Security Configuration Guide, Cisco DCNM for SAN, Release 5.x
Configuring Users and Common Role
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Configuring Users and Common Role

Table Of Contents

Configuring Users and Common Role

Information About Role-Based Authorization

About Roles

Rules and Features for Each Role

About the VSAN Policy

Role Distributions

About Role Databases

Locking the Fabric

About Common Roles

Mapping of CLI Operations to SNMP

Creating Users Guidelines

Characteristics of Strong Passwords

About SSH

Boot Mode SSH

SSH Authentication Using Digital Certificates

Passwordless File copy and SSH

Guidelines and Limitations

Default Settings

Configuring Users and Common Role

Configuring Roles and Profiles

Deleting Common Roles

Modifying Rules

Modifying the VSAN Policy

Committing Role-Based Configuration Changes

Discarding Role-Based Configuration Changes

Enabling Role-Based Configuration Distribution

Clearing Sessions

Configuring Users

Deleting a User

Configuring SSH Services

Generating the SSH Server Key Pair

Overwriting a Generated Key Pair

Enabling SSH or Telnet Service

Changing Administrator Password Using DCNM-SAN

Verifying Users and Common Role Configuration

Displaying Role-Based Information

Displaying Roles When Distribution is Enabled

Displaying User Account Information

Field Descriptions for Users and Common Role

Common Roles

Feature History for Users and Common Role


Configuring Users and Common Role


The CLI and SNMP use common roles in all switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family. You can use the CLI to modify a role that was created using SNMP and vice versa.

Users, passwords, and roles for all CLI and SNMP users are the same. A user configured through the CLI can access the switch using SNMP (for example, DCNM for SAN (DCNM-SAN or Device Manager) and vice versa.

This chapter includes the following topics:

Information About Role-Based Authorization

Guidelines and Limitations

Default Settings

Configuring Users and Common Role

Configuring SSH Services

Verifying Users and Common Role Configuration

Field Descriptions for Users and Common Role

Feature History for Users and Common Role

Information About Role-Based Authorization

Switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family perform authentication based on roles. Role-based authorization limits access to switch operations by assigning users to roles. This kind of authentication restricts you to management operations based on the roles to which you have been added.

When you execute a command, perform command completion, or obtain context-sensitive help, the switch software allows the operation to progress if you have permission to access that command.

This section includes the following topics:

About Roles

Rules and Features for Each Role

About the VSAN Policy

Role Distributions

About Role Databases

Locking the Fabric

About Common Roles

Mapping of CLI Operations to SNMP

Creating Users Guidelines

Characteristics of Strong Passwords

About SSH

Boot Mode SSH

SSH Authentication Using Digital Certificates

Passwordless File copy and SSH

About Roles

Each role can contain multiple users and each user can be part of multiple roles. For example, if role1 users are only allowed access to configuration commands, and role2 users are only allowed access to debug commands, then if Joe belongs to both role1 and role2, he can access configuration as well as debug commands.


Note If you belong to multiple roles, you can execute a union of all the commands permitted by these roles. Access to a command takes priority over being denied access to a command. For example, suppose you belong to a TechDocs group and you were denied access to configuration commands. However, you also belong to the engineering group and have access to configuration commands. In this case, you will have access to configuration commands.



Tip Any role, when created, does not allow access to the required commands immediately. The administrator must configure appropriate rules for each role to allow access to the required commands.


Rules and Features for Each Role

Up to 16 rules can be configured for each role. These rules reflect what CLI commands are allowed. The user-specified rule number determines the order in which the rules are applied. For example, rule 1 is applied before rule 2, which is applied before rule 3, and so on. A user not belonging to the network-admin role cannot perform commands related to roles.

For example, if user A is permitted to perform all show CLI commands, user A cannot view the output of the show role CLI command if user A does not belong to the network-admin role.

A rule specifies operations that can be performed by a specific role. Each rule consists of a rule number, a rule type (permit or deny), a CLI command type (for example, config, clear, show, exec, debug), and an optional feature name (for example, FSPF, zone, VSAN, fcping, or interface).


