Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference, Version 7.2
same-security-traffic through show asdm sessions Commands
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same-security-traffic through show asdm sessions Commands

Table Of Contents

same-security-traffic through show asdm sessions Commands

same-security-traffic

sasl-mechanism

secondary

secondary-color

secondary-text-color

secure-unit-authentication

security-level

send response

seq-past-window

serial-number

server

server-port

server-separator

server-type

service

service password-recovery

service-policy (class)

service-policy (global)

session

set connection

set connection advanced-options

set connection decrement-ttl

set connection timeout

set metric

set metric-type

setup

shape

show aaa local user

show aaa-server

show access-list

show activation-key

show admin-context

show arp

show arp-inspection

show arp statistics

show asdm history

show asdm image

show asdm log_sessions

show asdm sessions


same-security-traffic through show asdm sessions Commands


same-security-traffic

To permit communication between interfaces with equal security levels, or to allow traffic to enter and exit the same interface, use the same-security-traffic command in global configuration mode. To disable the same-security traffic, use the no form of this command.

same-security-traffic permit {inter-interface | intra-interface}

no same-security-traffic permit {inter-interface | intra-interface}

Syntax Description

inter-interface

Permits communication between different interfaces that have the same security level.

intra-interface

Permits communication in and out of the same interface.


Defaults

This command is disabled by default.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Global configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)(1)

This command was introduced.

7.2(1)

The intra-interface keyword now allows all traffic to enter and exit the same interface, and not just IPSec traffic.


Usage Guidelines

Allowing communication between same security interfaces (enabled by the same-security-traffic inter-interface command) provides the following benefits:

You can configure more than 101 communicating interfaces. If you use different levels for each interface, you can configure only one interface per level (0 to 100).

You can allow traffic to flow freely between all same security interfaces without access lists.

The same-security-traffic intra-interface command lets traffic enter and exit the same interface, which is normally not allowed. This feature might be useful for VPN traffic that enters an interface, but is then routed out the same interface. The VPN traffic might be unencrypted in this case, or it might be reencrypted for another VPN connection. For example, if you have a hub and spoke VPN network, where the security appliance is the hub, and remote VPN networks are spokes, for one spoke to communicate with another spoke, traffic must go into the security appliance and then out again to the other spoke.

Examples

The following example shows how to enable the same-security interface communication:

hostname(config)# same-security-traffic permit inter-interface

The following example shows how to enable traffic to enter and exit the same interface:

hostname(config)# same-security-traffic permit intra-interface

Related Commands

Command
Description

show running-config same-security-traffic

Displays the same-security-traffic configuration.


sasl-mechanism

To specify a SASL (Simple Authentication and Security Layer) mechanism for authenticating an LDAP client to an LDAP server, use the sasl-mechanism command in aaa-server host configuration mode. The SASL authentication mechanism options are digest-md5 and kerberos.

To disable an authentication mechanism, use the no form of this command.

sasl-mechanism {digest-md5 | kerberos server-group-name}

no sasl-mechanism {digest-md5 | kerberos server-group-name}


Note Because the security appliance serves as a client proxy to the LDAP server for VPN users, the LDAP client referred to here is the security appliance.


Syntax Description

Syntax DescriptionSyntax Description

digest-md5

The security appliance responds with an MD5 value computed from the username and password.

kerberos

The security appliance responds by sending the username and realm using the GSSAPI (Generic Security Services Application Programming Interface) Kerberos mechanism.

server-group-name

Specifies the Kerberos aaa-server group, up to 64 characters.


Defaults

No default behavior or values. The security appliance passes the authentication parameters to the LDAP server in plain text.


Note We recommend that you secure LDAP communications with SSL using the ldap-over-ssl command if you have not configured SASL.


Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

aaa-server host configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.1(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command to specify security appliance authentication to an LDAP server using SASL mechanisms.

Both the security appliance and the LDAP server can support multiple SASL authentication mechanisms. When negotiating SASL authentication, the security appliance retrieves the list of SASL mechanisms configured on the server and sets the authentication mechanism to the strongest mechanism configured on both the security appliance and the server. The Kerberos mechanism is stronger than the Digest-MD5 mechanism. To illustrate, if both the LDAP server and the security appliance support both mechanisms, the security appliance selects Kerberos, the stronger of the mechanisms.

When disabling the SASL mechanisms, you must enter a separate no command for each mechanism you want to disable because they are configured independently. Mechanisms that you do not specifically disable remain in effect. For example, you must enter both of the following commands to disable both SASL mechanisms:

no sasl-mechanism digest-md5

no sasl-mechanism kerberos <server-group-name>

Examples

The following examples, entered in aaa-server host configuration mode, enable the SASL mechanisms for authentication to an LDAP server named ldapsvr1 with an IP address of 10.10.0.1. This example enables the SASL digest-md5 authentication mechanism:

hostname(config)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 protocol ldap
hostname(config-aaa-server-group)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 host 10.10.0.1
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# sasl-mechanism digest-md5
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)#

The following example enables the SASL Kerberos authentication mechanism and specifies kerb-servr1 as the Kerberos AAA server:

hostname(config)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 protocol ldap
hostname(config-aaa-server-group)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 host 10.10.0.1
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# sasl-mechanism kerberos kerbsvr1
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

ldap-over-ssl

Specifies that SSL secures the LDAP client-server connection.

server-type

Specifies the LDAP server vendor as either Microsoft or Sun.

ldap attribute-map (global configuration mode)

Creates and names an LDAP attribute map for mapping user-defined attribute names to Cisco LDAP attribute names.


secondary

To give the secondary unit higher priority in a failover group, use the secondary command in failover group configuration mode. To restore the default, use the no form of this command.

secondary

no secondary

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

If primary or secondary is not specified for a failover group, the failover group defaults to primary.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Failover group configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Assigning a primary or secondary priority to a failover group specifies which unit the failover group becomes active on when both units boot simulataneously (within a unit polltime). If one unit boots before the other, then both failover groups become active on that unit. When the other unit comes online, any failover groups that have the second unit as a priority do not become active on the second unit unless the failover group is configured with the preempt command or is manually forced to the other unit with the no failover active command.

Examples

The following example configures failover group 1 with the primary unit as the higher priority and failover group 2 with the secondary unit as the higher priority. Both failover groups are configured with the preempt command, so the groups will automatically become active on their preferred unit as the units become available.

hostname(config)# failover group 1 
hostname(config-fover-group)# primary
hostname(config-fover-group)# preempt 100
hostname(config-fover-group)# exit
hostname(config)# failover group 2
hostname(config-fover-group)# secondary
hostname(config-fover-group)# preempt 100
hostname(config-fover-group)# mac-address e1 0000.a000.a011 0000.a000.a012 
hostname(config-fover-group)# exit
hostname(config)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

failover group

Defines a failover group for Active/Active failover.

preempt

Forces the failover group to become active on its preferred unit when the unit becomes available.

primary

Gives the primary unit a higher priority than the secondary unit.


secondary-color

To set a secondary color for the WebVPN login, home page, and file access page, use the secondary-color command in webvpn mode. To remove a color from the configuration and reset the default, use the no form of this command.

secondary-color [color]

no secondary-color

Syntax Description

color

(Optional) Specifies the color. You can use a comma separated RGB value, an HTML color value, or the name of the color if recognized in HTML.

