Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Quality of Service Configuration Guide, Release 4.x
Using Modular QoS CLI
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Using Modular QoS CLI

Table Of Contents

Using Modular QoS CLI

Information About MQC

Licensing Requirements for Using MQC Objects

Using an MQC Object

Type qos Policies

Type queuing Policies

System-Defined MQC Objects

Configuring an MQC Object

Configuring or Modifying a Class Map

Configuring or Modifying a Table Map

Configuring or Modifying a Policy Map

Applying Descriptions to MQC Objects

Verifying an MQC Object

Attaching and Detaching a QoS Policy Action from an Interface

Session Manager Support for QoS

Feature History for Using Modular QoS CLI


Using Modular QoS CLI


This chapter describes how to configure Modular QoS CLI (MQC) objects that can be used for configuring QoS features using the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS software.

This chapter includes the following sections:

Information About MQC

Licensing Requirements for Using MQC Objects

Using an MQC Object

Attaching and Detaching a QoS Policy Action from an Interface

Session Manager Support for QoS

Feature History for Using Modular QoS CLI

Information About MQC

MQC provides a language to define QoS policies.


Note MQC commands are included in the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Quality of Service Command Reference, Release 4.2.


You configure QoS policies using three steps:

1. Define traffic classes.

2. Associate policies and actions with each traffic class.

3. Attach policies to logical or physical interfaces and VLANs.

MQC provides three command types to define traffic classes and policies:

class-map—Defines a class map that represents a class of traffic based on packet-matching criteria. Class maps are referenced in policy maps.


Note When you configure match all for a QoS class map by entering the class-map type qos match-all command, the match-all option does not work. Instead, the match criteria is always treated as match any.


table-map—Defines a table map that represents a mapping from one set of packet field values to another set of packet fields. Table maps are referenced in policy maps.

policy-map—Defines a policy map that represents a set of policies to be applied on a class-by-class basis to class maps.

You define the following class-map and policy-map object types when you create them:

qos—Defines MQC objects that you can use for marking and policing.

queuing—Defines MQC objects that you can use for queuing and scheduling.


Note The qos type is the default.


You can attach policies to ports, port channels, VLANs, subinterfaces, or tunnels by using the service-policy interface configuration command.

You can view all or individual values for MQC objects by using the show table-map, show class-map, and show policy-map commands.


Caution In the interface configuration mode, the Cisco Nexus 7000 switch might accept QoS and ACL commands irrespective of the line card on which the interface is hosts is up or down. However, you cannot enter interface sub-mode when the line card is down because the Cisco Nexus 7000 switch does not accept any pre-configuration information.

Licensing Requirements for Using MQC Objects

The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature:

Product
License Requirement

NX-OS

QoS requires no license. Any feature not included in a license package is bundled with the Cisco NX-OS system images and is provided at no extra charge to you. For a complete explanation of the NX-OS licensing scheme, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Licensing Guide, Release 4.2.


However, using VDCs requires an Advanced Services license.

Using an MQC Object

You configure QoS and queuing policies using the MQC class-map, policy-map, and table-map objects. You cannot use table maps in queuing policies. After you configure class maps and policy maps, you can attach one policy map of each type to the ingress direction of an interface. Figure 2-1 lists the maximum QoS and queuing policies that you can define on each interface.

Figure 2-1 Maximum QoS Policies Per Interface

A policy map contains either a qos policy or queuing policy. The policy map references the names of class maps that represent traffic classes. For each class of traffic, the device applies the policies on the interface or VLAN that you select.

A packet is matched sequentially to a class of traffic starting from the first traffic class definition. When a match is found, the policy actions for that class are applied to the packet.

The reserved class map receives all traffic that is not matched in type qos policies, and the device applies the policy actions as it would for any other traffic class. You use class-default to perform mutations (mutation is a method for translating QoS values in the packet header prior to traffic classification).


Note You can access user-defined MQC objects only in the virtual device context (VDC) in which they were created. You can access the system-defined MQC objects in all VDCs.


