by the configuration on the switch to which they are connected.

The local proxy ARP feature is disabled by default. Use the ip local-proxy-arp interface configuration command to enable the local proxy ARP feature on an interface. Use the no ip local-proxy-arp interface configuration command to disable the feature. ICMP redirects are disabled on interfaces where the local proxy ARP feature is enabled.

To use the local proxy ARP feature, the IP proxy ARP feature must be enabled. The IP proxy ARP feature is enabled by default. Refer to the Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Network Protocols Configuration Guide Part 1, "IP Addressing and Services," "Configuring IP Addressing," "Configure Address Resolution Methods," at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios120/12cgcr/np1_c/1cprt2/1cipadr.htm

RADIUS Server

The RADIUS feature is a distributed client/server system that secures networks against unauthorized access. In the Cisco implementation, RADIUS clients run on Cisco routers and send authentication requests to a central RADIUS server that contains all user authentication and network service access information.

RADIUS is a fully open protocol, distributed in source code format, that can be modified to work with any security system currently available on the market.

Cisco supports RADIUS under its AAA security paradigm. RADIUS can be used with other AAA security protocols, such as TACACS+, Kerberos, or local username lookup. RADIUS is supported on all Cisco platforms. Refer to the Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Security Configuration Guide, "Security Server Protocols," "Configuring RADIUS," at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios120/12cgcr/secur_c/scprt2/scrad.htm

CEF Load Balancing on Gigabit Ethernet Ports

CEF load balancing is based on a combination of source and destination packet information; it allows you to optimize resources by distributing traffic over multiple paths for transferring data to a destination.

You can configure CEF load balancing on a per-destination basis. Load distortions may occur across multiple switch routers when the same CEF load balancing algorithm is used on every switch router. You can resolve these distortions by selecting a specific CEF load balancing algorithm based on your network environment.

New Features in 12.0(14)W5(20)

No new features were added to the 12.0(14)W5(20) release.

New Features in 12.0(10)W5(18e)

The Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers support BGP.

Layer 3 switching software on the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers features ACLs for Gigabit Ethernet ports. The primary function of an ACL is to provide network control and security, allowing you to filter packet flow into or out of the switch router interface.

Layer 3-switching software also supports IEEE 802.1Q bridging over Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, FEC, GEC and BVI. The switch router can be deployed in environments with the 802.1Q trunking protocol and can bridge between ISL and 802.1Q stations.

The Catalyst 2948G-L3 switch router supports IP uplink redirect. IP uplink redirect enables traffic between Fast Ethernet interfaces to be switched through the Gigabit Ethernet interface.

The Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers support per-port QoS traffic conditioning features, such as rate-limiting and shaping.

New Features in 12.0(7)W5(15d)

The Catalyst 2948G-L3 switch router can recover a system image using Xmodem and Ymodem protocols.


Note This feature is new only to the Catalyst 2948G-L3 switch router. The Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch router has this function as part of its basic software features.


New Features in 12.0(7)WX5(15a)

Layer 3 switching software on the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and the Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch router features the switching database manager (SDM). SDM resides on the central processor; its primary function is to maintain the Layer 3 switching database in ternary content addressable memory (TCAM). SDM maintains the address entries contained in TCAM in an appropriate order. SDM manages TCAM space by partitioning protocol-specific switching information into multiple regions.

The key benefit of SDM in Layer 3 switching is its ability to configure the size of the protocol regions in TCAM. SDM enables exact-match and longest-match address searches, which result in high-speed forwarding.

For additional information on SDM, refer to the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 Software Feature and Configuration Guide.

Limitations and Restrictions

The following limitations and restrictions apply to the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers:

HSRP performance drops when two switch routers are configured with BVI. When HSRP over BVI is configured on both the active and standby HSRP switch routers, and the HSRP-routed packets pass through the standby switch router to reach the active router, the performance of traffic traversing this path may degraded more slowly. You can resolve this problem by using the standby use-bia command to configure HSRP to use the burnt in address (BIA) MAC address instead of the HSRP virtual MAC address.

In the absence of any egress traffic on the master port (one of the following ports: f2, f6, f10, f12, f18, f22, f26, f30, f34, f38, f42, or f46) of the 10/100 Fast Ethernet interface, the Ethernet ports that are in the same EPIF as the master port learn MAC entries slower than their usual rate. For instance, if port f2 has no egress traffic, ports f1, f3, and f4 learn MAC entries at a slower rate than usual.

CDP will fail on a Gigabit port when trunking is enabled. The switch router will not send CDP packets on a trunk port connected to a Catalyst 4000 Family switch when CDP packets are coming on a VLAN for which a subinterface is not configured. To receive CDP packets, configure a dummy VLAN subinterface on the trunk port connected to the Catalyst 4000 family switch.

Under extreme conditions, MAC_learn IPC might be lost. A host move under high traffic conditions might cause a MAC entry in the Cisco IOS bridging table to be lost. Routing over BVI might cause loss of connectivity. You can resolve this problem by entering the clear bridge command

A root tree pointer may become invalid for an existing subinterface. This happens very infrequently, when a large configuration is copied to the running configuration under heavy traffic loads. Use the clear bridge command to remove the invalid root tree pointer.

The CLI command no qos switching is not supported. Use the qos mapping precedence value wrr-weight weight command to configure the same WRRweight for all the precedence values globally, using the CLI.

When the no negotiation auto command is used on a Gigabit port, the link status of that port appears up regardless of the presence of a cable or GBIC on that port.

If the interface encapsulation is changed to ISL or IEEE 802.1Q on a particular port while there is traffic on the interface, runts and input error counters might increase. However, after the link is stable and normal operation resumes, these counters should not continue to increase.

