Cisco MDS 9000 Family CLI Configuration Guide
Configuring IPv4 and IPv6 Access Control Lists
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Configuring IPv4 and IPv6 Access Control Lists

Table Of Contents

Configuring IPv4 and IPv6 Access Control Lists

IPv4-ACL and IPv6-ACL Configuration Guidelines

About Filter Contents

Protocol Information

Address Information

Port Information

ICMP Information

ToS Information

Configuring IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs

Creating IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs

Adding IP Filters to an Existing IPv4-ACL or IPv6-ACL

Removing IP Filters from an Existing IPv4-ACL or IPv6-ACL

Verifying the IPv4-ACL or IPv6-ACL Configuration

Reading the IP-ACL Log Dump

Applying an IP-ACL to an Interface

Applying an IP-ACL to mgmt0

Verifying Interface IP-ACL Configuration

IP-ACL Counter Cleanup


Configuring IPv4 and IPv6 Access Control Lists


Cisco MDS 9000 Family switches can route IP version 4 (IPv4) traffic between Ethernet and Fibre Channel interfaces. The IP static routing feature routes traffic between VSANs. To do so, each VSAN must be in a different IPv4 subnetwork. Each Cisco MDS 9000 Family switch provides the following services for network management systems (NMS):

IP forwarding on the out-of-band Ethernet interface (mgmt0) on the front panel of the supervisor modules.

IP forwarding on the in-band Fibre Channel interface using the IP over Fibre Channel (IPFC) function—IPFC specifies how IP frames can be transported over Fibre Channel using encapsulation techniques. IP frames are encapsulated into Fibre Channel frames so NMS information can cross the Fibre Channel network without using an overlay Ethernet network.

IP routing (default routing and static routing)—If your configuration does not need an external router, you can configure a default route using static routing.

Switches are compliant with RFC 2338 standards for Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) features. VRRP is a restartable application that provides a redundant, alternate path to the gateway switch.

IPv4 Access Control Lists (IPv4-ACLs and IPv6-ACLs) provide basic network security to all switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family. IPv4-ACLs and IPv6-ACLs restrict IP-related traffic based on the configured IP filters. A filter contains the rules to match an IP packet, and if the packet matches, the rule also stipulates if the packet should be permitted or denied.

Each switch in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family can have a maximum total of 128 IPv4-ACLs or 128 IPv6-ACLs and each IPv4-ACL or IPv6-ACL can have a maximum of 256 filters.

This chapter includes the following sections:

IPv4-ACL and IPv6-ACL Configuration Guidelines

About Filter Contents

Configuring IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs

Reading the IP-ACL Log Dump

Applying an IP-ACL to an Interface

IP-ACL Counter Cleanup

IPv4-ACL and IPv6-ACL Configuration Guidelines

Follow these guidelines when configuring IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs in any switch or director in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family:

You can apply IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs to VSAN interfaces, the management interface, Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on IPS modules and MPS-14/2 modules, and Ethernet PortChannel interfaces.


Tip If IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs are already configured in a Gigabit Ethernet interface, you cannot add this interface to an Ethernet PortChannel group. See the "Gigabit Ethernet IPv4-ACL Guidelines" section on page 46-7 for guidelines on configuring IPv4-ACLs.



Caution Do not apply IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs to only one member of a PortChannel group. Apply IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs to the entire channel group.

Configure the order of conditions accurately. As the IPv4-ACL or the IPv6-ACL filters are sequentially applied to the IP flows, only the first match determines the action taken. Subsequent matches are not considered. Be sure to configure the most important condition first. If no conditions match, the software drops the packet.

Configure explicit deny on the IP Storage Gigabit Ethernet ports to apply IP ACLs because implicit deny does not take effect on these ports.

About Filter Contents

An IP filter contains rules for matching an IP packet based on the protocol, address, port, ICMP type, and type of service (TS).

