Cisco SN 5420 Storage Router Software Configuration Guide, Release 2.1
Chapter 10 - Maintaining and Managing the Storage Router
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Maintaining and Managing the Storage Router

Table Of Contents

Maintaining and Managing the Storage Router

Prerequisite Tasks

Installing Updated Software

Specifying the Location to Retrieve Updated Software

Downloading Updated Software

Setting Updated Software as Boot Version

Precautions for Cluster Environments

Backing Up System Configuration

Restoring from Backups

Powering Down the Storage Router

Resetting the System

Recovering Passwords

Controlling SCSI Routing Instances in a Cluster

Making Changes to Instance Configurations

Enabling and Disabling Connections

Stopping & Starting Instances

Viewing Operational Statistics

Handling Failover

Indicating a Preferred Failover Sequence

Manual Failover

Managing CDP on the Storage Router

Using Scripts to Automate Tasks

Running Command Scripts

Managing the Log File

Gathering Troubleshooting Information

Using the Crash Log

Using FTP with the Storage Router

Understanding Diagnostics

Capturing System Messages at Bootup

Understanding Logging

Viewing and Saving the Log File

Capturing the Storage Router Configuration

Using Debug Facilities


Maintaining and Managing the Storage Router


This chapter explains how to perform normal maintenance and management tasks associated with the Cisco SN 5420 Storage Router. The following tasks are covered:

Prerequisite Tasks

Installing Updated Software

Backing Up System Configuration

Restoring from Backups

Powering Down the Storage Router

Resetting the System

Recovering Passwords

Controlling SCSI Routing Instances in a Cluster

Managing CDP on the Storage Router

Using Scripts to Automate Tasks

Managing the Log File

Gathering Troubleshooting Information

Storage router maintenance and management tasks can be performed using CLI commands, as described in this chapter, or via the web-based GUI. To access the web-based GUI, point your browser to the storage router's management interface IP address. After logging on, click the Help link to access online help for the GUI.


Note Not all maintenance and management tasks are appropriate for all storage routers. For example, tasks related to storage router clusters (such as failover of SCSI routing instances) are not necessary or available for storage routers deployed for iSCSI SAN interconnect and transparent SCSI routing.


Prerequisite Tasks

Before performing any storage router maintenance tasks, make sure you have configured system parameters as described in Chapter 2, "First-Time Configuration," or Chapter 3, "Configuring System Parameters."


Note Certain configuration tasks, such as identifying a location from which to download software, are optional and may not have been performed during initial configuration. You may perform these tasks at any time, via the CLI or the GUI. Where necessary, this chapter will identify the relevant tasks and commands.


Installing Updated Software

The SN 5420 Storage Router is designed to run on a continual basis without significant maintenance. However, from time to time, you may need to install updated software. The storage router stores software images (along with configuration files, log files, and other information) on a local file system. This file system is stored on an internal, non-volatile Flash disk. The show software version all command displays a list of all software versions stored on the storage router and the amount of disk space available for additional software.

Cisco.com provides registered users access to SN 5420 Storage Router software updates. (See the "Obtaining Technical Assistance" section on page xiv for details on using Cisco.com.) You can download updated software directly to the storage router from Cisco.com via standard HTTP, or via HTTP using a proxy server. You can also use a standard browser to download software updates and associated readme files from Cisco.com to a location of your choosing. Using the CLI or the storage router GUI, you can then make software available from this location (known as the "download location") to the storage router via HTTP, HTTP using a proxy server, or Trivial File Transport Protocol (TFTP).


Note Always review the README file before making updated software available to the storage router.


If you plan to use the CLI download software http or download software proxy commands to make the updated software available to the storage router, the machine hosting the download location must be running a web server. If you plan to use the CLI download software tftp command, the machine must be accessible using the Trivial File Transport Protocol. If the machine is not running a web server or accessible via TFTP, use the storage router web-based GUI to make the updated software available to the storage router. (See the online Help for details.)

The download location used for retrieving updated storage router software is set using the software http url, software proxy url, or the software tftp commands. To view the download location currently specified, use the show software version all command (Example 10-1). The show software version all command identifies the HTTP URL, Proxy URL, and TFTP host name and other information used to identify the download location, the current version of software running on the storage router, and the version that will be used at system restart. In the example, all default locations and related user names and passwords are set.

Example 10-1 Results of "show software version all" Command

[SN5420_A01]# show software version all
Version               Boot  Hash  Sign  Crash      Size  Date                 
--------------------  ----  ----  ----  -----  --------  ---------------------
2.1.0.32a              OK    OK    N/A       0   6.63 MB  Dec 4 12:23 CDT 2001
2.1.0.34               OK    OK    N/A       0   6.64 MB  Dec 7 14:50 CDT 2001
            Http Url: http://www.cisco.com
       Http Username: SWAdmin01
       Http Password: *********

       Proxy Address: 10.1.12.32
          Proxy Port: 3122
           Proxy Url: http://www.cisco.com
      Proxy Username: SWAdmin01
      Proxy Password: *********

       Tftp Hostname: 10.1.1.122
      Tftp Directory: sn5420/v2.1/

Disk Space Available: 19632 blocks (block=512)
     Current Version: 2.1.0.34
        Boot Version: 2.1.0.34


To update storage router software, perform the following steps:


Step 1 (Optional) Identify the location from which to retrieve the updated storage router software. (This is either Cisco.com or another download location of your choosing, as previously described.)

Step 2 Make the selected version of software available on the storage router local file system.

Step 3 (Optional) Set the new version as the version to be booted during the next system restart, and reboot the storage router.


Specifying the Location to Retrieve Updated Software

You must specify the location from which to retrieve updated software. If the current download location is not appropriate, you can reset it. Use the following procedures to specify the desired download location.

When you are finished, verify the new settings using the show software version all command, then save them using the save system bootconfig or save all bootconfig command.

Using HTTP

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show software version all

List the software versions currently available for booting, along with the current download locations. Verify that the version of software required is not already available. Verify that the current download location information for HTTP is correct.

Step 3 

software http url http://10.1.11.32/~software/sn5420

(Optional) If the current download location is not the one from which you would normally retrieve updated software, reset the current download location. For example, reset your current download location to http://10.1.11.32/~software/sn5420.

Step 4 

software http username webadmin password webword

(Optional) Use this command to define the user name and password needed to access the selected location. For example, specify user name webadmin and password webword. If no user name and password are required, use the keyword none (for example, software http username none).


Note If you are using the default URL, http://www.cisco.com, the username and password must be the same as your Cisco.com login ID and password.


Using Proxy Services

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show software version all

List the software versions currently available for booting, along with the current download locations. Verify that the version of software required is not already available. Verify that the current download location information for HTTP via proxy server is correct.

