Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Unicast Routing Configuration Guide, Release 6.x
Configuring Route Policy Manager
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Table of Contents

Configuring Route Policy Manager

Information About Route Policy Manager

Prefix Lists

MAC Lists

Route Maps

Match Criteria

Set Changes

Access Lists

AS Numbers for BGP

AS-path Lists for BGP

Community Lists for BGP

Extended Community Lists for BGP

Route Redistribution and Route Maps

Policy-Based Routing

Licensing Requirements for Route Policy Manager

Prerequisites for Route Policy Manager

Guidelines and Limitations

Default Settings

Configuring Route Policy Manager

Configuring IP Prefix Lists

Configuring MAC Lists

Configuring AS-path Lists

Configuring Community Lists

Configuring Extended Community Lists

Configuring Route Maps

Verifying the Route Policy Manager Configuration

Configuration Examples for Route Policy Manager

Related Topics

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

Feature History for Route Policy Manager

Information About Route Policy Manager

Route Policy Manager supports route maps and IP prefix lists for route redistribution. Cisco NX-OS supports IP access-lists as match criteria for route maps that are used for policy-based routing. A prefix list contains one or more IPv4 or IPv6 network prefixes and the associated prefix length values. You can use a prefix list by itself in features such as Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) templates, route filtering, or redistribution of routes that are exchanged between routing domains.

Route maps can apply to both routes and IP packets. Route filtering and redistribution pass a route through a route map while policy based routing passes IP packets through a route map.

This section includes the following topics:

Prefix Lists

You can use prefix lists to permit or deny an address or range of addresses. Filtering by a prefix list involves matching the prefixes of routes or packets with the prefixes listed in the prefix list. An implicit deny is assumed if a given prefix does not match any entries in a prefix list.

You can configure multiple entries in a prefix list and permit or deny the prefixes that match the entry. Each entry has an associated sequence number that you can configure. If you do not configure a sequence number, Cisco NX-OS assigns a sequence number automatically. Cisco NX-OS evaluates prefix lists starting with the lowest sequence number. Cisco NX-OS processes the first successful match for a given prefix. Once a match occurs, Cisco NX-OS processes the permit or deny statement and does not evaluate the rest of the prefix list.


Note An empty prefix list permits all routes.


MAC Lists

You can use MAC lists to permit or deny a MAC address or range of addresses. A MAC list consists of a list of MAC addresses and optional MAC masks. A MAC mask is a wild-card mask that is logically AND-ed with the MAC address when the route map matches on the MAC list entry. Filtering by a MAC list involves matching the MAC address of packets with the MAC addresses listed in the MAC list. An implicit deny is assumed if a given MAC address does not match any entries in a MAC list.

You can configure multiple entries in a MAC list and permit or deny the MAC addresses that match the entry. Each entry has an associated sequence number that you can configure. If you do not configure a sequence number, Cisco NX-OS assigns a sequence number automatically. Cisco NX-OS evaluates MAC lists starting with the lowest sequence number. Cisco NX-OS processes the first successful match for a given MAC address. Once a match occurs, Cisco NX-OS processes the permit or deny statement and does not evaluate the rest of the MAC list.

Route Maps

You can use route maps for route redistribution or policy-based routing. Route map entries consist of a list of match and set criteria. The match criteria specify match conditions for incoming routes or packets, and the set criteria specify the action taken if the match criteria are met.

You can configure multiple entries in the same route map. These entries contain the same route map name and are differentiated by a sequence number.

You create a route map with one or more route map entries arranged by the sequence number under a unique route map name. The route map entry has the following parameters:

  • Sequence number
  • Permission—permit or deny
  • Match criteria
  • Set changes

By default, a route map processes routes or IP packets in a linear fashion, that is, starting from the lowest sequence number. You can configure the route map to process in a different order using the continue statement, which allows you to determine which route map entry to process next.