This section includes the following topics:

Protocol Information

Address Information

Port Information

ICMP Information

ToS Information

Protocol Information

The protocol information is required in each filter. It identifies the name or number of an IP protocol. You can specify the IP protocol in one of two ways:

Specify an integer ranging from 0 to 255. This number represents the IP protocol.

Specify the name of a protocol including, but not restricted to, Internet Protocol (IP), Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), User Datagram Protocol (UDP), and Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP).


Note When configuring IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs on Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, only use the TCP or ICMP options.


Address Information

The address information is required in each filter. It identifies the following details:

Source—The address of the network or host from which the packet is being sent.

Source-wildcard—The wildcard bits applied to the source.

Destination—The number of the network or host to which the packet is being sent.

Destination-wildcard—The wildcard bits applied to the destination.

Specify the source and source-wildcard or the destination and destination-wildcard in one of two ways:

Using the 32-bit quantity in four-part, dotted decimal format (10.1.1.2/0.0.0.0 is the same as host 10.1.1.2).

Each wildcard bit set to zero indicates that the corresponding bit position in the packet's IPv4 address must exactly match the bit value in the corresponding bit position in the source.

Each wildcard bit set to one indicates that both a zero bit and a one bit in the corresponding position of the packet's IPv4 or IPv6 address will be considered a match to this access list entry. Place ones in the bit positions you want to ignore. For example, 0.0.255.255 requires an exact match of only the first 16 bits of the source. Wildcard bits set to one do not need to be contiguous in the source-wildcard. For example, a source-wildcard of 0.255.0.64 would be valid.

Using the any option as an abbreviation for a source and source-wildcard or destination and destination-wildcard (0.0.0.0/255.255.255.255)

Port Information

The port information is optional. To compare the source and destination ports, use the eq (equal) option, the gt (greater than) option, the lt (less than) option, or the range (range of ports) option. You can specify the port information in one of two ways:

Specify the number of the port. Port numbers range from 0 to 65535. Table 35-1 displays the port numbers recognized by the Cisco NX-OS software for associated TCP and UDP ports.

Specify the name of a TCP or UDP port as follows:

TCP port names can only be used when filtering TCP.

UDP port names can only be used when filtering UDP.

Table 35-1 TCP and UDP Port Numbers 

Protocol
Port
Number

UDP

dns

53

tftp

69

ntp

123

radius accounting

1646 or 1813

radius authentication

1645 or 1812

snmp

161

snmp-trap

162

syslog

514

TCP1

ftp

20

ftp-data

21

ssh

22

telnet

23

smtp

25

tasacs-ds

65

www

80

sftp

115

http

143

wbem-http

5988

wbem-https

5989

1 If the TCP connection is already established, use the established option to find matches. A match occurs if the TCP datagram has the ACK, FIN, PSH, RST, or URG control bit set.


ICMP Information

IP packets can be filtered based on the following optional ICMP conditions:

icmp-type—The ICMP message type is a number from 0 to 255.

icmp-code—The ICMP message code is a number from 0 to 255.

Table 35-2 displays the value for each ICMP type.

Table 35-2 ICMP Type Value 

ICMP Type 1
Code

echo

8

echo-reply

0

destination unreachable

3

traceroute

30

time exceeded

11

1 ICMP redirect packets are always rejected.


ToS Information

IP packets can be filtered based on the following optional ToS conditions:

ToS level—The level is specified by a number from 0 to 15.

ToS name—The name can be max-reliability, max-throughput, min-delay, min-monetary-cost, and normal.

Configuring IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs

Traffic coming into the switch is compared to IPv4-ACL or IPv6-ACL filters based on the order that the filters occur in the switch. New filters are added to the end of the IPv4-ACL or the IPv6-ACL. The switch keeps looking until it has a match. If no matches are found when the switch reaches the end of the filter, the traffic is denied. For this reason, you should have the frequently hit filters at the top of the filter. There is an implied deny for traffic that is not permitted. A single-entry IPv4-ACL or IPv6-ACL with only one deny entry has the effect of denying all traffic.