Step 3 

software proxy url default

(Optional) If the current download location is not the one from which you would normally retrieve updated software, reset the current download location. For example, reset your current download location to the default (http://www.cisco.com).

Step 4 

software proxy address http://10.1.10.126 port 32

(Optional) This is the address and port number of the proxy server that will be used to access the URL specified in Step 3 (for example, http://10.1.10.126, port 32).

Step 5 

software proxy username Ciscouser password Ciscopswd

(Optional) Use this command to define the user name and password needed to access the selected download location. For example, specify user name Ciscouser and password Ciscopswd. If no user name and password are required, use the keyword none (for example, software proxy username none).


Note If you are using the default URL, http://www.cisco.com, the username and password must be the same as your Cisco.com login ID and password.


Using TFTP

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show software version all

List the software versions currently available for booting, along with the current download locations. Verify that the version of software required is not already available. Verify that the current download location information for TFTP is correct.

Step 3 

software tftp hostname TFTPHost1 directory /tftpboot

If the current host name and base directory location are not the ones from which you would normally retrieve updated software, reset the host and optional base directory. For example, set the host name to TFTPHost1 and the base directory to /tftpboot. If a DNS is not defined for the storage router, enter the IP address of the TFTP host.

Downloading Updated Software

The download software command makes a new version of software available to the storage router for boot purposes. You can store two versions of software on the storage router. Before attempting to download updated software, verify that only a single version of software exists on the storage router.

Use the following procedures to make a new version of software available to the SN 5420 Storage Router.

Using HTTP

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show software version all

Verify that there is only one version of software on the storage router. If two versions exist, use the delete software version command to delete the old version of software to make room for the new version.

Step 3 

download software http version 2.1.1

Download a new software version to the storage router (for example, 2.1.1).


Timesaver There may be times when you need to make special software available to the storage router, for example, under the guidance of a Cisco Technical Support professional. If you isolate this software from standard updates by placing it in another location (not the default download location), you could change the default download location, download the software, and then reset the default download location. An easier way, however, is to specify the download location via the URL parameter on the download software http command. For example, to download a file named 211.tar containing version 2.1.1 software from http://your.website.com/sn5420, issue this command: download software http url http://your.website.com/sn5420/211.tar.


Using Proxy Services

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show software version all

Verify that there is only one version of software on the storage router. If two versions exist, use the delete software version command to delete the old version of software to make room for the new version.

Step 3 

download software proxy version 2.1.1

Make a new software version available to the storage router (for example, 2.11).


Timesaver There may be times when you need to make special software available to the storage router, for example, under the guidance of a Cisco Technical Support professional. If you isolate this software from standard updates by placing it in another location (not the default download location), you could change the default download location, download the software, and then reset the default download location. An easier way, however, is to specify the download location via the URL parameter on the download software proxy command. For example, to download a file named 211.tar containing version 2.1.1 software from http://your.website.com/sn5420 using the services of a proxy server, issue this command: download software proxy url http://your.website.com/sn5420/211.tar.


Using TFTP

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show software version all

Verify that there is only one version of software on the storage router. If two versions exist, use the delete software version command to delete the old version of software to make room for the new version.

Step 3 

download software tftp version 2.1.1

Make a new software version available to the storage router (for example, 2.11).


Timesaver There may be times when you need to make special software available to the storage router, for example, under the guidance of a Cisco Technical Support professional. If you isolate this software from standard updates by placing it in another location (not the default download location), you could change the default download location, download the software, and then reset the default download location. An easier way, however, is to specify the download location via the hostname and filename parameters on the download software tftp command. For example, to download a file named 211.tar containing version 2.1.1 software from my_tftpHost using TFTP, issue this command: download software tftp hostname my_tftpHost filename 211.tar. The 211.tar file must reside in the default base directory defined for the TFTP host.


Setting Updated Software as Boot Version

Downloading updated software to the storage router does not change the currently running version of the software, nor does it automatically set the new version to be booted at next system restart. You must take specific action to make the new software version bootable.

Setting software as the bootable version consists of verifying the software integrity and performing internal checks to ensure that the storage router can boot the specified version of software.

Use the following procedure to set the new software as the version to be booted.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

software version 2.1.1

Select the software to be booted when the system next starts (for example, boot 2.1.1 when the system restarts). The system checks the integrity of the specified software version to be sure that it is bootable.

Step 3 

show software version boot

Verify that the correct version is shown as the bootable version (identified as Boot Version).

Step 4 

reboot

(Optional) Restart the storage router to run the new software.

When you set a new software version as the bootable version, internal checks are made to ensure that the new software can be run.

Precautions for Cluster Environments

In a cluster environment, the software version command may temporarily suspend normal HA communications, while internal checks are made to ensure that the new software can be run. A suspension will cause a failover of any SCSI routing instances active on the storage router.

Any instances with the primary attribute set to the IP address of the storage router will resume running on the storage router after it is rebooted. If you are not going to reboot the storage router immediately, use the failover scsirouter command to return the desired SCSI routing instances to the storage router.

If the storage router is running in a cluster environment, issuing the reboot command will attempt failover for all SCSI routing instances to another storage router in the cluster. The iSCSI drivers handle reconnection of users to the appropriate storage devices, minimizing the effects of the reboot sequence on those users.

Backing Up System Configuration

Backing up the system configuration consists of saving selected storage router configuration information to XML files that can be stored both locally and remotely. Should problems occur, AAA authentication information, SCSI routing instances, FC server instances, access lists, VLANs and other storage router system configuration information can be restored from these files. (See Chapter 11, "Command Line Interface Reference," for details about what information is saved.)

While you can issue a save command at any time during a CLI command session, best practices suggest that you should back up your storage router system configuration to a file on a regular basis.

Configuration files are normally maintained in the savedconfig directory on the storage router. You can use the copy command to copy the configuration file to a server running TFTP, allowing you to integrate the SN 5420 Storage Router backups with other software archives. By accessing the web-based GUI from a remote server, you can create storage router backup files directly on that server. See the GUI online help for details.


Note See Chapter 11, "Command Line Interface Reference," for complete details on using the save and copy commands.


Creating Local Backups

Local backups allow you to store the resulting XML configuration file in the savedconfig directory on the storage router. Up to ten named configuration files can be locally stored.

Use the following procedure to perform a local backup that saves the configuration of all the current SCSI routing instances to a file named backup1 in the savedconfig directory.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

save scsirouter all backup1

Save all defined SCSI routing instances to a file named backup1.

Storing Backups to a Remote TFTP Server

Use the following procedure to create a backup configuration file named backup1 and to copy that backup file to another file named config_back1.xml, located on the TFTP host, tftpserver1, in the default directory, /tftpboot.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

save all backup1

Save the current running configuration to a file called backup1 in the savedconfig directory.