An invalid value is returned for SNMP requests for the CiscoFlashDeviceCard MIB object.

Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers do not block SNAP encapsulated ARP packets, even though there is switching support only for ARPA encapsulated IP packets. Because of this ARP entries for non-supported IP encapsulations can make it to the ARP table.

Without IEEE 802.1Q or ISL encapsulation on a subinterface, inbound IPX ACLs do not take effect.

When spanning tree is disabled in a bridge group, dynamically learned MAC entries will not be deleted immediately from the CAM. If the interface on which the MAC entries were learned goes down the entries will be aged out and removed.

Caveats

Caveats describe unexpected behavior in Cisco IOS software releases. Severity 1 caveats are the most serious caveats; severity 2 caveats are less serious. Caveats listed as open in a prior release are carried forward to the next release as either open or resolved.

For information on caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0, see "Caveats for Cisco IOS Release 12.0," which lists severity 1 and 2 caveats for Release 12.0 on Cisco.com and the Documentation CD-ROM.


Note Caveats about Fast Ethernet interfaces do not apply to the Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch router, which has only Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.


Open Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27d)

There are no open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27d):

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27d)

This section describes the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27d):

Through normal software maintenance processes, Cisco is removing deprecated functionality. These changes have no impact on system operation or feature availability. (CSCei76358)

Cisco IOS may permit arbitrary code execution after exploitation of a heap-based buffer overflow vulnerability. Cisco has included additional integrity checks in its software, as further described below, that are intended to reduce the likelihood of arbitrary code execution.

Cisco has made free software available that includes the additional integrity checks for affected customers.

This advisory is posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20051102-timers.shtml. (CSCei61732)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27c)

This section describes the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27c):

Cisco IOS does not update the IPX routing table when more than two equal hop paths are available and one of them is shut down. For example, a switch with three interfaces (I1, I2, and I3) might have an IPX network configured on each interface, as N1, N2, and N3, respectively. A remote IPX network (R) is accessible through N1, N2, and N3 interfaces. The maximum equal hop paths is set to 2. The IOS routing table will show two destination paths (N1 and N2) in the IPX routing table, the interface I2 will shut down. Because all the three paths are equal hop, the IOS routing table should show N1 and N3 as two equal hop paths. However, the routing table shows only N1 as the destination path.

Workaround: Enter the clear ipx route command. The routing table will show N1 and N3 as the destination next hop paths. (CSCdp13515)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27c)

This section describes the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27c):

A specifically crafted Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) connection to a telnet or reverse telnet port of a Cisco device running Internetwork Operating System (IOS) may block further telnet, reverse telnet, Remote Shell (RSH), Secure Shell (SSH), and in some cases Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP) access to the Cisco device. Telnet, reverse telnet, RSH and SSH sessions established prior to exploitation are not affected. All other device services will operate normally.

Conditions: User initiated specially crafted TCP connection to a telnet or reverse telnet port results in blocking further telnet sessions. Whereas, services such as packet forwarding, routing protocols and all other communication to and through the device remains unaffected.

Workaround: The detail advisory is available at: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20040827-telnet.shtml (CSCef46191)

TCP connections may be vulnerable to spoofed ICMP packets. A spoofed ICMP packet may cause the TCP connection to use a very low segment size for 10 minutes at a time.

This symptom is observed when TCP connections are configured for PMTU discovery. Note that PMTU discovery is disabled by default on a router.

Workaround: Disable PMTU discovery. (CSCed78149)

A Cisco device running IOS and enabled for the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is vulnerable to a Denial of Service (DoS) attack from a malformed BGP packet. Only devices with the command bgp log-neighbor-changes configured are vulnerable. The BGP protocol is not enabled by default, and must be configured in order to accept traffic from an explicitly defined peer. Unless the malicious traffic appears to be sourced from a configured, trusted peer, it would be difficult to inject a malformed packet.

Cisco has made free software available to address this problem.

This issue is tracked by CERT/CC VU#689326.

This advisory will be posted at

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20050126-bgp.shtml

(CSCee67450)

A document that describes how the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)could be used to perform a number of Denial of Service (DoS) attacks against the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) has been made publicly available. This document has been published through the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Internet Draft process, and is entitled "ICMP Attacks Against TCP" (draft-gont-tcpm-icmp-attacks-03.txt).

These attacks, which only affect sessions terminating or originating on a device itself, can be of three types:

1. Attacks that use ICMP "hard" error messages

2. Attacks that use ICMP "fragmentation needed and Don't Fragment (DF) bit set" messages, also known as Path Maximum Transmission Unit Discovery (PMTUD) attacks

3. Attacks that use ICMP "source quench" messages

Successful attacks may cause connection resets or reduction of throughput in existing connections, depending on the attack type.

Multiple Cisco products are affected by the attacks described in this Internet draft.

Cisco has made free software available to address these vulnerabilities. In some cases there are workarounds available to mitigate the effects of the vulnerability.

This advisory is posted at

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20050412-icmp.shtml.

The disclosure of these vulnerabilities is being coordinated by the National Infrastructure Security Coordination Centre (NISCC), based in the United Kingdom. NISCC is working with multiple vendors whose products are potentially affected. Its posting can be found at:

http://www.niscc.gov.uk/niscc/docs/re-20050412-00303.pdf?lang=en.

(CSCef60659)

In configurations with a large number of bridge groups and bridge group members, you might see the following traceback message during reload:

00:00:38:%SYS-3-CPUHOG: Task ran for 3084 msec (437/1), process = CDP Protocol, PC = 
6015BD40.