To configure an IPv4-ACL or an IPv6-ACL, follow these steps:


Step 1 Create an IPv4-ACL or an IPv6-ACL by specifying a filter name and one or more access condition(s). Filters require the source and destination address to match a condition. Use optional keywords to configure finer granularity.


Note The filter entries are executed in sequential order. You can only add the entries to the end of the list. Take care to add the entries in the correct order.


Step 2 Apply the access filter to specified interfaces.


Creating IPv4-ACLs or IPv6-ACLs

To create an IPv4-ACL, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# ip access-list List1 permit ip any any

Configures an IPv4-ACL called List1 and permits IP traffic from any source address to any destination address.

switch(config)# no ip access-list List1 permit ip any any

Removes the IPv4-ACL called List1.

Step 3 

switch(config)# ip access-list List1 deny tcp any any

Updates List1 to deny TCP traffic from any source address to any destination address.

To create an IPv6-ACL, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# ipv6 access-list List1

switch(config-ipv6-acl)#

Configures an IPv6-ACL called List1 and enters IPv6-ACL configuration submode.

switch(config)# no ipv6 access-list List1

Removes the IPv6-ACL called List1 and all its entries.

Step 3 

switch(config-ipv6-acl)# permit ipv6 any any

Adds an entry permitting IPv6 traffic from any source address to any destination address.

switch(config-ipv6-acl)# no permit ipv6 any any

Removes an entry from the IPv6-ACL.

switch(config-ipv6-acl)# deny tcp any any

Adds an entry to deny TCP traffic from any source address to any destination address.

To define an IPv4-ACL that restricts management access, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# ip access-list restrict_mgmt permit ip 10.67.16.0 0.0.0.255 any

Defines an entry in an IPv4-ACL named restrict_mgmt allowing all addresses in the 10.67.16.0/24 subnet.

Step 3 

switch(config)# ip access-list restrict_mgmt permit icmp any any eq 8

Adds an entry to an IPv4-ACL named restrict_mgmt to allow any device to ping the MDS (icmp type 8).

Step 4 

switch(config)# ip access-list restrict_mgmt deny ip any any

Explicitly blocks all other access to an access-list named restrict_mgmt.

To define an IPv6-ACL that restricts management access, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# ip access-list RestrictMgmt

switch(config-ipv6-acl)#

Configures an IPv6-ACL called RestrictMgmt and enters IPv6-ACL configuration submode.

Step 3 

switch(config)# permit ipv6 2001:0DB8:800:200C::/64 any

Defines an entry allowing all addresses in the 2001:0DB8:800:200C::/64 prefix.

Step 4 

switch(config)# permit icmp any any eq 8

Adds an entry to allow any device to ping the MDS (ICMP type 8).

Step 5 

switch(config)# deny ipv6 any any

Explicitly blocks all other IPv6 access.

To use the operand and port options for an IPv4-ACL, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# ip access-list List2 deny tcp 1.2.3.0 0.0.0.255 eq port 5 any

Denies TCP traffic from 1.2.3.0 through source port 5 to any destination.

To use the operand and port options for an IPv6-ACL, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# ip access-list List2 deny tcp 2001:0DB8:800:200C::/64 eq port 5 any

Denies TCP traffic from 2001:0DB8:800:200C::/64 through source port 5 to any destination.

Adding IP Filters to an Existing IPv4-ACL or IPv6-ACL

After you create an IPv4-ACL or an IPv6-ACL, you can add subsequent IP filters at the end of the IPv4-ACL or the IPv6-ACL. You cannot insert filters in the middle of an IPv4-ACL or an IPv6-ACL. Each configured entry is automatically added to the end of a IPv4-ACL or a IPv6-ACL.

To add entries to an existing IPv4-ACL, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# ip access-list List1 permit tcp 10.1.1.2 0.0.0.0 172.16.1.1 0.0.0.0 eq port telnet

Permits TCP for Telnet traffic.

Step 3 

switch(config)# ip access-list List1 permit tcp 10.1.1.2 0.0.0.0 172.16.1.1 0.0.0.0 eq port http

Permits TCP for HTTP traffic.

