Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI, 8.2
Configuring Smart Call Home
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Configuring Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Table Of Contents

Configuring Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Information About Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Information About Anonymous Reporting

What is Sent to Cisco?

DNS Requirement

Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home Prompt

Information About Smart Call Home

Licensing Requirements for Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Prerequisites for Smart Call Home and Anonymous Reporting

Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Configuring Anonymous Reporting

Configuring Smart Call Home

Enabling Smart Call Home

Declaring and Authenticating a CA Trust Point

Configuring DNS

Subscribing to Alert Groups

Testing Call Home Communications

Optional Configuration Procedures

Monitoring Smart Call Home

Configuration Example for Smart Call Home

Feature History for Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home


Configuring Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home


The Smart Call Home feature provides personalized, e-mail-based and web-based notification to customers about critical events involving their individual systems, often before customers know that a critical event has occurred.

The Anonymous Reporting feature is a subfeature of the Smart Call Home feature and allows Cisco to anonymously receive minimal error and health information from the device.


Note You might have received a popup dialog that invites you to do the following:

Enable Anonymous Reporting to help improve the ASA platform.

Register for Smart Home Notifications to receive personalized, proactive assistance from Cisco.

For information about the dialog, see the "Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home Prompt" section.


This chapter describes how to use and configure Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home, and it includes the following sections:

Information About Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Licensing Requirements for Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Prerequisites for Smart Call Home and Anonymous Reporting

Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Monitoring Smart Call Home

Configuration Example for Smart Call Home

Feature History for Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Information About Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

This section includes the following topics:

Information About Anonymous Reporting

Information About Smart Call Home

Information About Anonymous Reporting

Customers can help to improve the ASA platform by enabling Anonymous Reporting, which allows Cisco to securely receive minimal error and health information from the device. If you enable the feature, your customer identity will remain anonymous, and no identifying information will be sent.

Enabling Anonymous Reporting creates a trust point and installs a certificate. A CA certificate is required for your ASA to validate the server certificate present on the Smart Call Home web server and to form the HTTPS session so that your ASA can send messages securely. Cisco imports a certificate that is predefined in the software. If you decide to enable Anonymous Reporting, a certificate is installed on the ASA with a hardcoded trust point name: _SmartCallHome_ServerCA. When you enable Anonymous Reporting, this trust point is created, the appropriate certificate is installed, and you receive a message about this action. The certificate then shows up in your configuration.

If the appropriate certificate already exists in your configuration when you enable Anonymous Reporting, no trust point is created, and no certificate is installed.


Note When you enable Anonymous Reporting you acknowledge your consent to transfer the specified data to Cisco or to vendors operating on Cisco's behalf (including countries outside of the U.S.).
Cisco maintains the privacy of all customers. For information about Cisco's treatment of personal information, see the Cisco Privacy Statement at the following URL:
http://www.cisco.com/web/siteassets/legal/privacy.html


What is Sent to Cisco?

Messages are sent to Cisco once a month and whenever the ASA reloads. These messages are categorized by alert groups, which are predefined subsets of Smart Call Home alerts that are supported on the ASA: configuration alerts, inventory alerts, and crash information alerts.

Inventory alerts consist of output from the following commands:

show version—Displays the ASA software version, hardware configuration, license key, and related uptime data for the device.

show environment—Shows system environment information for ASA system components, such as hardware operational status for the chassis, drivers, fans, and power supplies, as well as temperature status, voltage, and CPU usage.

show inventory—Retrieves and displays inventory information about each Cisco product that is installed in the networking device. Each product is identified by unique device information, called the UDI, which is a combination of three separate data elements: the product identifier (PID), the version identifier (VID), and the serial number (SN).

show failover state—Displays the failover state of both units in a failover pair. The information displayed includes the primary or secondary status of the unit, the Active/Standby status of the unit, and the last reported reason for failover.

show module—Shows information about any modules installed on the ASAs, for example, information about an AIP SSC installed on the ASA 5505 or information about an SSP installed on the ASA 5585-X, and information about an IPS SSP installed on an ASA 5585-X.

