Cisco NAC Profiler Installation and Configuration Guide, Release 3.1.1
Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Events
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Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Events

Table Of Contents

Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Events

Overview

Cisco NAC Profiler Endpoint Event Types

New Endpoint Event Type

Profile Change Event Type

Profile Change (Entering) Events

Profile Change (Exiting) Events

Alarm Profile Event Type

Profile Consistency Event Type

Creating Cisco NAC Profiler Events

Activating Cisco NAC Profiler Events

Edit Cisco NAC Profiler Events

Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery via SNMP Trap

Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery via Syslog

Enabling Event Delivery via Syslog to an External Syslog Server

Enabling Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery to Internal Syslog

Enable Existing Cisco NAC Profiler Events for SNMP or Syslog Delivery Method


Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Events


Topics in this chapter include:

Overview

Cisco NAC Profiler Endpoint Event Types

Creating Cisco NAC Profiler Events

Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery via SNMP Trap

Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery via Syslog

Overview

Cisco NAC Profiler Events are a critical component of the endpoint Identity Monitoring capability of the Cisco NAC Profiler system. Cisco NAC Profiler is able to not only discover, locate and identify the endpoints on the network; it also constantly monitors the endpoint environment for changes. When the endpoint connected to a designated port changes, or if an endpoint begins exhibiting attributes resulting in re-profiling, these events can be logged by Cisco NAC Profiler and the system can automatically alert network operations or security management. In this way, the endpoint Identity Monitoring function of the NAC Profiler system can be used to proactively monitor the endpoints using the network.

The version 3.1 release of Cisco NAC Profiler provides five Endpoint Event types:

1. New Endpoint

2. Profile Change, which consists of two sub-types:

a. Profile Change Entering

b. Profile Change Exiting

3. Alarm Profile

4. Profile Consistency

5. Cisco NAC Events


Note The Cisco NAC Event type is used exclusively for the integration of NAC Profiler systems with Cisco NAC Appliance. This special event type is covered in detail in Chapter 13, "Integrating with the Cisco NAC Appliance" and not covered further in this chapter.


The first four event types form the basis of the Cisco NAC Profiler Identity Monitoring and alerting functionality.

New Endpoint, Profile Change, Alarm Profile, and Profile Consistency events are created and configured to alert network and security operations through the Cisco NAC Profiler UI and one or more of a combination of alerting mechanisms commonly used in the enterprise environment:

SNMP traps to the NMS

Syslog entries on the NAC Profiler Server and or external Syslog servers on the network


Tip When added to the NAC Profiler system configuration New Endpoint, Profile Change, Alarm Profile, and Profile Consistency Events are delivered to the Events Viewer and Events List located on the NAC Profiler Dashboard at the Home tab of the UI, as well as to the Endpoint Console view of NAC Profiler Events.


In 3.1 and later versions of Cisco NAC Profiler, support includes the enhancement made to the NAC Profiler Events functionality. In previous versions, the Event subsystem was passive and restricted only to a notification action on the occurrence of configured events. Since version 3.1, a new Event Delivery method was added called Active Response which evolved an Event-based mechanism system from a passive, notify-only system to one that can take specified actions on the network when designated events are detected by the NAC Profiler System.

The Active Response capability, when configured for a NAC Profiler event will utilize SNMP to enforce an action on the network access port of endpoints triggering the event. Through the Active Response capability, when an Event with Active Response enabled is triggered the Cisco NAC Profiler can perform one of the following actions on the switch port the system has determined the endpoint is currently connected to the network on:

1. Bounce the port: administratively disable then re-enable the port which will cause the connected endpoint to re-authenticate

2. Disable the port - place the port connecting the endpoint into an Admin Down state

3. On switches running specific versions of IOS, cause the 802.1X PAE State Machine to perform an immediate re-authentication of the endpoint using 802.1X/MAB.

You will need to perform minimum configuration of the NAC Server, as described in the "Perform the Initial CAS Configuration" section of the Cisco NAC Appliance Hardware Installation Guide, Release 4.7.


Note Cisco NAC Profiler is not supported in FIPS-compliant deployments in Cisco NAC Appliance Release 4.7(0).


Cisco NAC Profiler Events can be utilized to assist in the ongoing management, troubleshooting and improvement of the network security posture by immediately and automatically alerting appropriate personnel and systems when changes of interest are occurring at the edge of the network.

