Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference, Version 8.0
l2tp tunnel hello -- log-adj-changes
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l2tp tunnel hello through log-adj-changes Commands

Table Of Contents

l2tp tunnel hello through log-adj-changes Commands

l2tp tunnel hello

ldap attribute-map

ldap-attribute-map (aaa-server host mode)

ldap-base-dn

ldap-defaults

ldap-dn

ldap-group-base-dn

ldap-login-dn

ldap-login-password

ldap-naming-attribute

ldap-over-ssl

ldap-scope

leap-bypass

lifetime (ca server mode)

limit-resource

lmfactor

log

log-adj-changes


l2tp tunnel hello through log-adj-changes Commands


l2tp tunnel hello

To specify the interval between hello messages on L2TP over IPSec connections, use the l2tp tunnel hello command in global configuration mode. To reset the interval to the default, use the no form of the command:

l2tp tunnel hello interval

no l2tp tunnel hello interval

Syntax Description

interval

Interval between hello messages in seconds. The Default is 60 seconds. The range is 10 to 300 seconds.


Defaults

The default is 60 seconds.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Global configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.2(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The l2tp tunnel hello command enables the security appliance to detect problems with the physical layer of the L2TP connection. The default is 60 secs. If you configure it to a lower value, connections that are experiencing problems are disconnected earlier.

Examples

The following example configures the interval between hello messages to 30 seconds:

hostname(config)# l2tp tunnel hello 30

Related Commands

Command
Description

show vpn-sessiondbdetail remote filter protocol L2TPOverIPSec

Displays the details of L2TP connections.

vpn-tunnel-protocol l2tp-ipsec

Enables L2TP as a tunneling protocol for a specific tunnel group.


ldap attribute-map

To create and name an LDAP attribute map for mapping user-defined attribute names to Cisco LDAP attribute names, use the ldap attribute-map command in global configuration mode. To remove the map, use the no form of this command.

ldap attribute-map map-name

no ldap attribute-map map-name

Syntax Description

Syntax DescriptionSyntax Description

map-name

Specifies a user-defined name for an LDAP attribute map.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Global configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.1(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

With the ldap attribute-map command, you can map your own attribute names and values to Cisco attribute names. You can then bind the resulting attribute map to an LDAP server. Your typical steps would be as follows:

1. Use the ldap attribute-map command in global configuration mode to create an unpopulated attribute map. This commands enters ldap-attribute-map mode.

2. Use the map-name and map-value commands in ldap-attribute-map mode to populate the attribute map.

3. Use the ldap-attribute-map command in aaa-server host mode to bind the attribute map to an LDAP server. Note the hyphen after ldap in this command.


Note To use the attribute mapping features correctly, you need to understand both the Cisco LDAP attribute names and values as well as the user-defined attribute names and values.


Examples

The following example command, entered in global configuration mode, creates an LDAP attribute map named myldapmap prior to populating it or binding it to an LDAP server:

hostname(config)# ldap attribute-map myldapmap
hostname(config-ldap-attribute-map)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

ldap-attribute-map (aaa-server host mode)

Binds an LDAP attribute map to an LDAP server.

map-name

Maps a user-defined LDAP attribute name to a Cisco LDAP attribute name.

map-value

Maps a user-defined attribute value to the Cisco attribute name.

show running-config ldap attribute-map

Displays a specific running LDAP attribute map or all running attribute maps.

clear configure ldap attribute-map

Removes all LDAP attribute maps.


ldap-attribute-map (aaa-server host mode)

To bind an existing mapping configuration to an LDAP host, use the ldap-attribute-map command in aaa-server host configuration mode. To remove the binding, use the no form of this command.

ldap-attribute-map map-name

no ldap-attribute-map map-name

Syntax Description

Syntax DescriptionSyntax Description

map-name

Specifies an LDAP attribute mapping configuration.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Aaa-server host configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.1(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

If the Cisco-defined LDAP attribute names do not meet your ease-of-use or other requirements, you can create your own attribute names, map them to Cisco attributes, and then bind the resulting attribute configuration to an LDAP server. Your typical steps would include:

1. Use the ldap attribute-map command in global configuration mode to create an unpopulated attribute map. This command enters ldap-attribute-map mode. Note that there is no hyphen after "ldap" in this command.