Step 4 

switch(config)# ip access-list List1 permit udp 10.1.1.2 0.0.0.0 172.16.1.1 0.0.0.0

Permits UDP for all traffic.

To add entries to an existing IPv6-ACL, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# ipv6 access-list List2

switch(config-ipv6-acl)#

Configures an IPv6-ACL and enters IPv6-ACL configuration submode.

Step 3 

switch(config-ipv6-acl)# permit ip 2001:0DB8:800:200C::/64 2001:0DB8:800:2010::/64 eq 23

Permits TCP for Telnet traffic.

Step 4 

switch(config-ipv6-acl)# permit tcp 2001:0DB8:800:200C::/64 2001:0DB8:800:2010::/64 eq 143

Permits TCP for HTTP traffic.

Step 5 

switch(config-ipv6-acl)# permit udp 2001:0DB8:800:200C::/64 2001:0DB8:800:2010::/64

Permits UDP for all traffic.

Removing IP Filters from an Existing IPv4-ACL or IPv6-ACL

To remove configured entries from an IPv4-ACL, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# no ip access-list List2 deny tcp 1.2.3.0 0.0.0.255 eq port 5 any

Removes this entry from the IPv4-ACL (List2).

switch(config)# no ip access-list x3 deny ip any any

Removes this entry from the IPv4-ACL (x3).

switch(config)# no ip access-list x3 permit ip any any

Removes this entry from the IPv4-ACL (x3).

To remove configured entries from an IPv6-ACL, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

switch(config)#

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# ipv6 access-list List3

switch(config-ipv6-acl)#

Configures an IPv6-ACL and enters IPv6-ACL configuration submode.

Step 3 

switch(config-ipv6-acl)# no deny tcp 2001:0DB8:800:2010::/64 eq port 5 any

Removes the TCP entry from the IPv6-ACL.

Step 4 

switch(config-ipv6-acl)# no deny ip any any

Removes the IP entry from the IPv6-ACL.

Verifying the IPv4-ACL or IPv6-ACL Configuration

Use the show ip access-list command to view the contents of configured IPv4-ACLs. An IPv4-ACL can have one or more filters. (See Example 35-1.)

Example 35-1 Displays Filters Configured for an IPv4-ACL

switch# show ip access-list abc
ip access-list abc permit tcp any any (0 matches)
ip access-list abc permit udp any any (0 matches)
ip access-list abc permit icmp any any (0 matches)
ip access-list abc permit ip 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255 (2 matches)
ip access-list abc permit ip 10.3.70.0 0.0.0.255 (7 matches)

Use the show ipv6 access-list command to view the contents of configured access filters. Each access filter can have several conditions. (See Example 35-2 and Example 35-3.)

Example 35-2 Displays Configured IPv6-ACLs

switch# show ipv6 access-list
Access List Name/Number          Filters IF   Status    Creation Time
-------------------------------- ------- ---- --------- -------------
abc                              3       7    active    Tue Jun 24 17:51:40 2003 
x1                               3       1    active    Tue Jun 24 18:32:25 2003
x3                               0       1    not-ready Tue Jun 24 18:32:28 2003

Example 35-3 Displays a Summary of the Specified IPv6-ACL

switch# show ipv6 access-list abc

Reading the IP-ACL Log Dump

Use the log-deny option at the end of a filter condition to log information about packets that match dropped entries. The log output displays the ACL number, permit or deny status, and port information.


Note To capture these messages in a logging destination, you must configure severity level 7 for the kernel and ipacl facilities (see the "Facility Severity Levels" section on page 52-5) and severity level 7 for the logging destination: logfile (see the "Log Files" section on page 52-6), monitor (see the "Monitor Severity Level" section on page 52-4) or console (see the "Console Severity Level" section on page 52-4). For example:
switch# config t
switch(config)# logging level kernel 7
switch(config)# logging level ipacl 7
switch(config)# logging logfile message 7


For the input ACL, the log displays the raw MAC information. The keyword "MAC=" does not refer to showing an Ethernet MAC frame with MAC address information. It refers to the Layer 2 MAC-layer information dumped to the log. For the output ACL, the raw Layer 2 information is not logged.

