Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Quality of Service Configuration Guide, Release 6.x
Configuring Classification
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Table Of Contents

Configuring Classification

Information About Classification

Licensing Requirements for Classification

Prerequisites for Classification

Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring Traffic Classes

Configuring ACL Classification

Configuring DSCP Classification

Configuring IP Precedence Classification

Configuring Protocol Classification

Configuring QoS Group Classification

Configuring Discard Class Classification

Configuring Layer 3 Packet Length Classification

Configuring CoS Classification

Configuring IP RTP Classification

Configuring Class Map Classification

Verifying the Classification Configuration

Configuration Examples for Classification

Feature History for Classification


Configuring Classification


This chapter describes how to configure classification on the Cisco NX-OS device. This chapter includes the following sections:

Information About Classification

Licensing Requirements for Classification

Prerequisites for Classification

Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring Traffic Classes

Verifying the Classification Configuration

Configuration Examples for Classification

Feature History for Classification

Information About Classification

Classification is the separation of packets into traffic classes. You configure the device to take a specific action on the specified classified traffic, such as policing or marking down, or other actions.

You can create class maps to represent each traffic class by matching packet characteristics with the classification criteria in Table 2-1.

Table 2-1 Classification Criteria 

Classification Criteria
Description

CoS

class of service (CoS) field in the IEEE 802.1Q header.

IP precedence

Precedence value within the type of service (ToS) byte of the IP header.

Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP)

DSCP value within the DIffServ field of the IP header.

QoS group

Locally significant QoS values that can be manipulated and matched within the system. The range is from 0 to 126.

Discard class

Locally significant values that can be matched and manipulated within the system. The range is from 0 to 63.

Protocol

Standard Layer 2 protocol such as Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) or Connectionless Network Service (CLNS).

Packet length

Size range of Layer 3 packet lengths.

IP RTP

Identify applications using Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) by UDP port number range.

Class map

Criteria specified in a named class-map object.


You can specify multiple match criteria, you can choose to not match on a particular criterion, or you can determine the traffic class by matching any or all criteria.


Note However, if you match on an ACL, no other match criteria, except the packet length, can be specified in a match-all class. In a match-any class, you can match on ACLs and any other match criteria.


Some match criteria relate only to ingress or egress traffic. For example, the internal label QoS group has no meaning on ingress traffic because it has not yet been assigned a value.

Traffic that fails to match any class in a QoS policy map is assigned to a default class of traffic called class-default. The class-default can be referenced in a QoS policy map to select this unmatched traffic.


Note When you configure match all for a QoS class map by entering the class-map type qos match-all command, the match-all option does not work. Instead, the match criteria is always treated as match any.


You can reuse class maps within the same virtual device context (VDC) when defining the QoS policies for different interfaces that process the same types of traffic.


Note For more information on class maps, see Chapter 3 "Using Modular QoS CLI."


Licensing Requirements for Classification

The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature:

Product
License Requirement

Cisco NX-OS

The QoS feature does not a require license. Any feature not included in a license package is bundled with the Cisco NX-OS system images and is provided at no extra charge to you. For a complete explanation of the Cisco NX-OS licensing scheme, see the Cisco NX-OS Licensing Guide.


However, using virtual device contexts (VDCs) requires an Advanced Services license.

Prerequisites for Classification

Classification has the following prerequisites:

You must be familiar with Chapter 3 "Using Modular QoS CLI."

You are logged on to the switch.

You are in the correct VDC. A VDC is a logical representation of a set of system resources. You can use the switchto vdc command with a VDC number.

Guidelines and Limitations

Classification has the following configuration guidelines and limitations:

You can specify a maximum of 1024 match criteria in a class map.

You can configure a maximum of 4096 classes for use in a single policy map.

When you match on an ACL, the only other match you can specify is the Layer 3 packet length in a match-all class.

The match-all option in the class-map type qos match-all command is not supported. The match criteria of this command becomes the same as in the class-map type qos match-any command. The class-map type qos match-all command yields the same results as the class-map type qos match-any command.