Configuration alerts consist of output from the following commands:

show context—Shows allocated interfaces and the configuration file URL, the number of contexts configured, or, if you enable AR in the system execution space, from a list of all contexts.

show call-home registered-module status—Displays the registered module status. If you use system configuration mode, the command displays system module status based on the entire device, not per context.

Upon a system crash, modified information from the following command is sent:

show crashinfo (truncated)—Upon an unexpected software reload, the device sends a modified crash information file with only the traceback section of the file included, so only function calls, register values, and stack dumps are reported to Cisco.

For more information about ASA commands, see the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference document.

DNS Requirement

A DNS server must be configured properly for your ASA to reach the Cisco Smart Call Home server and send messages to Cisco. Because it is possible that your ASA resides in a private network and does not have access to the public network, Cisco verifies your DNS configuration and then configures it for you, if necessary, by doing the following:

1. Performing a DNS lookup for all DNS servers configured.

2. Getting the DNS server from the DHCP server by sending DHCPINFORM messages on the highest security-level interface.

3. Using the Cisco DNS servers for lookup.

4. Randomly using a static IP addresses for tools.cisco.com.

The above tasks are performed without changing the current configuration. (For example, the DNS server learned from DHCP will not be added to the configuration.)

If there is no DNS server configured, and your ASA cannot reach the Cisco Smart Call Home Server, Cisco generates a syslog message with the "warning" severity for every Smart Call Home message sent to remind you to configure DNS properly.

For information about system log messages, see the Cisco ASA 5500 Series System Log Messages.

Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home Prompt

When you enter configuration mode you receive a prompt that invites you to enable the Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home features if the following criteria are met:

At the prompt you may choose [Y]es, [N]o, [A]sk later. If you choose [A]sk later, then you are reminded again in seven days or when the ASA reloads. If you continue to choose [A]sk later, the ASA prompts two more times at seven-day intervals before it assumes a [N]o response and does not ask again.

At the ASDM prompt you can select from the following options:

Anonymous—Enables Anonymous Reporting.

Registered (enter an e-mail address)—Enables Smart Call Home and registers your ASA with Cisco TAC.

Do not enable Smart Call Home—Does not enable Smart Call Home and does not ask again.

Remind Me Later—Defers the decision. You are reminded again in seven days or whenever the ASA reloads. The ASA prompts two more times at seven-day intervals before it assumes a "Do not enable Smart Call Home response" and does not ask again.

If you did not receive the prompt, you may enable Anonymous Reporting or Smart Call Home by performing the steps in the "Configuring Anonymous Reporting" section or the "Configuring Smart Call Home" section.

Information About Smart Call Home

When fully configured, Smart Call Home detects issues at your site and reports them back to Cisco or through other user-defined channels (such as e-mail or directly to you), often before you know that these issues exist. Depending upon the seriousness of these problems, Cisco responds to customers regarding their system configuration issues, product end-of-life announcements, security advisory issues, and so on.

In this manner, Smart Call Home offers proactive diagnostics and real-time alerts on the ASA and provides high network availability and increased operational efficiency through proactive and quick issue resolution by doing the following:

Identifying issues quickly with continuous monitoring, real-time proactive alerts, and detailed diagnostics.

Making you aware of potential problems through Smart Call Home notifications, in which a service request has been opened, with all diagnostic data attached.

Resolving critical problems faster with direct, automatic access to experts in Cisco TAC.

Smart Call Home offers increased operational efficiency by providing you with the ability to do the following:

Use staff resources more efficiently by reducing troubleshooting time.

Generate service requests to Cisco TAC automatically, routed to the appropriate support team, which provides detailed diagnostic information that speeds problem resolution.