Note In this case, exec CLI commands refer to all commands in the EXEC mode that are not included in the show, debug, and clear CLI command categories.


About the VSAN Policy

Configuring the VSAN policy requires the ENTERPRISE_PKG license (For more information, see Cisco MDS 9000 Family NX-OS Licensing Guide).

You can configure a role so that it only allows tasks to be performed for a selected set of VSANs. By default, the VSAN policy for any role is permit, which allows tasks to be performed for all VSANs. You can configure a role that only allows tasks to be performed for a selected set of VSANs. To selectively allow VSANs for a role, set the VSAN policy to deny, and then set the configuration to permit or the appropriate VSANs.


Note Users configured in roles where the VSAN policy is set to deny cannot modify the configuration for E ports. They can only modify the configuration for F or FL ports (depending on whether the configured rules allow such configuration to be made). This is to prevent such users from modifying configurations that may impact the core topology of the fabric.



Tip Roles can be used to create VSAN administrators. Depending on the configured rules, these VSAN administrators can configure MDS features (for example, zone, fcdomain, or VSAN properties) for their VSANs without affecting other VSANs. Also, if the role permits operations in multiple VSANs, then the VSAN administrators can change VSAN membership of F or FL ports among these VSANs.


Users belonging to roles in which the VSAN policy is set to deny are referred to as VSAN-restricted users.

Role Distributions

Role-based configurations use the Cisco Fabric Services (CFS) infrastructure to enable efficient database management, and to provide a single point of configuration for the entire fabric.

The following configurations are distributed:

Role names and descriptions

List of rules for the roles

VSAN policy and the list of permitted VSANs

About Role Databases

Role-based configurations use two databases to accept and implement configurations.

Configuration database—The running database currently enforced by the fabric.

Pending database—Your subsequent configuration changes are stored in the pending database. If you modify the configuration, you need to commit or discard the pending database changes to the configuration database. The fabric remains locked during this period. Changes to the pending database are not reflected in the configuration database until you commit the changes.

Locking the Fabric

The first action that modifies the database creates the pending database and locks the feature in the entire fabric. Once you lock the fabric, the following situations apply:

No other user can make any configuration changes to this feature.

A copy of the configuration database becomes the pending database along with the first change.

About Common Roles

The CLI and SNMP in all switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family use common roles. You can use SNMP to modify a role that was created using the CLI and vice versa (see Figure 3-1).

Figure 3-1 Common Roles

Each role in SNMP is the same as a role created or modified through the CLI (see the "Information About Role-Based Authorization" section).

Each role can be restricted to one or more VSANs as required.

You can create new roles or modify existing roles using SNMP or the CLI.

SNMP—Use the CISCO-COMMON-ROLES-MIB to configure or modify roles. Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family MIB Quick Reference.

CLI—Use the role name command.

Mapping of CLI Operations to SNMP

SNMP has only three possible operations: GET, SET, and NOTIFY. The CLI has five possible operations: DEBUG, SHOW, CONFIG, CLEAR, and EXEC.


Note NOTIFY does not have any restrictions like the syslog messages in the CLI.


Table 3-1 explains how the CLI operations are mapped to the SNMP operations.

Table 3-1 CLI Operation to SNMP Operation Mapping 

CLI Operation
SNMP Operation

DEBUG

Ignored

SHOW

GET

CONFIG

SET

CLEAR

SET

EXEC

SET


Creating Users Guidelines

The passphrase specified in the snmp-server user option and the password specified username option are synchronized.

By default, the user account does not expire unless you explicitly configure it to expire. The expire option determines the date on which the user account is disabled. The date is specified in the YYYY-MM-DD format.

When creating users, note the following guidelines:

You can configure up to a maximum of 256 users on a switch.

The following words are reserved and cannot be used to configure users: bin, daemon, adm, lp, sync, shutdown, halt, mail, news, uucp, operator, games, gopher, ftp, nobody, nscd, mailnull, rpc, rpcuser, xfs, gdm, mtsuser, ftpuser, man, and sys.