2. Use the map-name and map-value commands in ldap-attribute-map mode to populate the attribute mapping configuration.

3. Use the ldap-attribute-map command in aaa-server host mode to bind the attribute map configuration to an LDAP server.

Examples

The following example commands, entered in aaa-server host configuration mode, bind an existing attribute map named myldapmap to an LDAP server named ldapsvr1:

hostname(config)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 host 10.10.0.1
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# ldap-attribute-map myldapmap
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

ldap attribute-map (global configuration mode)

Creates and names an LDAP attribute map for mapping user-defined attribute names to Cisco LDAP attribute names.

map-name

Maps a user-defined LDAP attribute name with a Cisco LDAP attribute name.

map-value

Maps a user-defined attribute value to a Cisco attribute.

show running-config ldap attribute-map

Displays a specific running ldap attribute mapping configuration or all running attribute mapping configurations.

clear configure ldap attribute-map

Removes all LDAP attribute maps.


ldap-base-dn

To specify the location in the LDAP hierarchy where the server should begin searching when it receives an authorization request, use the ldap-base-dn command in aaa-server host configuration mode. Aaa-server host configuration mode is accessibile from aaa-server protocol configuration mode. To remove this specification, thus resetting the search to start at the top of the list, use the no form of this command.

ldap-base-dn string

no ldap-base-dn

Syntax Description

string

A case-sensitive string of up to 128 characters that specifies the location in the LDAP hierarchy where the server should begin searching when it receives an authorization request; for example, OU=Cisco. Spaces are not permitted in the string, but other special characters are allowed.


Defaults

Start the search at the top of the list.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Aaa-server host configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

Pre-existing command, modified for this release


Usage Guidelines

This command is valid only for LDAP servers.

Examples

The following example configures an LDAP AAA server named srvgrp1 on host 1.2.3.4, sets a timeout of 9 seconds, sets a retry-interval of 7 seconds, and configures the LDAP base DN as starthere.

hostname(config)# aaa-server svrgrp1 protocol ldap
hostname(config-aaa-server-group)# aaa-server svrgrp1 host 1.2.3.4
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# timeout 9
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# retry 7
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# ldap-base-dn starthere
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# exit
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

aaa-server host

Enters AAA server host configuration mode so you can configure AAA server parameters that are host-specific.

ldap-scope

Specifies the extent of the search in the LDAP hierarchy that the server should make when it receives an authorization request.

ldap-naming-attribute

Specifies the Relative Distinguished Name attribute (or attributes) that uniquely identifies an entry on the LDAP server.

ldap-login-dn

Specifies the name of the directory object that the system should bind as.

ldap-login-password

Specifies the password for the login DN.


ldap-defaults

To define LDAP default values, use the ldap-defaults command in crl configure configuration mode. Crl configure configuration mode is accessible from crypto ca trustpoint configuration mode. These default values are used only when the LDAP server requires them. To specify no LDAP defaults, use the no form of this command.

ldap-defaults server [port]

no ldap-defaults

Syntax Description

port

(Optional) Specifies the LDAP server port. If this parameter is not specified, the security appliance uses the standard LDAP port (389).

server

Specifies the IP address or domain name of the LDAP server. If one exists within the CRL distribution point, it overrides this value.


Defaults

The default setting is not set.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Crl configure configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following example defines LDAP default values on the default port (389):

hostname(config)# crypto ca trustpoint central
hostname(ca-trustpoint)# crl configure
hostname(ca-crl)# ldap-defaults ldapdomain4 8389
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

crl configure

Enters ca-crl configuration mode.

crypto ca trustpoint

Enters trustpoint configuration mode.

protocol ldap

Specifies LDAP as a retrieval method for CRLs


ldap-dn

To pass a X.500 distinguished name and password to an LDAP server that requires authentication for CRL retrieval, use the ldap-dn command in crl configure configuration mode. Crl configure configuration mode is accessible from crypto ca trustpoint configuration mode. These parameters are used only when the LDAP server requires them. To specify no LDAP DN, use the no form of this command.

ldap-dn x.500-name password

no ldap-dn

Syntax Description

password

Defines a password for this distinguished name. The maximum field length is 128 characters.

x.500-name

Defines the directory path to access this CRL database, for example: cn=crl,ou=certs,o=CAName,c=US. The maximum field length is 128 characters.