The Smart Call Home Portal offers quick, web-based access to required information that provides you with the ability to do the following:

Review all Smart Call Home messages, diagnostics, and recommendations in one place.

Check service request status quickly.

View the most up-to-date inventory and configuration information for all Smart Call Home-enabled devices.

Licensing Requirements for Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

The following table shows the licensing requirements for Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home:

Model
License Requirement

All models

Base License.


Prerequisites for Smart Call Home and Anonymous Reporting

Smart Call Home and Anonymous Reporting have the following prerequisites:

DNS must be configured. (See the "DNS Requirement" section and see the "Configuring the DNS Server" section.)

Guidelines and Limitations

Firewall Mode Guidelines

Supported in routed and transparent firewall modes.

Context Mode Guidelines

Supported in single mode and multiple context mode.

IPv6 Guidelines

Supports IPv6.

Additional Guidelines for Anonymous Reporting

If an Anonymous Reporting message cannot be sent on the first try, the ASA retries two more times before dropping the message.

Anonymous Reporting can coexist with other Smart Call Home configurations without changing the existing configuration. For example, if Smart Call Home is off before enabling Anonymous Reporting, it remains off, even after enabling Anonymous Reporting.

Output from the show running-config all command shows details about the Anonymous Reporting user profile.

If Anonymous Reporting is enabled, you cannot remove the trust point, and when Anonymous Reporting is disabled, the trust point remains. If Anonymous Reporting is disabled, users can remove the trustpoint, but disabling Anonymous Reporting will not cause the trustpoint to be removed.

Additional Guidelines for Smart Call Home

In multiple context mode, the snapshots command is divided into two commands: one to obtain information from the system context and one to obtain information from the regular context.

The Smart Call Home back-end server can accept messages in XML format only.

Configuring Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

While Anonymous Reporting is a subfeature of the Smart Call Home feature and allows Cisco to anonymously receive minimal error and health information from the device, the Smart Call Home feature is more robust and allows for customized support of your system health, allowing Cisco TAC to monitor your devices and open a case when there is an issue, often before you know the issue occurred.

Generally speaking, you can have both features configured on your system at the same time, yet configuring the robust Smart Call Home feature provides the same functionality as Anonymous reporting, plus personalized service.

This section includes the following topics:

Configuring Anonymous Reporting

Configuring Smart Call Home

Configuring Anonymous Reporting

To configure Anonymous Reporting and securely provide minimal error and health information to Cisco, perform the following steps:

Detailed Steps

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

call-home reporting anonymous

Example:

hostname(config)# call-home reporting anonymous

Enables the Anonymous Reporting feature and creates a new anonymous profile.

Entering this command creates a trust point and installs a certificate that is used to verify the identity of the Cisco web server.

Step 2 

call-home test reporting anonymous

Example:

hostname(config)# call-home test reporting anonymous

(Optional) Tests that the Anonymous Reporting feature is fully enabled. Also ensures that you have connectivity to the server and that your system is able to send messages.

A success or error message returns test results.

Configuring Smart Call Home

This section describes how to configure the Smart Call Home feature.

This section includes the following topics:

Enabling Smart Call Home

Declaring and Authenticating a CA Trust Point

Configuring DNS

Subscribing to Alert Groups

Testing Call Home Communications

Optional Configuration Procedures

Enabling Smart Call Home

This section contains information about performing basic setup for the Smart Call Home feature.

To enable Smart Call Home and activate your call-home profile, perform this task:

Step 1 

service call-home
Example:

hostname(config)# service call-home

Enables the smart call home service.

Step 2 

call-home
Example:

hostname(config)# call-home

Enters call-home configuration mode.

Step 3 

contact-email-addr email
Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home)# contact-email-addr username@example.com

Configures the mandatory contact address. The address should be the Cisco.com ID account associated with the device.

Step 4 

profile profile-name 
Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home)# profile CiscoTAC-1

Enables the profile.

The default profile name is CiscoTAC-1.