This chapter will describe the functionality of the four event types enumerated in the last paragraph, and how they are configured. Viewing and managing the events viewer within the Cisco NAC Profiler UI is covered in Chapter 15, "Using the Cisco NAC Profiler Endpoint Console".


Tip In the 3.1 version of Cisco NAC Profiler, endpoint events are configured and enabled globally on a NAC Profiler system. When added to the system configuration, the event becomes enabled system-wide and does not require the configuration of events on selected network device ports which was required in earlier versions.



Tip The Active Response event delivery option requires that the NAC Profiler system have read-write SNMP access to the switches connecting endpoints. Refer to Chapter 8, "Managing Network Devices" for instructions on the configuration of Network Devices within the NAC Profiler system for read-write SNMP access.


Cisco NAC Profiler Endpoint Event Types

In the current version of Cisco NAC Profiler, there are four types of endpoint events that the system can be configured to report and optionally to take an Active Response action on.

The four event types are described in the following subsections.


Note Cisco NAC Events are used exclusively with integration of Cisco NAC Profiler with Cisco NAC Appliance. They are covered in detail in Chapter 13, "Integrating with the Cisco NAC Appliance".


New Endpoint Event Type

This event type is designed to alert upon initial discovery and profiling of a new endpoint into a designated Endpoint Profile.

This event is could be used to alert when endpoints are initially Profiled into one or more designated Endpoint Profiles of interest, again when endpoints are first seen by the Cisco NAC Profiler for the very first time. For example, it may be desirable to know when endpoints from a particular manufacturer are added to the network, possibly devices that are known to be unauthorized according to policy. Therefore, the user could create a Rogue Device Profile, as an example, that could be configured with rules that will match endpoints having MAC Vendors known to be manufacturers of SOHO Access Point routers. As endpoints from these vendors are connected to the network, they will be discovered and immediately profiled into the Rogue Device Profile by the NAC Profiler system.

If a New Endpoint event was created with the Matching Profile parameter configured to match the Rogue Device Profile, upon saving that event to the configuration, each and every time a new endpoint was added to the network for the very first time and is profiled into the Rogue Device Profile.


Note New version 3.1 Cisco NAC Profiler systems and existing systems upgraded to version 3.1 will have a New Endpoint event configured by default. This New Endpoint event is configured to match *all* Endpoint Profiles (including Not Profile) through the use of a Regular Expression. This default New Endpoint event creates an event in the Event Viewer and Events List on the Home Tab (only) each time the system discovers a new endpoint.


Conceptually, the New Endpoint event is a special case of the Profile Change (entering) event to be described in the next section as it is designed to trigger as endpoints enter into a designated Profile (which can include Not Profiled) initially.

Beyond alerting to the discovery of all new endpoints or endpoints of a particular type, with Active Response enabled on a New Endpoint event, the following use-case can be addressed. A common deployment challenge with port-based authentication is the proper handling of new endpoints that are non-responsive/non-authenticating. A common example is the addition of a new printer to the authenticated network. In this case, Cisco NAC Profiler has not discovered the device previously and therefore as it is connected to the network for the first time, the authentication system is not provisioned for it and the first authentication attempt fails resulting in the printer being placed in the guest or authentication failure VLAN. Once in that VLAN, the identity attributes that allow the endpoint to be profiled correctly as a printer will be observed by the NAC Profiler Collectors when best-practice design guidelines have been followed which result in the endpoint transitioning from Not Profiled to the Printer profile. With a New Endpoint event configured for the Printer profile with Active Response enabled, the port can be bounced forcing the switch to re-authenticate the endpoint which is now properly provisioned so that the new printer is authenticated (by MAC as a known printer) and gets the correct network policy. The port bounce will also result in the endpoint initiating DHCP which allows its local configuration to be updated so that the change of access is effected with no manual intervention.

Profile Change Event Type

This event is used to alert when endpoints transition into, or out, of designated Endpoint Profiles. Through the two sub-types, Profile Change events can be created for the purpose of monitoring and alerting when specified Profile transitions occur on the system. The two sub-types are explained in detail in the following sections.

Profile Change (Entering) Events

This event type is used for monitoring the transition of endpoints from any Endpoint Profile (for example, other than Not Profiled), into another designated Endpoint Profile or Profiles. This transition would occur when new identity attributes are reported by the Collectors resulting in the best-match profile for the endpoint changing to that of a Profile with a higher Profile Certainty Factor (CF).