This section includes the following topics:

Type qos Policies

Type queuing Policies

System-Defined MQC Objects

Configuring an MQC Object

Applying Descriptions to MQC Objects

Verifying an MQC Object

Type qos Policies

You use type qos policies to mark, to apply mutations, to set the ingress port trust state, and to police packets.

Figure 2-2 shows the QoS policy structure with the associated MQC objects of type qos without mutation, and Figure 2-3 shows the QoS policy structure with mutation. The MQC objects are shown in bold.

Figure 2-2 QoS Policy Diagram Showing Type qos MQC Object Usage without Mutation

Figure 2-3 QoS Policy Diagram Showing Type qos MQC Object Usage with Mutation

Type queuing Policies

You use type queuing policies to mark, shape, and queue packets. Marking is limited to the CoS field and does not support the use of table maps.

Figure 2-4 shows the QoS policy structure with associated MQC objects of type queuing. The MQC objects are shown in bold.


Note MQC table-map objects cannot be used in policies of type queuing.


Figure 2-4 QoS Policy Diagram Showing Type queuing MQC Object Usage

System-Defined MQC Objects


Note These are the default MQC objects. All of these values apply across all VDCs.


When you configure QoS features, and the systems requests one of these MQC objects, you can use these system-defined objects.The system-defined MQC objects are shown in Table 2-1. See the tables listed next to the object for information on these system-defined objects.

Table 2-1 System-Defined MQC Objects 

Table and Page
Description

Table 2-2

Type qos class maps

Table 2-3

Type queuing class maps

Table 2-4

Table maps

Table 2-5

Policy maps


Type qos class maps that are defined by the system are listed in Table 2-2.


Note You cannot reference the conform-color-in, conform-color-out, exceed-color-in, or exceed-color-out class maps in a policy map.


Table 2-2 System-Defined Type qos Class Maps 

Class Map Name
Description

class-default

Type qos class map that is assigned to all packets that match none of the criteria of traffic classes that you define in a type qos policy map. You can use class-default for mutation.

conform-color-in

Type qos conform color class map in the input direction. This color-aware class map makes a policer color-aware for conform action.

conform-color-out

Type qos conform color class map in the output direction. This color-aware class map makes a policer color-aware for conform action.

exceed-color-in

Type qos exceed color class map in the input direction. This color-aware class map makes a policer color-aware for exceed action.

exceed-color-out

Type qos exceed color class map in the output direction. This color-aware class map makes a policer color-aware for exceed action.


Type queuing class maps that are defined by the system are listed in Table 2-3.

