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Cisco Nexus 3000 Series Switches

Cisco Nexus 3000 Series Verified Scalability Guide for Cisco NX-OS Release 5.0(3)U3(1)

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Verified Scalability

Verified Scalability

The following tables list the Cisco verified scalability for topologies that include Layer 2 and Layer 3 feature configurations and Unicast Routing configurations.


Note


If your scale requirements exceed either the Verified Topology or the Verified Maximum, please contact your Cisco representative. Based on your requirements, it may be possible to validate support for your requirement, as long as the scale capability of the hardware is not exceeded.


Table 1 Cisco NX-OS Release 5.0(3)U3(1) Layer 2 and Layer 3 Topology Verified Scalability Values

Feature

Verified Topology1

Verified Maximum2

Active VLANs per switch

4,0003

4,0004

MTU (Bytes)

9,216

9,216

STP logical interfaces

9,000

9,000

MST instances

64

64

MAC table size

128,000

128,000

EtherChannels

10

64 (with the maximum of 16 port members per EtherChannel)

Number of port members per EtherChannel

16

16

SPAN sessions

2 active sessions

4 active sessions5

Layer 3 physical interfaces

64

64

Layer 3 SVI, subinterfaces, EtherChannels

1,024

1,024

VRF

200

1,000

IPv4 hosts

6

16,000

16,000

IPv6 hosts

7

8,000

8,000

IPv4 routes (LPM)

8,1928

16,0009

IPv6 routes (LPM less than or equal to 64 bits)

8,000 (with system urpf disabled) 10

4,000 (with system urpf enabled)11

8,000 (with system urpf disabled) 12

4,000 (with system urpf enabled)13

IPv6 routes (LPM greater than 64 bits and less than or equal to 127 bits)

256 (with system urpf disabled) 14

128 (with system urpf enabled)15

256 (with system urpf disabled) 16

128 (with system urpf enabled)17

IPv4 multicast routes

18

4,000

8,00019

IGMP Snooping groups

8,000

8,000

ECMP

32-way

64-way

TCAM entries for ACL20

1664 ingress, 1024 egress

1664 ingress, 1024 egress

HSRP

500

500

VRRP

255

255

Configurable QoS groups

8

8

HSRPv6

250

500

BFD neighbors

64

64

1 Verified Topology-- Indicates the verified scaling capabilities with all listed features enabled at the same time. The numbers listed here exceed those used by most customers in their topologies. The scale numbers listed here are not the maximum verified values if each feature is viewed in isolation.
2 Indicates the maximum scale capability tested for the corresponding feature individually. this number is the absolute maximum currently supported by Cisco NX-OS Release 5.0(3)U3(1) software for the corresponding feature. If the hardware is capable of a higher scale, future software releases may increase this verified maximum value.
3 507 VLANs in PVRST mode. 512 VLANs in RPVST mode where 507 are user-defined VLANs, and 4,000 VLANs in MST mode.
4 507 VLANs in PVRST mode. 512 VLANs in RPVST mode where 507 are user-defined VLANs, and 4,000 VLANs in MST mode.
5 4 active SPAN sessions with the SPAN source in a single direction (RX only or TX only in each SPAN session. 2 active SPAN sessions with the SPAN source in both RX and TX directions.
6 The Cisco Nexus 3064PQ offers half the scalability listed.
7 The Cisco Nexus 3064PQ offers half the scalability listed.
8 8,192 when URPF is enabled globally.
9 Increase to 16,000 when URPF is disabled globally. Use the system urpf disable command to disable URPF.
10 IPv6 will use up 2 entries for every route in the hardware.
11 IPv6 will use up 2 entries for every route in the hardware.
12 IPv6 will use up 2 entries for every route in the hardware.
13 IPv6 will use up 2 entries for every route in the hardware.
14 IPv6 will use up 2 entries for every route in the hardware.
15 IPv6 will use up 2 entries for every route in the hardware.
16 IPv6 will use up 2 entries for every route in the hardware.
17 IPv6 will use up 2 entries for every route in the hardware.
18 The Cisco Nexus 3064PQ offers half the scalability listed.
19 Use the hardware profile multicast max-limit 8000 command.
20 TCAM entries are shared between IPv4 and IPv6 ACLs. Please refer to the "Configuring ACL TCAM Region Sizes" section of the Security Guide for further breakdown and details.
Table 2 Cisco NX-OS Release 5.0(3)U3(1) Unicast Routing Verified Scalability Values

Feature

Parameter

Verified Limit

OSPFv2

Number of active interfaces

300

Number of passive interfaces

200

Number of process instances

4

Number of neighbors/total routes with aggressive timers (1 second/3 seconds)

16/7,900

OSPFv3

Number of active interfaces

200

Number of passive interfaces

200

Number of process instances

4

Number of neighbors/total routes with aggressive timers (1 second/3 seconds)

16/4,000

OSPFv2/OSPFv3 together

Number of active interfaces

400

Number of process instances

4

EIGRP

Number of active interfaces

50/7,500

BGP for IPv4

Number of peers (iBGP and eBGP, active)

500/6,500

Number of AS-path entries

256

Number of prefixes per peer (one peer, eBGP or iBGP, IPv4

6,500

BGP for IPv6

Number of peers (iBGP and eBGP, active)

500/3,900

Number of AS-path entries

256

Number of prefixes per peer (one peer, eBGP or iBGP, IPv4)

3,900

HSRP

Number of groups with default timers (3 seconds/10 seconds) for IPv6

500

Number of groups with aggressive timers (1 second/3 seconds) for IPv4

500

VRRP

Number of groups with default timers (1 second/3 seconds) for IPv4

250

VRFs

Number of VRFs

1,000

 

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