The following example is an input ACL log dump:

Jul 17 20:38:44 excal-2 
%KERN-7-SYSTEM_MSG:
%IPACL-7-DENY:IN=vsan1 OUT= 
MAC=10:00:00:05:30:00:47:df:10:00:00:05:30:00:8a:1f:aa:aa:03:00:00:00:08:00:45:00:00:54:00
:00:40:00:40:01:0e:86:0b:0b:0b:0c:0b:0b:0b:02:08:00:ff:9c:01:15:05:00:6f:09:17:3f:80:02:01
:00:08:09:0a:0b:0c:0d:0e:0f:10:11:12:13:14:15:16:17:18:19:1a:1b:1c:1d:1e:1f:20:21:22:23:24
:25:26:27:28:29:2a:2b SRC=11.11.11.12 DST=11.11.11.2 LEN=84 TOS=0x00 PREC=0x00 TTL=64 ID=0 
DF PROTO=ICMP TYPE=8 CODE=0 ID=277 SEQ=1280

The following example is an output ACL log dump:

Jul 17 20:38:44 excal-2 
%KERN-7-SYSTEM_MSG:
%IPACL-7-DENY:IN= OUT=vsan1 SRC=11.11.11.2 DST=11.11.11.12 LEN=84 TOS=0x00 PREC=0x00 
TTL=255 ID=38095 PROTO=ICMP TYPE=0 CODE=0 ID=277 SEQ=1280

Applying an IP-ACL to an Interface

You can define IP-ACLs without applying them. However, the IP-ACLs will have no effect until they are applied to an interface on the switch. You can apply IP-ACLs to VSAN interfaces, the management interface, Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on IPS modules and MPS-14/2 modules, and Ethernet PortChannel interfaces.


Tip Apply the IP-ACL on the interface closest to the source of the traffic.


When you are trying to block traffic from source to destination, you can apply an inbound IPv4-ACL to M0 on Switch 1 instead of an outbound filter to M1 on Switch 3 (see Figure 35-1).

Figure 35-1 Denying Traffic on the Inbound Interface

The access-group option controls access to an interface. Each interface can only be associated with one IP-ACL per direction. The ingress direction can have a different IP-ACL than the egress direction. The IP-ACL becomes active when applied to the interface.


Tip Create all conditions in an IP-ACL before applying it to the interface.



Caution If you apply an IP-ACL to an interface before creating it, all packets in that interface are dropped because the IP-ACL is empty.

The terms in, out, source, and destination are used as referenced by the switch:

In—Traffic that arrives at the interface and goes through the switch; the source is where it transmitted from and the destination is where it is transmitted to (on the other side of the router).


Tip The IP-ACL applied to the interface for the ingress traffic affects both local and remote traffic.


Out—Traffic that has already been through the switch and is leaving the interface; the source is where it transmitted from and the destination is where it is transmitted to.


Tip The IP-ACL applied to the interface for the egress traffic only affects local traffic.


To apply an IPv4-ACL to an interface, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# interface mgmt0

switch(config-if)#

Configures a management interface (mgmt0).

Step 3 

switch(config-if)# ip access-group restrict_mgmt

Applies an IPv4-ACL called restrict_mgmt for both the ingress and egress traffic (default).

switch(config-if)# no ip access-group NotRequired

Removes the IPv4-ACL called NotRequired.

Step 4 

switch(config-if)# ip access-group restrict_mgmt in

Applies an IPv4-ACL called restrict_mgmt (if it does not already exist) for ingress traffic.

switch(config-if)# no ip access-group restrict_mgmt in

Removes the IPv4-ACL called restrict_mgmt for ingress traffic.

switch(config-if)# ip access-group SampleName2 out

Applies an IPv4-ACL called SampleName2 (if it does not already exist) for egress traffic.

switch(config-if)# no ip access-group SampleName2 out

Removes the IPv4-ACL called SampleName2 for egress traffic.