You can classify traffic on Layer 2 ports based on either the port policy or VLAN policy of the incoming packet but not both. Either the port policy or the VLAN policy takes effect but not both. If both are present, the device acts on the port policy and ignores the VLAN policy.

The match cos command is not supported in the egress direction.

For F1 module proxy-forwarded traffic, ACL classification is matched against the layer 3 protocols shown in the following table.

Table 2-2 Protocol Number and Associated Layer 3 Protocol 

Protocol Number
Layer 3 Protocol

1

ICMP

2

IGMP

4

IPv4 Encapsulation

6

TCP

17

UDP



Note Layer 3 protocols not listed in the table are classified as protocol number 4 (IPv4 Encapsulation).


Configuring Traffic Classes

This section includes the following topics:

Configuring ACL Classification

Configuring DSCP Classification

Configuring IP Precedence Classification

Configuring Protocol Classification

Configuring QoS Group Classification

Configuring Discard Class Classification

Configuring Layer 3 Packet Length Classification

Configuring CoS Classification

Configuring IP RTP Classification

Configuring Class Map Classification

Configuring ACL Classification


Note The device does not support the no form of the match access-group name command.


You can classify traffic by matching packets based on existing ACLs. The permit and deny ACL keywords are ignored in the matching. QoS does not use the permit-deny functions of ACLs. You can classify by either IPv4 or IPv6.


Note Support is available for controlling deny access control entry ([no] hardware access-list allow deny ace) in the CLI. For more information about this support, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Security Configuration Guide, Release 6.x.



Note Tunneled IP packets are matched unless the tunneling protocol is also IP, and then the match applies to the outer IP header and not the encapsulated IP header.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. match access-group name acl-name

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class_acl

Creates or accesses the class map named class-map-name and enters class-map mode. The class map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

match access-group name acl-name

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# match access-group name my_acl

Configures the traffic class by matching packets based on the acl-name. The permit and deny ACL keywords are ignored in the matching.

Note The device does not support the no form of this command.

This example shows how to display the ACL class-map configuration:

switch# show class-map class_acl

Configuring DSCP Classification

You can classify traffic based on the DSCP value in the DiffServ field of the IP header. The standard DSCP values are listed in Table 2-3.

Table 2-3 Standard DSCP Values 

Value
List of DSCP Values

af11

AF11 dscp (001010)—decimal value 10

af12

AF12 dscp (001100)—decimal value 12

af13

AF13 dscp (001110)—decimal value 14

af21

AF21 dscp (010010)—decimal value 18

af22

AF22 dscp (010100)—decimal value 20

af23

AF23 dscp (010110)—decimal value 22

af31

AF31 dscp (011010)—decimal value 26

af32

AF40 dscp (011100)—decimal value 28

af33

AF33 dscp (011110)—decimal value 30

af41

AF41 dscp (100010)—decimal value 34

af42

AF42 dscp (100100)—decimal value 36

af43

AF43 dscp (100110)—decimal value 38

cs1

CS1 (precedence 1) dscp (001000)—decimal value 8

cs2

CS2 (precedence 2) dscp (010000)—decimal value 16

cs3

CS3 (precedence 3) dscp (011000)—decimal value 24

cs4

CS4 (precedence 4) dscp (100000)—decimal value 32

cs5

CS5 (precedence 5) dscp (101000)—decimal value 40

cs6

CS6 (precedence 6) dscp (110000)—decimal value 48

cs7

CS7 (precedence 7) dscp (111000)—decimal value 56

default

Default dscp (000000)—decimal value 0

ef

EF dscp (101110)—decimal value 46



Note Tunneled IP packets are matched unless the tunneling protocol is also IP, and the match applies to the outer IP header and not the encapsulated IP header.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. match [not] dscp dscp-list

4. exit

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

`DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class_dscp

Creates or accesses the class map named class-map-name and enters class-map mode. The class-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

match [not] dscp dscp-values

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# match dscp af21, af32

Configures the traffic class by matching packets based on dscp-values. The standard DSCP values are shown in Table 2-3.

Use the not keyword to match on values that do not match the specified range.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits global class-map queuing mode, and enters configuration mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to display the DSCP class-map configuration:

switch# show class-map class_dscp

Configuring IP Precedence Classification

You can classify traffic based on the precedence value in the type of service (ToS) byte field of the IP header. Table 2-4 shows the precedence values.