Defaults

The default setting is not on.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Crl configure configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following example specifies an X.500 name CN=admin,OU=devtest,O=engineering and a password xxzzyy for trustpoint central:

hostname(config)# crypto ca trustpoint central
hostname(ca-trustpoint)# crl configure
hostname(ca-crl)# ldap-dn cn=admin,ou=devtest,o=engineering xxzzyy
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

crl configure

Enters crl configure configuration mode.

crypto ca trustpoint

Enters ca trustpoint configuration mode.

protocol ldap

Specifies LDAP as a retrieval method for CRLs.


ldap-group-base-dn

To specify the base group in the Active Directory hierarchy used by dynamic access policies for group searches, use the ldap-group-base-dn command in aaa-server host configuration mode. To remove the command from the running configuration, use the no form of the command:

ldap-group-base-dn [string]

no ldap-group-base-dn [string]

Syntax Description

string

A case-sensitive string of up to 128 characters that specifies the location in the Active Directory hierarchy where the server should begin searching. For example, ou=Employees. Spaces are not permitted in the string, but other special characters are allowed.


Defaults

No default behavior or values. If you do not specify a group search DN, the search begins at the base DN.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

aaa-server host configuration mode


Command History

Release
Modification

8.0(4)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The ldap-group-base-dn command applies only to Active Directory servers using LDAP, and specifies an Active Directory heirarchy level that the show ad-groups command uses to begin its group search. The groups retrieved from the search are used by dynamic group policies as selection criteria for a specific policy.

Examples

The following example sets the group base DN to begin the search at the organization unit (ou) level Employees:

hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# ldap-group-base-dn ou=Employees

Related Commands

Command
Description

group-search-timeout

Adjusts the time the security appliance waits for a response from an Active Directory server for a list of groups.

show ad-groups

Displays groups that are listed on an Active Directory server.


ldap-login-dn

To specify the name of the directory object that the system should bind this as, use the ldap-login-dn command in aaa-server host configuration mode. Aaa-server host configuration mode is accessibile from aaa-server protocol configuration mode. To remove this specification, use the no form of this command.

ldap-login-dn string

no ldap-login-dn

Syntax Description

string

A case-sensitive string of up to 128 characters that specifies the name of the directory object in the LDAP hierarchy. Spaces are not permitted in the string, but other special characters are allowed.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Aaa-server host configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

This command is valid only for LDAP servers. The maximum supported string length is 128 characters.

Some LDAP servers, including the Microsoft Active Directory server, require that the security applianceestablish a handshake via authenticated binding before they will accept requests for any other LDAP operations. The security appliance identifies itself for authenticated binding by attaching a Login DN field to the user authentication request. The Login DN field describes the authentication characteristics of the security appliance. These characteristics should correspond to those of a user with administrator privileges.

For the string variable, enter the name of the directory object for VPN Concentrator authenticated binding, for example: cn=Administrator, cn=users, ou=people, dc=XYZ Corporation, dc=com. For anonymous access, leave this field blank.

Examples

The following example configures an LDAP AAA server named svrgrp1 on host 1.2.3.4, sets a timeout of 9 seconds, sets a retry-interval of 7 seconds, and configures the LDAP login DN as myobjectname.

hostname(config)# aaa-server svrgrp1 protocol ldap
hostname(config-aaa-server-group)# aaa-server svrgrp1 host 1.2.3.4
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# timeout 9
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# retry 7
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# ldap-login-dn myobjectname
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)#
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

aaa-server host

Enters AAA server host configuration mode so you can configure AAA server parameters that are host-specific.

ldap-base-dn

Specifies the location in the LDAP hierarchy where the server should begin searching when it receives an authorization request.

ldap-login-password

Specifies the password for the login DN. This command is valid only for LDAP servers.

ldap-naming-attribute

Specifies the Relative Distinguished Name attribute (or attributes) that uniquely identifies an entry on the LDAP server.

ldap-scope

Specifies the extent of the search in the LDAP hierarchy that the server should make when it receives an authorization request.


ldap-login-password

To specify the login password for the LDAP server, use the ldap-login-password command in aaa-server host configuration mode. Aaa-server host configuration mode is accessibile from aaa-server protocol configuration mode. To remove this password specification, use the no form of this command:

ldap-login-password string

no ldap-login-password

Syntax Description

string

A case-sensitive, alphanumeric password, up to 64 characters long. The password cannot contain space characters.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Aaa-server host configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

This command is valid only for LDAP servers. The maximum password string length is 64 characters.