Table 2-3 System-Defined Type queuing Class Maps 

Class Map Queue Name
Description
Default CoS Values

1 Gigabit Module Ingress: 2 queues with 4 thresholds per queue

2q4t-in-q1

Ingress queue 1 of 2q4t type

5-7

2q4t-in-q-default

Ingress default queue of 2q4t type

0-4

1 Gigabit Module Egress: 1 strict priority queue and 3 normal queues with 4 thresholds per queue

1p3q4t-out-pq1 1

Egress priority queue of 1p3q4t type

5-7

1p3q4t-out-q2

Egress queue 2 of 1p3q4t type

-

1p3q4t-out-q3

Egress queue 3 of 1p3q4t type

-

1p3q4t-out-q-default

Egress default queue of 1p3q4t type

0-4

10 Gigabit Module Ingress: 8 queues with 2 thresholds per queue

8q2t-in-q1

Ingress queue 1 of 8q2t type

5-7

8q2t-in-q2

Ingress queue 2 of 8q2t type

-

8q2t-in-q3

Ingress queue 3 of 8q2t type

-

8q2t-in-q4

Ingress queue 4 of 8q2t type

-

8q2t-in-q5

Ingress queue 5 of 8q2t type

-

8q2t-in-q6

Ingress queue 6 of 8q2t type

-

8q2t-in-q7

Ingress queue 7 of 8q2t type

-

8q2t-in-q-default

Ingress default queue of 8q2t type

0-4

10 Gigabit Module Egress: 1 strict priority queue and 7 normal queues with 4 thresholds per queue

1p7q4t-out-pq1 1

Egress priority queue of 1p7q4t type

5-7

1p7q4t-out-q2

Egress queue 2 of 1p7q4t type

-

1p7q4t-out-q3

Egress queue 3 of 1p7q4t type

-

1p7q4t-out-q4

Egress queue 4 of 1p7q4t type

-

1p7q4t-out-q5

Egress queue 5 of 1p7q4t type

-

1p7q4t-out-q6

Egress queue 6 of 1p7q4t type

-

1p7q4t-out-q7

Egress queue 7 of 1p7q4t type

-

1p7q4t-out-q-default

Egress default queue of 1p7q4t type

0-4

1 These are either priority or normal queues. If you use the priority keyword in your configuration, these are used as priority queues. Otherwise, they are used as normal queues.


Table maps that are defined by the system are listed in Table 2-4. The default mapping of values in the tables maps is contained in RFC 2597. These are not configurable.

Table 2-4 System-Defined Table Maps 

Table Map Name
Description

cir-markdown-map

Table map used to mark down packets that exceed the committed information rate (CIR).

Note Enter the show table-map command to display the default mapping.

pir-markdown-map

Table map used to mark down packets that violate the peak information rate (PIR).

Note Enter the show table-map command to display the default mapping.

cos-discard-class-map

Table map used to map the CoS value to the discard-class value.

cos-dscp-map

Table map used to map the CoS value to the DSCP value.

cos-precedence-map

Table map used to map the CoS value to the precedence value.

dscp-cos-map

Table map used to map the DSCP value to the CoS value.

dscp-precedence-map

Table map used to map the DSCP value to the precedence value.

dscp-discard-class-map

Table map used to map the DSCP value to the discard-class value.

precedence-dscp-map

Table map used to map the precedence value to the DSCP value.

precedence-cos-map

Table map used to map the precedence value to the CoS value.

precedence-discard-class-map

Table map used to map the precedence value to the discard-class value.

discard-class-cos-map

Table map used to map the discard-class value to the CoS value.

discard-class-prec-map

Table map used to map the discard-class value to the precedence value.

discard-class-dscp-map

Table map used to map the discard-class value to the DSCP value.


Policy maps that are defined by the system are listed in Table 2-5.

Table 2-5 System-Defined Queuing Policy Maps 

Queuing Policy Map Name
Description

default-in-policy

Input queuing policy map that is attached to all module ports to which you do not apply a queuing policy map. The default configuration values are as follows:

policy-map type queuing default-in-policy
class type queuing in-q1
queue-limit percent 50
bandwidth percent 80
class type queuing in-q-default
queue-limit percent 50
bandwidth percent 20

default-out-policy

Output queuing policy map that is attached to all module ports to which you do not apply a queuing policy map. The default configuration values are as follows:

policy-map type queuing default-out-policy
class type queuing out-pq1
priority level 1
queue-limit percent 16
class type queuing out-q2
queue-limit percent 1
class type queuing out-q3
queue-limit percent 1
class type queuing out-q-default
queue-limit percent 82
bandwidth remaining percent 25


Configuring an MQC Object

When you specify a MQC object command, the device creates the object if it does not exist and then enters map mode.

To remove a class-map, table-map, or policy-map object, use the no form of the command that you used to create the object.

For the commands that you can use in the MQC object mode, see the following configuration chapters:

Chapter 3 "Configuring Classification"

Chapter 4 "Configuring Marking"

Chapter 5 "Configuring Mutation Mapping"

Chapter 6 "Configuring Policing"

Chapter 7 "Configuring Queuing and Scheduling"

This section includes the following topics:

Configuring or Modifying a Class Map

Configuring or Modifying a Table Map

Configuring or Modifying a Policy Map

Configuring or Modifying a Class Map

You can create or modify a class map. You can then reference class maps in policy maps.