Step 3 

copy savedconfig:backup1 tftp://tserver1/tftpboot/back1.xml

Copy the saved configuration file, backup1, to a file called back1.xml, located on the TFTP server, tserver1, in the default /tftpboot directory.

Note The back1.xml file must already exist in the /tftpboot directory with the appropriate permissions that allow it to be overwritten. You cannot create a new file using TFTP.

Restoring from Backups

AAA authentication information, SCSI routing instances, access lists, VLANs, and selected system configuration data can be restored from previously saved configuration files. You may choose to restore selected data such as a specific SCSI routing instance, or all data, using the restore from command.

The file from which configuration is restored must reside in the savedconfig directory. If you need to restore configuration data from a backup file existing elsewhere in the network, use the copy command to make the desired file available in the savedconfig directory.

Restoring configuration data copies all or part of the contents of the specified file into persistent memory; it does not change the storage router's running configuration. Restored configuration data is only visible via the show commands using the from bootconfig option, until the instance has been restarted or the system has been rebooted.

Restoring a Deleted SCSI Routing Instance

For example, suppose the SCSI routing instance, scsi1, was inadvertently deleted. Use the following procedure to restore scsi1 from a configuration file that was saved to a URL.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

copy http://10.1.1.144/~backup/SN5420/
Sys1/config_back1.xml savedconfig:scsi1_restore.xml

Copy the specified configuration file from the designated URL and place it in the savedconfig directory, using the file name, scsi1_restore.xml.

Step 3 

show savedconfig

Verify that the imported file now exists in the savedconfig directory.

Step 4 

show scsirouter all from scsi1_restore.xml

Verify that SCSI routing instance, scsi1, exists in this configuration file.

Step 5 

restore scsirouter scsi1 from scsi1_restore.xml

Restores SCSI routing instance, scsi1, from the specified file.

Step 6 

show scsirouter scsi1 from
bootconfig

Display the restored SCSI routing instance, scsi1, to verify configuration is as expected.

Step 7 

scsirouter scsi1 enable

Start the restored SCSI routing instance, updating the running configuration of the storage router. Once the instance has been restored and restarted, modifications to its configuration can also be made.

Step 8 

save scsirouter scsi1 bootconfig

(Optional) If changes are made to the SCSI routing instance configuration, save the SCSI routing instance to the storage router bootable configuration.

Restoring an Existing SCSI Routing Instance

If you need to restore the configuration of a SCSI routing instance that is still active in the storage router, you must stop the instance, restore the configuration from the selected file, then restart the instance. For example, use the following procedure to restore the SCSI routing instance, scsi2, from the file, scsi2_backup.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show scsirouter scsi2 stats

Display current status of the SCSCI routing instance, scsi2. If the status is active, issue the no scsirouter enable command shown in Step 3 to stop the instance.

Step 3 

no scsirouter scsi2 enable

(Optional) Disable an active SCSI routing instance. You cannot restore an active instance.

Step 4 

show savedconfig

Confirm that the desired backup file exists in the savedconfig directory.

Step 5 

show scsirouter all from scsi2_backup

(Optional) Verify that the instance saved in the configuration file is the one you want to restore.

Step 6 

restore scsirouter scsi2 from scsi2_backup

Restore the SCSI routing instance.

Step 7 

show scsirouter scsi2 from
bootconfig

Confirm that the configuration of the SCSI routing instance is now correct.

Step 8 

scsirouter scsi2 enable

Restart the SCSI routing instance.

Step 9 

show scsirouter scsi2

(Optional) Verify the configuration of the restored and restarted SCSI routing instance. The running configuration should now match the restored permanent configuration. Once the instance has been restored and restarted, modifications to its configuration can also be made.

Step 10 

save scsirouter scsi2 bootconfig

(Optional) If changes are made to the SCSI routing instance configuration, save the restored SCSI routing instance to the storage router's bootable configuration.

Restoring an Access List

When you restore an access list, existing entries are never deleted. The restore will add missing entries and overwrite entries of the same name, but will never purge or delete existing entries. If necessary, you can delete an entire access list and then restore if from a saved configuration file.

Use the following procedure to restore the access list, mylist1, from the file, accesslist_backup.xml. In this example, mylist1 contains the following entries:

10.1.1.30/32

10.1.1.125/32

172.16.255.220/32

The saved access list in the configuration file, accesslist_backup.xml, contains these entries:

209.165.200.225/32

192.168.3.0/24

10.1.1.30/32


Note In a cluster environment, all access lists must be maintained on the first storage router to join the cluster. If you issue an access list command from another storage router in the cluster, the CLI displays an informational message with the system name and IP address of the storage router that is currently handling all access list functions.


 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show accesslist mylist1

Display the current entries associated with access list, mylist1.

Step 3 

show accesslist mylist1 from 
accesslist_backup.xml

Display the entries associated with access list, mylist1, saved in the configuration file, accesslist_backup.xml. The configuration file must exist in the savedconfig directory.

Step 4 

restore accesslist mylist1 from
accesslist backup.xml

Restore the access list entries for mylist1 from the saved configuration file, accesslist_backup.xml.

Step 5 

show accesslist mylist1

Display the entries for the restored access list, mylist1. The entries are:

10.1.1.30/32

10.1.1.125/32

172.16.255.220/32

209.165.200.225/32

192.168.3.0/24

Step 6 

save accesslist mylist1 
bootconfig

(Optional) If any entries prior to the restore were not saved, issue the copy command to save the current access list configuration to the storage router bootable configuration.

Restoring AAA Authentication Information

When you restore AAA authentication information, the following configuration settings are updated:

AAA authentication list

The user names and passwords in the local username database

Radius servers and associated server and global authentication port, retransmit, time-out, and key values

TACACS+ servers, and associated server and global authentication port, time-out, and key values.

Use the following procedure to restore the AAA authentication configuration that exists in the saved configuration file aaa_backup.xml.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show savedconfig aaa_backup.xml

Display the contents of the backup file, and verify that this is the AAA authentication configuration that you want to restore. The file must exist in the savedconfig directory.

Step 3 

restore aaa from aaa_backup.xml

Restore the AAA authentication from the saved configuration file, aaa_backup.xml.

Step 4 

show aaa

Display the AAA authentication information and verify that it is now correct.

Step 5 

save aaa bootconfig

(Optional) If you make any changes to the restored AAA authentication configuration, save the changed configuration to the storage router bootable configuration.

Restoring VLANs

You can restore specific VLANs or all VLANs. When you restore a VLAN, the VTP mode is also restored.

Use the following procedure to restore a VLAN. In this example, VLAN 10 (named TestLab) will be restored from the saved configuration file named VLAN_backup.xml.