Match Criteria

You can use a variety of criteria to match a route or IP packet in a route map. Some criteria, such as BGP community lists, are applicable only to a specific routing protocol, while other criteria, such as the IP source or the destination address, can be used for any route or IP packet.

When Cisco NX-OS processes a route or packet through a route map, it compares the route or packet to each of the match statements configured. If the route or packet matches the configured criteria, Cisco NX-OS processes it based on the permit or deny configuration for that match entry in the route map and any set criteria configured.

The match categories and parameters are as follows:

  • IP access lists—(For policy-based routing only). Match based on source or destination IP address, protocol, or QoS parameters.
  • BGP parameters—Match based on AS numbers, AS-path, community attributes, or extended community attributes.
  • Prefix lists—Match based on an address or range of addresses.
  • Multicast parameters—Match based on rendezvous point, groups, or sources.
  • Other parameters—Match based on IP next-hop address or packet length.

Set Changes

Once a route or packet matches an entry in a route map, the route or packet can be changed based on one or more configured set statements.

The set changes are as follows:

  • BGP parameters—Change the AS-path, tag, community, extended community, dampening, local preference, origin, or weight attributes.
  • Metrics—Change the route-metric, the route-tag, or the route-type.
  • Policy-based routing only—Change the interface or the default next-hop address.
  • Other parameters—Change the forwarding address or the IP next-hop address.

Access Lists

IP access lists can match the packet to a number of IP packet fields such as the following:

  • Source or destination IPv4 or IPv6 address
  • Protocol
  • Precedence
  • ToS

You can use ACLs in a route map for policy-based routing only. See the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Security Configuration Guide for more information on ACLs.

AS Numbers for BGP

You can configure a list of AS numbers to match against BGP peers. If a BGP peer matches an AS number in the list and matches the other BGP peer configuration, BGP creates a session. If the BGP peer does not match an AS number in the list, BGP ignores the peer. You can configure the AS numbers as a list, a range of AS numbers, or you can use an AS-path list to compare the AS numbers against a regular expression.

AS-path Lists for BGP

You can configure an AS-path list to filter inbound or outbound BGP route updates. If the route update contains an AS-path attribute that matches an entry in the AS-path list, the router processes the route based on the permit or deny condition configured. You can configure AS-path lists within a route map.

You can configure multiple AS-path entries in an AS-path list by using the same AS-path list name. The router processes the first entry that matches.

Community Lists for BGP

You can filter BGP route updates based on the BGP community attribute by using community lists in a route map. You can match the community attribute based on a community list, and you can set the community attribute using a route map.

A community list contains one or more community attributes. If you configure more than one community attribute in the same community list entry, the BGP route must match all community attributes listed to be considered a match.

You can also configure multiple community attributes as individual entries in the community list by using the same community list name. In this case, the router processes the first community attribute that matches the BGP route, using the permit or deny configuration for that entry.

You can configure community attributes in the community list in one of the following formats:

  • A named community attribute, such as internet or no-export.
  • In aa:nn format, where the first two bytes represent the two-byte AS number and the last two bytes represent a user-defined network number.
  • A regular expression.

See the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Unicast Routing Command Reference for more information on regular expressions.

Extended Community Lists for BGP

Extended community lists support 4-byte AS numbers. You can configure community attributes in the extended community list in one of the following formats:

  • In aa4:nn format, where the first four bytes represent the four-byte AS number and the last two bytes represent a a user-defined network number.
  • A regular expression.

See the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Unicast Routing Command Reference for more information on regular expressions.

Cisco NX-OS supports generic specific extended community lists, which provide similar functionality to regular community lists for four-byte AS numbers. You can configure generic specific extended community lists with the following properties:

  • Transitive—BGP propagates the community attributes across autonomous systems.
  • Nontransitive—BGP removes community attributes before propagating the route to another autonomous system.

Route Redistribution and Route Maps

You can use route maps to control the redistribution of routes between routing domains. Route maps match on the attributes of the routes to redistribute only those routes that pass the match criteria. The route map can also modify the route attributes during this redistribution using the set changes.

