Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance Software Configuration Guide, Release 4.2(1)SP1(5.1)
Configuring Virtual Service Blades
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Table of Contents

Configuring Virtual Service Blades

Information About Virtual Service Blades

VSM Virtual Service Blade

VSM Management VLAN

VSB High Availability

Role Collision Detection on the

Cisco Network Analysis Module Virtual Service Blade

Cisco Virtual Security Gateway Module Virtual Service Blade

Cisco Data Center Network Manager Module Virtual Service Blade

Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring Virtual Service Blades

Creating a Virtual Service Blade

Deleting a Virtual Service Blade

Modifying a Virtual Service Blade

Modifying a Virtual Service Blade on the

Modifying a VSM on the

Verifying the Virtual Service Blade Configuration

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Feature History for Virtual Service Blade

Configuring Virtual Service Blades

This chapter describes how to create and configure virtual service blades and includes the following sections:

Information About Virtual Service Blades

The modules (VSM, NAM, VSG, DCNM) hosted, created, and managed by the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance product family are called virtual service blades (VSBs). VSBs are created using ISO or OVA files found in the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance bootflash repository. The ISO or OVA defines the following for a VSB:

  • Required number of interfaces
  • Required hard disk emulation
  • Disk and RAM defaults

• Type of virtual service blade

Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM Virtual Service Blade

Role Collision Detection on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance

Cisco Virtual Security Gateway Module Virtual Service Blade

Cisco Data Center Network Manager Module Virtual Service Blade

Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM Virtual Service Blade

The Cisco Nexus 1110-S can host up to six VSMs and the Cisco Nexus 1110-X can host up to ten VSMs, each controlling a group of virtual Ethernet modules (VEMs). From a network management perspective, a VSM and its VEMs make up a virtual switch; and the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance and the multiple virtual switches it hosts are viewed as a cluster of switches.

You can create redundant virtual supervisor modules (VSMs) on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance product family with the Cisco Nexus 1000V ISO or OVA image located in bootflash. The image is copied to a new VSB when you create it. Once you have created the first VSM, you can point to that software image to create additional VSMs. You can upgrade your VSMs to a new release of Cisco Nexus 1000V software as needed.

This section includes the following topics:

To create a VSM virtual service blade, see Creating a Virtual Service Blade.

VSM Management VLAN

The Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance and its hosted VSBs share the same management VLAN in a static topology because the management VLAN is inherited. However, this constraint does not exist in the flexible topology, where the management VLAN of a VSB can be different from that of the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance host.

VSB High Availability

High availability is configured for the redundant VSB pairs that you create on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance. At a given time, not all VSBs are active on the active Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance. As long as there is connectivity between the active and standby Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance, access through a serial connection is maintained to any VSB. When a Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance fails, the remaining Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance becomes active and all VSBs in the standby state on that Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance become active on their own.

The VSB High Availability has the following features:

  • Deployment - A HA capable VSB has to be deployed on a Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance HA pair.
  • HA Role and inheritance - A VSB’s HA role is inherited from the host Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance’s HA role. A primary VSB will always reside on a Primary Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance and secondary VSB will always reside on a secondary Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.
  • Independence - A VSB’s HA role is independent of the state of the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance. For example, an active primary VSB can reside on a Standby Primary Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance or vice versa.
  • Control vlan and domain ID - HA information for the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance and a VSB are formed based on the control VLAN and Domain ID combination.

Note Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance does not support the control VLAN and domain ID combinations in the following cases:
(a) Across a VSM and Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance
(b) Across VSMs of different releases
If a VSM/VSB is configured with such a combination, it may result in system instability and/or traffic loss.


  • Back-up and save - You must save modifications to the configuration of a VSB and the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance, and back-up their respective settings independently. It is important to do so because the configuration settings of a Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance are different from those of a VSB and the copy or save configuration commands do not produce uniform results on both the platforms.
  • Removing from VSA- You can remove a VSB completely from both Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliances or from only one. If one of the redundant pair of VSB's becomes unusable, you can remove it from only the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance where it resides. This mitigates the recovery by preserving the remaining VSB in the HA pair.

For more information about High Availability on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance, see Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance High Availability.

For more information about VSM high availability, see the Cisco Nexus 1000V High Availability and Redundancy Configuration Guide, Release 4.2(1)SV1(5.1) .