Table 2-4 Precedence Values 

Value
List of Precedence Values

0-7

IP precedence value

critical

Critical precedence (5)

flash

Flash precedence (3)

flash-override

Flash override precedence (4)

immediate

Immediate precedence (2)

internet

Internetwork control precedence (6)

network

Network control precedence (7)

priority

Priority precedence (1)

routine

Routine precedence (0)



Note Tunneled IP packets are matched unless the tunneling protocol is also IP, and the match applies to the outer IP header and not the encapsulated IP header.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. match [not] precedence precedence-values

4. exit

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

`DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class_ip_precedence

Creates or accesses the class map named class-map-name, and then enters class-map mode. The class-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

match [not] precedence precedence-values

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# match precedence 1-2, 5-7

Configures the traffic class by matching packets based on precedence-values. Values are shown in Table 2-4. Use the not keyword to match on values that do not match the specified range.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits global class-map queuing mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to display the IP precedence class-map configuration:

switch# show class-map class_ip_precedence

Configuring Protocol Classification

For Layer 3 protocol traffic, you can use the ACL classification match. For more information, see the "Configuring ACL Classification" section.

You can classify traffic based on the protocol arguments described in Table 2-5.

Table 2-5 match Command Protocol Arguments 

Argument
Description

arp

Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

bridging

Bridging

cdp

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP)

clns

Connectionless Network Service (CLNS)

clns_es

CLNS End Systems

clns_is

CLNS Intermediate System

dhcp

Dynamic Host Configuration (DHCP)

isis

Intermediate system to intermediate system (IS-IS)

ldp

Label Distribution Protocol (LDP)

netbios

NetBIOS Extended User Interface (NetBEUI)



Note A maximum of eight different protocols (in Table 2-5) can be matched at a time.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. match [not] protocol {arp | bridging | clns | clns_is | dhcp | isis | netbios | cdp | clns_es | ldp}

4. exit

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class_protocol

Creates or accesses the class map named class-map-name, and then enters class-map mode. The class-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

match [not] protocol {arp | bridging | cdp | clns | clns_is | dhcp | isis | netbios | clns_es | ldp}

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# match protocol isis

Configures the traffic class by matching packets based on the specified protocol. Use the not keyword to match on protocols that do not match the protocol specified.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits global class-map queuing mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to display the protocol class-map configuration:

switch# show class-map class_protocol

Configuring QoS Group Classification

You can classify traffic based on the value of the QoS group internal label, which is not part of the packet payload or any packet header. You can set the value of the QoS group within a policy map by using the set qos-group command as described in the "Configuring QoS Group Marking" section.


Note You match on the QoS group only in egress policies because its value is undefined until you set it in an ingress policy.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. match [not] qos-group multi-range-qos-group-values

4. exit

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class_qos_group

Creates or accesses the class map named class-map-name, and then enters class-map mode. The class-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

match [not] qos-group multi-range-qos-group-values

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# match qos-group 4, 80-90

Configures the traffic class by matching packets based on a list of QoS group values. Values can range from 0 to 126. The default QoS group value is 0. Use the not keyword to match on values that do not match the specified range.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits global class-map queuing mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to to display the QoS group class-map configuration:

switch# show class-map class_qos_group

Configuring Discard Class Classification

You can classify traffic based on the value of the discard class internal label, which is not part of the packet payload or any packet header. You can set the value of the discard class within a policy map using the set discard-class command as described in the "Configuring Discard Class Marking" section.


Note You match on the discard class only in egress policies because its value is undefined until you set it in an ingress policy.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. match [not] discard-class multi-range-discard-class-values

4. exit

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class_discard_class

Creates or accesses the class map named class-map-name, and then enters class-map mode. The class-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

match [not] discard-class multi-range-discard-class-values

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# match discard-class 4, 60-62

Configures the traffic class by matching packets based on the list of discard-class values. Values can range from 0 to 63. The default discard class value is 0. Use the not keyword to match on values that do not match the specified range.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits global class-map queuing mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to display the discard class class-map configuration:

switch# show class-map class_discard_class

Configuring Layer 3 Packet Length Classification

You can classify Layer 3 traffic based on various packet lengths.