The router matches redistributed routes against each route map entry. If there are multiple match statements, the route must pass all of the match criteria. If a route passes the match criteria defined in a route map entry, the actions defined in the entry are executed. If the route does not match the criteria, the router compares the route against subsequent route map entries. Route processing continues until a match is made or the route is processed by all entries in the route map with no match. If the router processes the route against all entries in a route map with no match, the router accepts the route (inbound route maps) or forwards the route (outbound route maps).


Note When you redistribute BGP to IGP, iBGP is redistributed as well. To override this behavior, you must insert an additional deny statement into the route map.


Policy-Based Routing

You can use policy-based routing to forward a packet to a specified next-hop address based on the source of the packet or other fields in the packet header. For more information, see Chapter18, “Configuring Policy-Based Routing”

Licensing Requirements for Route Policy Manager

The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature:

 

Product
License Requirement

Cisco NX-OS

Route Policy Manager requires no license. Any feature not included in a license package is bundled with the Cisco NX-OS system images and is provided at no extra charge to you. For a complete explanation of the Cisco NX-OS licensing scheme, see the Cisco NX-OS Licensing Guide .

Prerequisites for Route Policy Manager

Route Policy Manager has the following prerequisites:

  • If you configure VDCs, install the appropriate license and enter the desired VDC (see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Virtual Device Context Configuration Guide for configuration information and the Cisco NX-OS Licensing Guide for licensing information).

Guidelines and Limitations

Route Policy Manager has the following configuration guidelines and limitations:

  • An empty route map denies all the routes.
  • An empty prefix list permits all the routes.
  • Without any match statement in a route-map entry, the permission (permit or deny) of the route-map entry decides the result for all the routes or packets.
  • If referred policies (for example, prefix lists) within a match statement of a route-map entry return either a no-match or a deny-match, Cisco NX-OS fails the match statement and processes the next route-map entry.
  • When you change a route map, Cisco NX-OS holds all the changes until you exit from the route-map configuration submode. Cisco NX-OS then sends all the changes to the protocol clients to take effect.
  • Because you can use a route map before you define it, verify that all your route maps exist when you finish a configuration change.
  • You can view the route-map usage for redistribution and filtering. Each individual routing protocol provides a way to display these statistics.
  • When you redistribute BGP to IGP, iBGP is redistributed as well. To override this behavior, you must insert an additional deny statement into the route map.

Default Settings

Table 17-1 lists the default settings for Route Policy Manager.

 

Table 17-1 Default Route Policy Manager Parameters

Parameters
Default

Route Policy Manager

Enabled

Administrative distance

115

Configuring Route Policy Manager

This section includes the following topics:


Note If you are familiar with the Cisco IOS CLI, be aware that the Cisco NX-OS commands for this feature might differ from the Cisco IOS commands that you would use.


Configuring IP Prefix Lists

IP prefix lists match the IP packet or route against a list of prefixes and prefix lengths. You can create an IP prefix list for IPv4 and create an IPv6 prefix list for IPv6.

You can configure the prefix list entry to match the prefix length exactly or to match any prefix with a length that matches the configured range of prefix lengths.

Use the ge and lt keywords to create a range of possible prefix lengths. The incoming packet or route matches the prefix list if the prefix matches and if the prefix length is greater than or equal to the ge keyword value (if configured) and less than or equal to the lt keyword value (if configured).

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. { ip | ipv6 } prefix-list name description string

3. ip prefix-list name [ seq number ] [{ permit | deny } prefix {[ eq prefix-length ] | [ ge prefix-length ] [ le prefix-length ]}]

or

ipv6 prefix-list name [ seq number ] [{ permit | deny } prefix {[ eq prefix-length ] | [ ge prefix-length ] [ le prefix-length ]}]

4. (Optional) show { ip | ipv6 } prefix-list name

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

 

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

{ ip | ipv6 } prefix-list name description string

 

Example :

switch(config)# ip prefix-list AllowPrefix description allows engineering server

(Optional) Adds an information string about the prefix list.