Step 5 

active
Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home-profile)# active

Activates the call home profile.

To disable this profile, enter the no active command.

Step 6 

destination transport-method http
Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home-profile)# destination transport-method http

Configures the destination transport method for the smart call-home message receiver.

The default destination transport method is e-mail. To configure e-mail see the "Sending the Output of a Command" section.

Declaring and Authenticating a CA Trust Point

If Smart Call Home is configured to send messages to a web server through HTTPS, you need to configure the ASA to trust the certificate of the web server or the certificate of the Certificate Authority (CA) that issued the certificate. The Cisco Smart Call Home Production server certificate is issued by Verisign. The Cisco Smart Call Home Staging server certificate is issued by Digital Signature Trust Co.

Detailed Steps

To declare and authenticate the Cisco server security certificate and establish communication with the Cisco HTTPS server for Smart Call Home service, perform this task:

Step 1 

crypto ca truspoint trustpoint-name
Example:
hostname(config)# crypto ca trustpoint cisco
 
        

Configures a trustpoint and prepares for certificate enrollment.

Note If you use HTTP as the transport method, you must install a security certificate through a trustpoint, which is required for HTTPS. Find the specific certificate to install at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/switches/lan/smart_call_home/SCH31_Ch6.html#wp1035380

Step 2 

enroll terminal
Example:
hostname(ca-trustpoint)# enroll terminal
 
        

Specifies a manual cut-and-paste method of certificate enrollment.

Step 3 

exit
hostname(ca-trustpoint)# exit 

Exits CA trustpoint configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

Step 4 

crypto ca authenticate trustpoint
Example:
hostname(ca-trustpoint)# crypto ca authenticate 
cisco
 
        

Authenticates the named CA. The CA name should match the trust point name specified in the crypto ca trustpoint command. At the prompt, paste the security certificate text.

Step 5 

quit
Example:
hostname(ca-trustpoint)# quit
 
        
%Do you accept this certificate [yes/no]:
 
        
yes

Specifies the end of the security certificate text and confirms acceptance of th entered security certificate.

Configuring DNS

You must configure DNS so that the HTTPS URLs in the Smart Call Home profile can successfully resolve.

To configure DNS, perform the following tasks:

Step 1 

dns domain-lookup name
Example:

hostname(config)# dns domain-lookup corp

Enables DNS lookup on a specific interface.

Step 2 

dns server-group group name
Example:
hostname(config)# DNS server-group DefaultDNS

Enters the server group submode to configure the parameters for that server group.

We suggest that you use the default server group name: DefaultDNS.

Step 3 

name-server name
Example:

hostname(config-dns-server-group)# name-server 192.168.1.1

Specifies the IP address of the DNS server.

Step 4 

(Optional) 
domain-name name
Example:

hostname(config-dns-server-group)# domain name domainexample

Specifies the domain name.

Subscribing to Alert Groups

An alert group is a predefined subset of the Smart Call Home alerts that are supported on the ASA. Different types of Smart Call Home alerts are grouped into different alert groups depending upon their type.

This section includes the following alert group topics:

Configuring Periodic Notification

Information about the Message Severity Threshold

Configuring Alert Group Subscription

Configuring Periodic Notification

When you subscribe a destination profile to either the Configuration or the Inventory alert group, you can choose to receive the alert group messages asynchronously or periodically at a specified time. The sending period can be one of the following:

Daily—Specify the time of the day to send, using an hour:minute format hh:mm, with a 24-hour clock (for example, 14:30).

Weekly—Specify the day of the week and time of day in the format day hh:mm, where the day of the week is spelled out (for example, monday).

Monthly—Specify the numeric date, from 1 to 31, and the time of day, in the format date hh:mm.

Information about the Message Severity Threshold

When you subscribe a destination profile to certain alert groups, you can set a threshold for sending alert group messages based upon the message level severity. (See Table 77-1). Any message with a value lower than the destination profile's specified threshold is not sent to the destination.