Workaround: Disable CDP on all interfaces or reduce the number of interfaces on which CDP is configured until the problem no longer occurs. (CSCdr97028)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27b)

This section describes the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27b):

Cisco IOS does not update the IPX routing table when more than two equal hop paths are available and one of them is shut down. For example, a switch with three interfaces (I1, I2, and I3) might have an IPX network configured on each interface, as N1, N2, and N3, respectively. A remote IPX network (R) is accessible through N1, N2, and N3 interfaces. The maximum equal hop paths is set to 2. The IOS routing table will show two destination paths (N1 and N2) in the IPX routing table, the interface I2 will shut down. Because all the three paths are equal hop, the IOS routing table should show N1 and N3 as two equal hop paths. However, the routing table shows only N1 as the destination path.

Workaround: Enter the clear ipx route command. The routing table will show N1 and N3 as the destination next hop paths. (CSCdp13515)

In configurations with a large number of bridge groups and bridge group members, you might see the following traceback message during reload:

00:00:38:%SYS-3-CPUHOG: Task ran for 3084 msec (437/1), process = CDP Protocol, PC = 
6015BD40.

Workaround: Disable CDP on all interfaces or reduce the number of interfaces on which CDP is configured until the problem no longer occurs. (CSCdr97028)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27b)

This section describes the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27b):

A vulnerability in the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) specification (RFC793) has been discovered by an external researcher. The successful exploitation enables an adversary to reset any established TCP connection in a much shorter time than was previously discussed publicly. Depending on the application, the connection may get automatically re-established. In other cases, a user will have to repeat the action (for example, open a new Telnet or SSH session). Depending upon the attacked protocol, a successful attack may have additional consequences beyond terminated connection which must be considered. This attack vector is only applicable to the sessions which are terminating on a device (such as a router, switch, or computer) and not to the sessions that are only passing through the device (for example, transit traffic that is being routed by a router). In addition, this attack vector does not directly compromise data integrity or confidentiality.

All Cisco products which contain TCP stack are susceptible to this vulnerability.

This advisory is available at:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20040420-tcp-ios.shtml, and it describes this vulnerability as it applies to Cisco products that run Cisco IOS® software.

A companion advisory that describes this vulnerability for products that do not run Cisco IOS software is available at:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20040420-tcp-nonios.shtml. (CSCed27956 and CSCed38527)

A Cisco device running IOS and enabled for the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is vulnerable to a Denial of Service (DOS) attack from a malformed BGP packet. The BGP protocol is not enabled by default, and must be configured in order to accept traffic from an explicitly defined peer. Unless the malicious traffic appears to be sourced from a configured, trusted peer, it would be difficult to inject a malformed packet. BGP MD5 is a valid workaround for this problem.

Cisco has made free software available to address this problem. For more details, refer to this advisory, available at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20040616-bgp.shtml. (CSCdu53656 and CSCea28131)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27)

This section describes the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27):

Cisco IOS does not update the IPX routing table when more than two equal hop paths are available and one of them is shut down. For example, a switch with three interfaces (I1, I2, and I3) might have an IPX network configured on each interface, as N1, N2, and N3, respectively. A remote IPX network (R) is accessible through N1, N2, and N3 interfaces. The maximum equal hop paths is set to 2. The IOS routing table will show two destination paths (N1 and N2) in the IPX routing table, the interface I2 will shut down. Because all the three paths are equal hop, the IOS routing table should show N1 and N3 as two equal hop paths. However, the routing table shows only N1 as the destination path.

Workaround: Enter the clear ipx route command. The routing table will show N1 and N3 as the destination next hop paths. (CSCdp13515)

In configurations with a large number of bridge groups and bridge group members, you might see the following traceback message during reload:

00:00:38:%SYS-3-CPUHOG: Task ran for 3084 msec (437/1), process = CDP Protocol, PC = 
6015BD40.

Workaround: Disable CDP on all interfaces or reduce the number of interfaces on which CDP is configured until the problem no longer occurs. (CSCdr97028)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(25)W5(27)

This section describes the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(25)W5(27):

Appletalk will stop working and the router will stop responding to "GETNETINFO" requests that happen during a Macintosh clients' bootup when you go to code a cat4232-in-mz.120-25.W5.27.bin image.

Workaround: Downgrade to an earlier image. (CSCeb70373)

Cisco routers and switches running Cisco IOS software and configured to process Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) packets are vulnerable to a Denial of Service (DoS) attack. A rare sequence of crafted IPv4 packets sent directly to the device may cause the input interface to stop processing traffic once the input queue is full. No authentication is required to process the inbound packet. Processing of IPv4 packets is enabled by default. Devices running only IP version 6 (IPv6) are not affected. A workaround is available.

Cisco has made software available, free of charge, to correct the problem.

This advisory is available at

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20030717-blocked.shtml. (CSCea02355)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(18)W5(22b)

This section describes the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(18)W5(22b):

Cisco IOS does not update the IPX routing table when more than two equal hop paths are available and one of them is shut down. For example, a switch with three interfaces (I1, I2, and I3) might have an IPX network configured on each interface, as N1, N2, and N3, respectively. A remote IPX network (R) is accessible through N1, N2, and N3. The maximum equal hop paths is set to 2. The IOS routing table shows two destination paths (N1 and N2) in the IPX routing table. When interface I2 is shut down, the IOS routing table should show N1 and N3 as two equal hop paths (because all three paths are equal hop paths.); however, the routing table shows only N1 as the destination path.

Workaround: Enter the clear ipx route command. The routing table will show N1 and N3 as the destination next hop paths. (CSCdp13515)

In configurations with a large number of bridge groups and bridge group members, you might see the following traceback message during reload.

00:00:38:%SYS-3-CPUHOG: Task ran for 3084 msec (437/1), process = CDP Protocol, PC = 
6015BD40.