Role Collision Detection on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance

When a Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM is configured or installed with the same role as an existing VSM with the same control VLAN and domain ID, the new VSM and the existing VSM exchange heartbeats to discover each other. Both VSMs detect a role collision when they exchange heartbeats. When such a collision occurs, identifying the primary and secondary VSMs becomes disruptive and inconsistent on a Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.

A role collision is detected on the control and the management interfaces if the Cisco Nexus 1000V VSMs and the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliances are configured in the following combinations:

1. When a Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM is configured with the same role and the control VLAN and domain ID as that of an existing VSM in the same platform or with another Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM from a different release.

2. When a VSM shares the control VLAN and the domain ID with a Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.

3. When a Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance shares the control VLAN and domain ID with another Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.


Caution The Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance does not support the architecture to detect and display a role collision in the HA paired Cisco Nexus 1000V VSMs or between two Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliances.

In any of these combinations, identifying the primary and secondary VSM becomes inconsistent and might involve flapping and rebooting, and some traffic loss. This problem can occur on a primary or a secondary Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM, depending on whether the newly configured or the installed VSM has the primary or the secondary role assigned to it.

At the first instance of a role collision on a Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance, the HA pairing begins to fluctuate when the secondary VSM tries to identify the primary and causes system instability. Also, when the Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM stops communicating in the domain, the collision time is not updated anymore. After an hour elapses since the last collision, the collision MAC entries are removed.

For combinations 1 and 2 listed above, you can enter the show system redundancy status command on the primary or secondary VSM console to display the traffic collision details. You can subsequently change the domain ID on the Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM or the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance to ensure proper operation of the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.


Note The colliding VSMs might also report a collision detection from the original VSM. Because the colliding VSMs can use the same IP address for their management interfaces, the remote SSH/Telnet connections might fail. Therefore, we recommend that you use the consoles during a role collision detection


However, when a Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance shares the control VLAN and domain ID with another Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance, you cannot use the show system redundancy status command to display the role collision details. We recommend that you keep the domain IDs unique on both the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliances to maintain high availability, and to avoid the potential system instability and data loss due to the role collision.

For more information about High Availability on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance, see Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance High Availability.

Cisco Network Analysis Module Virtual Service Blade

You can create one network analysis module (NAM) on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance with the NAM ISO image in the Cisco Nexus 1010 bootflash. The image is copied to a new NAM VSB when you create it.

To create a VSB for NAM, see Creating a Virtual Service Blade.

For more information about NAM, see the Cisco Network Analysis Module Software Documentation Guide, 4.2 .

Cisco Virtual Security Gateway Module Virtual Service Blade

You can create up to three virtual security gateway (VSG) modules on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance with the VSG ISO image. You can copy the VSG ISO image from the following link and then copy it to the new VSG VSB when you create it.

To create a VSB for VSG, see Creating a Virtual Service Blade.

For more information about VSG, see the Cisco Virtual Security Gateway for Nexus 1000V Series Switch Configuration Guide, Release 4.2(1)VSG1(1) .

Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance product family does not support OVA deployment and migration on VSG VSB.

Cisco Data Center Network Manager Module Virtual Service Blade

Cisco Data Center Network Manager is advanced management software that provides comprehensive life cycle management of data center LAN & SAN. DCNM enables holistic management of the data center infrastructure & optimizes overall uptime & reliability.

You can create one data center network manager module (DCNM) on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance with the DCNM ISO image in the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance bootflash. The image is copied to a new DCNM VSB when you create it.

For more information about installing DCNM on Cisco Nexus 1010, see the Cisco DCNM Installation and Licensing Guide, Release 5.x.

Guidelines and Limitations

The following are guidelines and limitations to use when configuring virtual service blades:

  • The Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance and its hosted Cisco Nexus 1000V VSMs must share the same management VLAN.
  • Unlike the control and packet VLANs which are set when a virtual service blade is created, a virtual service blade inherits its management VLAN from the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.

Caution Do not change the management VLAN on a virtual service blade. Since the management VLAN is inherited from the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance, if you change it, then the change is applied to both the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance and all of its hosted Cisco Nexus 1000V VSMs.

Configuring Virtual Service Blades

This section includes the following procedures:

Creating a Virtual Service Blade

Use this procedure to create a virtual service blade (VSB), such as a VSM, by installing and configuring the software.