Table 77-1 Severity and Syslog Level Mapping

Level
Keyword
Equivalent Syslog Level
Description

9

catastrophic

N/A

Network-wide catastrophic failure.

8

disaster

N/A

Significant network impact.

7

fatal

Emergency (0)

System is unusable.

6

critical

Alert (1)

Critical conditions, immediate attention needed.

5

major

Critical (2)

Major conditions.

4

minor

Error (3)

Minor conditions.

3

warning

Warning (4)

Warning conditions

2

notification

Notice (5)

Basic notification and informational messages. Possibly independently insignificant.

1

normal

Information (6)

Normal event signifying return to normal state.

0

debugging

Debug (7)

Debugging messages (default setting).


Configuring Alert Group Subscription

To subscribe a destination profile to an alert group, perform this task:

Detailed Steps

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

call-home

Example:

hostname(config) # call-home

Enters call-home configuration mode.

Step 2 

alert-group {all | configuration | diagnostic | environment | inventory | syslog}

Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# alert-group all

Enables the specified Smart Call Home group. Use the keyword all to enable all alert groups. By default, all alert groups are enabled.

Step 3 

profile profile-name

Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home)# profile profile1

Enters the profile configuration submode for the specified destination profile.

Step 4 

subscribe-to-alert-group configuration [periodic {daily hh:mm | monthly date hh:mm | weekly day hh:mm}]

Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home-profile)# subscribe-to-alert-group configuration periodic weekly Wednesday 23:30

Subscribes this destination profile to the configuration alert group. The configuration alert group can be configured for periodic notification, as described in the "Subscribing to Alert Groups" section.

To subscribe to all available alert groups, use the subscribe-to-alert-group all command.

Step 5 

subscribe-to-alert-group environment [severity {catastrophic | disaster | emergencies | alert | critical | errors | warnings | notifications | informational | debugging}]

Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home-profile)# subscribe-to-alert-group examplealertgroupname severity critical

Subscribes to group events with the specified severity level. The alert group can be configured to filter messages based on severity, as described in Table 77-1.

Step 6 

subscribe-to-alert-group syslog [severity {catastrophic | disaster | fatal | critical | major | minor | warning | notification | normal | debugging} [pattern string]]

Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home-profile)# subscribe-to-alert-group syslog severity notification pattern UPDOWN

Subscribes to syslog events with a severity level or message ID. The syslog alert group can be configured to filter messages based on severity, as described in Table 77-1.

Step 7 

subscribe-to-alert-group inventory [periodic {daily hh:mm | monthly date hh:mm | weekly day hh:mm}]

Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home-profile)# subscribe-to-alert-group inventory periodic daily 06:30

Subscribes to inventory events. The configuration alert group can be configured for periodic notification, as described in the "Subscribing to Alert Groups" section.

Step 8 

subscribe-to-alert-group telemetry periodic {hourly | daily | monthly day | weekly day [hh:mm]}

Example:
hostname(cfg-call-home-profile)# 
subscribe-to-alert-group monthly 15

Subscribes to telemetry periodic events. The configuration alert group can be configured for periodic notification, as described in the "Subscribing to Alert Groups" section.

Step 9 

subscribe-to-alert-group snapshot periodic {interval 
minutes | hourly | daily | monthly day_of_month | 
weekly day_of_week [hh:mm]}
Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home-profile)# subscribe-to-alert-group snapshot periodic interval weekly wendesday 23:15

Subscribes to snapshot periodic events. The configuration alert group can be configured for periodic notification, as described in the "Subscribing to Alert Groups" section.

Testing Call Home Communications

You can test Smart Call Home communications by sending messages manually using two command types. To send a user-defined Smart Call Home test message, use the call-home test command. To send a specific alert group message, use the call-home send command.