Workaround: Disable CDP on all interfaces or reduce the number of interfaces on which CDP is configured until the problem no longer occurs. (CSCdr97028)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(18)W5(22b)

This section describes the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(18)W5(22b):

An error can occur with management protocol processing. Go to the following URL for further information:

http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/bugtool/onebug.pl?bugid=CSCdw65903

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(18)W5(22a)

This section describes the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(18)W5(22a):

Cisco IOS does not update the IPX routing table when more than two equal hop paths are available and one of them is shut down. For example, a switch with three interfaces (I1, I2, and I3) might have an IPX network configured on each interface, as N1, N2, and N3, respectively. A remote IPX network (R) is accessible through N1, N2, and N3 interfaces. The maximum equal hop paths is set to 2. The IOS routing table will show two destination paths (N1 and N2) in the IPX routing table, the interface I2 will shut down. Because all the three paths are equal hop, the IOS routing table should show N1 and N3 as two equal hop paths. However, the routing table shows only N1 as the destination path.

Workaround: Enter the clear ipx route command. The routing table will show N1 and N3 as the destination next hop paths. (CSCdp13515)

In configurations with a large number of bridge groups and bridge group members, you might see the following traceback message during reload:

00:00:38:%SYS-3-CPUHOG: Task ran for 3084 msec (437/1), process = CDP Protocol, PC = 
6015BD40.

Workaround: Disable CDP on all interfaces or reduce the number of interfaces on which CDP is configured until the problem no longer occurs. (CSCdr97028)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(18)W5(22a)

This section describes the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(18)W5(22a):

An ARP packet received by the router that has the router's own interface address, but with a different MAC address, can overwrite the router's own MAC address in the ARP table, causing that interface to stop sending and receiving traffic. This attack is successful only against interfaces on the Ethernet segment that is local to the attacking host.

Workaround: Hardcode the interface's ARP table entry by using the arp ip-address hardware-address type [alias] command. This entry will remain in the ARP table until you enter the clear arp command.

Refer to the advisory at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/IOS-arp-overwrite-vuln-pub.shtml

This vulnerability does not apply to switches running Catalyst operating system software, only to switches running Cisco IOS software. (CSCdu81936)

A CPU HOG condition occurs on the switch router after you enter the no ipx router eigrp command for routes learned through IEEE 802.1Q encapsulation on the Gigabit Ethernet port. After approximately 15 seconds, the console prompt returns. (CSCdp37972)

ARP requests intended for any local IP address on the Catalyst 2948G-L3 switch router will be consumed even if the interface is configured only for bridging. The ARP requests will not be flooded inside the bridge group.

Workaround: Configure static ARPs on the device. (CSCdt43641)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(14)W5(20)

This section describes the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(14)W5(20):

A CPU HOG condition occurs on the switch router after you enter the no ipx router eigrp command for routes learned through IEEE 802.1Q encapsulation on the Gigabit Ethernet port. After approximately 15 seconds, the console prompt returns. (CSCdp37972)

In configurations with a large number of bridge groups and bridge group members, you might see the following traceback message during reload:

00:00:38:%SYS-3-CPUHOG: Task ran for 3084 msec (437/1), process = CDP Protocol, PC = 
6015BD40.

Workaround: Disable CDP on all interfaces or reduce the number of interfaces on which CDP is configured until the problem no longer occurs. (CSCdr97028)

Cisco IOS does not update the IPX routing table when more than two equal hop paths are available and one of them is shut down. For example, a switch with three interfaces (I1, I2, and I3) might have an IPX network configured on each interface, as N1, N2, and N3, respectively. A remote IPX network (R) is accessible through N1, N2, and N3 interfaces. The maximum equal hop paths is set to 2. The IOS routing table will show two destination paths (N1 and N2) in the IPX routing table, the interface I2 will shut down. Because all the three paths are equal hop, the IOS routing table should show N1 and N3 as two equal hop paths. However, the routing table shows only N1 as the destination path.

Workaround: Enter the clear ipx route command. The routing table will show N1 and N3 as the destination next hop paths. (CSCdp13515)

ARP requests intended for any local IP address on the Catalyst 2948G-L3 switch router will be consumed, even if the interface is configured only for bridging. The ARP requests are consumed they will not be flooded inside the bridge group.

Workaround: Configure static ARPs on the device which requests it. (CSCdt43641)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(14)W5(20)

This section describes the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(14)W5(20):

Enabling port-qos features on an interface with the B4 version of XPIF leads to high-performance drops.

Workaround: A special image that includes a fix is available. Contact TAC for a copy of the image. (CSCdt08870)

Occasionally when you apply port-qos features, such as rate-limiting and shaping, an interface does not take packet length into account, making the output bit rate inaccurate.

Workaround: This problem is fixed in Cisco 12.0(10)W05(17.113), which is an integrated release not available on Cisco.com. This IOS image will be provided on a case-by-case basis for customers requiring port-qos features. The next maintenance release will incorporate this fix. (CSCds82323)

When accessed through SNMP, the QoS mapping table lists an entry with the wrong precedence index value of 4. This value must be in a range from 0 to 3. (CSCdr24893)

A Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) UPDATE contains Network Layer Reachability Information (NLRI) and attributes that describe the path to the destination. Each path attribute is a type, length, value (TLV) object.

The type is a two-octet field that includes the attribute flags and the type code. The fourth high-order bit (bit 3) of the attribute flags is the Extended Length bit. It defines whether the attribute length is one octet (if set to 0) or two octets (if set to 1). The extended length bit is used only if the length of the attribute value is greater than 255 octets.