Note In a cluster environment, VLAN configuration must be performed on the first storage router to join the cluster. If you issue a VLAN command from another storage router in the cluster, the CLI displays an informational message with the system name and IP address of the storage router that is currently handling all VLAN functions.


 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show savedconfig VLAN_backup.xml

Display the contents on the saved configuration file VLAN_backup.xml. Verify that the file contains the VLAN and VTP configuration information that you want to restore (Example 10-2).

Step 3 

restore vlan 10 from VLAN_backup.xml

Restore VLAN 10 from the saved configuration file VLAN_backup.xml.

Step 4 

show vlan

Verify that the VLAN is restored and the configuration is correct.

Step 5 

show vtp

Verify that the VTP configuration is correct.

Step 6 

save vlan 10 bootconfig

(Optional) If you make any configuration changes to the VLAN after restoration, save the changes to the storage router bootable configuration.

Example 10-2 Show VLAN Information from Saved Configuration File

!
! VTP DOMAIN
!
vtp domain none
!
! VTP MODE
!
vtp mode transparent
!
! VLAN
!
vlan 10 name TestLab mtusize 1500

Restoring System Configuration

You can restore selected system information using the restore system command. You can restore the following information:

Administrator contact settings

SNMP network management configuration

NTP server and date, time, and time zone settings

DNS configuration

Syslog configuration for remote logging

Software default download locations and associated user names and passwords

CDP configuration

Restrict service setting for all interfaces

Use the following procedure to restore system configuration information. In this example, SNMP network management and syslog configuration will be restored from the saved configuration file named system_backup.xml.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show savedconfig system_backup.xml

Display the contents of the saved configuration file, system_backup.xml. Verify that the file contains the SNMP network management and syslog configurations that you want to restore.

Step 3 

restore system snmp from system_backup.xml

Restore SNMP network management configuration.

Step 4 

show snmp

Verify that the SNMP network management information is restored and that the configuration is correct (Example 10-3).

Step 5 

restore system remotelog from system_backup.xml

Restore syslog configuration settings.

Step 6 

show system

Verify that the syslog host and facility settings are restored and that the configuration is correct (Example 10-4).

Step 7 

save system bootconfig

(Optional) If you make any configuration changes to the SNMP or syslog configuration after restoration, save the changes to the storage router's bootable configuration.

Example 10-3 Verify SNMP Configuration

[SN5420_PR1]# show snmp
First Trap Host: 10.1.32.200
Second Trap Host: 10.2.12.242
Get Community String: public
Set Community String: private
Send Authentication Traps: enabled
Link Up/Down Enable for fei0: enabled
Link Up/Down Enable for fei1: enabled
Link Up/Down Enable for fc1: enabled
Link Up/Down Enable for ge2: enabled

Example 10-4 Verify Syslog Configuration

[SN5420_PR1]# show system
         System Name: SN5420_PR1
 System Deployed For: SCSI routing
       Disk Capacity: 63424 Blocks (block=512)
     Free Disk Space: 14464 Blocks (block=512)
    Software Version: 2.1.1
          Last Reset: Wed Jan 16 18:03:07 PDT 2001
        Current Time: Wed Jan 16 16:33:20 PDT 2001
           Time Zone: America/Los Angeles
          NTP Server: 10.1.60.86
         Name Server: 10.1.40.243
          SysLogHost: 10.1.20.311 Facility: syslog

Powering Down the Storage Router

If you need to make changes to the physical location or cabling of the storage router, you may need to schedule a time to power down the unit. Use the following procedure to properly power down a storage router. These steps assure that the file system is in the appropriate state prior to shutdown.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

halt

Assure that all configuration information is saved. Respond to any prompts to save information as desired. The storage router can be safely powered down when the [HALTED]# command prompt appears.

Resetting the System

There may be times when you need to return the storage router configuration to factory defaults, for example, when moving a system between environments (such as test and production) or for troubleshooting purposes.

To reset the SN 5420 Storage Router, perform the following steps:


Step 1 (Optional) Save existing configuration information to a file.

Step 2 Clear the current configuration and restore some or all factory defaults, using the clear conf command.


Note If the storage router is operating in a cluster environment, any SCSI routing instances running on this storage router fail over to another storage router in the cluster. If you are operating in a cluster environment but do not want SCSI routing instances to fail over, issue the no scsirouter enable command for all instances (or selected instances that should not fail over) before you issue the clear conf command. See the "Controlling SCSI Routing Instances in a Cluster" section for additional information on operating the storage router in a cluster environment.


Step 3 (Optional) Configure the management interface via an RS-232 console connection.

Step 4 Restore specific configuration information or reconfigure the storage router using CLI commands or the web-based GUI.


Reset All to Factory Defaults

Use the following procedure if an existing storage router is to be physically moved to another environment, and it is not necessary to retain any current configuration information, because the system setup will be completely different.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

clear conf

or

clear conf all cisco

Clear the current system configuration, including network management information.

For storage routers deployed for SCSI routing, use the clear conf wizard. At the prompt, enter the Administrator password. Enter all to erase system configuration and management port settings, and all saved configurations and SCSI routing instances (Example 10-5).

For storage routers deployed for transparent SCSI routing or iSCSI SAN interconnect, enter the clear conf all command, followed by the Administrator mode password (for example, cisco).

After either of the commands completes, the storage router will reboot.

Example 10-5 Reset Storage Router Configuration

Enter admin password: *****

This process can restore factory default settings for the SN5420.
* Select "apps" to remove active applications and retain system
  configuration settings.
* Select "system" to remove active applications and system
  configuration settings.
* Select "saved" to remove all backup configurations from disk.
* Select "all" to remove active applications, system configuration,
  and saved configurations.

The system configuration includes the management port, dns, admin and
monitor login, ntp, and snmp. You will need to use the console
to reconfigure the management port if you erase the system configuration.

The system will reboot if you select "apps", "system", or "all".

Erase what? [apps/system/saved/all/cancel (cancel)]


Note After the move, use the RS-232 console connection to configure the management interface IP address and other required system information. (See the "Initial System Configuration Script" section in Chapter 2, "First-Time Configuration," for details.) Then configure the storage router via the setup configuration wizards or other CLI commands, or via the web-based GUI.


Reset and Retain System Settings

Use the following procedure if an existing storage router is going to be used for testing purposes and then is to be restored to its current configuration, and for the test, the storage router's system configuration information is not going to change. The following procedure retains the system configuration and saved configuration files over the system reset.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

save all myfile

Save all configuration information in a file called myfile. This file is stored in the savedconfig directory.

Step 3 

clear conf

Clear the current configuration but retain system information (such as management and HA interfaces, DNS, Administrator and Monitor passwords, NTP server, and SNMP information) and saved configuration files.