Note You cannot create a queuing class map; you must use one of the system-defined queuing class maps listed in Table 2-3.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

3. exit

4. class-map [type qos] {conform-color-in | conform-color-out | exceed-color-in | exceed-color-out}

5. exit

6. class-map type queuing match-any class-queuing-name

7. exit

8. show class-map [type qos] [class-map-name | conform-color-in | conform-color-out | exceed-color-in | exceed-color-out]

9. show class-map type queuing [class-queuing-name]

10. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

config t

Example:

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# class-map class1

switch(config-cmap-qos)#

Creates or accesses the class map of type qos, and then enters class-map qos mode. Class-map names can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, are case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Note When you configure match all for a QoS class map by entering the class-map type qos match-all command, the match-all option does not work. Instead, the match criteria is always treated as match any

Step 3 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-qos)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits class-map qos mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 4 

class-map [type qos] {conform-color-in | conform-color-out | exceed-color-in | exceed-color-out}

Example:

switch(config)# class-map exceed-color-in

switch(config-color-map)#

(Optional) Accesses the class map of type qos for one of the system-defined color maps, and then enters color-map mode.

Note This is only used when color-aware policing is required.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

switch(config-color-map)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits color-map mode, and then enters configuration mode.

Step 6 

class-map type queuing match-any [class-queuing-name]

Example:

switch(config)# class-map type queuing match-any 1p3q4t-out-pq1

switch(config-cmap-que)#

Creates or accesses the class map of type queuing, and then enters class-map queuing mode. Class queuing names are listed in Table 2-3.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap-que)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits class-map queuing mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 8 

show class-map [type qos] [class-map-name | conform-color-in | conform-color-out | exceed-color-in | exceed-color-out]

Example:

switch(config)# show class-map

(Optional) Displays information about all configured class maps or a selected class map of type qos.

Step 9 

show class-map type queuing [class-queuing-name]

Example:

switch(config)# show class-map type queuing

(Optional) Displays information about all configured class maps or a selected class map of type queuing. Class queuing names are listed in Table 2-3.

Step 10 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Configuring or Modifying a Table Map

You can create or modify a table map that you can reference in policy maps. See Chapter 4 "Configuring Marking" for information on configuring table maps.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. table-map table-map-name

3. exit

4. table-map {cir-markdown-map | pir-markdown-map

5. exit

6. show table-map [table-map-name | cir-markdown-map | pir-markdown-map]

7. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

config t

Example:

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

table-map table-map-name

Example:

switch(config)# table-map table1

switch(config-tmap)#

Creates or accesses the table map and then enters table-map mode. Table map names can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, are case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

exit

Example:

switch(config-tmap)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits table-map mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 4 

table-map {cir-markdown-map | pir-markdown-map}

Example:

switch(config)# table-map cir-markdown-map

switch(config-mrkdwn-map)#

Accesses one of the system-defined markdown table maps, and then enters markdown-map mode.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

switch(config-mrkdwn-map)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits table-map mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 6 

show table-map [table-map-name | cir-markdown-map | pir-markdown-map | cos-discard-class-map]

Example:

switch(config)# show table-map

(Optional) Displays information about all configured table maps or a selected table map.

Step 7 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Configuring or Modifying a Policy Map

You can create or modify a policy map that you can use to define actions to perform on class maps.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. policy-map [type qos] [match-first] {qos-policy-map-name | qos-dynamic}

3. exit

4. policy-map type queuing [match-first] {queuing-policy-map-name | qos-dynamic}

5. exit

6. show policy-map [type qos] [policy-map-name | qos-dynamic]

7. show policy-map type queuing [policy-map-name | qos-dynamic]

8. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

config t

Example:

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

policy-map [type qos] [match-first] {policy-map-name | qos-dynamic}

Example:

switch(config)# policy-map policy1

switch(config-pmap-qos)#

Creates or accesses the policy map of type qos and then enters policy-map mode. Policy-map names can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, are case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

exit

Example:

switch(config-tmap)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits policy-map mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 4 

policy-map type queuing [match-first] {policy-map-name | qos-dynamic}

Example:

switch(config)# policy-map type queuing policy_queue1

switch(config-pmap-que)#

Creates or accesses the policy map of type queuing and then enters policy-map mode. You can specify a policy-map name. Policy-map names can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, are case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

switch(config-tmap)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits policy-map mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 6 

show policy-map [type qos] [policy-map-name | qos-dynamic]

Example:

switch(config)# show policy-map

(Optional) Displays information about all configured policy maps or a selected policy map of type qos.