RGB format is 0,0,0, a range of decimal numbers from 0 to 255 for each color (red, green, blue); the comma separated entry indicates the level of intensity of each color to combine with the others.

HTML format is #000000, six digits in hexadecimal format; the first and second represent red, the third and fourth green, and the fifth and sixth represent blue.

Name length maximum is 32 characters


Defaults

The default secondary color is HTML #CCCCFF, a lavender shade.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Webvpn


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The number of RGB values recommended for use is 216, many fewer than the mathematical possibilities. Many displays can handle only 256 colors, and 40 of those look differently on MACs and PCs. For best results, check published RGB tables. To find RGB tables online, enter RGB in a search engine.

Examples

The following example shows how to set an HTML color value of #5F9EAO, which is a teal shade:

hostname(config)# webvpn
hostname(config-webvpn)# secondary-color #5F9EAO

Related Commands

Command
Description

title-color

Sets a color for the WebVPN title bar on the login, home page, and file access page


secondary-text-color

To set the secondary text color for the WebVPN login, home page and file access page, use the secondary-text-color command in webvpn mode. To remove the color from the configuration and reset the default, use the no form of this command.

secondary-text-color [black | white]

no secondary-text-color

Syntax Description

auto

Chooses black or white based on the settings for the text-color command. That is, if the primary color is black, this value is white.

black

The default secondary text color is black.

white

You can change the text color to white.


Defaults

The default secondary text color is black.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Webvpn


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following example shows how to set the secondary text color to white:

hostname(config)# webvpn
hostname(config-webvpn)# secondary-text-color white

Related Commands

Command
Description

text-color

Sets a color for text in the WebVPN title bar on the login, home page and file access page


secure-unit-authentication

To enable secure unit authentication, use the secure-unit-authentication enable command in group-policy configuration mode. To disable secure unit authentication, use the secure-unit-authentication disable command. To remove the secure unit authentication attribute from the running configuration, use the no form of this command. This option allows inheritance of a value for secure unit authentication from another group policy.

Secure unit authentication provides additional security by requiring VPN hardware clients to authenticate with a username and password each time the client initiates a tunnel. With this feature enabled, the hardware client does not have a saved username and password.


Note With this feature enabled, to bring up a VPN tunnel, a user must be present to enter the username and password.


secure-unit-authentication {enable | disable}

no secure-unit-authentication

Syntax Description

disable

Disables secure unit authentication.

enable

Enables secure unit authentication.


Defaults

Secure unit authentication is disabled.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Group policy


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Secure unit authentication requires that you have an authentication server group configured for the tunnel group the hardware client(s) use.

If you require secure unit authentication on the primary security appliance, be sure to configure it on any backup servers as well.

Examples

The following example shows how to enable secure unit authentication for the group policy named FirstGroup:

hostname(config)# group-policy FirstGroup attributes
hostname(config-group-policy)# secure-unit-authentication enable

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip-phone-bypass

Lets IP phones connect without undergoing user authentication. Secure unit authentication remains in effect.

leap-bypass

Lets LEAP packets from wireless devices behind a VPN hardware client travel across a VPN tunnel prior to user authentication, when enabled. This lets workstations using Cisco wireless access point devices establish LEAP authentication. Then they authenticate again per user authentication.

user-authentication

Requires users behind a hardware client to identify themselves to the security appliance before connecting.


security-level

To set the security level of an interface, use the security-level command in interface configuration mode. To set the security level to the default, use the no form of this command. The security level protects higher security networks from lower security networks by imposing additional protection between the two.

security-level number

no security-level

Syntax Description

number

An integer between 0 (lowest) and 100 (highest).


Defaults

By default, the security level is 0.

If you name an interface "inside" and you do not set the security level explicitly, then the security appliance sets the security level to 100 (see the nameif command). You can change this level if desired.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Interface configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was moved from a keyword of the nameif command to an interface configuration mode command.


Usage Guidelines

The level controls the following behavior:

Network access—By default, there is an implicit permit from a higher security interface to a lower security interface (outbound). Hosts on the higher security interface can access any host on a lower security interface. You can limit access by applying an access list to the interface.

For same security interfaces, there is an implicit permit for interfaces to access other interfaces on the same security level or lower.

Inspection engines—Some inspection engines are dependent on the security level. For same security interfaces, inspection engines apply to traffic in either direction.

NetBIOS inspection engine—Applied only for outbound connections.

OraServ inspection engine—If a control connection for the OraServ port exists between a pair of hosts, then only an inbound data connection is permitted through the security appliance.

Filtering—HTTP(S) and FTP filtering applies only for outbound connections (from a higher level to a lower level).

For same security interfaces, you can filter traffic in either direction.

NAT control—When you enable NAT control, you must configure NAT for hosts on a higher security interface (inside) when they access hosts on a lower security interface (outside).

Without NAT control, or for same security interfaces, you can choose to use NAT between any interface, or you can choose not to use NAT. Keep in mind that configuring NAT for an outside interface might require a special keyword.

established command—This command allows return connections from a lower security host to a higher security host if there is already an established connection from the higher level host to the lower level host.

For same security interfaces, you can configure established commands for both directions.

Normally, interfaces on the same security level cannot communicate. If you want interfaces on the same security level to communicate, see the same-security-traffic command. You might want to assign two interfaces to the same level and allow them to communicate if you want to create more than 101 communicating interfaces, or you want protection features to be applied equally for traffic between two interfaces; for example, you have two departments that are equally secure.

If you change the security level of an interface, and you do not want to wait for existing connections to time out before the new security information is used, you can clear the connections using the clear local-host command.

Examples

The following example configures the security levels for two interfaces to be 100 and 0:

hostname(config)# interface gigabitethernet0/0
hostname(config-if)# nameif inside
hostname(config-if)# security-level 100
hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
hostname(config-if)# no shutdown
hostname(config-if)# interface gigabitethernet0/1
hostname(config-if)# nameif outside
hostname(config-if)# security-level 0
hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.1.2.1 255.255.255.0
hostname(config-if)# no shutdown

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear local-host

Resets all connections.

interface

Configures an interface and enters interface configuration mode.

nameif

Sets the interface name.

vlan

Assigns a VLAN ID to a subinterface.


send response

To send a RADIUS Accounting-Response Start and Accounting-Response Stop message to the sender of the RADIUS Accounting-Request Start and Stop messages, use the send response command in radius-accounting parameter configuration mode, which is accessed by using the inspect radius-accounting command.

This option is disabled by default.

send response

no send response

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behaviors or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

radius-accounting parameter configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.2(1)

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following example shows how to send a response with RADIUS accounting:

hostname(config)# policy-map type inspect radius-accounting ra
hostname(config-pmap)# send response
hostname(config-pmap-p)# send response

Related Commands

Commands
Description

inspect radius-accounting

Sets inspection for RADIUS accounting.

parameters

Sets parameters for an inspection policy map.


seq-past-window

To set the action for packets that have past-window sequence numbers (the sequence number of a received TCP packet is greater than the right edge of the TCP receiving window), use the seq-past-window command in tcp-map configuration mode. To set the value back to the default, use the no form of this command. This command is part of the TCP normalization policy enabled using the set connection advanced-options command.

seq-past-window {allow | drop}

no seq-past-window

Syntax Description

allow

Allows packets that have past-window sequence numbers. This action is only allowed if the queue-limit command is set to 0 (disabled).

drop

Drops packets that have past-window sequence numbers.