Note For information about upgrading Cisco Nexus 1000V software on an existing VSB, see the Cisco Nexus 1000V Software Upgrade Guide, Release 4.2(1)SV1(5.1).


BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Before beginning this procedure, you must know or do the following:

  • You are logged in to the CLI in EXEC mode.
  • You know the name of the virtual service blade that you want to create.

• You can create a new VSB using an ISO file from any of the following sources:

From a previously-created VSB.

Ships with the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance in bootflash repository:

Downloaded from www.cisco.com/go/1010download and copied to the bootflash repository.

  • If you are using an ISO file from bootflash repository or downloaded, you know the filename.
  • If you are using an ISO file from an existing virtual service blade, you know the name of the virtual service blade type. This procedure includes information about identifying this name.

• You know the following properties for the virtual service blade:

Domain ID

Management IP address

Management subnet mask length

Default gateway IPV4 address

Switchname

Administrator password

Control and packet VLAN IDs

  • This procedure shows you how to identify and assign control and packet VLANs for the virtual service blade. Do not assign a management VLAN because the management VLAN is inherited from the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.

Note • When you are connected through a serial port on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance, and you want to create a VSB, do the following:

Manually enter the configuration commands one after the other. Configuring a VSB by copying and pasting commands in bulk leads the terminal to hang and leaves the process incomplete.

Avoid using show commands that generate large outputs. Using these commands causes the serial port to lock and hangs the terminal.

  • If a terminal becomes unresponsive, open a new console and manually enter the commands one after the other to set up a new VSB.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. virtual-service-blade name

3. show vsb-type summary

4. virtual-service-blade-type [ name name | new iso file name | new ova file name ]

5. description description

6. show virtual-service-blade name name

7. interface name vlan vlanid

8. enable [primary | secondary]

9. show virtual-service-blade name name

10. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

config t

 

Example:

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Places you in the CLI Global Configuration mode.

Step 2

virtual-service-blade name

 

Example:

switch(config)# virtual-service-blade vsm-1

switch(config-vsb-config)#

Creates the named virtual service blade and places you into configuration mode for that service.

name : an alphanumeric string of up to 80 characters

Step 3

show virtual-service-blade-type summary

 

Displays a summary of all virtual service blade configurations by type name, such as VSM or NAM. You use this type name in the next step.

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# show virtual-service-blade-type summary
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Virtual-Service-Blade-Type Virtual-Service-Blade
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
VSM_SV1_3 vsm-1
vsm-2
 
NAM-MV nam-1

switch(config-vsb-config)#

Step 4

virtual-service-blade-type [ name name | new iso file name | new ova file name ]

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# virtual-service-blade-type new nexus-1000v.4.2.1.SV1.5.1.iso

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)#

virtual-service-blade-type new nexus-1000v.4.2.1.SV1.5.1.1010.ova

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Specifies the type and name of the software image file to add to this virtual service blade.

  • name : the name of the existing virtual service blade type. Enter the name of an existing type found in the Step 5 command output.
  • new : the name of the new ISO or OVA software image file in bootflash repository folder.

Step 5

description description

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# description vsm hamilton storage

switch(config-vsb-config)#

(Optional) Adds a description to the virtual service blade.

description : an alphanumeric string of up to 80 characters

Step 6

show virtual-service-blade name name

 

Displays the virtual service blade you have just created including the interface names that you configure in the next step.

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# show virtual-service-blade name vsm-1

virtual-service-blade vsm-1

Description:

Slot id: 6

Host Name:

Management IP:

VSB Type Name : vsm-1.iso

vCPU: 0

Ramsize: 0

Disksize: 0

Heartbeat: 0

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Interface Type VLAN State Uplink-Interface

Primary Secondary Oper Admin

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

HA Role: Primary

HA Status: NONE

Status: VSB NOT PRESENT

Location: PRIMARY

SW version:

HA Role: Secondary

HA Status: NONE

Status: VSB NOT PRESENT

Location: SECONDARY

SW version:

VSB Info:

 

 

Step 7

interface name vlan vlanid

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# interface control vlan 1044

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# interface packet vlan 1045

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Applies the interface and VLAN ID to this virtual service blade. Use the interface names from Step 6 command output.


Caution Do not assign a management VLAN. Unlike control and packet VLANs, the management VLAN is inherited from the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.


Caution To prevent loss of connectivity, you must configure the same control and packet VLANs on the hosted VSMs.