Step 7 

show policy-map type queuing [policy-map-name | qos-dynamic]

Example:

switch(config)# show policy-map type queuing

(Optional) Displays information about all configured policy maps or a selected policy map of type queuing.

Step 8 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Applying Descriptions to MQC Objects

You can apply the description command to any MQC object.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name
or
table-map table-map-name
or
policy-map [type qos] [match-first] [policy-map-name | qos-dynamic]

3. description string

4. exit

5. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

config t

Example:

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

class-map [type qos] [match-any | match-all] class-map-name

Example:

switch(config-cmap)# class-map class1

switch(config-cmap)#

Creates or accesses the class map, and then enters class-map mode. The class-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 alphanumeric characters.

table-map table-map-name

Example:

switch(config-tmap)# table-map table1

switch(config-tmap)#

Creates or accesses the table map, and then enters table-map mode.The table-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters

policy-map [type qos] [match-first] [policy-map-name | qos-dynamic]

Example:

switch(config)# policy-map policy1

switch(config-pmap)#

Creates or accesses the policy map, and then enters policy-map mode. The policy-map name can contain alphabetic, hyphen, or underscore characters, is case sensitive, and can be up to 40 characters.

Step 3 

description string

Example:

switch(config-cmap)# description my traffic class

switch(config-cmap)#

Adds a description string to the MQC object. The description can be up to 200 alphanumeric characters.

Note You cannot modify the description of system-defined queuing class maps.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

switch(config-cmap)# exit

switch(config)#

Exits table-map mode and enters configuration mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Verifying an MQC Object

To display MQC object configuration information, perform one of the following tasks:

Command
Purpose

show class-map [type qos] [class-map-name | conform-color-in | conform-color-out | exceed-color-in | exceed-color-out]

Displays information about all configured class maps or a selected class map of type qos.

show class-map type queuing [class-queuing-name]

Displays information about all configured class maps or a selected class map of type queuing. Class queuing names are listed in Table 2-3.

show table-map [table-map-name | cir-markdown-map | pir-markdown-map]

Displays information about all configured table maps or a selected table map.

show policy-map [type qos] [policy-map-name | qos-dynamic]

Displays information about all configured policy maps or a selected policy map of type qos.

show policy-map type queuing [policy-map-name | qos-dynamic]

Displays information about all configured policy maps or a selected policy map of type queuing.


For detailed information about the fields in the output from these commands, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Quality of Service Command Reference, Release 4.2.

Attaching and Detaching a QoS Policy Action from an Interface

The software does not allow you to enable or disable QoS features with a configuration command. To enable or disable QoS features, you must attach or detach QoS policies to or from interfaces, VLANs, or tunnels as described in this section.


Note You must enable the tunnel feature by entering the feature tunnel command and configure the tunnel before you attach policies.


The system-defined type queuing class maps (see Table 2-3) are attached to each interface unless you specifically attach a different class map.


Note The device restricts QoS policies to one per interface per direction (ingress or egress) for each of the policy types qos and queuing.


Policies that are defined at multiple interfaces have the following restrictions:

A QoS policy attached to the physical port will take effect when the port is not a member of a port channel.

A QoS policy attached to a port channel will take effect even when policies are attached to member ports.

A QoS policy attached to a VLAN is applied to all ports in that VLAN that do not have other policies specifically applied.

One ingress policy type queuing is supported for each Layer 2 port- and Layer 2 port-channel interface in both the ingress and egress direction. Egress type qos policies are not allowed on Layer 2 port or Layer 2 port-channel interfaces.