Defaults

The default action is to drop packets that have past-window sequence numbers.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Tcp-map configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.2(4)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

To enable TCP normalization, use the Modular Policy Framework:

1. tcp-map—Identifies the TCP normalization actions.

a. seq-past-window—In tcp-map configuration mode, you can enter the seq-past-window command and many others.

2. class-map—Identify the traffic on which you want to perform TCP normalization.

3. policy-map—Identify the actions associated with each class map.

a. class—Identify the class map on which you want to perform actions.

b. set connection advanced-options—Identify the tcp-map you created.

4. service-policy—Assigns the policy map to an interface or globally.

Examples

The following example sets the security appliance to allow packets that have past-window sequence numbers:

hostname(config)# tcp-map tmap
hostname(config-tcp-map)# seq-past-window allow
hostname(config)# class-map cmap
hostname(config-cmap)# match any
hostname(config)# policy-map pmap
hostname(config-pmap)# class cmap
hostname(config-pmap)# set connection advanced-options tmap
hostname(config)# service-policy pmap global
hostname(config)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

class-map

Identifies traffic for a service policy.

policy-map

dentifies actions to apply to traffic in a service policy.

queue-limit

Sets the out-of-order packet limit.

set connection advanced-options

Enables TCP normalization.

service-policy

Applies a service policy to interface(s).

show running-config tcp-map

Shows the TCP map configuration.

tcp-map

Creates a TCP map and allows access to tcp-map configuration mode.


serial-number

To include the security appliance serial number in the certificate during enrollment, use the serial-number command in crypto ca trustpoint configuration mode. To restore the default setting, use the no form of the command.

serial-number

no serial-number

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.


Defaults

The default setting is to not include the serial number.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Crypto ca trustpoint configuration


:

Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following example enters crypto ca trustpoint configuration mode for trustpoint central, and includes the security appliance serial number in the enrollment request for trustpoint central:

hostname(config)# crypto ca trustpoint central
hostname(ca-trustpoint)# serial-number
hostname(ca-trustpoint)# 

Related Commands

Command
Description

crypto ca trustpoint

Enters trustpoint configuration mode.


server

To specify a default e-mail proxy server, use the server command in the applicable e-mail proxy mode. To remove the attribute from the configuration, use the no version of this command. The security appliance sends requests to the default e-mail server when the user connects to the e-mail proxy without specifying a server. If you do not configure a default server, and a user does not specify a server, the security appliance returns an error.

server {ipaddr or hostname}

no server

Syntax Description

hostname

The DNS name of the default e-mail proxy server.

ipaddr

The IP address of the default e-mail proxy server.


Defaults

There is no default e-mail proxy server by default.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Pop3s

Imap4s

Smtps


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following example shows how to set a default POP3S e-mail server with an IP address. of 10.1.1.7:

hostname(config)# pop3s
hostname(config-pop3s)# server 10.1.1.7

server-port

To configure a AAA server port for a host, use the server-port command in AAA-server host mode. To remove the designated server port, use the no form of this command:

server-port port-number

no server-port

Syntax Description

port-number

A port number in the range 0 through 65535.


Defaults

The default server ports are as follows:

SDI—5500

LDAP—389

Kerberos—88

NT—139

TACACS+—49

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

AAA-server group


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following example configures an SDI AAA server named "srvgrp1" to use server port number 8888:

hostname(config)# aaa-server srvgrp1 protocol sdi
hostname(config-aaa-server-group)# aaa-server srvgrp1 host 192.168.10.10
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# server-port 8888
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# 

Related Commands

Command
Description

aaa-server host

Configures host-specific AAA server parameters.

clear configure aaa-server

Removes all AAA-server configuration.

show running-config aaa-server

Displays AAA server statistics for all AAA servers, for a particular server group, for a particular server within a particular group, or for a particular protocol


server-separator

To specify a character as a delimiter between the e-mail and VPN server names, use server-separator command in the applicable e-mail proxy mode. To revert to the default, ":", use the no form of this command.

server-separator {symbol}

no server-separator

Syntax Description

symbol

The character that separates the e-mail and VPN server names. Choices are "@," (at) "|" (pipe), ":"(colon), "#" (hash), "," (comma), and ";" (semi-colon).


Defaults

The default is "@" (at).

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Pop3s

Imap4s

Smtps


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The server separator must be different from the name separator.

Examples

The following example shows how to set a pipe (|) as the server separator for IMAP4S:

hostname(config)# imap4s
hostname(config-imap4s)# server-separator |

Related Commands

Command
Description

name-separator

Separates the e-mail and VPN usernames and passwords.


server-type

To manually configure the LDAP server model, use the server-type command in aaa-server host configuration mode. The security appliance supports the following server models:

Microsoft Active Directory

Sun Microsystems JAVA System Directory Server, formerly named the Sun ONE Directory Server.

To disable this command, use the no form of this command.

server-type {auto-detect| microsoft | sun}

no server-type {auto-detect| microsoft | sun}

Syntax Description

Syntax DescriptionSyntax Description

auto-detect

Specifies that the security appliance determines the LDAP server type through auto-detection.

microsoft

Specifies that the LDAP server is a Microsoft Active Directory.

sun

Specifies that the LDAP server is a Sun Microsystems JAVA System Directory Server.


Defaults

By default, auto-detection attempts to determine the server type.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

aaa-server host configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.1(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The security appliance supports LDAP version 3 and is compatible only with the Sun Microsystems JAVA System Directory Server and the Microsoft Active Directory.


NoteSun—The DN configured on the security appliance to access a Sun directory server must be able to access the default password policy on that server. We recommend using the directory administrator, or a user with directory administrator privileges, as the DN. Alternatively, you can place an ACI on the default password policy.

Microsoft—You must configure LDAP over SSL to enable password management with Microsoft Active Directory.


By default, the security appliance auto-detects whether it is connected to a Microsoft or a Sun LDAP directory server. However, if auto-detection fails to determine the LDAP server type and if you know the server is either a Microsoft or Sun server, you can use the server-type command to manually configure the server as either a Microsoft or a Sun Microsystems LDAP server.

Examples

The following example, entered in aaa-server host configuration mode, configures the server type for the LDAP server ldapsvr1 at IP address 10.10.0.1. The first example configures a Sun Microsystems LDAP server.

hostname(config)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 protocol ldap
hostname(config-aaa-server-group)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 host 10.10.0.1
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# server-type sun
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# 

The following example specifies that the security appliance use auto-detection to determine the server type:

hostname(config)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 protocol LDAP
hostname(config-aaa-server-group)# aaa-server ldapsvr1 host 10.10.0.1
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)# server-type auto-detect
hostname(config-aaa-server-host)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

ldap-over-ssl

Specifies that SSL secures the LDAP client-server connection.

sasl-mechanism

Configures SASL authentication between the LDAP client and server.

ldap attribute-map (global configuration mode)

Creates and names an LDAP attribute map for mapping user-defined attribute names to Cisco LDAP attribute names.


service

To enable resets for denied TCP connections, use the service command in global configuration mode. To disable resets, use the no form of this command.

service {resetinbound [interface interface_name] | resetoutbound [interface interface_name] | resetoutside}

no service {resetinbound [interface interface_name] | resetoutbound [interface interface_name] | resetoutside}

Syntax Description

interface interface_name

Enables or disables resets for the specified interface.