These sections describe Smart Call Home communication:

Sending a Smart Call Home Test Message Manually

Sending a Smart Call Home Alert Group Message Manually

Sending the Output of a Command

Sending a Smart Call Home Test Message Manually

To manually send a Smart Call Home test message, perform this task:

Command
Purpose
call-home test [test-message] profile profile-name
Example:

hostname# call-home test [testing123] profile profile1

Sends a test message using a profile configuration.


Sending a Smart Call Home Alert Group Message Manually

To manually trigger a Call Home alert group message, perform this task:

Step 1 

call-home send alert-group {inventory | 
configuration | snapshot | telemetry} 
[profile profile-name]
Example:

hostname# call-home send alert-group inventory

Sends an inventory alert group message to one destination profile, if specified. If no profile is specified, sends messages to all profiles that are subscribed to the inventory or configuration group.

Sending the Output of a Command

You can use the call-home send command to execute a CLI command and e-mail the command output to Cisco or to an e-mail address that you specify.

When sending the output of a command, the following guidelines apply:

The specified CLI command can be any run command, including commands for all modules.

If you specify an e-mail address, the command output is sent to that address. If no e-mail address is specified, the output is sent to Cisco TAC. The e-mail is sent in log text format with the service number, if specified, in the subject line.

The service number is required only if no e-mail address is specified or if a Cisco TAC e-mail address is specified.

To execute a CLI command and e-mail the command output, perform this task:

Command
Purpose
call-home send cli command [email email]
Example:

hostname# call-home send cli command email username@example.com

Sends command output to an e-mail address.


Optional Configuration Procedures

This section includes the following topics:

Configuring Smart Call Home Customer Contact Information

Configuring the Mail Server

Configuring Call Home Traffic Rate Limiting

Destination Profile Management

Configuring Smart Call Home Customer Contact Information

Obtain the following customer contact information to configure this task:

E-mail address (required)

Phone number (optional)

Street address (optional)

Contract ID (optional)

Customer name (optional)

Customer ID (optional)

Site ID (optional)

To configure customer contact information, perform this task:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

call-home
Example:

hostname(config)# call-home

Enters call home configuration mode.

Step 2 

contact-email-addr email-address
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# contact-email-addr username@example.com

Configures the mandatory customer contact e-mail address (if you have not already done so). The email-address should be the Cisco.com ID account that is associated with the device.

Step 3 

(Optional) 
phone-number phone-number-string
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# phone-number 8005551122

Specifies a customer phone number.

Step 4 

(Optional) 
street-address street-address
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# street-address "1234 Any Street, Any city, Any state, 12345"

Specifies the customer address, which is a free-format string that can be up to 255 characters long.

Step 5 

(Optional) 
contact-name contact name
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# contact-name contactname1234

Specifies the customer name, which can be up to 128 characters long.

Step 6 

(Optional) 
customer-id customer-id-string
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# customer-id customer1234

Specifies the customer ID, which can be up to 64 characters long.

Step 7 

(Optional) 
site-id site-id-string
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# site-id site1234

Specifies a customer site ID.

Step 8 

(Optional) 
contract-id contract-id-string
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# contract-id contract1234

Specifies the customer contract identification, which can be up to 128 characters long.

This example shows the configuration of contact information:

hostname# configure terminal
hostname(config)# call-home
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# contact-email-addr username@example.com
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# phone-number 8005551122
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# street-address "1234 Any Street, Any city, Any state, 12345"

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# contact-name contactname1234

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# customer-id customer1234
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# site-id site1234
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# contract-id contract1234
 
   

Configuring the Mail Server

We recommend that you use HTTPS for message transport, as it is the most secure. However, you can configure an e-mail destination for Smart Call Home and then configure the mail server to use the e-mail message transport.

To configure the mail server, perform this task:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

call-home
Example:

hostname(config)# call-home

Enters call home configuration mode.