Step 3

ip prefix-list name [ seq number ] [{ permit | deny } prefix {[ eq prefix-length ] | [ ge prefix-length ] [ le prefix-length ]}]

 

Example:

switch(config)# ip prefix-list AllowPrefix seq 10 permit 192.0.2.0/24 eq 24

 

Creates an IPv4 prefix list or adds a prefix to an existing prefix list. The prefix length is matched as follows:

  • eq—Matches the exact prefix length .
  • ge—Matches a prefix length that is equal to or greater than the configured prefix length .
  • le—Matches a prefix length that is equal to or less than the configured prefix length .

ipv6 prefix-list name [ seq number ] [{ permit | deny } prefix {[ eq prefix-length ] | [ ge prefix-length ] [ le prefix-length ]}]

 

Example:

switch(config)# ipv6 prefix-list AllowIPv6Prefix seq 10 permit 2001:0DB8:: le 32

 

Creates an IPv6 prefix list or adds a prefix to an existing prefix list. The prefix length is configured as follows:

  • eq—Matches the exact prefix length .
  • ge—Matches a prefix length that is equal to or greater than the configured prefix length .
  • le—Matches a prefix length that is equal to or less than the configured prefix length .

Step 4

show { ip | ipv6 } prefix-list name

 

Example :

switch(config)# show ip prefix-list AllowPrefix

(Optional) Displays information about prefix lists.

Step 5

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

This example shows how to create an IPv4 prefix list with two entries and apply the prefix list to a BGP neighbor:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)# ip prefix-list allowprefix seq 10 permit 192.0.2.0/24 eq 24

switch(config)# ip prefix-list allowprefix seq 20 permit 209.165.201.0/27 eq 27

switch(config)# router bgp 65536:20

switch(config-router)# neighbor 192.0.2.1/16 remote-as 65535:20

switch(config-router-neighbor)# address-family ipv4 unicast

switch(config-router-neighbor-af)# prefix-list allowprefix in

 

Configuring MAC Lists

You can configure a MAC list to permit or deny a range of MAC addresses.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. mac-list name [ seq number ] { permit | deny } mac-address [ mac-mask ]

3. (Optional) show mac -list name

4. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

 

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

mac-list name [ seq number ] { permit | deny } mac-address [mac-mask]

 

Example:

switch(config)# mac-list AllowMac seq 1 permit 0022.5579.a4c1 ffff.ffff.0000

Creates a MAC list or adds a MAC address to an existing MAC list. The seq range is from 1 to 4294967294. The mac-mask specifies the portion of the MAC address to match against and is in MAC address format.

Step 3

show mac- list name

 

Example :

switch(config)# show mac-list AllowMac

(Optional) Displays information about MAC lists.

Step 4

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

Configuring AS-path Lists

You can specify an AS-path list filter on both inbound and outbound BGP routes. Each filter is an access list based on regular expressions. If the regular expression matches the representation of the AS-path attribute of the route as an ASCII string, the permit or deny condition applies.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. ip as-path access-list name { deny | permit } expression

3. (Optional) show { ip | ipv6 } as-path list name

4. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

 

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

ip as-path access-list name { deny | permit } expression

 

Example:

switch(config)# ip as-path access-list Allow40 permit 40

Creates a BGP AS-path list using a regular expression.

Step 3

show { ip | ipv6 } as-path-access-list name

 

Example :

switch(config)# show ip as-path-access-list Allow40

(Optional) Displays information about as-path access lists.