resetinbound

Sends TCP resets for all inbound TCP sessions that attempt to transit the security appliance and are denied by the security appliance based on access lists or AAA settings. The security appliance also sends resets for packets that are allowed by an access list or AAA, but do not belong to an existing connection and are denied by the stateful firewall. Traffic between same security level interfaces is also affected. When this option is not enabled, the security appliance silently discards denied packets. If you do not specify an interface, then this setting applies to all interfaces.

resetoutbound

Sends TCP resets for all outbound TCP sessions that attempt to transit the security appliance and are denied by the security appliance based on access lists or AAA settings. The security appliance also sends resets for packets that are allowed by an access list or AAA, but do not belong to an existing connection and are denied by the stateful firewall. Traffic between same security level interfaces is also affected. When this option is not enabled, the security appliance silently discards denied packets. This option is enabled by default. You might want to disable outbound resets to reduce the CPU load during traffic storms, for example.

resetoutside

Enables resets for TCP packets that terminate at the least secure interface and are denied by the security appliance based on access lists or AAA settings. The security appliance also sends resets for packets that are allowed by an access list or AAA, but do not belong to an existing connection and are denied by the stateful firewall. When this option is not enabled, the security appliance silently discards the packets of denied packets. We recommend that you use the resetoutside keyword with interface PAT. This keyword allows the security appliance to terminate the IDENT from an external SMTP or FTP server. Actively resetting these connections avoids the 30-second timeout delay.


Defaults

By default, service resetoutbound is enabled for all interfaces.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Global configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.1(1)

The interface keyword and the resetoutbound command were added.


Usage Guidelines

You might want to explicitly send resets for inbound traffic if you need to reset identity request (IDENT) connections. When you send a TCP RST (reset flag in the TCP header) to the denied host, the RST stops the incoming IDENT process so that you do not have to wait for IDENT to time out. Waiting for IDENT to time out can cause traffic to slow because outside hosts keep retransmitting the SYN until the IDENT times out, so the service resetinbound command might improve performance.

Examples

The following example disables outbound resets for all interfaces except for the inside interface:

hostname(config)# no service resetoutbound
hostname(config)# service resetoutbound interface inside

The following example enables inbound resets for all interfaces except for the DMZ interface:

hostname(config)# service resetinbound
hostname(config)# no service resetinbound interface dmz

The following example enables resets for connections that terminate on the outside interface:

hostname(config)# service resetoutside

Related Commands

Command
Description

show running-config service

Displays the service configuration.


service password-recovery

To enable password recovery, use the service password-recovery command in global configuration mode. To disable password recovery, use the no form of this command. Password recovery is enabled by default, but you might want to disable it to ensure that unauthorized users cannot use the password recovery mechanism to compromise the security appliance.

service password-recovery

no service password-recovery

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

Password recovery is enabled by default.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Global configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

On the ASA 5500 series adaptive security appliance, if you forget the passwords, you can boot the security appliance into ROMMON by pressing the Escape key on the terminal keyboard when prompted during startup. Then set the security appliance to ignore the startup configuration by changing the configuration register (see the config-register command). For example if your configuration register is the default 0x1, then change the value to 0x41 by entering the confreg 0x41 command. After reloading the security appliance, it loads a default configuration, and you can enter privileged EXEC mode using the default passwords. Then load the startup configuration by copying it to the running configuration and reset the passwords. Finally, set the security appliance to boot as before by setting the configuration register to the original setting. For example, enter the config-register 0x1 command in global configuration mode.

On the PIX 500 series security appliance, boot the security appliance into monitor mode by pressing the Escape key on the terminal keyboard when prompted during startup. Then download the PIX password tool to the security appliance, which erases all passwords and aaa authentication commands.

On the ASA 5500 series adaptive security appliance, the no service password-recovery command prevents a user from entering ROMMON with the configuration intact. When a user enters ROMMON, the security appliance prompts the user to erase all Flash file systems. The user cannot enter ROMMON without first performing this erasure. If a user chooses not to erase the Flash file system, the security appliance reloads. Because password recovery depends on using ROMMON and maintaining the existing configuration, this erasure prevents you from recovering a password. However, disabling password recovery prevents unauthorized users from viewing the configuration or inserting different passwords. In this case, to recover the system to an operating state, load a new image and a backup configuration file, if available. The service password-recovery command appears in the configuration file for informational purposes only; when you enter the command at the CLI prompt, the setting is saved in NVRAM. The only way to change the setting is to enter the command at the CLI prompt. Loading a new configuration with a different version of the command does not change the setting. If you disable password recovery when the security appliance is configured to ignore the startup configuration at startup (in preparation for password recovery), then the security appliance changes the setting to boot the startup configuration as usual. If you use failover, and the standby unit is configured to ignore the startup configuration, then the same change is made to the configuration register when the no service password recovery command replicates to the standby unit.

On the PIX 500 series security appliance, the no service password-recovery command forces the PIX password tool to prompt the user to erase all Flash file systems. The user cannot use the PIX password tool without first performing this erasure. If a user chooses not to erase the Flash file system, the security appliance reloads. Because password recovery depends on maintaining the existing configuration, this erasure prevents you from recovering a password. However, disabling password recovery prevents unauthorized users from viewing the configuration or inserting different passwords. In this case, to recover the system to an operating state, load a new image and a backup configuration file, if available.

Examples

The following example disables password recovery for the ASA 5500 series adaptive security appliance:

hostname(config)# no service password-recovery
WARNING: Executing "no service password-recovery" has disabled the password recovery 
mechanism and disabled access to ROMMON.  The only means of recovering from lost or 
forgotten passwords will be for ROMMON to erase all file systems including configuration 
files and images.  You should make a backup of your configuration and have a mechanism to 
restore images from the ROMMON command line.

The following example disables password recovery for the PIX 500 series security appliance:

hostname(config)# no service password-recovery
WARNING: Saving "no service password-recovery" in the startup-config will disable password 
recovery via the npdisk application.  The only means of recovering from lost or forgotten 
passwords will be for npdisk to erase all file systems including configuration files and 
images.  You should make a backup of your configuration and have a mechanism to restore 
images from the Monitor Mode command line.

The following example for the ASA 5500 series adaptive security appliance shows when to enter ROMMON at startup and how to complete a password recovery operation.

Use BREAK or ESC to interrupt boot.
Use SPACE to begin boot immediately.
Boot interrupted.                              
 

Use ? for help.
rommon #0> confreg
 
Current Configuration Register: 0x00000001
Configuration Summary:
  boot default image from Flash
 
Do you wish to change this configuration? y/n [n]: n
 
rommon #1> confreg 0x41
 
Update Config Register (0x41) in NVRAM...
 
rommon #2> boot
Launching BootLoader...
Boot configuration file contains 1 entry.
 

Loading disk0:/ASA_7.0.bin... Booting...
###################
...
Ignoring startup configuration as instructed by configuration register.
Type help or '?' for a list of available commands.
hostname> enable
Password:
hostname# configure terminal
hostname(config)# copy startup-config running-config
 
Destination filename [running-config]?
Cryptochecksum(unchanged): 7708b94c e0e3f0d5 c94dde05 594fbee9
 
892 bytes copied in 6.300 secs (148 bytes/sec)
hostname(config)# enable password NewPassword
hostname(config)# config-register 0x1

Related Commands

Command
Description

config-register

Sets the security appliance to ignore the startup configuration when it reloads.

enable password

Sets the enable password.

password

Sets the login password.


service-policy (class)

To apply a hierarchical policy map under another policy map, use the service-policy command in class configuration mode. To disable the service policy, use the no form of this command. Hierarchical policies are supported only for QoS traffic shaping when you want to perform priority queueing on a subset of shaped traffic.

service-policy policymap_name

no service-policy policymap_name

Syntax Description

policymap_name

Specifies the policy map name that you configured in the policy-map command. You can only specify a Layer 3/4 policy map that includes the priority command.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Class configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.2(4)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Hierarchical priority queueing is used on interfaces on which you enable a traffic shaping queue. A subset of the shaped traffic can be prioritized. The standard priority queue is not used (the priority-queue command).