Note In scenarios where endpoints are discovered and immediately profiled into an endpoint profile or transition from Not Profiled to a Profile matching a Profile Change (entering) event, this will not trigger a Profile Change (entering) event. In order for the Profile Change (entering) event to fire, an endpoint must be in an Endpoint Profile (for example, not in Not Profiled) and as the result of a re-model (new endpoint data reported by the Collectors) be transitioned to an Endpoint Profile matching a Profile Change (entering) event.


Such a profile transition may be of interest and may justify action be taken with endpoints transitioning into specified profiles. For example, if special-purpose endpoints such as HVAC systems or ID Badge Readers transitioned from their respective endpoint profiles to the Windows or Apple User profiles via NetWatch detection of a DHCP Vendor Class Identifier or Web User Agent identity attribute observed for the MAC of an HVAC or ID Badge Reader, such an event may be of interest and warrant an Active Response as such as transition is out of the ordinary.

Profile Change (Exiting) Events

This event type is used for monitoring the transition of endpoints from a specified Endpoint Profile or Profiles to any other Endpoint Profile or back to a state of Not Profiled.

For example, if it is desirable to know that an endpoint that was currently in the Printers profile leaves that Profile for any other profile, due to the endpoint data for the endpoint requiring it's best-match profile changing to another or no longer meeting the rules in the Printer profile, the Profile Change (Exiting) event type would be used.

When used in conjunction with Active Response event delivery, a use case for this event type may be to detect and respond to attempted MAC Spoofing. For example, endpoints leaving the Printer profile for a higher-certainty Windows or Apple User profile upon the exhibition of a web user agent by the endpoint would fire the Profile Change (Exiting) event. If Active Response delivery was configured for the event, a port bounce could be commanded which would force the immediate re-authentication of the endpoint which would thwart the MAC Spoof immediately upon detection.

Alarm Profile Event Type

The determination of best-match profile for a given endpoint via the Certainty Factor is one of the primary underpinnings of Endpoint Profiling and Identity Monitoring. As outlined previously, each endpoint discovered by the system can be in one and only one Endpoint Profile at any given point in time. A given endpoint may satisfy the rules in more than one Profile at any given time however, and the determination in such a case of the best-match is made based on the profile with the highest Profile Certainty calculated based on rule-matches by the endpoint.

The Alarm Profile Event is used in conjunction with special Endpoint Profiles termed `alarm profiles' that are designed with rules that match endpoint identity attributes of interest, but are not designed to actually containerize endpoints. Alarm profiles have a sufficiently low Certainty Factor so that endpoints remain in the best-match Profile that is indicative of their type while still matching the rules in the Alarm Profile that have an Alarm Profile Event tied to them so that the system can alert that endpoints are exhibiting attributes of interest.

A simple example may help to better explain this event type. Consider a network use policy that forbids the use of the Firefox browser on company owned Windows PCs. An Alarm Profile could be created that contained Web User Agent rules that matched the user agent displayed by the Firefox browser by default when that browser is run on the network, with a very low CF to prevent endpoints from transitioning out of the Windows profile when the presence of the Firefox browser was detected. The Alarm Event would be created so that when endpoints in any Endpoint Profile also satisfied the rule in the Alarm Profile (for example, Collector detected the web user agent exhibited by the endpoint), the event would fire.


Note Alarm Profile Events will fire for an endpoint upon each re-Model of the endpoint MAC if it satisfies the rules in the Alarm profile. In certain scenarios, this can lead to high event volume and should be monitored closely after enablement.


Profile Consistency Event Type

This event was designed to be used to check specified Endpoint Profiles for consistency of the rule set, and to alert when endpoints display conflicting identity attributes and are currently satisfying the rules in multiple Endpoint Profiles at the last re-model. Recall that each endpoint discovered by the system can be in one and only one Endpoint Profile at any given point in time. A given endpoint may satisfy the rules in more than one Profile at any given time however, and the determination in such a case of the best-match is made based on the profile with the highest Profile Certainty calculated based on rule-matches by the endpoint.

The Profile Consistency Event is used to alert when Endpoints in designated Endpoint Profiles are satisfying rules in one or more other Endpoint Profile in addition to their best-match profile upon their last re-model. This can be indicative of rule sets that are overlapping suggesting revisiting the Profile Hierarch and rule sets in enabled Profiles, or, that endpoints triggering the Profile Consistency events may in fact be displaying identity attributes that need to be investigated.