The AS_PATH (type code 2) is represented by a series of TLVs (or path segments). The path segment type indicates whether the content is an AS_SET or AS_SEQUENCE. The path segment length indicates the number of autonomous systems (ASes) in the segment. The path segment value contains the list of ASes (each AS is represented by two octets).

The total length of the attribute depends on the number of path segments and the number of ASes in them. For example, if the AS_PATH contains only an AS_SEQUENCE, then the maximum number of ASes (without having to use the extended length bit) is 126 [= (255-2)/2]. If the UPDATE is propagated across an AS boundary, then the local Abstract Syntax Notation (ASN) must be appended and the extended length bit used.

The caveat was caused by the mishandling of the operation during which the length of the attribute was truncated to only one octet. Because of the internal operation of the code, the receiving border router would not be affected, but its iBGP peers would detect the mismatch and issue a NOTIFICATION message (update malformed) to reset their session.

The average maximum AS_PATH length in the Internet is between 15 and 20 ASes, so there is no need to use the extended length. The failure was discovered because of a malfunction in the BGP implementation of another vendor. There is no workaround.

[Part of the text was taken from rfc 1771.] (CSCdr54230)

Cisco Security Advisory:

Cisco IOS Software TCP Initial Sequence Number Randomization Improvements

Revision 1.0: INTERIM

For Public Release 2001 February 27 20:00 US/Eastern (UTC+0500)

____________________________________________________________________________

Summary

Cisco IOS software contains a flaw that permits the successful prediction of TCP Initial Sequence Numbers.

This vulnerability is present in all released versions of Cisco IOS software running on Cisco routers and switches. It only affects the security of TCP connections that originate or terminate on the affected Cisco device itself; it does not apply to TCP traffic forwarded through the affected device in transit between two other hosts.

To remove the vulnerability, Cisco is offering free software upgrades for all affected platforms. The defect is described in DDTS record CSCds04747.

Workarounds are available that limit or deny successful exploitation of the vulnerability by filtering traffic containing forged IP source addresses at the perimeter of a network or directly on individual devices.

This notice will be posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/ios-tcp-isn-random-pub.shtml. (CSCds04747)

When BGP sessions get reset, currently, with lob neighbor-changes, the even is errlogged. However, to find out the reasons as to why there was a reset, one has to turn on the debugs. This fix will automatically errlog the NOTIFICATION message when the sessions are reset. This feature will be turned on by the same log neighbor-changes knob. (CSCdr54231

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(10)W5(18e)

This section describes the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(10)W5(18e):

Enabling port-qos features on an interface with the B4 version of XPIF leads to high performance drops.

Workaround: A special image that includes a fix is available. Contact TAC for a copy of the image. (CSCdt08870)

Occasionally when you apply port-qos features, such as rate-limiting and shaping, an interface does not take packet length into account, making the output bit rate inaccurate.

Workaround: This problem is fixed in Cisco 12.0(10)W05(17.113), which is an integrated release not available on Cisco.com. This IOS image will be provided on a case-by-case basis for customers requiring port-qos features. The next maintenance release will incorporate this fix. (CSCds82323)

When accessed through SNMP, the QoS mapping table lists an entry with the wrong precedence index value of 4. This value must be in a range from 0 to 3. (CSCdr24893)

A CPU HOG condition occurs on the switch router after you enter the no ipx router eigrp command for routes learned through IEEE 802.1Q encapsulation on the Gigabit Ethernet port. After approximately 15 seconds the console prompt returns. (CSCdp37972)

In configurations with a large number of bridge groups and bridge group members, you might see the following traceback message during reload:

00:00:38:%SYS-3-CPUHOG: Task ran for 3084 msec (437/1), process = CDP Protocol, PC = 
6015BD40.

Workaround: Disable CDP on all interfaces or reduce the number of interfaces on which CDP is configured until the problem no longer occurs. (CSCdr97028)

Cisco IOS does not update the IPX routing table when more than two equal hop paths are available and one of them is shut down. For example, a switch with three interfaces (I1, I2, and I3) might have an IPX network configured on each interface, as N1, N2, and N3, respectively. A remote IPX network (R) is accessible through N1, N2, and N3 interfaces. The maximum equal hop paths is set to 2. The IOS routing table will show two destination paths (N1 and N2) in the IPX routing table, the interface I2 will shut down. Because all the three paths are equal hop, the IOS routing table should show N1 and N3 as two equal hop paths. However, the routing table shows only N1 as the destination path.

Workaround: Enter the clear ipx route command. The routing table will show N1 and N3 as the destination next hop paths. (CSCdp13515)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(10)W5(18e)

This section describes the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(10)W5(18e):

Address resolution protocol (ARP) packets are consumed and flooded by IOS even though IP routing is turned off globally. (CSCdr39535)

When IP multicast routing is enabled on a BVI, nonReverse Path Forwarding (RPF) IP multicast data packets are discarded. Because of this some hosts in the same bridge domain might be disconnected. (CSCdr35926)

When IP multicast routing is not enabled over BVI and BVI is configured to route IP, IP multicast data packets are discarded. (CSCdr35855)

Under heavy traffic conditions, remote MAC entries are not learned consistently on all FEC members. This causes traffic to flood in one direction.

Workaround: Use the clear bridge command to resync the remote entries on all ports. (CSCdp53223)

When BVI is configured, the following message appears when the switch router is reloaded:

%CEF hwidb not found for BVI1

This is a harmless message. (CSCdp51343)

The total number of IPX networks that can be added to the BVI interfaces is restricted to 32. (CSCdp49222)

Packets are switched out on the native VLAN, leading to routing by the CPU (with BVI). Untagged packets coming in on the 802.1Q native VLAN are not processed by the microcode. Instead they are given to the CPU, and the CPU does the processing. This means that high CPU utilization will be seen if untagged packets are received at a high rate on the native VLAN subinterfaces. (CSCdp33630)


Note Generally, only management data, transmitted at a very low rate, would be seen on the native VLAN, because it is mainly used for network management purposes.