For hierarchical priority-queueing, perform the following tasks using Modular Policy Framework:

1. class-map—Identify the traffic on which you want to perform priority queueing.

2. policy-map (for priority queueing)—Identify the actions associated with each class map.

a. class—Identify the class map on which you want to perform actions.

b. priority—Enable priority queueing for the class map. You can only include the priority command in this policy map if you want to use is hierarchically.

3. policy-map (for traffic shaping)—Identify the actions associated with the class-default class map.

a. class class-default—Identify the class-default class map on which you want to perform actions.

b. shape—Apply traffic shaping to the class map.

c. service-policy—Call the priority queueing policy map in which you configured the priority command so you can apply priority queueing to a subset of shaped traffic.

4. service-policy—Assigns the policy map to an interface or globally.

Examples

The following example enables traffic shaping for all traffic on the outside interface, and prioritizes traffic within VPN tunnel-grp1 with the DSCP bit set to ef:

hostname(config)# class-map TG1-voice
hostname(config-cmap)# match tunnel-group tunnel-grp1
hostname(config-cmap)# match dscp ef

hostname(config)# policy-map priority-sub-policy
hostname(config-pmap)# class TG1-voice
hostname(config-pmap-c)# priority

hostname(config-pmap-c)# policy-map shape_policy
hostname(config-pmap)# class class-default
hostname(config-pmap-c)# shape
hostname(config-pmap-c)# service-policy priority-sub-policy

hostname(config-pmap-c)# service-policy shape_policy interface outside

Related Commands

Command
Description

class (policy-map)

Identifies a class map for a policy map.

clear configure service-policy

Clears service policy configurations.

clear service-policy

Clears service policy statistics.

policy-map

Identifies actions to perform on class maps.

priority

Enables priority queueing.

service-policy (global)

Applies a policy map to an interface.

shape

Enables traffic shaping.

show running-config service-policy

Displays the service policies configured in the running configuration.

show service-policy

Displays the service policy statistics.


service-policy (global)

To activate a policy map globally on all interfaces or on a targeted interface, use the service-policy command in global configuration mode. To disable the service policy, use the no form of this command. Use the service-policy command to enable a set of policies on an interface.

service-policy policymap_name [ global | interface intf ]

no service-policy policymap_name [ global | interface intf ]

Syntax Description

policymap_name

Specifies the policy map name that you configured in the policy-map command. You can only specify a Layer 3/4 policy map, and not an inspection policy map (policy-map type inspect).

global

Applies the policy map to all interfaces.

interface intf

Applies the policy map to a specific interface.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Global configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

To enable the service policy, use the Modular Policy Framework:

1. class-map—Identify the traffic on which you want to perform priority queueing.

2. policy-map—Identify the actions associated with each class map.

a. class—Identify the class map on which you want to perform actions.

b. commands for supported features—For a given class map, you can configure many actions for various features, including QoS, application inspection, CSC or AIP SSM, TCP and UDP connections limits and timeout, and TCP normalization. See the Cisco Security Appliance Command Line Configuration Guide for more details about the commands available for each feature.

3. service-policy—Assigns the policy map to an interface or globally.

Interface service policies take precedence over the global service policy for a given feature. For example, if you have a global policy with inspections, and an interface policy with TCP normalization, then both inspections and TCP normalization are applied to the interface. However, if you have a global policy with inspections, and an interface policy with inspections, then only the interface policy inspections are applied to that interface.

By default, the configuration includes a global policy that matches all default application inspection traffic and applies inspection to the traffic globally. You can only apply one global policy, so if you want to alter the global policy, you need to either edit the default policy or disable it and apply a new one.

The default service policy includes the following command:

service-policy global_policy global

Examples

The following example shows how to enable the inbound_policy policy map on the outside interface:

hostname(config)# service-policy inbound_policy interface outside

The following commands disable the default global policy, and enables a new one called new_global_policy on all other security appliance interfaces:

hostname(config)# no service-policy global_policy global
hostname(config)# service-policy new_global_policy global

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear configure service-policy

Clears service policy configurations.

clear service-policy

Clears service policy statistics.

service-policy (class)

Applies a hierarchical policy under another policy map.

show running-config service-policy

Displays the service policies configured in the running configuration.

show service-policy

Displays the service policy statistics.


session

To establish a Telnet session to an intelligent SSM, such as an AIP SSM or a CSC SSM, use the session command in privileged EXEC mode.

session slot [do | ip]

Syntax Description

do

Executes a command on the SSM specified by the slot argument. Do not use the do keyword unless you are advised to do so by Cisco TAC.

ip

Configures logging IP addresses for the SSM specified by the slot argument. Do not use the ip keyword unless you are advised to do so by Cisco TAC.

slot

Specifies the SSM slot number, which is always 1.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.

7.1(1)

The do and ip keywords were added. These keywords are for use only when advised to do so by Cisco TAC.


Usage Guidelines

This command is only available when the SSM is in the Up state. See the show module command for state information.

To end a session, enter exit or Ctrl-Shift-6 then the X key.

Examples

The following example sessions to an SSM in slot 1:

hostname# session 1
Opening command session with slot 1.
Connected to slot 1. Escape character sequence is 'CTRL-^X'.

Related Commands

Command
Description

debug session-command

Shows debug messages for sessions.


set connection

To specify connection limits within a policy map for a traffic class, use the set connection command in class configuration mode. To remove these specifications, thereby allowing unlimited connections, use the no form of this command.

set connection {[conn-max n] [embryonic-conn-max n] [per-client-embryonic-max n] [per-client-max n] [random-sequence-number {enable | disable}]}

no set connection {[conn-max n] [embryonic-conn-max n] [per-client-embryonic-max n] [per-client-max n] [random-sequence-number {enable | disable}]}

Syntax Description

conn-max n

The maximum number of simultaneous TCP and/or UDP connections that are allowed, between 0 and 65535. The default is 0, which allows unlimited connections. For example, if two servers are configured to allow simultaneous TCP and/or UDP connections, the connection limit is applied to each configured server separately.

embryonic-conn-max n

The maximum number of simultaneous embryonic connections allowed, between 0 and 65535. The default is 0, which allows unlimited connections.

per-client-embryonic-max n

Sets the maximum number of simultaneous embryonic connections allowed per client, between 0 and 65535. A client is defined as the host that sends the initial packet of a connection (that builds the new connection) through the security appliance. If an access-list is used with a class-map to match traffic for this feature, the embryonic limit is applied per-host, and not the cumulative embryonic connections of all clients that match the access list. The default is 0, which allows unlimited connections. This keyword is not available for management class maps.

per-client-max n

Sets the maximum number of simultaneous connections allowed per client, between 0 and 65535. A client is defined as the host that sends the initial packet of a connection (that builds the new connection) through the security appliance. If an access-list is used with a class-map to match traffic for this feature, the connection limit is applied per-host, and not the cumulative connections of all clients that match the access list. The default is 0, which allows unlimited connections. This keyword is not available for management class maps.

random-sequence-number {enable | disable}

Enable or disable TCP sequence number randomization. This keyword is not available for management class maps. See the "Usage Guidelines" section for more information.