Step 4

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

This example shows how to create an AS-path list with two entries and apply the AS path list to a BGP neighbor:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)# ip as-path access-list AllowAS permit 64510

switch(config)# ip as-path access-list AllowAS permit 64496

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

switch(config)# router bgp 65536:20
switch(config-router)# neighbor 192.0.2.1/16 remote-as 65535:20
switch(config-router-neighbor)# address-family ipv4 unicast
switch(config-router-neighbor-af)# filter-list AllowAS in
 

Configuring Community Lists

You can use community lists to filter BGP routes based on the community attribute. The community number consists of a 4-byte value in the aa:nn format. The first two bytes represent the autonomous system number, and the last two bytes represent a user-defined network number.

When you configure multiple values in the same community list statement, all community values must match to satisfy the community list filter. When you configure multiple values in separate community list statements, the first list that matches a condition is processed.

Use community lists in a match statement to filter BGP routes based on the community attribute.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. ip community-list standard list-name { deny | permit } [community-list] [ internet ] [ local-AS ] [ no-advertise ] [ no-export ]

or

ip community-list expanded list-name { deny | permit } expression

3. (Optional) show ip community-list name

4. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

 

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

ip community-list standard list-name { deny | permit } [ community-list ] [ internet ] [ local-AS ] [ no-advertise ] [ no-export ]

 

 

Example:

switch(config)# ip community-list standard BGPCommunity permit no-advertise 65536:20

 

Creates a standard BGP community list. The list-name can be any case-sensitive, alphanumeric string up to 63 characters. The community-list can be one or more communities in the aa:nn format.

ip community-list expanded list-name { deny | permit } expression

 

Example:

switch(config)# ip community-list expanded BGPComplex deny 50000:[0-9][0-9]_

 

Creates an expanded BGP community list using a regular expression.

Step 3

show ip community-list name

 

Example :

switch(config)# show ip community-list BGPCommunity

(Optional) Displays information about community lists.

Step 4

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

This example shows how to create a community list with two entries:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)# ip community-list standard BGPCommunity permit no-advertise 65536:20

switch(config)# ip community-list standard BGPCommunity permit local-AS no-export

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

Configuring Extended Community Lists

You can use extended community lists to filter BGP routes based on the community attribute. The community number consists of a 6-byte value in the aa4:nn format. The first four bytes represent the autonomous system number, and the last two bytes represent a user-defined network number.

When you configure multiple values in the same extended community list statement, all extended community values must match to satisfy the extended community list filter. When you configure multiple values in separate extended community list statements, the first list that matches a condition is processed.

Use extended community lists in a match statement to filter BGP routes based on the extended community attribute.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. ip extcommunity-list standard list-name { deny | permit } 4bytegeneric { transitive | non-transitive } aa4:nn

or

ip extcommunity-list expanded list-name { deny | permit } expression

3. (Optional) show ip extc ommunity-list name

4. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

 

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

ip extcommunity-list standard list-name { deny | permit } 4bytegeneric { transitive | nontransitive } community1 [ community2... ]

 

 

Example:

switch(config)# ip extcommunity-list standard BGPExtCommunity permit 4bytegeneric transitive 65536:20

Creates a standard BGP extended community list. The community can be one or more extended communities in the aa4:nn format.

ip extcommunity-list expanded list-name { deny | permit } expression

 

Example:

switch(config)# ip extcommunity-list expanded BGPExtComplex deny 1.5:[0-9][0-9]_

Creates an expanded BGP extended community list using a regular expression.

Step 3

show ip community-list name

 

Example :

switch(config)# show ip community-list BGPCommunity

(Optional) Displays information about extended community lists.

Step 4

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

This example shows how to create a generic specific extended community list:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)# ip extcommunity-list standard test1 permit 4bytegeneric transitive 65536:40 65536:60

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

Configuring Route Maps

You can use route maps for route redistribution or route filtering. Route maps can contain multiple match criteria and multiple set criteria.

Configuring a route map for BGP triggers an automatic soft clear or refresh of BGP neighbor sessions.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. route-map map-name [ permit | deny ] [ seq ]

3. (Optional) continue seq

4. (Optional) exit

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

 

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

route-map map-name [ permit | deny ] [ seq ]

 

Example:

switch(config)# route-map Testmap permit 10

switch(config-route-map)#

Creates a route map or enters route-map configuration mode for an existing route map. Use seq to order the entries in a route map.