Open Caveats in Release 12.0(7)W5(15d)

This section describes the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(7)W5(15d):

Address resolution protocol (ARP) packets are consumed and flooded by IOS even though IP routing is turned off globally. (CSCdr39535)

When IP multicast routing is enabled on a BVI, nonReverse Path Forwarding (RPF) IP multicast data packets are discarded. Because of this some hosts in the same bridge domain might be disconnected. (CSCdr35926)

When IP multicast routing is not enabled over BVI and BVI is configured to route IP, IP multicast data packets are discarded. (CSCdr35855)

When accessed through SNMP, the QoS mapping table lists an entry with the wrong precedence index value of 4. This value must be in a range from 0 to 3. (CSCdr24893)

Under heavy traffic conditions, remote MAC entries are not learned consistently on all FEC members. This causes traffic to flood in one direction.

Workaround: Use the clear bridge command to resync the remote entries on all ports. (CSCdp53223)

When BVI is configured, the following message appears when the switch router is reloaded:

%CEF hwidb not found for BVI1

This is a harmless message. (CSCdp51343)

The total number of IPX networks that can be added to the BVI interfaces is restricted to 32. (CSCdp49222)

A CPU HOG condition occurs on the switch router after you enter the no ipx router eigrp command for routes learned through IEEE 802.1Q encapsulation on the Gigabit Ethernet port. After approximately 15 seconds the console prompt returns. (CSCdp37972)

Packets are switched out on the native VLAN, leading to routing by the CPU (with BVI). Untagged packets coming in on the 802.1Q native VLAN are not processed by the microcode. Instead they are given to the CPU, and the CPU does the processing. This means that high CPU utilization will be seen if untagged packets are received at a high rate on the native VLAN subinterfaces. (CSCdp33630)


Note In general, only management data transmitted at a very low rate would be seen on the native VLAN, because it is mainly used for network management purposes.


Cisco IOS does not update the IPX routing table when more than two equal hop paths are available and one of them is shut down. For example, a switch with three interfaces (I1, I2, and I3) might have an IPX network configured on each interface, as N1, N2, and N3, respectively. A remote IPX network (R) is accessible through N1, N2, and N3 interfaces. The maximum equal hop paths is set to 2. The IOS routing table will show two destination paths (N1 and N2) in the IPX routing table, the interface I2 will shut down. Because all the three paths are equal hop, the IOS routing table should show N1 and N3 as two equal hop paths. However, the routing table shows only N1 as the destination path.

Workaround: Enter the clear ipx route command. The routing table will show N1 and N3 as the destination next hop paths. (CSCdp13515)

In configurations with a large number of bridge groups and bridge group members, you might see the following traceback message during reload.

00:00:38:%SYS-3-CPUHOG: Task ran for 3084 msec (437/1), process = CDP Protocol, PC = 
6015BD40.

Workaround: Disable CDP on all interfaces or reduce the number of interfaces on which CDP is configured until the problem no longer occurs. (CSCdr97028)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(7)W5(15d)

This section describes the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(7)W5(15d):

When the interface encapsulation of a port channel subinterface is changed from ISL to 802.1Q, or vice versa, and if this subinterface is the only member of a bridge-group, the console might not respond. However, the system runs normally, and the user can access the console using Telnet as long as there is IP connectivity to the system. (CSCdp56448)

Workaround: Before attempting an encapsulation change on the port channel subinterface, do one of the following:

Remove the bridge-group globally, by entering the no bridge bridge_id command.

Add an additional member to the bridge-group.

Remove all members of the port channel.

The 64-byte packets transmitted by the Gigabit Ethernet ports are not updated in the interface statistics. This does not impact performance. (CSCdp27003)

When traffic to the CPU from many interfaces is very high, the CPU might have memory allocation failures for the packet buffers. (CSCdp54671)

The front panel link LED for Fast Ethernet ports is green for the 10/100 Mbps link speed. The link LED is not amber for 10 Mbps, as mentioned in the Catalyst 2948G-L3 Hardware Installation Guide. (CSCdp43594)

With constrained multicast flooding (CMF), when a bridge group member joins and leaves a multicast group, the multicast traffic is still forwarded out of that bridge member.

Workaround: Use the clear bridge multicast command to stop forwarding traffic out of the bridge member. (CSCdp42656)

Open Caveats in Release 12.0(7)Wx5(15a)

This section describes the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(7)Wx5(15a):


Note Caveats about Fast Ethernet interfaces do not apply to the Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch router, which has only Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.


Address resolution protocol (ARP) packets are consumed and flooded by IOS even though IP routing is turned off globally. (CSCdr39535)

When IP multicast routing is enabled on a BVI, nonReverse Path Forwarding (RPF) IP multicast data packets are discarded. Because of this some hosts in the same bridge domain might be disconnected. (CSCdr35926)

When IP multicast routing is not enabled over BVI and BVI is configured to route IP, IP multicast data packets are discarded. (CSCdr35855)

When accessed through SNMP, the QoS mapping table lists an entry with the wrong precedence index value of 4. This value must be in a range from 0 to 3. (CSCdr24893)

When traffic to the CPU from many interfaces is very high, the CPU might have memory allocation failures for the packet buffers. (CSCdp54671)

Under heavy traffic conditions, remote MAC entries are not learned consistently on all FEC members. This causes traffic to flood in one direction.