Note Profile Consistency Events will fire for an endpoint upon each re-Model of the endpoint MAC if it remains in the Profile(s) specified in the Event, yet still satisfies rules in other profiles. In certain scenarios, this can lead to high event volume and should be monitored closely after enablement.


Creating Cisco NAC Profiler Events

To create Cisco NAC Profiler Events of the aforementioned types, navigate to the Configuration tab and select the Events link from the secondary menu. The NAC Profiler Events configuration page is displayed shown in Figure 12-1.

Figure 12-1 NAC Profiler Events Page

Select the Create Events option from the table on the NAC Profiler Events configuration page to create New Endpoint, Profile Change, Alarm Profile or Profile Consistency events and add them to the system configuration.

Selecting Create Events results in the displayed of the Add Event form illustrated in Figure 12-2. The Add Event form is used for creation of Events of all the Event Types outlined earlier in the Chapter. As certain options are selected, the form changes automatically to capture the configuration parameters for the selected Event Type (logic) and Delivery Methods.

Figure 12-2 Add Event Form

To create a new endpoint event, complete the Add Event form for the desired event type using the following steps:


Step 1 Name the event to be created.


Tip Enter a unique and meaningful name to describe the NAC Profiler event being created. When naming the event, consideration should be given to the fact that the Event Name is utilized in displaying the event via the Event Delivery Methods; Cisco NAC Profiler Interface, SNMP Trap, or Syslog. NAC Profiler event names must be unique.


Step 2 Define the Event Logic.

Use the radio buttons to select the appropriate event type for the event being added: New Endpoint, Profile Change, Alarm Profile or Profile Consistency.

Additionally, the Event Logic enables the administrator to select options to make the event mechanism more selective and hence enhancing the value of NAC Profiler Events for the purposes of network operations and security management.

The Matching Profile field provides a mechanism to further refine the event by making the event mechanism more selective. The interpretation of "Matching" is dependent on the rule type/sub-type as outlined below:


Tip Matching Profile will accept a regular expression that matches one or more Profile names.


For New Endpoint events, the Matching Profile field is used to designate the Profile (or Profiles) that should be monitored for the addition of new endpoints seen for the first time by Cisco NAC Profiler. In the example outlined earlier in the chapter, if it was desirable for Cisco NAC Profiler to generate an event each time an new endpoint was added to the network and was added to the Profile named 'Belkin Devices,' the Matching Profile would have /Belkin/ entered in it.

For Profile Change events, the Matching Profiles field allows one or more Profiles to be designated as monitored for Profile changes. When Profile Change Event is selected a pull down menu appears, allowing the sub-type of the Profile Change to be selected which results in the following interpretation of Matching Profile:

Entering Profile - Selecting "Entering Profile" will result in an event that monitors the Matching Profile(s) for Endpoints that transition from another Profile (other than Not Profiled) and entered the matching Profile(s)

Exiting Profile - Selecting "Exiting Profile" will result in an event that monitors the Matching Profile(s) for Endpoints that exit the Profile(s) transitioning to any other profile including Not Profiled

The Matching Profile for Alarm Profile events is used to designate the Alarm Profile. Endpoints in any profile that also match the rules in the specified Alarm Profile will trigger the event.

For Profile Consistency Events, specify the Profile(s) that are to be monitored for consistency. Events will be triggered when endpoints currently in a matching profile also satisfy the rules in one or more additional profiles.

Step 3 Select desired Event Delivery method(s) to be executed upon the event being triggered.

Cisco NAC Profiler provides four Endpoint Event delivery methods applicable to New Endpoints, Profile Change, Alarm Profile, and Profile Consistency events. Those delivery methods are as follows:

SNMP Trap - Cisco NAC Profiler will issues an SNMP Trap to the designated SNMP Manager. See Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery via SNMP Trap for additional system configuration required to enable SNMP trap delivery.

Syslog - Cisco NAC Profiler will write a syslog message based on the settings in /etc/syslog.conf. This can be configured to use both the internal syslog on the NAC Profiler Server and external syslog servers. See Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery via Syslog for additional system configuration required for delivery of events via syslog.

Cisco NAC Profiler Interface - (default) Cisco NAC Profiler will display the event in the NAC Profiler Events page of the Endpoint Console provided by the user interface. Management of Events in the Endpoint Console is covered in Chapter 15, "Using the Cisco NAC Profiler Endpoint Console".

Active Response- If a event occurs in which Active Response delivery option is enabled then one of the following actions will be taken on the access port connecting the endpoint (if it is known):

Disable Port, where the Port is placed in Admin Down state.