Defaults

For the conn-max, embryonic-conn-max, per-client-embryonic-max, and per-client-max parameters, the default value of n is 0, which allows unlimited connections.

Sequence number randomization is enabled by default.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Class configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.

7.1(1)

The per-client-embryonic-max and per-client-max keywords were added.


Usage Guidelines

Configure this command using Modular Policy Framework. First define the traffic to which you want to apply the timeout using the class-map command (for through traffic) or class-map type management command (for management traffic). Then enter the policy-map command to define the policy, and enter the class command to reference the class map. In class configuration mode, you can enter the set connection command. Finally, apply the policy map to an interface using the service-policy command. For more information about how Modular Policy Framework works, see the Cisco Security Appliance Command Line Configuration Guide.


Note You can also configure maximum connections, maximum embryonic connections, and TCP sequence randomization in the NAT configuration. If you configure these settings for the same traffic using both methods, then the security appliance uses the lower limit. For TCP sequence randomization, if it is disabled using either method, then the security appliance disables TCP sequence randomization.


TCP Intercept Overview

Limiting the number of embryonic connections protects you from a DoS attack. The security appliance uses the per-client limits and the embryonic connection limit to trigger TCP Intercept, which protects inside systems from a DoS attack perpetrated by flooding an interface with TCP SYN packets. An embryonic connection is a connection request that has not finished the necessary handshake between source and destination. TCP Intercept uses the SYN cookies algorithm to prevent TCP SYN-flooding attacks. A SYN-flooding attack consists of a series of SYN packets usually originating from spoofed IP addresses. The constant flood of SYN packets keeps the server SYN queue full, which prevents it from servicing connection requests. When the embryonic connection threshold of a connection is crossed, the security appliance acts as a proxy for the server and generates a SYN-ACK response to the client SYN request. When the security appliance receives an ACK back from the client, it can then authenticate the client and allow the connection to the server.

Disabling TCP Intercept for Management Packets for Clientless SSL Compatibility

By default, TCP management connections have TCP Intercept always enabled. When TCP Intercept is enabled, it intercepts the 3-way TCP connection establishment handshake packets and thus deprives the security appliance from processing the packets for clientless SSL. Clientless SSL requires the ability to process the 3-way handshake packets to provide selective ACK and other TCP options for clientless SSL connections. To disable TCP Intercept for management traffic, you can set the embryonic connection limit; only after the embryonic connection limit is reached is TCP Intercept enabled.

TCP Sequence Randomization Overview

Each TCP connection has two ISNs: one generated by the client and one generated by the server. The security appliance randomizes the ISN of the TCP SYN passing in both the inbound and outbound directions.

Randomizing the ISN of the protected host prevents an attacker from predecting the next ISN for a new connection and potentially hijacking the new session.

TCP initial sequence number randomization can be disabled if required. For example:

If another in-line firewall is also randomizing the initial sequence numbers, there is no need for both firewalls to be performing this action, even though this action does not affect the traffic.

If you use eBGP multi-hop through the security appliance, and the eBGP peers are using MD5. Randomization breaks the MD5 checksum.

You use a WAAS device that requires the security appliance not to randomize the sequence numbers of connections.

Examples

The following is an example of the use of the set connection command configure the maximum number of simultaneous connections as 256 and to disable TCP sequence number randomization:

hostname(config)# policy-map localpolicy1
hostname(config-pmap)# class local_server
hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection conn-max 256 random-sequence-number disable
hostname(config-pmap-c)# 

The following is an example of the use of the set connection command in a service policy that diverts traffic to a CSC SSM. The set connection command restricts each client whose traffic the CSC SSM scans to a maximum of five connections.

hostname(config)# policy-map csc_policy
hostname(config-pmap)# class local_server
hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection per-client-max 5
hostname(config-pmap-c)# csc fail-close
hostname(config-pmap-c)# 

You can enter this command with multiple parameters or you can enter each parameter as a separate command. The security appliance combines the commands into one line in the running configuration. For example, if you entered the following two commands in class configuration mode:

hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection conn-max 600
hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection embryonic-conn-max 50

The output of the show running-config policy-map command would display the result of the two commands in a single, combined command:

set connection conn-max 600 embryonic-conn-max 50

Related Commands

Command
Description

class

Specifies a class-map to use for traffic classification.

clear configure policy-map

Removes all policy-map configuration, except that if a policy-map is in use in a service-policy command, that policy-map is not removed.

policy-map

Configures a policy; that is, an association of a traffic class and one or more actions.

show running-config policy-map

Displays all current policy-map configurations.

show service-policy

Displays service policy configuration. Use the set connection keyword to view policies that include the set connection command.


set connection advanced-options

To specify advanced TCP connection options within a policy-map for a traffic class, use the set connection advanced-options command in class mode. To remove advanced TCP connection options for a traffic class within a policy map, use the no form of this command.

set connection advanced-options tcp-mapname

no set connection advanced-options tcp-mapname

Syntax Description

tcp-mapname

Name of a TCP map in which advanced TCP connection options are configured.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Class


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

You must have configured the policy-map command and the class command, as well as the TCP map name, before issuing this command. See the description of the tcp-map command for detailed information.

Examples

The following example shows the use of the set connection advanced-options command to specify the use of a TCP map named localmap:

hostname(config)# access-list http-server permit tcp any host 10.1.1.1
hostname(config)# class-map http-server
hostname(config-cmap)# match access-list http-server
hostname(config-cmap)# exit
hostname(config)# tcp-map localmap
hostname(config)# policy-map global_policy global
hostname(config-pmap)# description This policy map defines a policy concerning connection 
to http server.
hostname(config-pmap)# class http-server
hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection advanced-options localmap
hostname(config-pmap-c)# 

Related Commands

Command
Description

class

Specifies a class-map to use for traffic classification.

class-map

Configures a traffic class by issuing at most one (with the exception of tunnel-group and default-inspection-traffic) match command, specifying match criteria, in the class-map mode.

clear configure policy-map

Remove all policy-map configuration, except that if a policy-map is in use in a service-policy command, that policy-map is not removed.

policy-map

Configures a policy; that is, an association of a traffic class and one or more actions.

show running-config policy-map

Display all current policy-map configurations.


set connection decrement-ttl

To decrement the time to live value within a policy map for a traffic class, use the set connection decrement-ttl command in class configuration mode. To not decrement the time to live, use the no form of this command.

set connection decrement-ttl

no set connection decrement-ttl

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

By default, the security appliance does not decrement the time to live.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Class configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.2(2)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

This command, along with the icmp unreachable command, is required to allow a traceroute through the security appliance that shows the security appliance as one of the hops.