Workaround: Use the clear bridge command to resync the remote entries on all ports. (CSCdp53223)

When the interface encapsulation of a port channel subinterface is changed from ISL to 802.1Q, or vice versa, and if this subinterface is the only member of a bridge-group, the console might not respond. However, the system runs normally, and the user can access the console using Telnet as long as there is IP connectivity to the system. (CSCdp56448)

Workaround: Before attempting an encapsulation change on the port channel subinterface, do one of the following:

Remove the bridge-group globally, by entering the no bridge bridge_id command.

Add an additional member to the bridge-group.

Remove all members of the port channel.

When BVI is configured, the following message appears when the switch router is reloaded:

%CEF hwidb not found for BVI1

This is a harmless message. (CSCdp51343)

The total number of IPX networks that can be added to the BVI interfaces is restricted to 32. (CSCdp49222)

A CPU HOG condition occurs on the switch router after you enter the no ipx router eigrp command for routes learned through IEEE 802.1Q encapsulation on the Gigabit Ethernet port. After approximately 15 seconds the console prompt returns. (CSCdp37972)

The front panel link LED for Fast Ethernet ports is green for the 10/100 Mbps link speed. The link LED is not amber for 10 Mbps, as mentioned in the Catalyst 2948G-L3 Hardware Installation Guide. (CSCdp43594)

With constrained multicast flooding (CMF), when a bridge group member joins and leaves a multicast group, the multicast traffic is still forwarded out of that bridge member.

Workaround: Use the clear bridge multicast command to stop forwarding traffic out of the bridge member. (CSCdp42656)

Packets are switched out on the native VLAN, leading to routing by the CPU (with BVI). Untagged packets coming in on the 802.1Q native VLAN are not processed by the microcode. Instead they are given to the CPU, and the CPU does the processing. This means that high CPU utilization will be seen if untagged packets are received at a high rate on the native VLAN subinterfaces. (CSCdp33630)


Note In general, only management data transmitted at a very low rate would be seen on the native VLAN, because it is mainly used for network management purposes.


Cisco IOS does not update the IPX routing table when more than two equal hop paths are available and one of them is shut down. For example, a switch with three interfaces (I1, I2, and I3) might have an IPX network configured on each interface, as N1, N2, and N3, respectively. A remote IPX network (R) is accessible through N1, N2, and N3 interfaces. The maximum equal hop paths is set to 2. The IOS routing table will show two destination paths (N1 and N2) in the IPX routing table, the interface I2 will shut down. Because all the three paths are equal hop, the IOS routing table should show N1 and N3 as two equal hop paths. However, the routing table shows only N1 as the destination path.

Workaround: Enter the clear ipx route command. The routing table will show N1 and N3 as the destination next hop paths. (CSCdp13515)

The 64-byte packets transmitted by the Gigabit Ethernet ports are not updated in the interface statistics. This does not impact performance. (CSCdp27003)

In configurations with a large number of bridge groups and bridge group members, you might see the following traceback message during reload:

00:00:38:%SYS-3-CPUHOG: Task ran for 3084 msec (437/1), process = CDP Protocol, PC = 
6015BD40.

Workaround: Disable CDP on all interfaces or reduce the number of interfaces on which CDP is configured until the problem no longer occurs. (CSCdr97028)

Resolved Caveats in Release 12.0(7)Wx5(15a)

There were no resolved caveats for Release 12.0(7)Wx5(15a).

Error Messages

This section describes Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch router error messages.


Note Error messages about Fast Ethernet interfaces do not apply to the Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch router, which has only Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.


When you use the sdm size command in an attempt to add more IP multicast routes than the size previously configured, the following error message is displayed.

For example, if the number of IP multicast routes added to SDM exceeds the size configured with the sdm size command, the following error message is displayed:

%LSS-1-SDM: IP Multicast, Region reached limit Cannot accept more entries

Explanation    Cannot accept more routes in SDM.

Recommended Action    To rectify this situation, increase the protocol size using the sdm size configuration command and reload the switch router.

When you attempt to add more routes than the Fast Ethernet CAM size allows, the following error message is displayed:

7:28:06:%LSS-4-INTERFACE:(Interface FastEthernet2) CAM reached limit. Cannot
accept more route entries

Explanation    Cannot accept more routes in CAM.

Recommended Action    None.

Related Documentation

This section describes the documentation available for the Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch routers. Both printed manuals and electronic documents are available.

The most current documentation is available on Cisco.com and the Documentation CD-ROM. These electronic documents might contain updates and modifications made after the hard-copy documents were printed.

Use these release notes with the following documents:

Catalyst 2948G-L3 Hardware Installation Guide

Catalyst 2948G-L3 and Catalyst 4908G-L3 Software Feature and Configuration Guide

Catalyst 4908G-L3 Hardware Installation Guide

For information about MIBs, refer to: http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml

Service and Support

For service and support for a product purchased from a reseller, contact the reseller. Resellers offer a wide variety of Cisco service and support programs, which are described in the section "Service and Support" in the information packet that was shipped with your product.


Note If you purchased your product from a reseller, you can access Cisco.com as a guest. Cisco.com is Cisco Systems' primary real-time support channel. Your reseller offers programs that include direct access to Cisco.com services.


For service and support for a product purchased directly from Cisco, use Cisco.com.

Software Configuration Tips on the Cisco TAC Home Page

For helpful tips on configuring Cisco products, follow this path on Cisco.com:

Service & Support: Technical Assistance Center

"Software Technical Tips" are popular tips and hints gathered from Cisco's Technical Assistance Center (TAC). Most of these documents are also available from the TAC's Fax-on-Demand service. To access Fax-on-Demand and receive documents at your fax machine, call 888-50-CISCO (888-502-4726). From international areas, call 650-556-8409.