Bounce Port, where the port transitions to a Down state and back to a Up state, this may cause the endpoint to re-authenticate if authentication is enable on the Network Device port.

Reauthenticate (Cisco Switches only), usage with supported Cisco Switches in which the event will trigger an 802.1X re-authentication of the endpoint. Note that the re-authentication is session-based so that in the case of ports with multiple authenticated endpoints connected, only the endpoint involved in the event is forced to re-authenticate.

Any combination of the four Event Delivery options can be selected for the Endpoint Event being created by selecting the check box.


Note A configured Active Response action will be executed by the NAC Profiler system ONLY when the following conditions are satisfied:
1. The location (switch & port) of the endpoint triggering the event is known by the NAC Profiler System.
2. The system has less than 3 MAC addresses located on the port at the time the event is fired.
3. The read-write SNMP community string for the Network Device is present in the system configuration.

If these conditions are not met when an Event with the Active Response delivery option enabled is triggered, the specified action will not be initiated by the system.



Tip Active Response events that result in a network device configuration change effected by Cisco NAC Profiler are logged in the Change Logs viewed from the Utilities Tab of the Cisco NAC Profiler UI. See Chapter 16, "Using the Cisco NAC Profiler Utilities Tab".


Step 4 Specify desired Event Level

Select one of the four available Event Level options (Info, Minor, Normal or Critical) to aid operators in the interpretation of the priority/severity of this Endpoint Event.

Step 5 Enable the Event as desired

Once defined the Event can be enabled or disabled at any time by selecting the appropriate option.

Step 6 Select the Add Event button to save the newly created Endpoint Event.


If additional Cisco NAC Profiler Events are desired, repeat the process outlined above to create the New Endpoint, Profile Change, Alarm Profile, and Profile Consistency events required.

Activating Cisco NAC Profiler Events

In order for NAC Profiler Events to become active on the system, the configuration changes outlined in earlier sections need to be committed to the running configuration of the system.

For all NAC Profiler events, as soon as the event is created and saved, execute an Apply Changes -> Update Modules.


Tip For the Profile Change - Entering event, if endpoints were currently in the Profile(s) specified in the Matching Profiles entry for the event prior to the activation of the Profile Change event, the event will not be triggered for these endpoints as the event logic requires that an endpoint be added to the Profile post event activation.


If configured correctly, when a New Endpoint, Profile Change, Alarm Profile, or Profile Consistency event occurs, the notification(s) specified in the respective event configuration should show the event. For a description of Cisco NAC Profiler's Event display and management provided within the Endpoint Console, please see Chapter 15, "Using the Cisco NAC Profiler Endpoint Console".


Note Events of these types will also be shown in the Events List and Event Viewer on the dashboard (home tab).


Edit Cisco NAC Profiler Events

To view the list of NAC Profiler Events saved on the system and their current status select the View/Edit Events List link in the NAC Profiler Events table (Configuration -> NAC Profiler Events -> View/Edit Events list. Figure 12-3 is an example of the table that will be presented upon selecting View/Edit Events:

Figure 12-3 Table of NAC Profiler Events

Selecting a blue hyperlink Event Name will open the Edit Event form for the selected Event Name as illustrated in Figure 12-4.

Figure 12-4 Edit Event Form

The form is populated with the current (last saved) NAC Profiler event parameters which can be edited as desired. Refer to "Creating Cisco NAC Profiler Events" section for a description of each parameter and instructions for defining a NAC Profiler Event.

Temporary enablement or disablement of the Endpoint Event can be accomplished by selecting the appropriate radio button.

After making changes to the event that are to be committed to the system, be sure to select the Save Event button to save the changes to the system configuration.

If the event is to be deleted, select the Delete Event button to remove the event from the system configuration.After desired changes are made, the changes must be committed to the running system configuration. Execute an Apply Changes -> Update Modules to commit the edits to NAC Profiler Events.

Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery via SNMP Trap

Cisco NAC Profiler supports event delivery via several different methods: SNMP traps, Syslog, as well to the Cisco NAC Profiler Interface. This section outlines the procedure for enabling the optional Event Delivery method of SNMP traps for selected Events and for NAC Profiler Server Module Configuration for SNMP Trap Delivery

The NAC Profiler system is enabled at the system-level for event delivery via SNMP traps via the configuration of optional parameters in the Profiler Server configuration.