Examples

The following example enables time to live decrements and sets the ICMP unreachable rate limit:

hostname(config)# policy-map localpolicy1
hostname(config-pmap)# class local_server
hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection decrement-ttl
hostname(config-pmap-c)# exit
hostname(config)# icmp unreachable rate-limit 50 burst-size 6

Related Commands

Command
Description

class

Specifies a class map to use for traffic classification.

clear configure policy-map

Removes all policy map configuration, except if a policy map is in use in a service-policy command, that policy map is not removed.

icmp unreachable

Controls the rate at which ICMP unreachables are allowed through the security appliance.

policy-map

Configures a policy; that is, an association of a traffic class and one or more actions.

show running-config policy-map

Displays all current policy map configurations.

show service-policy

Displays service policy configuration.


set connection timeout

To specify connection timeouts within a policy map for a traffic class, use the set connection timeout command in class configuration mode. To remove the timeout, use the no form of this command.

set connection timeout {[embryonic hh:mm:ss] [tcp hh:mm:ss [reset]] [half-closed hh:mm:ss] [dcd [retry_interval [max_retries]]]}

no set connection timeout {[embryonic hh:mm:ss] [tcp hh:mm:ss [reset]] [half-closed hh:mm:ss] [dcd [retry_interval [max_retries]]]}

Syntax Description

dcd

Enables dead connection detection (DCD). DCD detects a dead connection and allows it to expire, without expiring connections that can still handle traffic. You configure DCD when you want idle, but valid connections to persist. After a TCP connection times out, the security appliance sends DCD probes to the end hosts to determine the validity of the connection. If one of the end hosts fails to respond after the maximum retries are exhausted, the security appliance frees the connection. If both end hosts respond that the connection is valid, the security appliance updates the activity timeout to the current time and reschedules the idle timeout accordingly.

embryonic hh:mm:ss

Sets the timeout period until a TCP embryonic (half-open) connection is closed, between 0:0:5 and 1193:0:0. The default is 0:0:30. You can also set the value to 0, which means the connection never times out. A TCP connection for which a three-way handshake is not complete is an embryonic connection.

half-closed hh:mm:ss

Sets the idle timeout period until a half-closed connection is closed, between 0:5:0 and 1193:0:0. The default is 0:10:0. You can also set the value to 0, which means the connection never times out. Half-closed connections are not affected by DCD. Also, the security appliance does not send a reset when taking down half-closed connections.

max_retries

Sets the number of consecutive failed retries for DCD before declaring the connection as dead. The minimum value is 1 and the maximum value is 255. The default is 5.

reset

Sends a TCP RST packet to both end systems after TCP idle connections are removed.

retry_interval

Time duration in hh:mm:ss format to wait after each unresponsive DCD probe before sending another probe, between 0:0:1 and 24:0:0. The default is 0:0:15.

tcp hh:mm:ss

Sets the idle timeout period after which an established connection closes.


Defaults

The default embryonic timeout is 30 seconds.

The default half-closed idle timeout is 10 minutes.

The default dcd max_retries value is 5.

The default dcd retry_interval value is 15 seconds.

The default tcp idle timeout is 1 hour.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Class configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.

7.2(1)

Support for DCD was added.


Usage Guidelines

Configure this command using Modular Policy Framework. First define the traffic to which you want to apply the timeout using the class-map command. Then enter the policy-map command to define the policy, and enter the class command to reference the class map. In class configuration mode, you can enter the set connection timeout command. Finally, apply the policy map to an interface using the service-policy command. For more information about how Modular Policy Framework works, see the Cisco Security Appliance Command Line Configuration Guide.

Enabling DCD changes the behavior of idle-timeout handling in the TCP normalizer. DCD probing resets the idle timeout on the connections seen in the show conn command. To determine when a connection that has exceeded the configured timeout value in the timeout command but is kept alive due to DCD probing, the show service-policy command includes counters to show the amount of activity from DCD.

Examples

The following example sets the connection timeouts for all traffic:

hostname(config)# class-map CONNS
hostname(config-cmap)# match any
hostname(config-cmap)# policy-map CONNS
hostname(config-pmap)# class CONNS
hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection timeout tcp 2:0:0 embryonic 0:40:0 half-closed 
0:20:0 dcd
hostname(config-pmap-c)# service-policy CONNS interface outside

You can enter set connection commands with multiple parameters or you can enter each parameter as a separate command. The security appliance combines the commands into one line in the running configuration. For example, if you entered the following two commands in class configuration mode:

hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection timeout tcp 2:0:0
hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection timeout embryonic 0:40:0

the output of the show running-config policy-map command would display the result of the two commands in a single, combined command:

set connection timeout tcp 2:0:0 embryonic 0:40:0

Related Commands

Command
Description

class

Specifies a class-map to use for traffic classification.

clear configure policy-map

Remove all policy-map configuration, except that if a policy-map is in use in a service-policy command, that policy-map is not removed.

policy-map

Configures a policy; that is, an association of a traffic class and one or more actions.

set connection

Configure connection values.

show running-config policy-map

Display all current policy-map configurations.

show service-policy

Displays counters for DCD and other service activity.


set metric

To set the metric value for a routing protocol, use the set metric command in route-map configuration mode. To return to the default metric value, use the no form of this command.

set metric value

no set metric value

Syntax Description

value

Metric value.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Route-map configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

Preexisting

This command was preexisting.


Usage Guidelines

The no set metric value command allows you to return to the default metric value. In this context, the value is an integer from 0 to 4294967295.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure a route map for OSPF routing:

hostname(config)# route-map maptag1 permit 8
hostname(config-route-map)# set metric 5
hostname(config-route-map)# match metric 5
hostname(config-route-map)# show route-map
route-map maptag1 permit 8
set metric 5
match metric 5
hostname(config-route-map)# exit
hostname(config)# 

Related Commands

Command
Description

match interface

Distributes any routes that have their next hop out one of the interfaces specified,

match ip next-hop

Distributes any routes that have a next-hop router address that is passed by one of the access lists specified.

route-map

Defines the conditions for redistributing routes from one routing protocol into another.


set metric-type

To specify the type of OSPF metric routes, use the set metric-type command in route-map configuration mode. To return to the default setting, use the no form of this command.

set metric-type {type-1 | type-2}

no set metric-type

Syntax Description

type-1

Specifies the type of OSPF metric routes that are external to a specified autonomous system.

type-2

Specifies the type of OSPF metric routes that are external to a specified autonomous system.


Defaults

The default is type-2.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Route-map configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

Preexisting

This command was preexisting.


Examples

The following example shows how to configure a route map for OSPF routing:

hostname(config)# route-map maptag1 permit 8
hostname(config-route-map)# set metric 5
hostname(config-route-map)# match metric 5
hostname(config-route-map)# set metric-type type-2
hostname(config-route-map)# show route-map
route-map maptag1 permit 8
  set metric 5
  set metric-type type-2
  match metric 5
hostname(config-route-map)# exit
hostname(config)# 

Related Commands

Command
Description

match interface

Distributes any routes that have their next hop out one of the interfaces specified,

route-map

Defines the conditions for redistributing routes from one routing protocol into another.

set metric

Specifies the metric value in the destination routing protocol for a route map.


setup

To configure a minimal configuration for the security appliance using interactive prompts, enter the setup command in global configuration mode. This configuration provides connectivity to use ASDM. See also the configure factory-default command to restore the default configuration.

setup

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Global configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

Preexisting

This command was preexisting.


Usage Guidelines

The setup dialog automatically appears at boot time if there is no startup configuration in Flash memory.

Before you can use the setup command, you must have an inside interface already configured. The PIX 500 series default configuration includes an inside interface (Ethernet 1), but the ASA 550 series default configuration does not. Before using the setup command, enter the interface command for the interface you want to make inside, and then the nameif inside command.