Examples

The following example configures an LDAP AAA server named srvgrp1 on host 1.2.3.4, sets a timeout of 9 seconds, sets a retry-interval of 7 seconds, and configures the LDAP login password as obscurepassword.

hostname(config)# aaa-server svrgrp1 protocol ldap
hostname(config)# aaa-server svrgrp1 host 1.2.3.4
hostname(config-aaa-server)# timeout 9
hostname(config-aaa-server)# retry 7
hostname(config-aaa-server)# ldap-login-password obscurepassword
hostname(config-aaa-server)#
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

aaa-server host

Enters AAA server host configuration mode so you can configure AAA server parameters that are host-specific.

ldap-base-dn

Specifies the location in the LDAP hierarchy where the server should begin searching when it receives an authorization request.

ldap-login-dn

Specifies the name of the directory object that the system should bind as.

ldap-naming-attribute

Specifies the Relative Distinguished Name attribute (or attributes) that uniquely identifies an entry on the LDAP server.

ldap-scope

Specifies the extent of the search in the LDAP hierarchy that the server should make when it receives an authorization request.


ldap-naming-attribute

To specify the Relative Distinguished Name attribute, use the ldap-naming-attribute command in aaa-server host configuration mode. Aaa-server host configuration mode is accessibile from aaa-server protocol configuration mode. To remove this specification, use the no form of this command:

ldap-naming-attribute string

no ldap-naming-attribute

Syntax Description

string

The case-sensitive, alphanumeric Relative Distinguished Name attribute, consisting of up to 128 characters, that uniquely identifies an entry on the LDAP server. Spaces are not permitted in the string, but other special characters are allowed.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Aaa-server host configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Enter the Relative Distinguished Name attribute that uniquely identifies an entry on the LDAP server. Common naming attributes are Common Name (cn) and User ID (uid).

This command is valid only for LDAP servers. The maximum supported string length is 128 characters.

Examples

The following example configures an LDAP AAA server named srvgrp1 on host 1.2.3.4, sets a timeout of 9 seconds, sets a retry-interval of 7 seconds, and configures the LDAP naming attribute as cn.

hostname(config)# aaa-server svrgrp1 protocol ldap
hostname(config-aaa-server-group)# aaa-server svrgrp1 host 1.2.3.4
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# timeout 9
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# retry 7
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# ldap-naming-attribute cn
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)#
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

aaa-server host

Enters AAA server host configuration mode so you can configure AAA server parameters that are host-specific.

ldap-base-dn

Specifies the location in the LDAP hierarchy where the server should begin searching when it receives an authorization request.

ldap-login-dn

Specifies the name of the directory object that the system should bind as.

ldap-login-password

Specifies the password for the login DN. This command is valid only for LDAP servers.

ldap-scope

Specifies the extent of the search in the LDAP hierarchy that the server should make when it receives an authorization request.


ldap-over-ssl

To establish a secure SSL connection between the security appliance and the LDAP server, use the ldap-over-ssl command in aaa-server host configuration mode. To disable SSL for the connection, use the no form of this command.

ldap-over-ssl enable

no ldap-over-ssl enable

Syntax Description

Syntax DescriptionSyntax Description

enable

Specifies that SSL secures a connection to an LDAP server.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Aaa-server host configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.1(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command to specify that SSL secures a connection between the security appliance and an LDAP server.


Note We recommend enabling this feature if you are using plain text authentication. See the sasl-mechanism command.