At the prompt, enter the Administrator password. Enter apps to retain system configuration settings.

The storage router will reboot.

Perform the required user testing. When finished, continue with Step 4 to restore the original configuration.

Step 4 

restore all from myfile

Restore original configuration, which was retained over the clear conf command.

Step 5 

reboot

Reboot to restore the original application configuration into running memory.

Reset to Remove Saved Configuration Files

Use the following procedure if a stand-alone storage router has joined a cluster and adopted the new cluster's configuration. The procedure removes previously saved configuration files from the stand-alone period, but the storage router's system configuration, management information, and SCSI routing instances remain unchanged.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

clear conf

Remove all saved configuration files from the savedconfig directory.

At the prompt, enter the Administrator password. Enter saved to retain system configuration settings.

All files are removed from the savedconfig directory, but the storage router does not reboot.

Step 3 

show savedconfig

Verify that all files have been removed from the savedconfig directory.


Note You can also use the delete savedconfig command to delete selected saved configuration files from the savedconfig directory.


Recovering Passwords

The SN 5420 management interface is password protected. You must enter passwords when accessing the SN 5420 via Telnet (for the CLI) or the web-based GUI. Password protection can also be enabled for the storage router console interface, thereby requiring that the same Administrator and Monitor mode passwords that are configured for the management interface be applied to the console interface.

If the passwords have been enabled for the console interface and are lost, you can recover management access to the storage router using the password recovery procedure. The password recovery procedure requires physical access to the storage router console and can be found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/474/

Controlling SCSI Routing Instances in a Cluster

It is important to know where SCSI routing instances are running. While automatic failover capabilities keep the storage router cluster operational in times of system difficulties, manual HA controls provide the ability to distribute SCSI routing instances between the storage routers in a cluster to meet your specific network requirements.

The following are typical activities involved with controlling SCSI routing instances in a cluster environment. While most of these activities are performed infrequently, some (such as viewing operational statistics) may be performed on a regular basis.

Making Changes to Instance Configurations

Enabling and Disabling Connections

Stopping & Starting Instances

Viewing Operational Statistics

Handling Failover

Making Changes to Instance Configurations


Note To assure that changes are correctly propagated to all storage routers within a cluster, always modify the configuration of a SCSI routing instance from the storage router where the instance is currently active.


From time to time, you will make changes to the SCSI routing instance configurations. Changes include such actions as adding or deleting a target, adding or deleting a LUN, remapping a target, or modifying access. It is important to understand the ramifications of these changes on the IP hosts accessing the associated storage resources. For example, changing the instance configuration may change the device presentation to the host's iSCSI driver, effectively changing the name or number assigned to the device by the host operating system. Certain instance configuration changes, such as adding or deleting targets, adding or deleting LUNs within a particular target, or adding or deleting entire instances may change the order of the devices presented to the host. Even if the host is only associated with one SCSI routing instance, the device order could make a difference.

Typically, the IP host operating system assigns drive identifications in the order they are received based on certain criteria. For example, a Linux system assigns drive identifications in the order they are received based on host, bus, target, and LUN information. Changing the order of the storage device discovery may result in a changed drive identification. Applications running on the host may require modification to appropriately access the current drives.

If an entire SCSI routing instance is removed, or there are no targets available for the host, the host's iSCSI driver configuration file must be updated to remove the appropriate reference before restarting the iSCSI driver. If a host's iSCSI configuration file contains a reference to an instance which does not exist or has no targets available for the host, the iSCSI driver will not complete a login and will not discover targets associated with any SCSI routing instance.

For additional information and recommended procedures for changing iSCSI driver configuration, see the iSCSI driver readme and example configuration files.You can access the latest iSCSI drivers and readme and example configuration files from Cisco.com.

Enabling and Disabling Connections

A SCSI routing instance becomes active, by default, once it is associated with a Fibre Channel interface to storage devices. Each target that is added to an instance is also, by default, enabled. However, no IP hosts or FC server instances can connect or log in to that target because the target has no access list association. Once you associate an access list with a target, it is automatically enabled; the IP hosts and FC server instances specified by access list entries are allowed to connect or log in to the target.

Use the scsirouter target disabled command to control access to the target without changing the access list association or stopping the entire SCSI routing instance. Existing connections and logins are not affected, but future connections and logins are prohibited.

Use the scsirouter target enabled command when you are ready to allow connections and logins again.

For example, suppose you have a problem with an entry in the access list, webserver2. This access list is associated with the target, webstorage2, which is, in turn, associated with the SCSI routing instance foo.

Use the following procedure to temporarily disable access to the target associated with a problem access list.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show scsirouter foo stats

Display status to confirm the SCSI routing instance, foo, is active on this storage router.

Step 3 

show scsirouter foo

Verify the name and current status of the target and access list. The target, webstorage2, should be associated with the webserver2 access list and the target should be enabled. (Example 10-6.)

Step 4 

scsirouter foo 
target webstorage2 disabled

Disable access to the target, webstorage2.

Example 10-6 Verify Target, Access List, and Target Status

[SN5420_PR1]# show scsirouter foo
foo primary "10.1.10.244" 
foo serverif ge2 10.1.10.234/32
foo deviceif fc1 
foo target webstorage2 enabled "TRUE" 
foo target webstorage2 accesslist "webserver2" 
foo target webstorage2 lun 0 loopid "125" lun "32" 

Stopping & Starting Instances

If a storage router is experiencing a problem with a specific set of IP hosts or storage resources, you may wish to stop the associated SCSI routing instance from running anywhere in the cluster. The no scsirouter enable command causes the specified SCSI routing instance to cease running on the storage router, but does not cause a failover to another storage router in the cluster. This command effectively stops an instance from running anywhere in the cluster.

Once a SCSI routing instance has been stopped, it can be re-activated by issuing the scsirouter enable command. The scsirouter enable command must be issued from the same storage router as the no scsirouter enable command.

See Chapter 11, "Command Line Interface Reference," for command details.

Viewing Operational Statistics

Use the show scsirouter stats command to display the status of the SCSI routing instance and to see the number of active connections and the number of logins that have occurred since the storage router was last restarted (or since statistics were last cleared).

For example, the show scsirouter stats command in Example 10-7 shows that SCSI routing instance, foo, is currently active on storage router, SN5420_PR1.

Example 10-7 Results of "show scsirouter stats" Command

[SN5420_PR1]# show scsirouter foo stats

router  status        started      iSCSI ver (Min/Max)  logins  active
foo     ACTIVE    Jan 11 23:06:08          2/2            10       7

Handling Failover

In a cluster, storage routers continually exchange HA information as heartbeats to detect failures in the cluster. HA messages are sent using UDP over IP and, depending on the message type or situation, may be sent as unicast or multicast messages. To make sure that HA information is exchanged reliably between storage routers, the storage routers balance the transmission of heartbeats between the management and the HA interfaces at regular intervals. Failover of SCSI routing instances is automatic when a storage router detects that another storage router in the cluster is no longer responding to heartbeats.