Note One or more Events has to be enabled for the SNMP trap event delivery method. When creating new events to be delivered via an SNMP trap, see "Creating Cisco NAC Profiler Events" section. If existing events are to be enabled for SNMP trap event delivery see "Enable Existing Cisco NAC Profiler Events for SNMP or Syslog Delivery Method" section.


Follow the following steps to utilize this option system-wide


Step 1 Navigate to the Configure Server form and complete the following sub-steps:

a. Enter the Manager IP Address and Manager Community String in the SNMP Configuration portion of the form for the system designated to receive traps from the NAC Profiler System when events are triggered.

b. Enter the NAC Profiler Interface DNS/IP address in the External Reference section of the form. Fro NAC Profiler Server pairs, the DNS/IP entered should be the VIP of the NAC Profiler Server pair. See Chapter 6, "Configuring the Cisco NAC Profiler Server", for complete details on the configuration of Server Module parameters.

An example is provided in the following figures: the IP address of the SNMP trap receiver designated to receive NAC Profiler event traps is 10.173.60.244, and the community String of the trap receiver is public. See Figure 12-5 in this example.

Figure 12-5 NAC Profiler Server Module SNMP Configuration

Figure 12-6 NAC Profiler Server External Reference

Figure 12-6 shows the entry for the NAC Profiler External Reference. This should be the management interface (eth0) DNS/IP of the NAC Profiler Server (standalone). For HA-pairs, it should be the DNS/VIP for the NAC Profiler Server HA pair. This parameter is used to identify the NAC Profiler system as the sender of SNMP traps by the receiving host (network management typically).

Step 2 Select the Update Server button to save the changes to the Server module configuration.


After an Apply Changes -> Update Modules is executed, whenever a NAC Profiler Event that is enabled for delivery via SNMP traps occurs on the system, a trap will be sent from the NAC Profiler system to the designated trap receiver. Figure 12-7 provides an example of traps generated and received for a Newly Profiled and Profile Change event enabled for delivery via SNMP trap.

Figure 12-7 Example NAC Profiler Event Traps Received by Trap Receiver

Configuring Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery via Syslog

In the following sections, the procedures for configuration of the NAC Profiler system to deliver NAC Profiler Events via syslog are outlined. By default, syslog messages generated by a NAC Profiler Events are sent to the following location on the NAC Profiler Server: /var/log/auth.log. However, the NAC Profiler system can be configured to send the syslog messages resulting from Events to the internal syslog, see "Enabling Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery to Internal Syslog" section, and or send the messages resulting from selected events to external syslog server(s), see "Enabling Event Delivery via Syslog to an External Syslog Server" section. The following sections will provide the procedures to be followed in order to configure Cisco NAC Profiler to send syslog messages to both locations.


Tip These are advanced configuration tasks requiring some familiarity with the FreeBSD operating system and the vi text editor.


Enabling Event Delivery via Syslog to an External Syslog Server

Enabling NAC Profiler Event delivery to an external syslog server requires system-level configuration changes to the NAC Profiler Server host operating system, and selecting the syslog event delivery method for one or more NAC Profiler events.

Follow the procedure below to make the required system-level configuration changes to the NAC Profiler Server.


Note One or more NAC Profiler Events has to be enabled for the syslog event delivery method. When creating new events to be delivery via syslog, see "Creating Cisco NAC Profiler Events" section. If existing events are to be enabled for syslog event delivery see "Enable Existing Cisco NAC Profiler Events for SNMP or Syslog Delivery Method" section.



Step 1 Initiate an SSH session to the NAC Profiler Server. For HA pairs, use the VIP. Elevate to root access by using the su command.


Note For HA pairs, the procedure outlined in this section must be performed on both appliances in the pair to enable the desired syslog functionality on both appliances. Start with the Primary (by SSH to the VIP), and then repeat the procedure on the current Secondary. Failure to configure both members of the pair with the proper syslog configuration will result in NAC Profiler event delivery via syslog failing if the HA pair should failover.


Step 2 Edit the syslog.conf file using vi. Add a line to the syslog.conf file designating the syslog server(s) that should receive NAC Profiler Events via the syslog delivery method using the following format:


"authpriv.alert        				  @<IP address or DNS name>", 

Tip Ensure that the tab key is used, not the space bar when entering the white space prior to the entry for the IP/DNS name of the syslog server.