Step 2 

mail-server ip-address | name priority 1-100 all
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# mail-server 10.10.1.1 smtp.example.com priority 1

Specifies the SMTP mail server. Customers can specify up to five mail servers. At least one mail server is required for using e-mail transport for Smart Call Home messages.

The lower the number, the higher the priority of the mail server.

The ip-address option can be an IPv4 or IPv6 mail server address.

This example shows the configuration of a primary mail server (named"smtp.example.com") and a secondary mail server at IP address 10.10.1.1:

hostname# configure terminal
hostname(config)# call-home
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# mail-server smtp.example.com priority 1
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# mail-server 10.10.1.1 priority 2
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# exit
hostname(config)# 
 
   

Configuring Call Home Traffic Rate Limiting

You can configure this optional setting to specify the number of messages that Smart Call Home sends per minute.

To configure Smart Call Home traffic rate limiting, perform this task:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

call-home
Example:

hostname(config)# call-home

Enters call home configuration mode.

Step 2 

rate-limit msg-count
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# rate-limit 5

Specifies the number of messages that Smart Call Home can send per minute. The default value is 10 messages per minute.

This example shows how to configure Smart Call Home traffic rate limiting:

hostname# configure terminal
hostname(config)# call-home
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# rate-limit 5
 
   

Destination Profile Management

These sections describe destination profile management:

Configuring a Destination Profile

Activating and Deactivating a Destination Profile

Copying a Destination Profile

Renaming a Destination Profile

Configuring a Destination Profile

To configure a destination profile for e-mail or for HTTP, perform this task:

Step 1 

call-home
Example:

hostname(config)# call-home

Enters call home configuration mode.

Step 2 

profile profile-name
Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home)# profile newprofile

Enters the profile configuration mode for the specified destination profile. If the specified destination profile does not exist, it is created.

Step 3 

destination {email address | http url} | 
message-size-limit size | preferred-msg-format 
{long-text | short-text | xml} transport-method 
{email | http}}
Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home-profile)# destination address email username@example.com

hostname(cfg-call-home-profile)# destination preferred-msg-format long-text

Configures the destination, message size, message format, and transport method for the smart call-home message receiver. The default message format is XML, and the default enabled transport method is e-mail. The e-mail-address is the e-mail address of the smart call-home receiver, which can be up to 100 characters long. By default, the maximum URL size is 5 MB.

Use the short-text format to send and read a message on a mobile device, and use the long text format to send and read a message on a computer.

If the message receiver is the Smart Call Home back-end server, ensure that the preferred-msg-format is XML, as the back-end server can accept messages in XML format only.

Activating and Deactivating a Destination Profile

Smart Call Home destination profiles are automatically activated when you create them. If you do not want to use a profile right away, you can deactivate the profile.

To activate or deactivate a destination profile, perform this task:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

call-home
Example:

hostname(config)# call-home

Enters call home configuration mode.

Step 2 

profile profile-name
Example:

hostname(cfg-call-home)# profile newprofile

Enters the profile configuration mode.

Creates, edits, or deletes a profile, which can be up to 20 characters long.

Step 3 

active
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home-profile)# active

Enables or disables a profile. By default, a new profile is enabled when it is created.

Step 4 

no active
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home-profile)# no active

Disables the destination profile.

This example shows how to activate a destination profile:

hostname# configure terminal
hostname(config)# call-home
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# profile newprofile
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home-profile)# active
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# end
 
   

This example shows how to deactivate a destination profile:

hostname# configure terminal
hostname(config)# call-home
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# profile newprofile
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home-profile)# no active
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# end
 
   

Copying a Destination Profile

To create a new destination profile by copying an existing profile, perform this task:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

call-home
Example:

hostname(config)# call-home

Enters call home configuration mode.

Step 2 

profile profilename
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# profile newprofile

Specifies the profile to copy.

Step 3 

copy profile src-profile-name dest-profile-name
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# copy profile profile1 profile2

Copies the content of an existing profile (src-profile-name, which can be up to 23 characters long) to a new profile (dest-profile-name, which can be up to 23 characters long).