Step 3

continue seq

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# continue 10

(Optional) Determines what sequence statement to process next in the route map. Used only for filtering and redistribution.

Step 4

exit

 

Example :

switch(config-route-map)# exit

(Optional) Exits route-map configuration mode.

Step 5

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

You can configure the following optional match parameters for route maps in route-map configuration mode:


Note The default-information originate command ignores match statements in the optional route map.


 

Command
Purpose

match as-path name [ name... ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match as-path Allow40

Matches against one or more AS-path lists. Create the AS-path list with the ip as-path access-list command.

match as-number { number [ ,number... ] | as-path-list name [ name... ]}

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match as-number 33,50-60

Matches against one or more AS numbers or AS-path lists. Create the AS-path list with the ip as-path access-list command. The number range is from 1 to 65535. The AS-path list name can be any case-sensitive, alphanumeric string up to 63 characters.

match community name [ name... ][ exact-match ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match community BGPCommunity

Matches against one or more community lists. Create the community list with the ip community-list command.

match extcommunity name [ name... ][ exact-match ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match extcommunity BGPextCommunity

Matches against one or more extended community lists. Create the community list with the ip extcommunity-list command.

match interface interface-type number [ interface-type number... ] [null 0]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match interface e 1/2

Matches any routes that have their next hop out one of the configured interfaces. Use ? to find a list of supported interface types.

You can specify a null interface by using null 0 .

match ip address prefix-list name [ name... ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match ip address prefix-list AllowPrefix

Matches against one or more IPv4 prefix lists. Use the ip prefix-list command to create the prefix list.

match ipv6 address prefix-list name [ name... ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match ip address prefix-list AllowIPv6Prefix

Matches against one or more IPv6 prefix lists. Use the ipv6 prefix-list command to create the prefix list.

match ip multicast [ source ipsource ] [[ group ipgroup ] [ rp iprp ]]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match ip multicast rp 192.0.2.1

Matches an IPv4 multicast packet based on the multicast source, group, or rendezvous point.

match ipv6 multicast [ source ipsource ] [[ group ipgroup ] [ rp iprp ]]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match ip multicast source 2001:0DB8::1

Matches an IPv6 multicast packet based on the multicast source, group, or rendezvous point.

match ip next-hop prefix-list name [ name ... ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match ip next-hop prefix-list AllowPrefix

Matches the IPv4 next-hop address of a route to one or more IP prefix lists. Use the ip prefix-list command to create the prefix list.

match ipv6 next-hop prefix-list name [ name ... ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match ipv6 next-hop prefix-list AllowIPv6Prefix

Matches the IPv6 next-hop address of a route to one or more IP prefix lists. Use the ipv6 prefix-list command to create the prefix list.

match ip route-source prefix-list name [ name ... ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match ip route-source prefix-list AllowPrefix

Matches the IPv4 route source address of a route to one or more IP prefix lists. Use the ip prefix-list command to create the prefix list.

match ipv6 route-source prefix-list name [ name ... ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match ipv6 route-source prefix-list AllowIPv6Prefix

Matches the IPv6 route-source address of a route to one or more IP prefix lists. Use the ipv6 prefix-list command to create the prefix list.

match mac-list name [ name... ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match mac-list AllowMAC

Matches against one or more MAC lists. Use the mac-list command to create the MAC list.

match metric value [ +- deviation. ] [ value.. ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match metric 50 + 10

Matches the route metric against one or more metric values or value ranges. Use +- deviation argument to set a metric range. The route map matches any route metric that falls within the range:

value - deviation to value + deviation .

match route-type route-type

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match route-type level 1 level 2

Matches against a type of route. The route-type can be one or more of the following:

  • external—The external route (BGP, EIGRP, and OSPF type 1 or 2)
  • inter-area—OSPF inter-area route
  • internal—The internal route (including the OSPF intra- or inter-area)
  • intra-area—OSPF intra-area route
  • level-1—The IS-IS level 1 route
  • level-2—The IS-IS level 2 route
  • local—The locally generated route
  • nssa-external—The NSSA external route (OSPF type 1 or 2).
  • type-1—The OSPF external type 1 route
  • type-2—The OSPF external type 2 route

match tag tagid [ tagid... ]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match tag 2

Matches a route against one or more tags for filtering or redistribution.

match vlan vlan-id [ vlan-rang e]

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# match vlan 3, 5-10

Matches against a VLAN.

You can configure the following optional set parameters for route maps in route-map configuration mode:

 

Command
Purpose

set as-path { tag | prepend { last-as number | as-1 [ as-2... ]}}

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set as-path prepend 10 100 110

Modifies an AS-path attribute for a BGP route. You can prepend the configured number of last AS numbers or a string of particular AS-path values ( as-1 as-2...as-n ).

set comm-list name delete

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set comm-list BGPCommunity delete

Removes communities from the community attribute of an inbound or outbound BGP route update. Use the ip community-list command to create the community list.

set community { none | additive | local-AS | no-advertise | no-export | community-1 [community-2...]}

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set community local-AS

Sets the community attribute for a BGP route update.

commands in the same sequence of a route map attribute, the deletion operation is performed before the set operation.

command in BGP neighbor address family configuration mode to propagate BGP community attributes to BGP peers.

set dampening halflife reuse suppress duration

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set dampening 30 1500 10000 120

Sets the following BGP route dampening parameters:

  • halflife —The range is from 1 to 45 minutes. The default is 15.
  • reuse —The range is from is 1 to 20000 seconds. The default is 750.
  • suppress —The range is from is 1 to 20000. The default is 2000.
  • duration —The range is from is 1 to 255 minutes. The default is 60.

set distance value

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set distance 150

Sets the administrative distance of routes for OSPFv2 or OSPFv3. The range is from 1 to 255.

set extcomm-list name delete

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set extcomm-list BGPextCommunity delete

Removes communities from the extended community attribute of an inbound or outbound BGP route update. Use the ip extcommunity-list command to create the extended community list.

set extcommunity 4byteas-generic { transitive | nontransitive } { none | additive ] community-1 [community-2...]}

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set extcommunity generic transitive 1.0:30

Sets the extended community attribute for a BGP route update.

commands in the same sequence of a route map attribute, the deletion operation is performed before the set operation.

command in BGP neighbor address family configuration mode to propagate BGP extended community attributes to BGP peers.

set extcommunity cost community-id1 cost [ igp | pre-bestpath ] [community-id2...]}

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set extcommunity cost 33 1.0:30

Sets the cost community attribute for a BGP route update. This attribute allows you to customize the BGP best path selection process for a local autonomous system or confederation. The community-id range is from 0 to 255. The cost range is from 0 to 4294967295. The path with the lowest cost is preferred. For paths with equal cost, the path with the lowest community ID is preferred.

The igp keyword compares the cost after the IGP cost comparison. The pre-bestpath keyword compares before all other steps in the bestpath algorithm.

set extcommunity rt community-1 [ additive ] [community-2...]}

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set extcommunity rt 1.0:30

Sets the extended community route target attribute for a BGP route update. The community value can be a 2-byte AS number:4-byte network number, a 4-byte AS number:2-byte network number, or an IP address:2-byte network number.

Use the additive keyword to add a route target to an existing extended community route target attribute.

set forwarding-address

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set forwarding-address

Sets the forwarding address for OSPF.

set level { backbone | level-1 | level-1-2 | level-2 }

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set level backbone

Sets what area to import routes to for IS-IS. The options for IS-IS are level-1, level-1-2, or level-2. The default is level-1.

set local-preference value

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set local-preference 4000

Sets the BGP local preference value. The range is from 0 to 4294967295.

set metric [ + | - ] bandwidth-metric

 

Example :

switch(config-route-map)# set metric +100

Adds or subtracts from the existing metric value. The metric is in Kb/s. The range is from 0 to 4294967295.

set metric bandwidth [ delay reliability load mtu ]

 

Example :

switch(config-route-map)# set metric 33 44 100 200 1500

Sets the route metric values.