Each cluster supports up to 12 active SCSI routing instances. Since each storage router can also support up to 12 SCSI routing instances, high availability is ensured for each instance in the cluster (regardless of the division of those instances between storage routers).

Indicating a Preferred Failover Sequence

Each storage router dynamically builds and maintains a failover list of other storage routers in a cluster, using the information from the heartbeats received from the other members of the cluster. This list is regularly updated (about every five seconds). The failover list is also updated when a new storage router is added to the cluster, an existing storage router is removed from the cluster, or when a user specifies or changes the failover sequence associated with a particular SCSI routing instance.

You can configure a preferred failover sequence of up to two storage routers for each SCSI routing instance. If you do not specify a preferred failover sequence, the first storage router on the failover list becomes the preferred node for failover actions. If a failover situation occurs and the preferred node is unavailable, the storage router will attempt the failover to the other storage routers on the list in a round-robin fashion.

As an example scenario, a cluster is composed of four storage routers, SN5420Sys1, SN5420Sys2, SN5420Sys3, and SN5420Sys4. The SCSI routing instance, foo2, is running on SN5420Sys1. The following example procedure builds a failover sequence for SCSI routing instance, foo2, by assigning SN5420Sys3 as the primary storage router and SN5420Sys2 as the secondary storage router for failover.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

scsirouter  foo2 failover
primary SN5420Sys3

Assign the first storage router (SN5420Sys3) that the SCSI routing instance, foo2, will be failed over to in a failover sequence. If a problem occurs with the storage router foo2 is currently running on, an attempt will be made to failover foo2 to SN5420Sys3.

Note Use "?" to display a list of storage routers that can be specified; for example
scsirouter foo2 failover primary ?

Step 3 

scsirouter foo2 failover
secondary SN5420Sys2

Assign the second storage router (SN5420Sys2) that the SCSI routing instance, foo2, will be failed over to in a failover sequence. If a problem occurs and the failover attempt to SN5420Sys3 fails for any reason, an attempt will be made to failover foo2 to SN5420Sys2.

Manual Failover

While failover of SCSI routing instances is automatic, there may be times when you wish to manually move a SCSI routing instance from one storage router to another. The move may be temporary, after which the instance will be moved back to its original location. At other times, you may want to move a SCSI routing instance permanently to another storage router, ensuring that the instance will continue running on the specified storage router whenever possible.

As an example cluster scenario, a cluster is composed of two storage routers, SN5420Sys1 and SN5420Sys2. SN5420Sys1 is currently running instances, scsi1 and scsi2, and is the primary storage router for both instances. SN5420Sys2 is currently running instances, scsi3 and scsi4. The primary attribute for scsi3 and scsi4 is set to the default setting of none, indicating no preferred storage router for failover for either instance.

Failover as Temporary Move

Referring to the example cluster scenario just described, the following procedure moves the SCSI routing instance, scsi1, from its primary, or preferred, storage router, SN5420Sys1, to the other storage router on a temporary basis. The commands in this procedure are issued from a CLI session from storage router, SN5420Sys1.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show cluster

or

show scsirouter scsi1 stats

Verify that the instance to be moved, scsi1, is indeed running on storage router, SN5420Sys1.

Step 3 

failover scsirouter scsi1

Failover SCSI routing instance, scsi1.

Note Because there are only two storage routers in the cluster, you do not need to specify the failover destination. If more than two storage routers are in a cluster, and you want to assure that the SCSI routing instance fails over to a specific storage router, use the failover scsirouter to form of the command (for example, failover scsirouter scsi1 to SN5420Sys2).

Step 4 

show  cluster

or

show scsirouter  scsi1 stats

Verify that the specified SCSI routing instance, scsi1, is no longer running on the storage router, SN5420Sys1.

Once the failover is complete, establish a Telnet session to SN5420Sys2 and verify—using CLI commands described in Step 1 and Step 2 above—that the SCSI routing instance, scsi1, is now running on that storage router.

This is considered a temporary move because SN5420Sys1 is still designated as the primary storage router for the SCSI routing instance, scsi1. If, for example, SN5420Sys1 is rebooted, scsi1 will stop running on SN5420Sys2 and will start up and run on SN5420Sys1.


Note Use caution if you change the configuration of a SCSI routing instance while it is running on a storage router that is not the instance's configured primary storage router. If the instance's configuration changes while the designated primary storage router for that instance is down (or otherwise removed from the cluster), the changes will not be propagated to that storage router. When the primary storage router reboots (or otherwise returns to the cluster), it will reassert itself as the primary and will start to run the instance using the last configuration it had before leaving the cluster.


Failover as Permanent Move

Referring to the example cluster scenario previously described, the following procedure moves the SCSI routing instance, scsi2, from its primary, or preferred, storage router, SN5420Sys1, to the other storage router on a permanent basis. The commands in this procedure are issued from a CLI session from storage router, SN5420Sys1.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show cluster

or

show scsirouter scsi2 stats

Verify that the instance to be moved, scsi2, is indeed running on storage router, SN5420Sys1.

Step 3 

scsirouter scsi2 primary
SN5420Sys2

Set SN5420Sys2 as the primary storage router for the desired SCSI routing instance, scsi2.

Step 4 

save scsirouter scsi2

Save the current SCSI routing instance configuration, including the primary setting, and circulate the changed configuration around the cluster.

Step 5 

failover scsirouter scsi2

Failover the desired SCSI routing instance, scsi2.

Once the failover is complete, establish a Telnet session to SN5420Sys2 and verify—using the show scsirouter scsi2 command—that the SCSI routing instance, scsi2, is now running on SN5420Sys2 and that SN5420Sys2 is designated as the primary storage router for that instance.

Failover for Distribution Purposes

In the example cluster scenario previously described, there is a significant increase in traffic for SCSI routing instance, scsi4, and as a result, you decide to distribute all of the other instances (scsi1, scsi2, and scsi3) to the SN5420Sys1 storage router. SN5420Sys1 is already running scsi1 and scsi2.

The following procedure moves the SCSI routing instance, scsi3, to SN5420Sys1. The commands in this procedure are issued from a CLI session from storage router, SN5420Sys2.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show cluster

or

show scsirouter scsi3 stats

Verify that the SCSI routing instance to be moved is indeed running on storage router, SN5420Sys2.

Step 3 

failover scsirouter scsi3 
to SN5420Sys1

Failover the desired SCSI routing instance, scsi3, to SN5420Sys1.

