Cisco Network Boot Installation and Configuration Guide, Release 2.1
Chapter 3 - Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation
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Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation

Table Of Contents

Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation

Prerequisite Tasks

Configuration Tasks

Checking the Network Configuration

Creating a Master Boot Image

Installing the Operating System and Applications

Installing the Cisco iSCSI Driver

Configuring the Network Interface

Host with NIC That Is PXE Enabled

Host with NIC That Is Not PXE Enabled

Configuring iSCSI Targets for Replication

Setting Up the DHCP/TFTP Server

DHCP Server with Windows 2000

TFTP Server with Windows 2000

Replicating Boot Images

Installing the Network Boot Administration Utility

Creating a Partition

Replicating a Boot Image to an iSCSI Target

Completing the Replication Process

Configuring an IP Host to Boot from the Network


Installing and Configuring for Cisco Network Boot Operation


This chapter explains how to install and configure the software needed to implement Cisco Network Boot software.

When going through this process for the first time, you will be performing the steps to create a master boot image on a master boot host. Once the master boot image is created, it is replicated to the iSCSI targets.

This chapter contains the following topics.

Prerequisite Tasks

Configuration Tasks

Checking the Network Configuration

Creating a Master Boot Image

Configuring iSCSI Targets for Replication

Setting Up the DHCP/TFTP Server

Replicating Boot Images

Configuring an IP Host to Boot from the Network

Prerequisite Tasks

Before installing and configuring the components for the iSCSI Network Boot Program, you should have performed the following tasks:

Planned for the setup of all hardware, software, and network equipment.

Collected all configuration information for the Cisco 5400 Series system, the iSCSI targets, the DHCP/TFTP server, and the hosts. See Collecting Configuration Information.

Located the most current Cisco iSCSI driver, readme files, and example configuration files from Cisco.com. In addition, information about driver compatibility and other relevant driver information is on Cisco.com.

Located the latest release of Cisco Network Boot from Cisco.com.

Studied the examples in Figure 3-1 and Figure 3-2 in this chapter. These examples are helpful when you configure access lists with IP addresses and iSCSI targets in a SCSI routing instance.


Note The SCSI routing instance in all examples is named bootrtr.


Configuration Tasks

To configure for Cisco Network Boot, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Check the network configuration.

Step 2 Create a master boot image.

Step 3 Set up the storage router.

Step 4 Configure at least one iSCSI target.

Step 5 Set up the DHCP/TFTP server.

Step 6 Replicate the boot image to the iSCSI targets.

Step 7 Configure the IP hosts to boot from the network.


Figure 3-1 illustrates example addresses used in this chapter. Figure 3-2 illustrates SCSI routing parameters in an example configuration. The parameters are also used in the examples in this chapter.

Figure 3-1 Example - IP Addresses

Figure 3-2 Example - Routing Parameters in a Configuration

Checking the Network Configuration

Checking the network configuration consists of the tasks for checking the LAN items, checking that the NIC with PXE enabled are connected, and setting the Cisco switches.

When you set up the LAN for the Cisco Network Boot operation, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Make sure you have checked or included the items in Table 3-1.

Step 2 Ensure the NICs with PXE enabled are connected to the Cisco SN 5400 Series system and the DHCP server via the IP Ethernet connection.

Step 3 Verify that the Cisco switches work with DHCP. Following are an example of a switch CLI command and an example of how to configure the switches.

To check the DHCP settings, enter this command at the > enable prompt:

#show dhcp server

To set the DHCP server IP address, enter these commands at the > enable prompt:

#configure terminal
#ip dhcp-server A.B.C.D

Step 4 Verify that the Cisco switches on the gigabit Ethernet or the 10/100 Ethernet ports are set to initialize quickly. Following are examples of the commands to configure these switches.

To set the portfast option for interface #1, enter these commands for each port at the > enable prompt:

#configure terminal
#interface GigabitEthernet 0/1
#spanning-tree portfast

To set the switches for interface #2, you need to exit out of the current interface settings first. Enter these commands at the > enable prompt:

#exit
#interface GigabitEthernet 0/2
#spanning-tree portfast


Caution Spantree portfast start should only be enabled on ports connected to a single host. Connecting hubs, concentrators, switches, bridges, and so on, to a fast start port can cause temporary spanning tree loops.