User passwords are not displayed in the switch configuration file.

If a password is trivial (short, easy-to-decipher), your password configuration is rejected. Be sure to configure a strong password as shown in the sample configuration. Passwords are case-sensitive. "admin" is no longer the default password for any Cisco MDS 9000 Family switch. You must explicitly configure a strong password.


Caution Cisco MDS NX-OS supports user names that are created with alphanumeric characters or specific special characters (+ [plus], = [equal], _ [underscore], - [hyphen], \ [backslash], and . [period]) whether created remotely (using TACACS+ or RADIUS) or locally. Local user names cannot be created with any special characters (apart from those specified). If a non-supported special character user name exists on an AAA server, and is entered during login, then the user is denied access.

Characteristics of Strong Passwords

A strong password has the following characteristics:

At least eight characters long

Does not contain many consecutive characters (such as "abcd")

Does not contain many repeating characters (such as "aaabbb")

Does not contain dictionary words

Does not contain proper names

Contains both upper- and lower-case characters

Contains numbers

The following are examples of strong passwords:

If2CoM18

2004AsdfLkj30

Cb1955S21

About SSH

SSH provides secure communications to the Cisco NX-OS CLI. You can use SSH keys for the following SSH options:

SSH2 using RSA

SSH2 using DSA

Boot Mode SSH

Due to the increasing emphasis on security and security-related issues, the ssh command in this release runs in the Boot mode. SSH is a preferred and more secure method of data exchange over the network because it communicates over the secure channel, and the data is encrypted before sending on the channel.

Example 3-1 shows how to use the ssh command to conncet to a remote server from any switch.

Example 3-1 Connecting a Remote Server from Any Switch

switch# ssh admin @ hostname

SSH Authentication Using Digital Certificates

SSH authentication on the Cisco MDS 9000 Family switches provide X.509 digital certificate support for host authentication. An X.509 digital certificate is a data item that vouches for the origin and integrity of a message. It contains encryption keys for secured communications and is "signed" by a trusted certification authority (CA) to verify the identity of the presenter. The X.509 digital certificate support provides either DSA or RSA algorithms for authentication.

The certificate infrastructure uses the first certificate that supports the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) and is returned by the security infrastructure, either through query or notification. Verification of certificates is successful if the certificates are from any of the trusted CAs.

You can configure your switch for either SSH authentication using an X.509 certificate or SSH authentication using a Public Key Certificate, but not both. If either of them is configured and the authentication fails, you will be prompted for a password.

For more information on CAs and digital certificates, see Chapter 6, "Configuring Certificate Authorities and Digital Certificates."

Passwordless File copy and SSH

Secure Shell (SSH) public key authentication can be used to achieve password-free logins. SCP and SFTP uses SSH in the background, which enables these copy protocols to be used for a password-free copy with public key authentication. The NX-OS version only supports the SCP and STFP client functionality.

You can create an RSA and DSA identity that can be used for authentication with SSH. The identity consists of two parts: public and private keys. The public and the private keys are generated by the switch or can be generated externally and imported to the switch. For import purposes, the keys should be in OPENSSH format.

To use the key on a host machine hosting an SSH server, you must transfer the public key file to the machine and add the contents of it to the authorized_keys file in your SSH directory (for example, $HOME/.ssh) on the server. For the import and export of private keys, the key is protected by encryption. You are asked to enter the passphrase for the keys. If you enter a passphrase, the private key is protected by encryption. If you leave the password field blank, the key will not be encrypted.

If you need to copy the keys to another switch, you will have to export the keys out of the switch to a host machine, and then import the keys to other switches from that machine.

The key files are persistent across reload.

Guidelines and Limitations

Fabric merge does not modify the role database on a switch. If two fabrics merge, and the fabrics have different role databases, the software generates an alert message.

See the "Merge Guidelines for RADIUS and TACACS+ Configurations" section on page 4-15 for detailed concepts.

Verify that the role database is identical on all switches in the entire fabric.

Be sure to edit the role database on any switch to the desired database and then commit it. This synchronizes the role databases on all the switches in the fabric.