Note This feature is designed for IP packets only.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. match [not] packet length packet-length-list

4. exit

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class_packet_length

Creates or accesses the class map named class-map-name, and then enters class-map mode. The class-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

match [not] packet length packet-length-list

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# match packet length min 2000

Configures the traffic class by matching packets based on various packet lengths. Values can range from 1 to 9198. Use the not keyword to match on values that do not match the specified range.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits global class-map queuing mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to display the packet length class-map configuration:

switch# show class-map class_packet_length

Configuring CoS Classification

You can classify traffic based on the class of service (CoS) in the IEEE 802.1Q header. This 3-bit field is defined in IEEE 802.1p to support QoS traffic classes. CoS is encoded in the high order 3 bits of the VLAN ID Tag field and is referred to as user_priority.


Note The match cos command is not supported in the egress direction.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. match [not] cos cos-list

4. exit

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class_cos

Creates or accesses the class map named class-map-name, and then enters class-map mode. The class-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

match [not] cos cos-list

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# match cos 4, 5-6

Configures the traffic class by matching packets based on list of CoS values. Values can range from 0 to 7. Use the not keyword to match on values that do not match the specified range.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits global class-map queuing mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to display the CoS class-map configuration:

switch# show class-map class_cos

Configuring IP RTP Classification

The IP Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) is a transport protocol for real-time applications that transmit data such as audio or video and is defined by RFC 3550. Although RTP does not use a common TCP or UDP port, you typically configure RTP to use ports 16384 to 32767. UDP communications uses an even-numbered port and the next higher odd-numbered port is used for RTP Control Protocol (RTCP) communications.

You can configure classification based on UDP port ranges, which are likely to target applications using RTP.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. match [not] ip rtp udp-port-value

4. exit

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class_rtp

Creates or accesses the class map named class-map-name, and then enters class-map mode. The class-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

match [not] ip rtp udp-port-value

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# match ip rtp 2000-2100, 4000-4100

Configures the traffic class by matching packets based on a range of lower and upper UDP port numbers, which is likely to target applications using RTP. Values can range from 2000 to 65535. Use the not keyword to match on values that do not match the specified range.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits global class-map queuing mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to display the RTP class-map configuration:

switch# show class-map class_rtp

Configuring Class Map Classification

You must create a referenced class map prior to its reference. You can configure only one level of nesting of class maps. You cannot reference a class map that references another class map.

Before you delete a referenced class map, you should delete all references to that class map.

You can classify traffic based on the match criteria in another class map. You can reference the same class map in multiple policies.

Follow these guidelines while configuring the class-map classification:

To perform a logical OR with the class map specified in the match class-map command, use the match-any keyword. The match-any or match-all specification of the matched class map is ignored.

To perform a logical AND with the class map specified in the match class-map command, use the match-all keyword. The match-any or match-all specification of the matched class map is ignored.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. match [not] class-map class-map-name

4. exit

5. (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class_class_map

Creates or accesses the class map named class-map-name, and then enters class-map mode. The class-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

match [not] class-map class-map-name

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# match class-map class_map3

Configures the traffic class by matching packets based on the match criteria in another class map. Because match-all is the default for the class-map command, the match criteria specified in class_map3 are ANDed with the match criteria in class_class_map. Use the not keyword to match on values that do not match the specified range.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits global class-map queuing mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to display the class-map class-map configuration:

switch# show class-map class_class_map

Verifying the Classification Configuration

Use the show class-map command to verify the class-map configuration. This command displays all class maps.

switch# show class-map
...

Configuration Examples for Classification

The following example shows how to configure classification for two classes of traffic:

class-map class_dscp
  match dscp af21, af32
exit
class-map class_cos
  match cos 4, 5-6
  exit

Feature History for Classification

Table 2-6 lists the release history for this feature.

Table 2-6 Feature History for Classification 

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

No changes from Release 4.1(2)

5.1(1)

Classification

4.1(2)

You can now match IPv4 and IPv6 ACLs.