Also, ensure that the entry for the external syslog server isn't placed at the bottom of the syslog.conf file; ideally it should be placed towards the top of the file as shown in the example edited syslog.conf file shown below. In this example, the syslog server is at IP 10.173.60.244:


[root@BeaconHA1 /etc]# vi syslog.conf
# configuration file for syslogd -- GBS customized
#
# $Id: syslog.conf 1606 2008-11-11 20:06:04Z jdamron $
#
# $FreeBSD: src/etc/syslog.conf,v 1.28 2005/03/12 12:31:16 glebius Exp $
#
#       Spaces ARE valid field separators in this file. However,
#       other *nix-like systems still insist on using tabs as field
#       separators. If you are sharing this file between systems, you
#       may want to use only tabs as field separators here.
#       Consult the syslog.conf(5) manpage.
*.err;kern.warning;auth.notice;mail.crit                /dev/console
*.notice;authpriv.none;kern.debug;local0.info;lpr.info;mail.crit;news.err       
/var/log/messages
local5.*                                        /var/log/heartbeat
authpriv.alert								 @10.173.60.244
security.*                                      /var/log/security
auth.info;authpriv.info                         /var/log/auth.log
mail.info                                       /var/log/maillog
lpr.info                                        /var/log/lpd-errs
ftp.info                                        /var/log/xferlog
cron.*                                          /var/log/cron
local4.none;*.=debug                            /var/log/debug.log
*.emerg                                         *
# uncomment this to log all writes to /dev/console to /var/log/console.log
#console.info                                   /var/log/console.log
# uncomment this to enable logging of all log messages to /var/log/all.log
# touch /var/log/all.log and chmod it to mode 600 before it will work
#*.*                                            /var/log/all.log
# uncomment this to enable logging to a remote loghost named loghost
#*.*                                            @loghost
# uncomment these if you're running inn
# news.crit                                     /var/log/news/news.crit
# news.err                                      /var/log/news/news.err
# news.notice                                   /var/log/news/news.notice
!startslip
*.*                                             /var/log/slip.log
!ppp
*.*                                             /var/log/ppp.log
!slapd
local4.*                                        -/var/log/ldap

Step 3 Save the changes to the syslog.conf file via shift zz and exit the vi editor.

Step 4 Change directory (cd) to /etc/rc.d location and perform a restart of syslog daemon with the command, ./syslogd restart, in order for the new changes to the syslog configuration of the NAC Profiler Server appliance to take effect.


[root@BeaconHA1 /etc/rc.d]# ./syslogd restart
Stopping syslogd.
Starting syslogd.
[root@BeaconHA1 /etc/rc.d]#

The NAC Profiler system is now enabled for NAC Profiler Event delivery via syslog to an external syslog server.


After the Update Modules, when a NAC Profiler Event that is enabled for delivery via syslog occurs, the NAC Profiler system will log the event according to the external syslog configuration on the external syslog server(s) specified.

Figure 12-8 shows example syslog entries made by a NAC Profiler system on an external syslog server resulting from a Profile Change and Newly Profiled events enabled for delivery via external syslog.

Figure 12-8 Example External Syslog Messages resulting from Cisco NAC Profiler Event

Enabling Cisco NAC Profiler Event Delivery to Internal Syslog

Enabling NAC Profiler Event delivery to internal syslog requires system-level configuration changes to the appliance operating system, and selecting the syslog event delivery method for one or more NAC Profiler events.

Complete the following procedure to make the required system-level configuration changes to the NAC Profiler Server system:


Note One or more NAC Profiler Events has to be enabled for the syslog event delivery method. When creating new events to be delivery via syslog, see "Creating Cisco NAC Profiler Events" section. If existing events are to be enabled for syslog event delivery see "Enable Existing Cisco NAC Profiler Events for SNMP or Syslog Delivery Method" section.



Step 1 Initiate an SSH session to the NAC Profiler Server system. For HA pairs, use the VIP. Elevate to root system user access by using the su command.


Note For HA pairs, the procedure outlined in this section must be performed on both appliances in the pair to enable the desired syslog functionality on both appliances. Start with the Primary (by SSH to the VIP), and then repeat the procedure on the current Secondary. Failure to configure both members of the pair with the proper syslog configuration will result in NAC Profiler event delivery via syslog failing if the HA pair should failover.


Step 2 Open the syslog.conf file for editing, via vi syslog.conf command and make the changes outlined below to second line of the file. All syslog messages will be sent to the internal syslog server located at /var/log/messages on the NAC Profiler server appliance.