Examples

The following commands, entered in aaa-server host configuration mode, enable SSL for a connection between the security appliance and the LDAP server named ldapsvr1 at IP address 10.10.0.1. They also configure the plain SASL authentication mechanism.

hostname(config)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 protocol ldap
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 host 10.10.0.1
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# ldap-over-ssl enable
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

sasl-mechanism

Specifies SASL authentication between the LDAP client and server.

server-type

Specifies the LDAP server vendor as either Microsoft or Sun.

ldap attribute-map (global configuration mode)

Creates and names an LDAP attribute map for mapping user-defined attribute names to Cisco LDAP attribute names.


ldap-scope

To specify the extent of the search in the LDAP hierarchy that the server should make when it receives an authorization request, use the ldap-scope command in aaa-server host configuration mode. Aaa-server host configuration mode is accessibile from aaa-server protocol configuration mode. To remove this specification, use the no form of this command.

ldap-scope scope

no ldap-scope

Syntax Description

scope

The number of levels in the LDAP hierarchy for the server to search when it receives an authorization request. Valid values are:

onelevel—Search only one level beneath the Base DN

subtree—Search all levels beneath the Base DN


Defaults

The default value is onelevel.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Aaa-server host configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

Pre-existing command, modified for this release


Usage Guidelines

Specifying the scope as onelevel results in a faster search, because only one level beneath the Base DN is searched. Specifying subtree is slower, because all levels beneath the Base DN are searched.

This command is valid only for LDAP servers.

Examples

The following example configures an LDAP AAA server named svrgrp1 on host 1.2.3.4, sets a timeout of 9 seconds, sets a retry-interval of 7 seconds, and configures the LDAP scope to include the subtree levels.

hostname(config)# aaa-server svrgrp1 protocol ldap
hostname(config-aaa-server-group)# aaa-server svrgrp1 host 1.2.3.4
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# timeout 9
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# retry 7
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# ldap-scope subtree
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)#
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

aaa-server host

Enters AAA server host configuration mode so you can configure AAA server parameters that are host-specific.

ldap-base-dn

Specifies the location in the LDAP hierarchy where the server should begin searching when it receives an authorization request.

ldap-login-dn

Specifies the name of the directory object that the system should bind as.

ldap-login-password

Specifies the password for the login DN. This command is valid only for LDAP servers.

ldap-naming-attribute

Specifies the Relative Distinguished Name attribute (or attributes) that uniquely identifies an entry on the LDAP server.


leap-bypass

To enable LEAP Bypass, use the leap-bypass enable command in group-policy configuration mode. To disable LEAP Bypass, use the leap-bypass disable command. To remove the LEAP Bypass attribute from the running configuration, use the no form of this command. This option allows inheritance of a value for LEAP Bypass from another group policy.

leap-bypass {enable | disable}

no leap-bypass

Syntax Description

disable

Disables LEAP Bypass.

enable

Enables LEAP Bypass.


Defaults

LEAP Bypass is disabled.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Group-policy configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

When enabled, LEAP Bypass allows LEAP packets from wireless devices behind a VPN hardware client to travel across a VPN tunnel prior to user authentication. This lets workstations using Cisco wireless access point devices establish LEAP authentication. Devices are then able to authenticate again, per user authentication.

This feature does not work as intended if you enable interactive hardware client authentication.

For further information, see the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI.


Note There may be security risks in allowing any unauthenticated traffic to traverse the tunnel.


Examples

The following example shows how to set LEAP Bypass for the group policy named "FirstGroup":

hostname(config)# group-policy FirstGroup attributes
hostname(config-group-policy)# leap-bypass enable

Related Commands

Command
Description

secure-unit-authentication

Requires VPN hardware clients to authenticate with a username and password each time the client initiates a tunnel.

user-authentication

Requires users behind VPN hardware clients to identify themselves to the security appliance before connecting.


lifetime (ca server mode)

To specify the length of time that the Local Certificate Authority (CA) certificate, each issued user certificates, or the Certificate Revocation List (CRL) is valid, use the lifetime command in CA server configuration mode. To reset the lifetime to the default setting, use the no form of this command.

lifetime {ca-certificate | certificate | crl} time

no lifetime {ca-certificate | certificate | crl}

Syntax Description

ca-certificate

Specifies the lifetime of the local CA server certificate.

certificate

Specifies the lifetime of all user certificates issued by the CA server.

crl

Specifies the lifetime of the CRL.

time

For the CA certificate and all issued certificates, time specifies the number of days the certificate is valid. The valid range is from 1 to 3650 days.