Default Settings

Table 3-2 lists the default settings for all switch security features in any switch.

Table 3-2 Default Switch Security Settings 

Parameters
Default

Roles in Cisco MDS Switches

Network operator (network-operator)

AAA configuration services

Local

Authentication port

1812

Accounting port

1813

Preshared key communication

Clear text

RADIUS server time out

1 (one) second

RADIUS server retries

Once

TACACS+

Disabled

TACACS+ servers

None configured

TACACS+ server timeout

5 seconds

AAA server distribution

Disabled

VSAN policy for roles

Permit

User account

No expiry (unless configured)

Password

None

Password-strength

Enabled

Accounting log size

250 KB

SSH service

Enabled

Telnet service

Disabled


Configuring Users and Common Role

This section includes the following topics:

Configuring Roles and Profiles

Deleting Common Roles

Modifying Rules

Modifying the VSAN Policy

Committing Role-Based Configuration Changes

Discarding Role-Based Configuration Changes

Enabling Role-Based Configuration Distribution

Clearing Sessions

Configuring Users

Deleting a User

Configuring Roles and Profiles

Detailed Steps


Note Only users belonging to the network-admin role can create roles.


To create an additional role or to modify the profile for an existing role using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select Users and Roles from the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Roles tab in the Information pane.

Step 3 Click Create Row to create a role in DCNM-SAN.

Step 4 Select the switches on which to configure a role.

Step 5 Enter the name of the role in the Name field.

Step 6 Enter the description of the role in the Description field.

Step 7 (Optional) Check the Enable check box to enable the VSAN scope and enter the list of VSANs in the Scope field to which you want to restrict this role.

Step 8 Click Create to create the role.



Note Device Manager automatically creates six roles that are required for Device Manager to display a view of a switch. These roles are system, snmp, module, interface, hardware, and environment.


Deleting Common Roles

Detailed Steps

To delete a common role using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select Users and Roles from the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Roles tab in the Information pane.

Step 3 Click the role you want to delete.

Step 4 Click Delete Row to delete the common role.

Step 5 Click Yes to confirm the deletion or No to cancel it.


Modifying Rules

Detailed Steps

To modify the rules for an existing role using Device Manager, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Security > Roles.

Step 2 Click the role for which you want to edit the rules.

Step 3 Click Rules to view the rules for the role.

You see the Edit Role Rules dialog box.

Step 4 Edit the rules you want to enable or disable for the common role.

Step 5 Click Apply to apply the new rules.


Rule 1 is applied first, which permits, for example, sangroup users access to all config CLI commands. Rule 2 is applied next, denying FSPF configuration to sangroup users. As a result, sangroup users can perform all other config CLI commands, except the fspf CLI configuration commands.


Note The order of rule placement is important. If you had swapped these two rules and issued the deny config feature fspf rule first and issued the permit config rule next, you would be allowing all sangroup users to perform all configuration commands because the second rule globally overrode the first rule.


Modifying the VSAN Policy

Detailed Steps

To modify the VSAN policy for an existing role using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select Users and Roles from the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Roles tab in the Information pane.

Step 3 Check the Scope Enable check box if you want to enable the VSAN scope and restrict this role to a subset of VSANs.

Step 4 Enter the list of VSANs in the Scope VSAN Id List field that you want to restrict this role to.

Step 5 Click Apply Changes to save these changes.


Committing Role-Based Configuration Changes

If you commit the changes made to the pending database, the configuration is committed to all the switches in the fabric. On a successful commit, the configuration change is applied throughout the fabric and the lock is released. The configuration database now contains the committed changes and the pending database is now cleared.

Detailed Steps

To commit role-based configuration changes using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select Users and Roles in the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Roles CFS tab in the Information pane.

Step 3 Set the Global drop-down menu to enable to enable CFS.

Step 4 Click the Apply Changes icon to save this change.

Step 5 Set the Config Action drop-down menu to commit to commit the roles using CFS.

Step 6 Click the Apply Changes icon to save this change.