Metrics are as follows:

  • metric0 —Bandwidth in Kb/s. The range is from 0 to 4294967295.
  • metric1 —Delay in 10-microsecond units.
  • metric2 —Reliability. The range is from 0 to 255 (100 percent reliable).
  • metric3 —Loading. The range is from 1 to 200 (100 percent loaded).
  • metric4 —MTU of the path. The range is from 1 to 4294967295.

set metric-type { external | internal | type-1 | type-2 }

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set metric-type internal

Sets the metric type for the destination routing protocol. The options are as follows:

external—IS-IS external metric

internal— IGP metric as the MED for BGP

type-1—OSPF external type 1 metric

type-2—OSPF external type 2 metric

set nssa-only

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set nssa-only

Sets Type-7 LSA generated on ASBR with no P bit set. This prevents Type-7 to Type-5 LSA translation in OSPF.

set origin { egp as-number | igp | incomplete }

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set origin incomplete

Sets the BGP origin attribute. The EGP as-number range is from 0 to 65535.

set tag name

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set tag 33

Sets the tag value for the destination routing protocol. The name parameter is an unsigned integer.

set weight count

 

Example:

switch(config-route-map)# set weight 33

Sets the weight for the BGP route. The range is from 0 to 65535.

The set metric-type internal command affects an outgoing policy and an eBGP neighbor only. If you configure both the metric and metric-type internal commands in the same BGP peer outgoing policy, Cisco NX-OS ignores the metric-type internal command.

Verifying the Route Policy Manager Configuration

To display route policy manager configuration information, perform one of the following tasks:

 

Command
Purpose

show ip community-list [name]

Displays information about a community list.

show ip ext community-list [name]

Displays information about an extended community list.

show [ip | ipv6] prefix-list [name]

Displays information about an IPv4 or IPv6 prefix list.

show route-map [name]

Displays information about a route map.

Configuration Examples for Route Policy Manager

This example shows how to use an address family to configure Route Policy Manager so that any unicast and multicast routes from neighbor 209.0.2.1 are accepted if they match prefix-list AllowPrefix:

router bgp 64496
 
neighbor 209.0.2.1 remote-as 64497
address-family ipv4 unicast
route-map filterBGP in

route-map filterBGP

match ip address prefix-list AllowPrefix

 

ip prefix-list AllowPrefix 10 permit 192.0.2.0/24

ip prefix-list AllowPrefix 20 permit 209.165.201.0/27

Related Topics

The following topics can give more information on Route Policy Manager:

Additional References

For additional information related to implementing IP, see the following sections:

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Route Policy Manager CLI commands

Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Unicast Routing Command Reference

VDCs and VRFs

Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Virtual Device Context Configuration Guide

Standards

Standards
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.

Feature History for Route Policy Manager

Table 17-2 lists the release history for this feature.

 

Table 17-2 Feature History for Route Policy Manager

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

Match interfaces

6.2(2)

Added support for null interfaces to the match interface command.

Route policy manager

6.1(1)

Added support for the set distance command and for the inter-area and intra-area options for the match route-type command.

MPLS set clauses

5.2(1)

Added support for set extcommunity cost , set extcommunity rt , and set nssa-only commands.

MAC lists , metric, and VLANs

5.0(2)

Added support for the match mac-list , match metric , and match vlan commands.

Extended community lists

4.2(1)

Added support for generic specific extended community lists.

Match interfaces

4.1(2)

Added support to match a list of interfaces in a route map.

Match AS numbers

4.1(2)

Added support to match a range of AS numbers in a route map.

Route policy manager

4.0(1)

This feature was introduced.