This example shows how to copy an existing profile:

hostname# configure terminal
hostname(config)# call-home
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# profile newprofile
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home-profile)# copy profile profile1 profile2
 
   

Renaming a Destination Profile

To change the name of an existing profile, perform this task:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

call-home
Example:

hostname(config)# call-home

Enters call home configuration mode.

Step 2 

profile profilename
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# profile newprofile

Specifies the profile to rename.

Step 3 

rename profile src-profile-name dest-profile-name
Example:

ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# rename profile profile1 profile2

Changes the name of an existing profile, the src-profile-name (an existing profile name can be up to 23 characters long), and the dest-profile-name (a new profile name can be up to 23 characters long).

This example shows how to rename an existing profile:

hostname# configure terminal
hostname(config)# call-home
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home)# profile newprofile
ciscoasa(cfg-call-home-profile)# rename profile profile1 profile2
 
   

Monitoring Smart Call Home

To monitor the Smart Call Home feature,enter one of the following commands:

Command
Purpose

show call-home detail

 

Shows the current Smart Call Home detail configuration.

show call-home mail-server status

 

Shows the current mail server status.

show call-home profile {profile name | all}

 

Shows the configuration of Smart Call Home profiles.

show call-home registered-module status [all]

 

Shows the registered module status.

show call-home statistics

 

Shows call-home detail status.

show call-home

 

Shows the current Smart Call Home configuration.

show running-config call-home

 

Shows the current Smart Call Home running configuration.

show smart-call-home alert-group

 

Shows the current status of Smart Call Home alert groups.


Configuration Example for Smart Call Home

The following example shows how to configure the Smart Call Home feature:

hostname (config)# service call-home
hostname (config)# call-home
hostname (cfg-call-home)# contact-email-addr customer@mail.server
hostname (cfg-call-home)# profile CiscoTAC-1
hostname (cfg-call-home-profile)# destination address http 
https://example.cisco.com/its/service/example/services/ExampleService
hostname (cfg-call-home-profile)# destination address email callhome@example.com
hostname (cfg-call-home-profile)# destination transport-method http
hostname (cfg-call-home-profile)# subscribe-to-alert-group inventory periodic monthly
hostname (cfg-call-home-profile)# subscribe-to-alert-group configuration periodic monthly
hostname (cfg-call-home-profile)# subscribe-to-alert-group environment
hostname (cfg-call-home-profile)# subscribe-to-alert-group diagnostic

hostname (cfg-call-home-profile)# subscribe-to-alert-group telemetry periodic daily

Feature History for Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Table 77-2 lists each feature change and the platform release in which it was implemented. ASDM is backwards-compatible with multiple platform releases, so the specific ASDM release in which support was added is not listed.

Table 77-2 Feature History for Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home

Feature Name
Platform Releases
Feature Information

Smart Call Home

8.2(2)

The Smart Call Home feature offers proactive diagnostics and real-time alerts on the ASA, and provides higher network availability and increased operational efficiency.

We introduced or modified the following commands:

active (call home), call-home, call-home send alert-group, call-home test, contact-email-addr, customer-id (call home), destination (call home), profile, rename profile, service call-home, show call-home, show call-home detail, show smart-call-home alert-group, show call-home profile, show call-home statistics, show call-home mail-server status, show running-config call-home, show call-home registered-module status all, site-id, street-address, subscribe-to-alert-group all, subscribe-to-alert-group configuration, subscribe-to-alert-group diagnostic, subscribe-to-alert-group environment, subscribe-to-alert-group inventory, subscribe-to-alert-group syslog.

 

Anonymous Reporting

8.2(5)/8.4(2)

Customers can help to improve the ASA platform by enabling Anonymous Reporting, which allows Cisco to securely receive minimal error and health information from a device.

We introduced the following commands: call-home reporting anonymous, call-home test reporting anonymous.