Discarding Role-Based Configuration Changes

If you discard (abort) the changes made to the pending database, the configuration database remains unaffected and the lock is released.

Detailed Steps

To discard role-based configuration changes using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select Users and Roles in the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Roles CFS tab in the Information pane.

Step 3 Set the Config Action drop-down menu to abort to discard any uncommitted changes.

Step 4 Click the Apply Changes icon to save this change.


Enabling Role-Based Configuration Distribution

Detailed Steps

To enable role-based configuration distribution using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select Users and Roles in the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Roles CFS tab in the Information pane.

Step 3 Set the Global drop-down menu to enable to enable CFS distribution.

Step 4 Click the Apply Changes icon to save this change.


Clearing Sessions

Detailed Steps

To forcibly clear the existing role session in the fabric using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select Users and Roles in the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Roles CFS tab in the Information pane.

Step 3 Set the Config Action drop-down menu to clear to clear the pending database.

Step 4 Click the Apply Changes icon to save this change.



Caution Any changes in the pending database are lost when you clear a session.

Configuring Users

Before configuring users, make sure that you have configured roles to associate with the users that you are creating.


Note As of Cisco SAN-OS Release 3.1(2b), DCNM-SAN automatically checks whether encryption is enabled, which allows you to create users.


Detailed Steps

To configure a new user or to modify the profile of an existing user using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select Users and Roles from the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Users tab in the Information pane to see a list of users.

Step 3 Click the Create Row icon.

You see the Users - Create dialog box as shown in Figure 3-2.

Figure 3-2 Users - Create Dialog Box

Step 4 (Optional) Alter the Switches check boxes to specify one or more switches.

Step 5 Enter the user name in the New User field.

Step 6 Enter the password for the user.

Step 7 Check the roles that you want to associate with this user.

See the "Rules and Features for Each Role" section.

Step 8 Select the appropriate option for the type of authentication protocol used. The default value is MD5.

Step 9 Select the appropriate option for the type of privacy protocol used. The default value is DES.

Step 10 (Optional) Enter the expiry date for this user.

Step 11 (Optional) Enter the SSH Key filename.

Step 12 Click Create to create the entry.


Deleting a User

Detailed Steps

To delete a user using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select Users and Roles from the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Users tab in the Information pane to see a list of users.

Step 3 Click the name of the user you want to delete.

Step 4 Click Delete Row to delete the selected user.

Step 5 Click Apply Changes to save this change.


Configuring SSH Services

A secure SSH connection with an RSA key is available as a default on all Cisco MDS 9000 Family switches. If you require a secure SSH connection with a DSA key, you need to disable the default SSH connection, Generate a DSA key and then enable the SSH connection (see the "Generating the SSH Server Key Pair" section).


Caution If you are logging in to a switch through SSH and you have issued the aaa authentication login default none command, you must enter one or more key strokes to log in. If you press the Enter key without entering at least one keystroke, your log in will be rejected.

This section includes the following topics:

Generating the SSH Server Key Pair

Overwriting a Generated Key Pair

Enabling SSH or Telnet Service

Changing Administrator Password Using DCNM-SAN

Generating the SSH Server Key Pair

Ensure that you have an SSH server key pair with the appropriate version before enabling the SSH service. Generate the SSH server key pair according to the SSH client version used. The number of bits specified for each key pair ranges from 768 to 2048.

The SSH service accepts two types of key pairs for use by SSH version 2.

The dsa option generates the DSA key pair for the SSH version 2 protocol.

The rsa option generates the RSA keypair for the SSH version 2 protocol.


Caution If you delete all of the SSH keys, you cannot start a new SSH session.

Detailed Steps

To generate the SSH key pair using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select SSH and Telnet.

Step 2 Click the Create Row icon.

You see the SSH and Telnet Key - Create dialog box (see Figure 3-3).

Figure 3-3 SSH and Telnet - Create Dialog Box

Step 3 Check the switches you want to assign to this SSH key pair.

Step 4 Choose the key pair option type from the listed Protocols. The listed protocols are SSH1, SSH2(rsa), and SSH2(dsa).