From:

*.notice;authpriv.none;kern.debug;local0.info;lpr.info;mail.crit;news.err       
/var/log/messages

To:

*.notice;authpriv.info;kern.debug;local0.info;lpr.info;mail.crit;news.err       
/var/log/messages

The entire syslog.conf file after the change should appear as shown below:


[root@BeaconHA1 /etc]# vi syslog.conf
# configuration file for syslogd -- GBS customized
#
# $Id: syslog.conf 1606 2008-11-11 20:06:04Z jdamron $
#
# $FreeBSD: src/etc/syslog.conf,v 1.28 2005/03/12 12:31:16 glebius Exp $
#
#       Spaces ARE valid field separators in this file. However,
#       other *nix-like systems still insist on using tabs as field
#       separators. If you are sharing this file between systems, you
#       may want to use only tabs as field separators here.
#       Consult the syslog.conf(5) manpage.
*.err;kern.warning;auth.notice;mail.crit                /dev/console
*.notice;authpriv.info;kern.debug;local0.info;lpr.info;mail.crit;news.err       
/var/log/messages
local5.*                                        /var/log/heartbeat
security.*                                      /var/log/security
auth.info;authpriv.info                         /var/log/auth.log
mail.info                                       /var/log/maillog
lpr.info                                        /var/log/lpd-errs
ftp.info                                        /var/log/xferlog
cron.*                                          /var/log/cron
local4.none;*.=debug                            /var/log/debug.log
*.emerg                                         *
# uncomment this to log all writes to /dev/console to /var/log/console.log
#console.info                                   /var/log/console.log
# uncomment this to enable logging of all log messages to /var/log/all.log
# touch /var/log/all.log and chmod it to mode 600 before it will work
#*.*                                            /var/log/all.log
# uncomment this to enable logging to a remote loghost named loghost
#*.*                                            @loghost
# uncomment these if you're running inn
# news.crit                                     /var/log/news/news.crit
# news.err                                      /var/log/news/news.err
# news.notice                                   /var/log/news/news.notice
!startslip
*.*                                             /var/log/slip.log
!ppp
*.*                                             /var/log/ppp.log
!slapd
local4.*                                        -/var/log/ldap

Save the change to the syslog.conf via shift zz.

Step 3 Change directory (cd) to /etc/rc.d location and perform a restart of syslog daemon with the command, ./syslogd restart, in order to for the new changes to the syslog configuration to take affect on the NAC Profiler Server appliance.


[root@BeaconHA1 /etc/rc.d]# ./syslogd restart
Stopping syslogd.
Starting syslogd.
[root@BeaconHA1 /etc/rc.d]#

The NAC Profiler system is now enabled for NAC Profiler Event delivery via internal syslog


After the Update Modules, when a NAC Profiler Event that is enabled for delivery via syslog occurs, the NAC Profiler system will log the event to its syslog according to the internal syslog configuration.

A example of the output for the messages log (/var/log/messages), with NAC Profiler Event delivery to internal syslog configured can be seen in the example output below:

[root@QAProfiler2 /var/log]# cat messages | grep "Event Name"

Mar 27 14:01:15 QAProfiler2 beacon[855]: Newly Profiled Event. Event Name: [Andy 
IP Newly Profiled] Switch/port: 10.9.0.100(17) New Profile: (Andy IP) Old Profile: 
(Andy MAC) End node: 00:04:f2:10:53:c2(10.11.1.248)

Mar 27 14:01:15 QAProfiler2 beacon[855]: Profile Change Event. Event Name: [Andy 
MAC - Profile Change] Switch/port: 10.9.0.100(17) New Profile: (Andy IP) Old 
Profile: (Andy MAC) End node: 00:04:f2:10:53:c2(10.11.1.248)

[root@QAProfiler2 /var/log]#

Enable Existing Cisco NAC Profiler Events for SNMP or Syslog Delivery Method

To configure existing NAC Profiler events for delivery via syslog or SNMP, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Navigate to the Configuration Tab, select the Events link, then View/Edit Events List. This displays the list of events currently in the configuration (Figure 12-3).

Step 2 To enable syslog event delivery method for an event, select the event name to open the Edit Event form for the saved event (Figure 12-9).

Figure 12-9 Enable Event for Syslog Delivery Method

Step 3 Ensure that in the ''Event delivery methods'' section of the form that the Syslog box has been checked to enable this event for delivery via syslog.

Step 4 Click on ''Edit Event'' button to save the changes to the NAC Profiler Event configuration.