Step 8

Repeat Step 7 to apply additional interfaces.

Step 9

enable [primary | secondary]

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# enable

Enter domain id[1-4095]: 1054

Enter Management IP address: 10.78.108.40

Enter Management subnet mask length 28

IPv4 address of the default gateway: 10.78.108.117

Enter Switchname: VSM-1

Enter the password for 'admin': Sfish123

switch(config-vsb-config)#

Initiates the configuration of the virtual service blade and then enables it.

If you are enabling a non-redundant virtual service blade, you can specify its HA role as follows:

  • primary : designates the virtual service blade in a primary role.
  • secondary : designates the virtual service blade in a secondary role.

The Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance prompts you for the following:

  • Domain ID
    This must be a different domain ID than the one you used for the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.
  • Management IP address
  • Management subnet mask length
  • Default gateway IPV4 address
  • Switchname
  • Administrator password

Step 10

show virtual-service-blade name

Displays the new virtual service blade for verification.

While the switch is configuring the virtual service blade, the switch output for this command progresses from in progress to powered on.

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# show virtual-service-blade name vsm-1

 

virtual-service-blade vsm-1

Description:

Slot id: 1

Host Name: switch

Management IP: 172.23.181.37

VSB Type Name : VSM-1.1

vCPU: 1

Ramsize: 2048

Disksize: 3

Heartbeat: 35275

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Interface Type VLAN State Uplink-Interface

Primary Secondary Oper Admin

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- VsbEthernet1/1 control 423 up up Po1 Po1

VsbEthernet1/2 management 231 up up Po1 Po1

VsbEthernet1/3 packet 423 up up Po1 Po1

internal NA NA up up

HA Role: Primary

HA Status: ACTIVE

Status: VSB POWERED ON

Location: PRIMARY

SW version: 4.2(1)SV1(4a)

HA Role: Secondary

HA Status: STANDBY

Status: VSB POWERED ON

Location: SECONDARY

SW version: 4.2(1)SV1(4a)

VSB Info:

Domain ID : 441

switch(config-vsb-config)#

switch# switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Step 11

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# copy running-config startup-config

Saves the running configuration persistently through reboots and restarts by copying it to the startup configuration.

Deleting a Virtual Service Blade

Use this procedure to delete a virtual service blade, such as a VSM or NAM.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Before beginning this procedure, you must know or do the following:

  • You are logged in to the CLI in EXEC mode.
  • You know the name of the virtual service blade you are deleting.
  • You must shut down the virtual service blade before it can be deleted. This procedure includes instructions for shutting down the virtual service blade.
  • A virtual service blade can be removed completely from both redundant Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliances, or from only one. If one of a redundant pair of virtual service blade blades becomes unusable, it can be removed from only the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance where it resides. This mitigates the recovery by preserving the remaining virtual service blade in the pair. This may become necessary if a new instance of the service must be provisioned.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. virtual-service-blade name

3. shutdown

4. show virtual-service-blade summary

5. One of the following:

no virtual-service-blade name

no enable

6. show virtual-service-blade summary

7. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

config t

 

Example:

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Places you in the CLI Global Configuration mode.

Step 2

virtual-service-blade name

 

Example:

switch(config)# virtual-service-blade vsm-5

switch(config-vsb-config)#

Places you into configuration mode for the named virtual service blade.

Step 3

shutdown

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# shutdown

switch(config-vsb-config)#

Shuts down the virtual service blade.

Step 4

show virtual-service-blade summary

 

Displays a summary of services for verification of the shutdown.

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# show virtual-service-blade summary

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Name HA-Role HA-Status Status Location
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
vsm-1 PRIMARY ACTIVE VSB POWERED ON PRIMARY
vsm-1 SECONDARY STANDBY VSB POWERED ON SECONDARY

 

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Step 5

One of the following:

  • no virtual-service-blade name
  • no enable [ primary | secondary ]

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# no virtual-service-blade vsm-5

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# no enable

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Deletes the specified virtual service blade.

  • no virtual-service-blade : Removes the virtual service blade in its entirety from the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.
  • no enable : Removes the specified virtual service blade from the system but retains the infrastructure configuration (interface VLANs, RAM size, disk size overrides) in Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance. Use this command to delete only one virtual service blade in a pair (primary or secondary).

Step 6

show virtual-service-blade summary

 

Displays a summary of services for verification of the removal.