Step 5 Set the number of bits that will be used to generate the key pairs in the NumBits drop-down menu.

Step 6 Click Create to generate these keys.



Note 1856 DSA NumberKeys are not supported by switches that running Cisco MDS NX-OS software version 4.1(1) and later.


Overwriting a Generated Key Pair

If the SSH key pair option is already generated for the required version, you can force the switch to overwrite the previously generated key pair.

Detailed Steps

To overwrite the previously generated key pair using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select SSH and Telnet.

You see the configuration in the Information pane.

Step 2 Highlight the key that you want to overwrite and click Delete Row.

Step 3 Click the Apply Changes icon to save these changes.

Step 4 Click the Create Row icon.

You see the SSH and Telnet Key - Create dialog box.

Step 5 Check the switches you want to assign this SSH key pair.

Step 6 Choose the key pair option type from the Protocols radio buttons.

Step 7 Set the number of bits that will be used to generate the key pairs in the NumBits drop-down menu.

Step 8 Click Create to generate these keys.


Enabling SSH or Telnet Service

By default, the SSH service is enabled with the RSA key.

Detailed Steps


Note If you are logging in to a switch through SSH and you have issued the aaa authentication login default none CLI command, you must enter one or more key strokes to log in. If you press the Enter key without entering at least one keystroke, your log in will be rejected.


DCNM-SAN enables SSH automatically when you configure it.

To enable or disable SSH using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select SSH and Telnet.

Step 2 Select the Control tab and check an SSH check box or Telnet check box for each switch (see Figure 3-4).

Figure 3-4 Control Tab under SSH and Telnet

Step 3 Click the Apply Changes icon to save this change.


Changing Administrator Password Using DCNM-SAN

Detailed Steps

To change the administrator password in DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click the Open tab in the control panel.

Step 2 Choose the password field to change the password for an already existing user for the fabric.

Step 3 Click Open to open the fabric.


Note New password will be saved after the fabric is open. The user name and password fields are editable in the Fabric tab only after you unmanage the fabric.



Verifying Users and Common Role Configuration

For detailed information about the fields in the output from these commands, refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Command Reference.

This section includes the following topics:

Displaying Role-Based Information

Displaying Roles When Distribution is Enabled

Displaying User Account Information

Displaying Role-Based Information

The rules are displayed by rule number and are based on each role. All roles are displayed if the role name is not specified.

To view rules for a role using Device Manager, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Security > Roles.

You see the Roles dialog box.

Step 2 Select a role name and click Rules.

You see the Rules dialog box.

Step 3 Click Summary to get a summarized view of the rules configured for this role.


Displaying Roles When Distribution is Enabled

To view the roles using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Switches > Security and then select Users and Roles in the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Users tab in the Information pane (see Figure 3-5).

Figure 3-5 Roles CFS Tab

Step 3 Set the Config View As drop-down value to pending to view the pending database or set the Config View as drop-down menu to running to view the running database.

Step 4 Click Apply Changes to save this change.


Displaying User Account Information

To display information about configured user accounts using DCNM-SAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Expand Security and then select Users and Roles in the Physical Attributes pane.

Step 2 Click the Users tab.

You see the list of SNMP users shown in Figure 3-6 in the Information pane.

Figure 3-6 Users Listed Under the Users Tab


Field Descriptions for Users and Common Role

Common Roles


Note Common roles is not available in displayFCoE mode (use security roles).


Field
Description

Description

Description of the common role.

Enable

This specifies whether the common role has a VSAN restriction or not.

List

List of VSANs user is restricted to.


Feature History for Users and Common Role

Table 3-3 lists the release history for this feature. Only features that were introduced or modified in 5.x or a later release appear in the table.

Table 3-3 Feature History for FIPS 

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

Changes to SSH

5.0(1a)

Boot Mode SSH, Passwordfree File copy, and SSH.

Role Distributions

5.0(1a)

Enabling role-based configuration distribution.

Creating Users Guidelines

5.0(1a)

Caution has been changed.