To apply an IPv6-ACL to an interface, follow these steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

switch# config t

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

switch(config)# interface mgmt0

switch(config-if)#

Configures a management interface (mgmt0).

Step 3 

switch(config-if)# ipv6 traffic-filter RestrictMgmt in

Applies an IPv6-ACL called RestrictMgmt (if it does not already exist) for ingress traffic.

switch(config-if)# no ipv6 traffic-filter RestrictMgmt in

Removes the IPv6-ACL called RestrictMgmt for ingress traffic.

switch(config-if)# ipv6 traffic-filter SampleName2 out

Applies an IPv6-ACL called SampleName2 (if it does not already exist) for egress traffic.

switch(config-if)# no ipv6 traffic-filter SampleName2 out

Removes the IPv6-ACL called SampleName2 for egress traffic.

Applying an IP-ACL to mgmt0

A system default ACL called mgmt0 exists on the mgmt0 interface. This ACL is not visible to the user, so mgmt0 is a reserved ACL name that cannot be used. The mgmt0 ACL blocks most ports and only allows access to required ports in line with accepted security policies.

Verifying Interface IP-ACL Configuration

Use the show interface command to display the IPv4-ACL configuration on an interface.

switch# show interface mgmt 0
mgmt0 is up
    Hardware is FastEthernet
    Address is 000c.30d9.fdbc
    Internet address is 172.22.31.113/24
    MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100 Mbps full Duplex
    ip access-group restrict_mgmt in
    35988 packets input, 3105539 bytes
      0 multicast frames, 0 compressed
      0 input errors, 0 frame, 0 overrun 0 fifo
    2495 packets output, 430547 bytes, 0 underruns
      0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 fifo
      0 carrier errors

Use the show interface command to display the IPv6-ACL configuration on an interface.

switch# show interface gigabitethernet 2/1
GigabitEthernet2/1 is up
    Hardware is GigabitEthernet, address is 000e.38c6.28b0
    Internet address is 10.1.1.10/24
    MTU 1500  bytes
    Port mode is IPS
    Speed is 1 Gbps
    Beacon is turned off
    Auto-Negotiation is turned on
    ip access-group RestrictMgmt
    5 minutes input rate 1208 bits/sec, 151 bytes/sec, 2 frames/sec
    5 minutes output rate 80 bits/sec, 10 bytes/sec, 0 frames/sec
    6232 packets input, 400990 bytes
      0 multicast frames, 0 compressed
      0 input errors, 0 frame, 0 overrun 0 fifo
    503 packets output, 27054 bytes, 0 underruns
      0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 fifo
      0 carrier errors

IP-ACL Counter Cleanup

Use the clear command to clear the counters for a specified IPv4-ACL filter entry.


Note You cannot use this command to clear the counters for individual filters.


switch# show ip access-list abc
ip access-list abc permit tcp any any (0 matches)
ip access-list abc permit udp any any (0 matches)
ip access-list abc permit icmp any any (0 matches)
ip access-list abc permit ip 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255 (2 matches)
ip access-list abc permit ip 10.3.70.0 0.0.0.255 (7 matches)

switch# clear ip access-list counters abc

switch# show ip access-list abc
ip access-list abc permit tcp any any (0 matches)
ip access-list abc permit udp any any (0 matches)
ip access-list abc permit icmp any any (0 matches)
ip access-list abc permit ip 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255 (0 matches)
ip access-list abc permit ip 10.3.70.0 0.0.0.255 (0 matches)

Use the clear ipv6 access-list command to clear the counters for all IPv6-ACLs.

switch# clear ipv6 access-list

Use the clear ipv6 access-list name command to clear the counters for a specified IPv6-ACL.

switch# clear ipv6 access-list List1


Note You cannot use this command to clear the counters for each individual filter.


.