Step 7

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

Saves the running configuration persistently through reboots and restarts by copying it to the startup configuration.

Modifying a Virtual Service Blade

Use this section to modify the control VLAN, packet VLAN, or the RAM size of a virtual service blade and then make the corresponding changes to the VSM.

This section includes the following topics:

Modifying a Virtual Service Blade on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance

Use this procedure to modify the control VLAN, packet VLAN, or the RAM size of a virtual service blade.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Before beginning this procedure, you must know or do the following:

  • You are logged in to the CLI in EXEC mode.
  • You know the name of the virtual service blade you are modifying.
  • You must shut down the virtual service blade before modifying the RAM size. This procedure includes instructions for shutting down the virtual service blade.
  • You must shut down the virtual service blade before modifying the control VLAN. This procedure includes instructions for shutting down the virtual service blade.

Caution The VSM must be in the shut state before modifying the control VLAN to preserve high availability when the service comes back. The control VLAN passes control messages to the standby VSM.

  • You change the configuration first in the virtual service blade configuration and, then, in the Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM configuration. This procedure changes the virtual service blade configuration. To change the Cisco Nexus 1000V configuration, see the Modifying a VSM on the Cisco Nexus 1000V.

Caution Do not modify the management VLAN. If you change the management VLAN, the change is applied to both the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance and all of the Cisco Nexus 1000V VSMs. The Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance and its hosted Cisco Nexus 1000V VSMs share the same management VLAN. Unlike the control and packet VLANs which are set when a virtual service blade is created, the management VLAN is inherited.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. virtual-service-blade name

3. Do one of the following:

If you are modifying the ram size or the control VLAN, then continue with the next step.

Otherwise, go to Step 6.

4. shutdown

5. show virtual-service-blade summary

6. One of the following:

ramsize size

interface control vlan vlanid

interface control vlan vlanid

7. no shutdown

8. show virtual-service-blade name name

9. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

config t

 

Example:

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Places you in the CLI Global Configuration mode.

Step 2

virtual-service-blade name

 

Example:

switch(config)# virtual-service-blade vsm-5

switch(config-vsb-config)#

Places you into configuration mode for the named virtual service blade.

Step 3

Do one of the following:

  • If you are modifying the RAM size or the control VLAN, then continue with the next step.
  • Otherwise, go to Step 6.

Step 4

shutdown

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# shutdown

switch(config-vsb-config)#

Shuts down the virtual service blade.

Step 5

show virtual-service-blade summary

 

Displays a summary of services for verification of the shutdown.

Example:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Name HA-Role HA-Status Status Location

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

vsm-1 PRIMARY ACTIVE VSB POWERED ON PRIMARY

vsm-1 SECONDARY STANDBY VSB POWERED ON SECONDARY

 

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

 

Step 6

One of the following:

  • ramsize size
  • interface control vlan vlanid
  • interface packet vlan vlanid

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# ramsize 1024

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# interface control vlan 1116

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# interface packet vlan 1117

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Modifies the virtual service blade. You can modify any of the following virtual service blade parameters:

  • memory allocated for RAM (1024-4096 MB).
  • control VLAN ID
  • packet VLAN ID

Step 7

no shutdown

 

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# no shutdown

switch(config-vsb-config)#

Returns the virtual service blade status to powered on.

Step 8

show virtual-service-blade name name

 

Displays the virtual service blade information for verification of the changes.

Example:

switch(config-vsb-config)# show virtual-service-blade name vsm-1

virtual-service-blade vsm-1

Description:

Slot id: 1

Host Name: switch

Management IP: 172.23.181.37

VSB Type Name : VSM-1.1

vCPU: 1

Ramsize: 2048

Disksize: 3

Heartbeat: 35275

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Interface Type VLAN State Uplink-Interface

Primary Secondary Oper Admin

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VsbEthernet1/1 control 423 up up Po1 Po1

VsbEthernet1/2 management 231 up up Po1 Po1

VsbEthernet1/3 packet 423 up up Po1 Po1

internal NA NA up up

HA Role: Primary

HA Status: ACTIVE

Status: VSB POWERED ON

Location: PRIMARY

SW version: 4.2(1)SV1(4a)

HA Role: Secondary

HA Status: STANDBY

Status: VSB POWERED ON

Location: SECONDARY

SW version: 4.2(1)SV1(4a)

VSB Info:

Domain ID : 441

switch(config-vsb-config)#

 

Step 9

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

Saves the running configuration persistently through reboots and restarts by copying it to the startup configuration.