In addition to "Software Technical Tips," the following sections are on the Technical Documents page:

Cisco Product Catalog—MultiNet & Cisco Suite 100, Network Management, Cisco IOS Software Bulletins, CiscoPro Configurations.

Field Notices—Notification of critical issues regarding Cisco products. These include problem descriptions, safety or security issues, and hardware defects.

Hardware Technical Tips—Technical tips related to specific hardware platforms.

Hot Tips—Popular tips and hints for a range of product suites, gathered from Cisco's Technical Assistance Center (TAC).

Internetworking Technical Tips—Tips for using and deploying Cisco IOS software features and services.

Sample Configurations—Actual configuration examples complete with topology and annotations.

Special Collections—Other helpful documents: Frequently Asked Questions, Security Advisories, References & RFCs, Case Studies, and the CiscoPro Documentation CD-ROM.

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available on Cisco.com. Cisco also provides several ways to obtain technical assistance and other technical resources. These sections explain how to obtain technical information from Cisco Systems.

Cisco.com

You can access the most current Cisco documentation at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/home/home.htm

You can access the Cisco website at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com

You can access international Cisco websites at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml

Ordering Documentation

You can find instructions for ordering documentation at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/es_inpck/pdi.htm

You can order Cisco documentation in these ways:

Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order Cisco product documentation from the Ordering tool:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/ordering/index.shtml

Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by calling Cisco Systems Corporate Headquarters (California, USA) at 408 526-7208 or, elsewhere in North America, by calling 800 553-NETS (6387).

Documentation Feedback

You can send comments about technical documentation to bug-doc@cisco.com.

You can submit comments by using the response card (if present) behind the front cover of your document or by writing to the following address:

Cisco Systems
Attn: Customer Document Ordering
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883

We appreciate your comments.

Obtaining Technical Assistance

For all customers, partners, resellers, and distributors who hold valid Cisco service contracts, Cisco Technical Support provides 24-hour-a-day, award-winning technical assistance. The Cisco Technical Support Website on Cisco.com features extensive online support resources. In addition, Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) engineers provide telephone support. If you do not hold a valid Cisco service contract, contact your reseller.

Cisco Technical Support Website

The Cisco Technical Support Website provides online documents and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. The website is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport

Access to all tools on the Cisco Technical Support Website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a user ID or password, you can register at this URL:

http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do

Submitting a Service Request

Using the online TAC Service Request Tool is the fastest way to open S3 and S4 service requests. (S3 and S4 service requests are those in which your network is minimally impaired or for which you require product information.) After you describe your situation, the TAC Service Request Tool automatically provides recommended solutions. If your issue is not resolved using the recommended resources, your service request will be assigned to a Cisco TAC engineer. The TAC Service Request Tool is located at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/servicerequest

For S1 or S2 service requests or if you do not have Internet access, contact the Cisco TAC by telephone. (S1 or S2 service requests are those in which your production network is down or severely degraded.) Cisco TAC engineers are assigned immediately to S1 and S2 service requests to help keep your business operations running smoothly.

To open a service request by telephone, use one of the following numbers:

Asia-Pacific: +61 2 8446 7411 (Australia: 1 800 805 227)
EMEA: +32 2 704 55 55
USA: 1 800 553 2447

For a complete list of Cisco TAC contacts, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/contacts

Definitions of Service Request Severity

To ensure that all service requests are reported in a standard format, Cisco has established severity definitions.

Severity 1 (S1)—Your network is "down," or there is a critical impact to your business operations. You and Cisco will commit all necessary resources around the clock to resolve the situation.

Severity 2 (S2)—Operation of an existing network is severely degraded, or significant aspects of your business operation are negatively affected by inadequate performance of Cisco products. You and Cisco will commit full-time resources during normal business hours to resolve the situation.

Severity 3 (S3)—Operational performance of your network is impaired, but most business operations remain functional. You and Cisco will commit resources during normal business hours to restore service to satisfactory levels.

Severity 4 (S4)—You require information or assistance with Cisco product capabilities, installation, or configuration. There is little or no effect on your business operations.

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Information about Cisco products, technologies, and network solutions is available from various online and printed sources.

Cisco Marketplace provides a variety of Cisco books, reference guides, and logo merchandise. Visit Cisco Marketplace, the company store, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/

The Cisco Product Catalog describes the networking products offered by Cisco Systems, as well as ordering and customer support services. Access the Cisco Product Catalog at this URL:

http://cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/pcat/

Cisco Press publishes a wide range of general networking, training and certification titles. Both new and experienced users will benefit from these publications. For current Cisco Press titles and other information, go to Cisco Press at this URL:

http://www.ciscopress.com

Packet magazine is the Cisco Systems technical user magazine for maximizing Internet and networking investments. Each quarter, Packet delivers coverage of the latest industry trends, technology breakthroughs, and Cisco products and solutions, as well as network deployment and troubleshooting tips, configuration examples, customer case studies, certification and training information, and links to scores of in-depth online resources. You can access Packet magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/packet

iQ Magazine is the quarterly publication from Cisco Systems designed to help growing companies learn how they can use technology to increase revenue, streamline their business, and expand services. The publication identifies the challenges facing these companies and the technologies to help solve them, using real-world case studies and business strategies to help readers make sound technology investment decisions. You can access iQ Magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/iqmagazine

Internet Protocol Journal is a quarterly journal published by Cisco Systems for engineering professionals involved in designing, developing, and operating public and private internets and intranets. You can access the Internet Protocol Journal at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/ipj

World-class networking training is available from Cisco. You can view current offerings at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/learning/index.html