Once the failover is complete, establish a Telnet session to SN5420Sys1 and verify—using the show scsirouter command—that instances, scsi1, scsi2, and scsi3, are now running there.


Note Because scsi3 has no primary setting, it will remain running on SN5420Sys1 until it is explicitly stopped or failed over, or until it automatically fails over because an interface is unavailable or a software or hardware problem occurred.


Managing CDP on the Storage Router

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) is primarily used to obtain protocol addresses of neighboring devices and to discover the platform of those devices. CDP is media- and protocol-independent and runs on all Cisco-manufactured equipment including routers, bridges, access servers, and switches.

Each device configured for CDP sends periodic messages, known as advertisements, to a multicast address. Each device advertises at least one address at which it can receive SNMP messages. The advertisements also contain time-to-live, or holdtime, information, which indicates the length of time a receiving device should hold CDP information before discarding it. Each device also listens to the periodic CDP messages sent by others in order to learn about neighboring devices and determine when their interfaces to the media go up or down.

The SN 5420 Storage Router is enabled, by default, to exchange CDP information with other CDP-enabled devices in the network. CDP can be enable or disabled for individual interfaces on the storage router, and the holdtime for receiving devices and the frequency of CDP transmissions from the storage router can be modified.

Disable CDP for Selected Interfaces

CDP can be enabled or disabled for the management, HA, and Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on the storage router. By default, all interfaces are enabled for CDP. Use the following procedure to disable CDP for an interface.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

no cdp interface ge2 enable

Disable CDP on the desired interface (ge2).

Step 3 

show cdp interface

Confirm that CDP is disabled for the interface.

Step 4 

save system bootconfig

(Optional) Save the CDP change to the storage router's bootable configuration.

Modify the CDP Holdtime and Timeout Values

Holdtime is the amount of time the receiving device should hold a CDP packet from the storage router before discarding it. The CDP holdtime value must be set to a higher number of seconds than the CDP timer value (the time between CDP transmissions from the storage router). For example, the default CDP holdtime value is 180 seconds. The default CDP timer value is 60 seconds.

Use the following procedure to change the CDP holdtime value and the CDP timer value.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show cdp

Verify the current CDP configuration.

Step 3 

cdp holdtime 300

Set the number of seconds (300) that a receiving device should hold the storage router CDP packet.

Step 4 

cdp timer 120

Set the number of seconds (120) between transmissions of CDP packets from the storage router.

Step 5 

show cdp

(Optional) Verify the new CDP configuration.

Step 6 

save system bootconfig

(Optional) Save the CDP changes to the storage router's bootable configuration.

Using Scripts to Automate Tasks

If you frequently issue a series of CLI commands, you can save time by entering those commands into a script for execution purposes. Command scripts are stored in the script directory and are simply ASCII text files containing CLI commands.

Follow these rules when creating a command script:

Commands can start anywhere on a line. The first word on any line that is not preceded by a comment character is considered to be the start of a command string.

Comments can be added by placing an exclamation point (!) or number sign (#) character at the beginning of the line or as the first character at any position in the line. Comments are useful for documenting the contents of the file and the expected results. Comments can also be used to prevent a command from executing without removing it from the file by inserting a comment character before the command string.

You can extend commands across line boundaries by ending a line with a backslash ( \ ) as the continuation character. Use the continuation character to make long commands more readable. The line sequence is continued until a command line without a continuation character is encountered. If a comment line is used to end a line continuation sequence, you must add a blank line after the comment.

For example:

radius-server host 10.5.0.53 \
auth-port 1644 \
timeout 60 \
retransmit 5
! Configure 1st RADIUS server

radius-server host 10.6.0.61
. . .

When scripts run, the commands and any responses are echoed on the storage router console.

Scripts can be created on any system using any text editor and placed in the script directory of the target storage router using FTP. See the "Using FTP with the Storage Router" section for details.

Running Command Scripts

Use the following procedure to execute the CLI commands stored in a script file. In this example, the script file is named CreateSc and must exist in the script directory.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show script CreateSc

Verify that the script, CreateSc, exists in the script directory and that it contains the configuration that you want to recreate.

Step 3 

read script CreateSc

Read and execute the CLI commands in the script file. When prompted, confirm that you want to continue and execute the script commands.

After the script completes, issue the appropriate show commands to verify that the script executed as expected.

Managing the Log File

The storage router logs event information to a series of log files, based on the configured logging threshold. The default event logging threshold is notification. Use the show logging commands to display log file entries and to search for entries that match specific text strings or regular expressions.

Log files are created in the storage router log directory. They can occupy up to 4 MB of memory. Once this limit has been reached, the oldest file is removed and a new one is created. The show logging size command can be used to display the size of the existing log files.

Depending on the needs of your enterprise, you can archive log files to a remote server, or you can clear log files on a periodic basis. You can use FTP to transfer files from the storage router to a remote server (see the "Using FTP with the Storage Router" section for details), or you can use the web-based GUI to display the contents of the log file and use cut-and-paste techniques to save the information to a local file. You can also issue the show logging all command and redirect the output of your console using the logging facilities for your specific console interface.

Clearing the Log Files

Use the following procedure to periodically clear the storage router log files.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show logging size

(Optional) Check the current size of the storage router log files (Example 10-8).

Step 3 

show logging all

or

show logging last 50

(Optional) Display all the current log file entries (first command), or display a selected number of entries, such as 50, from the end of the file (second command).

Step 4 

clear log

Clear the existing log file. The storage router clears the existing log file and starts a new log file.

Example 10-8 Results of "show logging size" Command

[SN5420_PRA]# show logging size
5120 messages (342797 bytes) logged

Gathering Troubleshooting Information

If you experience problems with the storage router, you may need to obtain troubleshooting information for Cisco technical support personnel. The SN 5420 Storage Router provides several features that can help you assemble the necessary information.

The following are typical activities involved with troubleshooting the storage router:

Using the Crash Log

Using FTP with the Storage Router

Understanding Diagnostics

Capturing System Messages at Bootup

Understanding Logging

Capturing the Storage Router Configuration

Using Debug Facilities

Using the Crash Log

If the storage router experiences an unexpected problem that forces it to automatically reboot, a special log file is generated. The file is named crash.txt and is stored in the log directory. You can display the contents of this file to the console using the show crash command.

To save the show crash command output, redirect the output of your console using the logging facilities for your specific console interface. Depending on your console interface and scroll buffer size, you may also be able to copy and paste the contents from your console into an ASCII text file.

The crash log provides the following information:

Boot information, including the kernel version and creation date

A list of all tasks, including entry point, task ID and priority for each task

Task registers and stack trace for each task in the task list

A list of all modules, including module ID, data start addresses, etc.