Step 10

You have completed this procedure. You must now update the VSM configuration using the Modifying a VSM on the Cisco Nexus 1000V.

Modifying a VSM on the Cisco Nexus 1000V

Use this procedure to modify the control VLAN ID, packet VLAN ID, or RAM size in the VSM configuration on the Cisco Nexus 1000V.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Before beginning this procedure, you must know or do the following:

  • You are logged in to the CLI in EXEC mode.
  • You know the name of the VSM you are modifying.
  • You change the configuration first in the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance virtual service blade configuration and, then, in the Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM configuration. This procedure changes the Cisco Nexus 1000V VSM configuration. To change the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance virtual service blade configuration, see the Modifying a Virtual Service Blade on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.

Caution Do not modify the management VLAN. If you change the management VLAN, the change is applied to both the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance and all of the Cisco Nexus 1000V VSMs. The Cisco Nexus 1010 and its hosted Cisco Nexus 1000V VSMs share the same management VLAN. Unlike the control and packet VLANs which are set when a virtual service blade is created, the management VLAN is inherited.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. login virtual-service-blade vb6

2. login

3. password

4. show svs domain

5. config t

6. svs-domain

7. control vlan vlanid

8. packet vlan vlanid

9. show svs domain

10. copy running-config startup-config

11. Ctrl \

12. close

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

login virtual-service-blade vb6

Logs you into the Cisco Nexus 1000V CLI for the VSM you are modifying.

Step 2

login

Authenticates your user ID.

Step 3

password

Authenticates your password.

Example:

switch-1# login virtual-service-blade 1

Telnet escape character is '^\'.

Trying 192.168.0.18...

Connected to 192.168.0.18.

Escape character is '^\'.

 

User Access Verification

switch-vsm1 login:

password:

Step 4

show svs domain

 

n1000v# show svs domain

SVS domain config:
Domain id: 100
Control vlan: 1114
Packet vlan: 1115
L2/L3 Control mode: L2
L3 control interface: NA Status: Config push to VC successful.

n1000v#

Displays the domain configuration for the VSM.

Step 5

config t

 

Example:

n1000v# config t

n1000v(config)#

Places you in the CLI Global Configuration mode.

Step 6

svs-domain

 

Example:

n1000v(config)# svs domain

n1000v(config-svs-domain)#

Places you into SVS Domain Configuration mode.

Step 7

control vlan vlanid

 

Example:

n1000v(config-svs-domain)# control vlan 1116

n1000v(config-svs-domain)#

Modifies the VLAN ID of the VSM domain control VLAN.

Step 8

packet vlan vlanid

 

Example:

n1000v(config-svs-domain)# packet vlan 1117

n1000v(config-svs-domain)#

Modifies the VLAN ID of the VSM domain packet VLAN.

Step 9

show svs domain

 

Example:

n1000v(config-svs-domain)# show svs domain

SVS domain config:
Domain id: 100
Control vlan: 1116
Packet vlan: 1117
L2/L3 Aipc mode: L2
L2/L3 Aipc interface: mgmt0
Status: Config push to VC successful.

n1000v(config-svs-domain)#

Displays the domain configuration for verification of the changes.

Step 10

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

n1000v(config-svs-domain)# copy running-config startup-config

n1000v(config-svs-domain)#

Saves the running configuration persistently through reboots and restarts by copying it to the startup configuration.

Step 11

Press the Ctrl key and \ key

 

Example:

n1000v(config-svs-domain)# Ctrl \

Telnet>

 

Exits from the SVS Domain Configuration mode and returns you to a Telnet prompt.

Step 12

close

 

Example:

Telnet> close

switch#

Closes the Telnet session and returns you to EXEC mode on the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance.

Step 13

You have completed this procedure.

Verifying the Virtual Service Blade Configuration

To verify the virtual service blade configuration, use the following commands:

 

Command
Purpose

show virtual-service-blade [name name ]

Displays the configuration for a specific virtual service blade.

See Example 4-3 on page 4-19

show virtual-service-blade summary

Displays a summary of all virtual service blade configurations.

Note This command is only recognized by the primary Cisco Nexus 1010.