For the CRL, time specifies the number of hours the CRL is valid. The valid range for the CRL is from 1 to 720 hours.


Defaults

The default lifetimes are:

CA certificate - Three years

Issued certificates - One year

CRL - Six hours

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

CA server configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

8.0(2)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

By specifying the number of days or hours that a certificate or CRL is valid, this command determines the expiration date included in the certificate or the CRL.

Examples

The following example configures the CA to issue certificates that are valid for three months:

hostname(config)# crypto ca server 
hostname(config-ca-server)# lifetime certificate 90
hostname(config-ca-server))# 
 
   

The following example configures the CA to issue a CRL that is valid for two days:

hostname(config)# crypto ca server
hostname(config-ca-server)# lifetime crl 48
hostname(config-ca-server)# 

Related Commands

Command
Description

cdp-url

Specifies the certificate revocation list distribution point (CDP) to be include in the certificates issued by the CA.

crypto ca server

Provides access to the CA Server Configuration mode CLI command set, which allows you to configure and manage the local CA.

crypto ca server crl issue

Forces the issuance of a CRL.

show crypto ca server

Displays the local CA configuration details in ASCII text.

show crypto ca server cert-db

Displays local CA server certificates.

show crypto ca server crl

Displays the current CRL of the local CA.


limit-resource

To specify a resource limit for a class in multiple context mode, use the limit-resource command in class configuration mode. To restore the limit to the default, use the no form of this command. The security appliance manages resources by assigning contexts to resource classes. Each context uses the resource limits set by the class.

limit-resource {all 0 | [rate] resource_name number[%]}

no limit-resource {all | [rate] resource_name}

Syntax Description

all 0

Sets the limit for all resources as unlimited.

number[%]

Specifies the resource limit as a fixed number greater than or equal to 1, or as a percentage of the system limit between 1 and 100 (when used with the percent sign (%)). Set the limit to 0 to indicate an unlimited resource. For resources that do not have a system limit, you cannot set the percentage (%); you can only set an absolute value.

rate

Specifies that you want to set the rate per second for a resource. See Table 18-1 for resources for which you can set the rate per second.

resource_name

Specifies the resource name for which you want to set a limit. This limit overrides the limit set for all.


Defaults

All resources are set to unlimited, except for the following limits, which are by default set to the maximum allowed per context:

Telnet sessions—5 sessions.

SSH sessions—5 sessions.

IPSec sessions—5 sessions.

MAC addresses—65,535 entries.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Class configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.2(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

When you limit a resource for a class, the security appliance does not set aside a portion of the resources for each context assigned to the class; rather, the security appliance sets the maximum limit for a context. If you oversubscribe resources, or allow some resources to be unlimited, a few contexts can "use up" those resources, potentially affecting service to other contexts.

Table 18-1 lists the resource types and the limits. See also the show resource types command.


Note If the System Limit column value is N/A, then you cannot set a percentage of the resource because there is no hard system limit for the resource.


Table 18-1 Resource Names and Limits 

Resource Name
Rate or Concurrent
Minimum and Maximum Number per Context
System Limit
Description

mac-addresses

Concurrent

N/A

65,535

For transparent firewall mode, the number of MAC addresses allowed in the MAC address table.

conns

Concurrent or Rate

N/A

Concurrent connections: See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI for the connection limit for your platform.

Rate: N/A

TCP or UDP connections between any two hosts, including connections between one host and multiple other hosts.

inspects

Rate

N/A

N/A

Application inspections.

hosts

Concurrent

N/A

N/A

Hosts that can connect through the security appliance.

asdm

Concurrent

1 minimum

5 maximum

32

ASDM management sessions.

Note ASDM sessions use two HTTPS connections: one for monitoring that is always present, and one for making configuration changes that is present only when you make changes. For example, the system limit of 32 ASDM sessions represents a limit of 64 HTTPS sessions.

ssh

Concurrent

1 minimum

5 maximum

100

SSH sessions.

syslogs

Rate

N/A

N/A

System log messages.

telnet

Concurrent

1 minimum

5 maximum

100

Telnet sessions.

xlates

Concurrent

N/A

N/A

Address translations.