Table 3-1 Network Configuration Items

Item
Description

Gigabit Ethernet or 10/100 configuration

You need a Gigabit Ethernet or 10/100 configuration for the IP Ethernet connection that connects the DHCP/TFTP server, the hosts, and the Cisco 5400 Series system.

Each host requires a 10/100, 10/100/1000, or Gigabit Ethernet port capable of PXE that has access to the DHCP/TFTP server and the Cisco 5400 Series system. This port can be an onboard Ethernet port or provided as a NIC.

VLANs

If these exist, make sure you check that all VLAN configurations are correct. VLANS are another way to manage multiple network segments.

For example, if you are on a VLAN 20 and the DHCP server is on VLAN 40, then you need to make sure you have routing between the VLANs and a DHCP helper address.

DHCP helper address

DHCP helper address helps a host locate a DHCP server if the DHCP server is on a different network (segment) than the host.

Cisco switches based on Router IOS and routers need a DHCP helper address.

Spantree portfast

If you are using Cisco devices, you need a Cisco version of the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), a loop-prevention protocol.


Creating a Master Boot Image

Creating a master boot image consists of tasks for installing the operating system and applications, installing the iSCSI driver, and configuring the network interface.

Installing the Operating System and Applications


Step 1 Install Microsoft Windows 2000 Server or Advanced Server on the master boot host.

Step 2 Install all other applications that will be on the master boot image.


Installing the Cisco iSCSI Driver

To install the Cisco iSCSI driver for Microsoft Windows 2000 into the master boot host, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Download the most current Cisco iSCSI driver.

Step 2 Install and configure the Cisco iSCSI driver using the Cisco iSCSI driver readme file.

Step 3 Enter the IP address associated with the SCSI routing instance.

Step 4 Click the Early Boot button if the boot type does not say Early.

Step 5 Click Add > Save.


Configuring the Network Interface

Configuring the network interface consists of the tasks for assigning the IP address.

Keep in mind the following when assigning the IP address:

Network interfaces attached to the hosts that are connected to DHCP and to iSCSI targets in the Cisco SN 5400 Series system network via the IP Ethernet must have the PXE program enabled.

Network interfaces that are attached to the host, but connected to another network, do not have PXE enabled.

When you assign an IP address to the NIC that is PXE enabled, you need to make sure it is the same address as the DHCP IP address. See Table 3-3.

Host with NIC That Is PXE Enabled

To assign an IP address for a NIC that is PXE enabled, use your NIC documentation to perform the following tasks:


Step 1 Click Start > Settings > Network and Dialup Connections > Local Area Connection. Choose the local area connection with a NIC with PXE enabled.

Step 2 Configure the TCP/IP properties.

Figure 3-3 Example - TCP/IP Properties

Step 3 Check the setting in the Use the following IP address field.

Step 4 Assign the IP address used from the DHCP configuration.



Caution Do not change the static IP address to a DHCP address. Doing so might result in loss of data.

Host with NIC That Is Not PXE Enabled

Obtaining an IP address automatically using DHCP prevents each system from being configured with the same IP addresses after replication. Each system would then need to be booted individually and manually configured to have another IP address. This way, using DHCP for setting the IP addresses creates less administrative work.

To assign an IP address for a NIC that is not PXE enabled, use your NIC documentation to perform the following tasks:


Step 1 Click Start > Settings > Network and Dialup Connections > Local Area Connection. Choose the local area connection with the PXE program not enabled.

Step 2 Configure the TCP/IP properties.

Step 3 Check the setting in the Obtain an IP address automatically field.



Note The NIC type and interface number selected for the booting process must be the same on all hosts.


Configuring iSCSI Targets for Replication

Configuring an iSCSI target consists of the tasks for configuring an iSCSI target to create a boot image and configuring iSCSI targets for the replicated images.

Before you configure an iSCSI target, keep the following in mind:

The first disk mapped to an iSCSI target must be LUN 0. This device is used as the boot disk. All other disks mapped to this iSCSI target should be numbered sequentially, such as LUN 1, LUN 2, LUN 3.

When configuring the iSCSI target to create volumes (logical or virtual devices), you must make each boot image no smaller than the size of the files on the directly attached disk on the master boot host plus 10%. If a larger swap space is needed, the boot image needs to be larger.