See Example 4-4 on page 4-19

show virtual-service-blade-type summary

Displays a summary of all virtual service blade configurations by type, such as VSM or NAM.

See Example 4-1 on page 4-18

show virtual-service-blade [name name] statistics

Displays statistics for a specific virtual service blade such as CPU utilization, memory, last reboot time, total number of reboots.

show network-uplink type

Displays the uplink configuration for verification.

See Example 4-2 on page 4-19

Example 4-1 Virtual Service Blade Type

switch# show virtual-service-blade-type summary
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Virtual-Service-Blade-Type Virtual-Service-Blade
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VSM_SV1_3 vsm-1
vsm-2
 
NAM-MV nam-1
switch#

Example 4-2 Network Uplink Type

switch# show network uplink type

Administrative topology id: 2
Operational topology id: 1
switch#

Example 4-3 Virtual Service Blade

virtual-service-blade vsm-1
Description:
Slot id: 1
Host Name: switch
Management IP: 172.23.181.37
VSB Type Name : VSM-1.1
vCPU: 1
Ramsize: 2048
Disksize: 3
Heartbeat: 35275
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Interface Type VLAN State Uplink-Interface
Primary Secondary Oper Admin
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VsbEthernet1/1 control 423 up up Po1 Po1
VsbEthernet1/2 management 231 up up Po1 Po1
VsbEthernet1/3 packet 423 up up Po1 Po1
internal NA NA up up
HA Role: Primary
HA Status: ACTIVE
Status: VSB POWERED ON
Location: PRIMARY
SW version: 4.2(1)SV1(4a)
HA Role: Secondary
HA Status: STANDBY
Status: VSB POWERED ON
Location: SECONDARY
SW version: 4.2(1)SV1(4a)
VSB Info:
Domain ID : 441

Example 4-4 Virtual Service Blade Summary

switch# show virtual-service-blade summary
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Name HA-Role HA-Status Status Location
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
vsm-1 PRIMARY ACTIVE VSB POWERED ON PRIMARY
vsm-1 SECONDARY STANDBY VSB POWERED ON SECONDARY
 

Example 4-5 Virtual Service Blade Statistics

switch# show virtual-service-blade name VSM statistics
 
virtual-service-blade: VSM
Virtual Memory: 2297m
Physical Memory: 1.1g
CPU Usage Percentage: 4.0
Up Since: Mon Sep 10 16:05:21 2012
Number of Restarts: 1
Last heartbeat received at: Thu Sep 13 09:11:17 2012
 

Additional References

For additional information related to implementing system-level HA features, see the following sections:

Related Documents

 

Related Topic
Document Title

Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance software setup configuration

Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance Software Installation and Upgrade Guide, Release 4.2(1)SP1(5.1)

Complete command syntax, command modes, command history, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples for all Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance commands.

Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance Command Reference, Release 4.2(1)SP1(5.1)

Complete command syntax, command modes, command history, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples for Cisco Nexus 1000V commands.

Cisco Nexus 1000V Command Reference, Release 4.2(1)SV1(5.1)

Configuring Cisco Nexus 1000V licenses

Cisco Nexus 1000V License Configuration Guide, Release 4.2(1)SV1(5.1)

Configuring the Cisco Nexus 1000V domain

Cisco Nexus 1000V System Management Configuration Guide, Release 4.2(1)SV1(5.1)

Installing and upgrading the Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance software

Cisco Nexus Virtual Services Appliance Software Installation and Upgrade Guide, Release 4.2(1)SP1(5.1)

Standards

 

Standards
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.

MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link
  • CISCO-PROCESS-MIB

To locate and download MIBs, go to the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml

RFCs

RFCs
Title

No RFCs are supported by this feature

Feature History for Virtual Service Blade

This section provides the virtual service blade blade release history.

 

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

show virtual-service-blade name name statistics command

4.2(1)SP1(5.1)

This command was introduced.

DCNM VSB

4.2(1)SP1(3)

This module was introduced.

Creating and exporting a VSB backup file

4.2(1)SP1(3)

Commands and procedure added for exporting and importing a VSB configuration file.

Importing a VSB backup file

4.2(1)SP1(3)

Procedure added for recovering a VSM using a saved configuration file.

Escape sequence

4.2(1)SP1(2)

Escape sequence changed from $ to ^\.

Virtual Service Blade

4.0(4)SP1(1)

This feature was introduced.