A list of all devices and associated drivers

A list of all drivers, including the number of create, delete, open, close, read, write, and I/O control actions performed

A list of free memory addresses and a summary of memory usage information

A list of open file descriptors

Network interface information, including flags, interface type, addresses, and MTU information for all storage router interfaces

The storage router route table

The ARP table

The storage router host table

Active Internet connection information, including PCB, connection type (TCP or UDP), receive and send queues, local and foreign addresses, and state for each connection

Routing statistics

IP statistics

ICMP statistics

TCP statistics

UDP statistics

Network stack data pool (MBufs) and cluster pool table information

NFS authorization

Mounted NFS filesystem information

IDE disk or Flash information, including device types and parameters

Registered crash dump functions

Sample registered dump functions

CPC710 registers at time of exception

Information used to create the crash.txt file is periodically written to the tmpcrash.txt file in the log directory. If a crash occurred at the current time, use the show crash current command to display the information as it would be written to the crash log.

Using FTP with the Storage Router

In certain cases, you may want to copy log files from the storage router to another server in your network for analysis purposes, or you may want to copy configuration or script files to another server prior to making them available to another storage router. The storage router includes an FTP daemon; however, the FTP port (port 21) is, by default, restricted.

Use the following procedure to enable FTP and to copy the current message log file from the storage router to another server in the network.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

enable

Enter Administrator mode.

Step 2 

show restrict

Display interface restrictions. If port 21 on the management interface (fei0) is closed, use the command in Step 3 to open it.

Step 3 

no restrict mgmt ftp

(Optional) Allow FTP functions on the management interface.

Once the function is enabled, open the FTP session to the storage router from the server. You will be prompted for a user name and password. The user name is admin and the password is the storage router Administrator password. The default Administrator password is cisco.


Note The user name and the password are both case sensitive.


Change to the log directory using the FTP cd command. Specify the binary flag using the FTP binary command. Issue the FTP get command to retrieve the messages0 file and to copy it to the specified file on your server. When the process completes, close the FTP connection, using the FTP bye command.

See Example 10-9 for an example of an FTP session just described. In this example, the storage router management interface IP address is 10.1.11.310.

Example 10-9 FTP Session

Server1> ftp 10.1.11.310
Connected to 10.1.11.310.
220 VxWorks (5.4.1) FTP server ready
Name: admin
331 Password required
Password:********
230 User logged in
ftp> cd log
250 Changed directory to "/ata0/log"
ftp> binary
200 Type set to I, binary mode
ftp> get
(remote-file) messages0
(local-file) SN5420Sys1_Messages
200 Port set okay
150 Opening BINARY mode data connection
226 Transfer complete
40863 bytes received in 0.049 seconds (8.1e+02 Kbytes/s)
ftp> bye
221 Bye...see you later

If you had to remove the restriction on the management interface before proceeding with the FTP session, return to your storage router CLI session and re-enable the restriction, using the following procedure.

 
Command
Description

Step 1 

show restrict

Verify that port 21 on the management interface is currently open.

Step 2 

restrict mgmt ftp

Close the management interface to FTP functions. No FTP functions will be allowed.

Understanding Diagnostics

The SN 5420 Storage Router performs hardware diagnostics when the unit is powered up. Hardware diagnostics cannot be bypassed. If a hardware diagnostic fails, the storage router halts. The boot process cannot be reinitiated.

If you experience a hardware diagnostic failure, contact Cisco technical support personnel as described in the "Obtaining Technical Assistance" section on page xiv for further instructions.

The storage router performs additional "soft" diagnostics after the hardware diagnostics complete on power up and after every system reboot. If necessary, the soft diagnostics can be bypassed.

If you experience problems with soft diagnostics, contact Cisco technical support personnel for assistance.

Capturing System Messages at Bootup

The SN 5420 Storage Router logs a variety of messages to the console during the system boot process. If you are experiencing problems with the storage router, it may be helpful to capture these messages. Use the console interface to perform the boot process and capture the console log using typical external methods.

Understanding Logging

The SN 5420 Storage Router generates a variety of system event messages. Messages are assigned a notification level, which reflects the messages priority in the system. Messages with the highest priority are assigned a notification level of emergencies. Messages at this level indicate that the system is unusable. Messages with the lowest priority are assigned a notification level of debugging. Messages at this level are for debugging purposes. Table 10-1 lists the notification levels, their level number, and their description.

Table 10-1 Error Message Notification Levels 

Notification Level
Level Number
Description

emergencies

0

System unusable

alerts

1

Immediate action needed

critical

2

Critical conditions

errors

3

Error conditions

warnings

4

Warning conditions

notification

5

Normal but significant conditions

informational

6

Informational messages only

debugging

7

Debugging messages


Messages can be logged to the storage router console, a log file, or a remote host. You can assign a specific logging threshold for messages logged to each location. All messages at the specified notification level and numerically lower levels will be logged to the appropriate location. See the logging commands in Chapter 11, "Command Line Interface Reference," for details.

By default, notification is the event logging threshold for messages to the console and to the storage router log file. Event messages are not, by default, logged to any remote host. Use the show logging command to display the current event logging thresholds.

During normal operations, you may prefer to change the notification level for messages that are logged to the console. However, if you are experiencing problems with a storage router, you may need to change the notification level to debugging to see all event messages.

Changes to the notification level for the console are valid for the current session only. Changes to the notification level for the log file are retained until the storage router reboots. No logging configuration settings are saved across a storage router restart.


Note Logging event messages is a normal storage router function. Changing the logging level does not impact the operation of the storage router.


Viewing and Saving the Log File

You can view the entire storage router log file or selected portions of the log file using the show logging command. You can also view the log file using the web-based GUI. If you want to analyze or search the log file in more detail, you can use FTP to retrieve a copy of the log file. See the "Using FTP with the Storage Router" section for details.

For additional information about managing the storage router log file, see the "Managing the Log File" section.

Capturing the Storage Router Configuration

You can use the show runningconfig or show bootconfig command to display the storage router's current running configuration or bootable configuration. You can then redirect this display to create a script file in the storage router's script directory. The resulting file can be used as a basis to create command scripts to automate common tasks. See the "Using Scripts to Automate Tasks" section for more details.

Using Debug Facilities

The storage router includes debug facilities for SCSI routing instances. Running debug traces can impact the operation of the storage router. If you experience problems with a SCSI routing instance that cannot be resolved, Cisco technical support personnel may ask you to capture some debug traces. They will assist you to properly configure your storage router to accomplish this task. By default, debug facilities are disabled for all SCSI routing instances.

See the debug scsirouter and debug scsirouter target commands in Chapter 11, "Command Line Interface Reference," for more information on using the storage router debug facilities.