Initially, you need to set up only one iSCSI target for use with the first boot host.

When you configure each of the other iSCSI targets, you can do it immediately after you configure the first iSCSI target or you can do it later when you go through the process to replicate a boot image for each iSCSI target.

To configure the iSCSI target for replication, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Install and configure the Cisco SN 5400 Series system if it is not already set up. Refer to the appropriate Cisco SN 5400 Series system configuration guide.

Step 2 Make sure the iSCSI target and the access list are configured so that the master boot host can access the iSCSI target.

Initially every iSCSI target should be accessible by the master boot host. Once you complete the replication process, only each host can have access to and be mapped to an iSCSI target. At the end of the replication process, you need to adjust the access lists and the iSCSI targets in the SCSI routing instance so that only each host can access its own iSCSI target.


Caution Only one host is allowed to access an iSCSI target at any time. If more than one host has access, a data loss may occur.

Each host to which an access list corresponds should be powered down when you make changes to that access list for the iSCSI target.

Step 3 Configure an iSCSI target for the master boot host by adding or configuring information. See Table 3-2 for some example information that also appears in Figure 3-2.

Step 4 Configure the access list to include the IP address of the master boot host.


Note You can configure access lists for the other hosts now or later.


Step 5 Note the target name. One way you can access the target name is by entering a CLI command on the Cisco 5400 Series system as shown in the following example:

show scsirouter bootrtr

where bootrtr is the name of the SCSI routing instance.

You will use the target name later when setting up the DHCP server.


Table 3-2 Example: iSCSI Target Configuration

Example
Description

bootrtr

Name of SCSI routing instance

10.2.50.102

IP address of the SCSI routing instance

Note This is not the management address.

0

LUN for iSCSI target that will be mapped to the host. This LUN must be zero.

iqn.1987-05.com.cisco.00.0aeccb6d6099d0b325595df2480730cc.masterbootdisk

Name of the iSCSI target


Setting Up the DHCP/TFTP Server

Setting up the DHCP/TFTP server consists of tasks for creating a scope, a reservation, and configuration options for the host.

The DHCP/TFTP server contains two separate servers: the DHCP server and the TFTP server. Both servers must reside on the same host computer.

You can find more information about the installation of DHCP by referring to the DHCP documentation for your DHCP server.


Note You can configure the DHCP server for the master boot host and the other hosts or you can configure the other hosts later or before you use them.


DHCP Server with Windows 2000

To set up the DHCP server, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Install the appropriate service pack and hotfixes.

Step 2 In Windows, choose Start > Programs > Administrative Tools > DHCP to go to DHCP.

Step 3 From the Action menu, choose Add server.

Step 4 Create a scope by specifying scope options for your configuration. See your DHCP documentation.

Step 5 Right-click Reservations under Scope and select New Reservation. Add the information for each of the following options:

Reservation name (also the host name)

IP address

MAC address

Description

See Table 3-3 for a description and sample for each option.


Note Each reservation name must be different.


Step 6 If you are adding more hosts to the network, click Add. Go to step 6. Repeat for each host you will be adding to the network. Click Close when you have completed creating reservations for all systems.

Step 7 From the Reservations menu, select Master and right-click to view Configuration Options.

Step 8 Check and add the scope and reservation options. Add the following information for each of the options:

Scope (This is done for each LAN.)

043 - vendor-specific options

067- bootfile name

Reservation (This is done for each host.)

012 - host name

017 - root file

See Table 3-4 and Table 3-5 for a sample of each option.

Step 9 Save these options.

Step 10 Exit DHCP.


Table 3-3 New Reservation Options

Option
Description
Sample Entry

Reservation name

Name of the host.

HERMES_master

IP Address

The IP address of the host. This address should match the address set in the SN 542x access list.

10.2.50.49

MAC address

A 6-byte hex address of the NIC in the master boot host with PXE enabled. You can get this address from the system documentation or by booting the system with PXE enabled, which will display the address.

Also, you can use the following command in a command prompt window on the host:

ipconfig /all

00:04:56:AC:71:29

Description

Description of the reservation name.

iSCSI boot master

Table 3-4 Configuration Options—Scope

Option
Description
Sample Entry

043

Vendor-specific information

This should be set to 03 06 01 03. (Ignore any other PXE servers.)