One ingress and one egress QoS policy are supported for each Layer 3 and Layer 3 port-channel interface.

One ingress and one egress QoS policy are supported for each VLAN.

One ingress and one egress queuing policy are supported for each Layer 2 port-, Layer 2 port-channel, Layer 3 port-, and Layer 3 port-channel interface.

When a VLAN or port channel, or both, touches multiple forwarding engines, all policies that enforce a rate are enforced per forwarding engine.

For example, a policer configured on a specific VLAN that limits the rate for the VLAN to 100 Mbps and has one switch port in the VLAN on one module and has another switch port in the VLAN on another module, each forwarding engine enforces the 100-Mbps rate. In this case, you could actually have up to 200 Mbps in the VLAN you configured to limit the rate to 100 Mbps.


Note Default queuing policies are active, unless you configure and apply another policy. See Table 2-5 for the default queuing policies.


The interface where a QoS policy is applied is summarized in Table 2-6. Each row represents the interface levels. The entry descriptions are as follows:

Applied—Interface where an attached policy is applied.

Present—Interface where a policy is attached but not applied.

Not present—Interface where no policy is attached.

Present or not—Interface where a policy is either attached or not, but not applied.

Table 2-6 QoS Policy Interfaces 

Port Policy
Port-Channel Policy
VLAN Policy

Applied

Not present

Present or not

Present or not

Applied

Present or not

Not present

Not present

Applied


To attach a policy map to an interface, use the service-policy interface command mode or the VLAN command mode. You specify whether the policies defined in the policy map are applied to the input or output stream of packets on the interface.

To detach a policy map from an interface or VLAN, use the no form of the service-policy interface command mode or the VLAN command mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. interface {[ethernet slot/port] | [port-channel channel-number] | | [tunnel number]}
or
vlan [vlan-id]

3. service-policy [type qos] {input | output} {policy-map-name | qos-dynamic} [no-stats]

4. show policy-map [vlan vlan_id] [input | output] [type qos | queuing] [class [type qos | queuing] class-map-name]

5. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

config t

Example:

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

interface {[ethernet slot/port] | [port-channel channel-number] | [tunnel number]}

Example 1:

switch(config)# interface ethernet 1/1

switch(config-if)#

Example 2:

switch(config)# vlan 2

Enters interface mode on the interface or a specified VLAN.

Step 3 

service-policy [type qos] {input | output} {policy-map-name | qos-dynamic} [no-stats]

Example:

switch(config-if)# service-policy input policy1

switch(config-if)#

Adds the policy map to the input or output packets of an interface or VLAN. Only one input policy and one output policy can be attached to an interface or VLAN.

This example adds policy1 to the input interface.

Step 4 

show policy-map [vlan vlan-id] [input | output] [type qos | queuing] [class [type qos | queuing] class-map-name]

Example:

switch(config)# show policy-map vlan 1 input type qos

(Optional) Displays information about policy maps applied to all interfaces or the specified interface. You can limit what the device displays to input or output policies, qos or queuing polices, and to a specific class.

This example shows all policy maps on the Ethernet 1/1 interface.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Session Manager Support for QoS

Beginning in Cisco NX-OS Release 4.2, Session Manger supports the configuration of QoS. This feature allows you to verify the QoS configuration and confirm that the resources required by the configuration are available prior to committing them to the running configuration. See the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS System Management Configuration Guide, Release 4.2 for information about Session Manager.

Once you start the configuration session, do not enter any configuration commands using the configure terminal configuration mode until the configuration session is aborted or committed. Entering parallel configurations (one using the configuration session and another using the configuration terminal configuration mode) may cause verification failures in the configuration session mode.

Feature History for Using Modular QoS CLI

Table 2-7 lists the release history for this feature.

Table 2-7 Feature History for Modular QoS CLI 

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

No change

4.1(2)

-

Support for Session Manager

4.2(1)

Allows you to verify the configuration and required resources prior to committing them to the running configuration.