Examples

The following example sets the default class limit for conns to 10 percent instead of unlimited:

hostname(config)# class default
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource conns 10%
 
   

All other resources remain at unlimited.

To add a class called gold, enter the following commands:

hostname(config)# class gold
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource mac-addresses 10000
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource conns 15%
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource rate conns 1000
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource rate inspects 500
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource hosts 9000
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource asdm 5
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource ssh 5
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource rate syslogs 5000
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource telnet 5
hostname(config-class)# limit-resource xlates 36000
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

class

Creates a resource class.

context

Configures a security context.

member

Assigns a context to a resource class.

show resource allocation

Shows how you allocated resources across classes.

show resource types

Shows the resource types for which you can set limits.


lmfactor

To set a revalidation policy for caching objects that have only the last-modified timestamp, and no other server-set expiration values, use the lmfactor command in cache configuration mode. To set a new policy for revalidating such objects, use the command again. To reset the attribute to the default value of 20, enter the no version of the command.

lmfactor value

no lmfactor

Syntax Description

value

An integer in the range of 0 to 100.


Defaults

The default value is 20.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Cache configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.1(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The security appliance uses the value of the lmfactor to estimate the length of time for which it considers a cached object to be unchanged. This is known as the expiration time. The security appliance estimates th expiration time by the time elapsed since the last modification multiplied by the lmfactor.

Setting the lmfactor to zero is equivalent to forcing an immediate revalidation, while setting it to 100 results in the longest allowable time until revalidation.

Examples

The following example shows how to set an lmfactor of 30:

hostname(config)# webvpn
hostname(config-webvpn)# cache 
hostname(config-webvpn-cache)# lmfactor 30
hostname(config-webvpn-cache)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

cache

Enters WebVPN Cache mode.

cache-compressed

Configures WebVPN cache compression.

disable

Disables caching.

expiry-time

Configures the expiration time for caching objects without revalidating them.

max-object-size

Defines the maximum size of an object to cache.

min-object-size

Defines the minimum sizze of an object to cache.


log

When using the Modular Policy Framework, log packets that match a match command or class map by using the log command in match or class configuration mode. This log action is available in an inspection policy map (the policy-map type inspect command) for application traffic. To disable this action, use the no form of this command.

log

no log

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behaviors or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Match and class configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.2(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

An inspection policy map consists of one or more match and class commands. The exact commands available for an inspection policy map depends on the application. After you enter the match or class command to identify application traffic (the class command refers to an existing class-map type inspect command that in turn includes match commands), you can enter the log command to log all packets that match the match command or class command.

When you enable application inspection using the inspect command in a Layer 3/4 policy map (the policy-map command), you can enable the inspection policy map that contains this action, for example, enter the inspect http http_policy_map command where http_policy_map is the name of the inspection policy map.

Examples

The following example sends a log when packets match the http-traffic class map.

hostname(config-cmap)# policy-map type inspect http http-map1
hostname(config-pmap)# class http-traffic
hostname(config-pmap-c)# log
 
   

Related Commands

Commands
Description

class

Identifies a class map name in the policy map.

class-map type inspect

Creates an inspection class map to match traffic specific to an application.

policy-map

Creates a Layer 3/4 policy map.

policy-map type inspect

Defines special actions for application inspection.

show running-config policy-map

Display all current policy map configurations.


log-adj-changes

To configure the router to send a syslog message when an OSPF neighbor goes up or down, use the log-adj-changes command in router configuration mode. To turn off this function, use the no form of this command.

log-adj-changes [detail]

no log-adj-changes [detail]

Syntax Description

detail

(Optional) Sends a syslog message for each state change, not just when a neighbor goes up or down.


Defaults

This command is enabled by default.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Router configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

Preexisting

This command was preexisting.


Usage Guidelines

The log-adj-changes command is enabled by default; it appears in the running configuration unless removed with the no form of the command.

Examples

The following example disables the sending of a syslog message when an OSPF neighbor goes up or down:

hostname(config)# router ospf 5
hostname(config-router)# no log-adj-changes
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

router ospf

Enters router configuration mode.

show ospf

Displays general information about the OSPF routing processes.