067

Bootfile name

bootrtr.com

Table 3-5 Configuration Options—Reservation

Option
Description
Sample Entry

012

Host name

HERMES_master

017

Root path to the name of the iSCSI target. When you load the inbp.com file on to the master boot host, the root path to the iSCSI target is also loaded.

iscsi:10.2.50.102:tcp:3260:0: 
iqn.1987-05.com.cisco. 
00xxxxxxxxxxxxxmasterbootdisk

See Table 3-6 for a description of each element in this root path.


Table 3-6 Root Path Elements

Element
Description
iscsi

Required prefix.

10.2.50.102

Address of the SCSI routing instance configured in an earlier step.

Note This is the IP address of the SCSI router; it is not the management address.

tcp or 6

Specifies that tcp is used.

3260

iSCSI port number. 3260 is the default, which is assigned by IANA.

0

LUN to use (zero).

iqn.1987-05.com.cisco.00.0aeccb6d6099d0b325
595df2480730cc.masterbootdisk

iSCSI target name. You can get the iSCSI target name using the scsirouter CLI command. See Configuring iSCSI Targets for Replication.


TFTP Server with Windows 2000

To set up the TFTP server, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Install the TFTP server by installing the remote Installation services. Do not configure the remote Installation services at any time.

Step 2 Create the following directory, if not present, by entering:

c:\tftpdroot

Step 3 Copy the inbp.com file from Cisco.com into the c:\tftpdroot directory. You can find the inbp.com file in the Cisco Network Boot package called netboot-2.1.1.zip from Cisco.com.

Step 4 Click Start > Programs > Administrative Tools > Services.

Step 5 Double-click Trivial FTP Daemon service.

Step 6 Ensure that the status displays Started.

If it does not display Started, click Start and set Startup Type to Automatic.


Replicating Boot Images

Replicating boot images consists of the tasks for installing the Network Boot Administration utility, creating a partition on your iSCSI target, replicating the master boot image, replicating other boot images, and completing the replication process.

The Network Boot Administration utility is a component in Cisco Network Boot that allows you to perform Cisco Network Boot administrative tasks, including boot image replication.

Note Since the boot disks were configured as iSCSI target/LUN 0, the number of devices that can be replicated is limited to 8. After replication, the configuration for the Cisco 5400 Series system must be adjusted to allow access to another 8 boot disks, and so on, until all the boot disks are replicated. Alternatively, for replication, only the boot disks can be LUNs 0-n. If this is done, be sure to reconfigure back to LUN 0 after replication.


Installing the Network Boot Administration Utility

To install the Network Boot Administration utility, perform the following tasks:


Step 1 To install the utility, locate the zip package called netboot-2.1.1.zip at Cisco.com, unzip the package, and double-click setup.exe.

Step 2 The Network Boot Administration Wizard appears. Click Next and read the license agreement and the readme file. Click Yes then Next.

Step 3 Fill in the Customer Information and click Next.

Step 4 Choose the Destination Location and click Next.

Step 5 Once the wizard has completed the installation, click Finish.


Creating a Partition

To create a partition, perform the following tasks:


Step 1 Click Start > Programs > Cisco Storage Networking > Network Boot Administration.

Step 2 In the netboot window, choose Disk Management.

A window showing disks with partitions appears. (See Figure 3-4.)

Step 3 Right-click an unallocated region of a basic disk and click Create Partition....

Figure 3-4 Disk Management Window

Step 4 In the Create Partition wizard, click Next.

Step 5 In the Select Partition Type window, select Primary Partition > Next.

Step 6 In the Specify Partition Size window, fill in Amount of disk space to use and click Next.

Estimate the size to be at least 10% more than the size of the used space on the source volume. If a larger swap space is needed, the boot image needs to be larger.

Step 7 In the Assign Drive letter or path window, choose Assign a drive letter, choose or enter a drive letter, and click Next.

Step 8 In the Format Partition window, choose Format this partition > Perform quick format and click Next > Finish.

Step 9 When the formatting process is complete, the partition displays the name of the new volume, the size, and the term, healthy. (See Figure 3-5.) Right-click the partition and select Mark Partition Active.

Step 10 Once you mark the partition active, the name New Volume and the term, healthy (active), appears. (See Figure 3-5.)


Figure 3-5 Healthy/Active Volume

Replicating a Boot Image to an iSCSI Target

To replicate a boot image, perform the following tasks:


Step 1 Choose Source Volumes.

Step 2 Click the volume drive letter from Source Volumes (where you want to copy from). The source can come from one of two different places:

Directly attached disk drive on a master boot host where the master boot image is located.

A volume that was created using the replication process directly from the master boot image.

Step 3 A Destination Volumes window appears with the other drives that can be chosen as a destination. Choose the volume drive letter to where you want to copy. In the example, the source volume C is copied to the destination volume E. (See Figure 3-6.)

Figure 3-6 Destinations Window

Step 4 Click Replicate Boot Volume.

Step 5 Confirm the data on the Confirm Replication of Volume screen and click Next.

Step 6 Fill in the following information:

Value
Description
Example - 1st Time
Example - 2nd Time

Source IP address

IP address of the host that contains the boot image. It must be the IP address of the NIC with PXE enabled. See the Configuration Worksheet - DHCP/TFTP Server, Table 2-4.

1.2.50.49
1.2.50.49

Destination IP address

IP address of the host that receives the boot image. It must be the IP address of the NIC with PXE enabled. See the Configuration Worksheet - DHCP/TFTP Server, Table 2-4.

1.2.50.49 (same)
1.2.50.48 
(different)

Destination computer name

The name of the host designated as the destination computer. See the Configuration Worksheet - DHCP/TFTP Server, Table 2-4

HERMES_master
HOMER


Note Examples are shown for the first and second time (and any other time after the first time) you run the replication process. The first time you run the replication process, the source IP address and the destination IP address and computer name must match to create a boot disk for the master boot image. When you run the process the second time (and any other time after the first time), the source IP address remains the same and the destination IP address and computer name must change to be the next replication for other hosts.


Step 7 Click Next.

Step 8 Confirm the details and click Next.

Step 9 Once the progress bar showing the replication process has completed normally, click Finish.

Step 10 For all other iSCSI targets, create a partition and begin with Step 1 in this procedure to replicate the additional boot images.


Completing the Replication Process

To complete the replication process, perform the following tasks:


Step 1 When you have replicated all boot images, shut down the computer.

Step 2 When the system is down, remove the directly attached disk drive from the master boot host, if desired.

Step 3 Establish a management session with the Cisco SN 5400 Series system.

Step 4 Modify the access list so that each host can access only its iSCSI target.


Caution Failing to properly configure access lists can lead to data corruption.

Refer to the appropriate Cisco software configuration guide for the Cisco SN 5400 Series system for further information about modifying access lists.


Configuring an IP Host to Boot from the Network

Configuring an IP host to boot from the network consists of the tasks for ensuring that Cisco Network Boot is enabled for the appropriate NIC, changing the boot order, saving the order and observing indicators to ensure Cisco Network Boot is running.


Note If you haven't completed setting up the hosts on the DHCP/TFTP server, do so at this time.


To configure IP host to boot from the network, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Boot the host.

Step 2 Press F2 or use the configured system method of accessing the System Setup for your host.

Step 3 Ensure PXE support is enabled for the NIC that was configured earlier in DHCP.

Step 4 Change the boot order to Boot from the network first.

Step 5 Press F10 or the host's method of saving the System Setup options.

After you have pressed F10, the booting continues

Step 6 Observe the following indicators to ensure that Cisco Network Boot is running and accessing the DHCP server properly:

The IP addresses, submasks, default gateways displayed on the hosts should match those configured in the DHCP server.

When inbp.com is downloaded by TFTP and starts, many messages should appear on the screen. Check for a message that shows version information, such as:

Cisco Network Boot version 2.1.1

Check for a line that displays LUN 0 and FC storage device information (See Table 3-7), such as:

iSCSI LUN: 0000 Seagate ST318452 00023CV08080

Microsoft Windows 2000 Server or Advanced Server boots correctly.


Note When you see a light flashing on the storage array on some systems, this indicates that the host is communicating with the storage.



Table 3-7 Description of Line

Example
Description
iSCSI LUN

Line introduction

0000

LUN number of the iSCSI target that was found

Seagate

Manufacturer of the storage device

ST318452

Model number of the storage device

00023CV08080

Serial number of the storage device