In multiple context mode, you can use the setup command in the system execution space and for each context.

When you enter the setup command, you are asked for the information in Table 24-1. The system setup command includes a subset of these prompts. If there is already a configuration for the prompted parameter, it appears in barckets so you can either accept it as the default or override it by entering something new.

Table 24-1 Setup Prompts 

Prompt
Description
Pre-configure Firewall 
now through 
interactive prompts 
[yes]?

Enter yes or no. If you enter yes, the setup dialog continues. If no, the setup dialog stops and the global configuration prompt (hostname(config)#) appears.

Firewall Mode 
[Routed]:

Enter routed or transparent.

Enable password:

Enter an enable password. (The password must have at least three characters.)

Allow password 
recovery [yes]?

Enter yes or no.

Clock (UTC):

You cannot enter anything in this field. UTC time is used by default.

Year:

Enter the year using four digits, for example, 2005. The year range is 1993 to 2035.

Month:

Enter the month using the first three characters of the month; for example, Sep for September.

Day:

Enter the day of the month, from 1 to 31.

Time:

Enter the hour, minutes, and seconds in 24-hour time format. For example, enter 20:54:44 for 8:54 p.m and 44 seconds.

Inside IP address:

Enter the IP address for the inside interface.

Inside network mask:

Enter the network mask that applies to the inside IP address. You must specify a valid network mask, such as 255.0.0.0 or 255.255.0.0.

Host name:

Enter the hostname that you want to display in the command line prompt.

Domain name:

Enter the domain name of the network on which the security appliance runs.

IP address of host 
running Device 
Manager:

Enter the IP address of the host that needs to access ASDM.

Use this configuration 
and write to flash?

Enter yes or no. If you enter yes, the inside interface is enabled and the requested configuration is written to the Flash partition.

If you enter no, the setup dialog repeats, beginning with the first question:

Pre-configure Firewall now through interactive prompts [yes]?

Enter no to exit the setup dialog or yes to repeat it.


Examples

This example shows how to complete the setup command prompts:

hostname(config)# setup
Pre-configure Firewall now through interactive prompts [yes]? yes 
Firewall Mode [Routed]: routed
Enable password [<use current password>]: writer
Allow password recovery [yes]? yes
Clock (UTC):
   Year: 2005
   Month: Nov
   Day: 15
   Time: 10:0:0
Inside IP address: 192.168.1.1
Inside network mask: 255.255.255.0
Host name: tech_pubs
Domain name: your_company.com
IP address of host running Device Manager: 10.1.1.1

The following configuration will be used:
Enable password: writer
Allow password recovery: yes
Clock (UTC): 20:54:44 Sep 17 2005
Firewall Mode: Routed
Inside IP address: 192.168.1.1
Inside network mask: 255.255.255.0
Host name: tech_pubs
Domain name: your_company.com
IP address of host running Device Manager: 10.1.1.1

Use this configuration and write to flash? yes

Related Commands

Command
Description

configure factory-default

Restores the default configuration.


shape

To enable QoS traffic shaping, use the shape command in class configuration mode. If you have a device that transmits packets at a high speed, such as a security appliance with Fast Ethernet, and it is connected to a low speed device such as a cable modem, then the cable modem is a bottleneck at which packets are frequently dropped. To manage networks with differing line speeds, you can configure the security appliance to transmit packets at a fixed slower rate, called traffic shaping. To remove this configuration, use the no form of this command.

shape average rate [burst_size]

no shape average rate [burst_size]

Syntax Description

average rate

Sets the average rate of traffic in bits per second over a given fixed time period, between 64000 and 154400000. Specify a value that is a multiple of 8000. See the "Usage Guidelines" section for more information about how the time period is calculated.

burst_size

Sets the average burst size in bits that can be transmitted over a given fixed time period, between 2048 and 154400000. Specify a value that is a multiple of 128. If you do not specify the burst_size, the default value is equivalent to 4-milliseconds of traffic at the specified average rate. For example, if the average rate is 1000000 bits per second, 4 ms worth = 1000000 * 4/1000 = 4000.


Defaults

If you do not specify the burst_size, the default value is equivalent to 4-milliseconds of traffic at the specified average rate. For example, if the average rate is 1000000 bits per second, 4 ms worth = 1000000 * 4/1000 = 4000.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Class configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.2(4)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

To enable traffic shaping, use the Modular Policy Framework:

1. policy-map—Identify the actions associated with the class-default class map.

a. class class-default—Identify the class-default class map on which you want to perform actions.

b. shape—Apply traffic shaping to the class map.

c. (Optional) service-policy—Call a different policy map in which you configured the priority command so you can apply priority queueing to a subset of shaped traffic.

2. service-policy—Assigns the policy map to an interface or globally.

Traffic Shaping Overview

Traffic shaping is used to match device and link speeds, thereby controlling packet loss, variable delay, and link saturation, which can cause jitter and delay.

Traffic shaping must be applied to all outgoing traffic on a physical interface or in the case of the ASA 5505, on a VLAN. You cannot configure traffic shaping for specific types of traffic.

Traffic shaping is implemented when packets are ready to be transmitted on an interface, so the rate calculation is performed based on the actual size of a packet to be transmitted, including all the possible overhead such as the IPSec header and L2 header.

The shaped traffic includes both through-the-box and from-the-box traffic.

The shape rate calculation is based on the standard token bucket algorithm. The token bucket size is twice the burst size value. See the Cisco Security Appliance Command Line Configuration Guide for more information about the token bucket.

When bursty traffic exceeds the specified shape rate, packets are queued and transmitted later. Following are some characteristics regarding the shape queue (for information about hierarchical priority queueing, see the priority command):

The queue size is calculated based on the shape rate. The queue can hold the equivalent of 200-milliseconds worth of shape rate traffic, assuming a 1500-byte packet. The minimum queue size is 64.

When the queue limit is reached, packets are tail-dropped.

Certain critical keep-alive packets such as OSPF Hello packets are never dropped.

The time interval is derived by time_interval = burst_size / average_rate. The larger the time interval is, the burstier the shaped traffic might be, and the longer the link might be idle. The effect can be best understood using the following exaggerated example:

Average Rate = 1000000

Burst Size = 1000000

In the above example, the time interval is 1 second, which means, 1 Mbps of traffic can be bursted out within the first 10 milliseconds of the 1-second interval on a 100 Mbps FE link and leave the remaining 990 milliseconds idle without being able to send any packets until the next time interval. So if there is delay-sensitive traffic such as voice traffic, the Burst Size should be reduced compared to the average rate so the time interval is reduced.

How QoS Features Interact

You can configure each of the QoS features alone if desired for the security appliance. Often, though, you configure multiple QoS features on the security appliance so you can prioritize some traffic, for example, and prevent other traffic from causing bandwidth problems.

See the following supported feature combinations per interface:

Standard priority queuing (for specific traffic) + Policing (for the rest of the traffic).

You cannot configure priority queueing and policing for the same set of traffic.

Traffic shaping (for all traffic on an interface) + Hierarchical priority queueing (for a subset of traffic).

You cannot configure traffic shaping and standard priority queueing for the same interface; only hierarchical priority queueing is allowed. For example, if you configure standard priority queueing for the global policy, and then configure traffic shaping for a specific interface, the feature you configured last is rejected because the global policy overlaps the interface policy.

Typically, if you enable traffic shaping, you do not also enable policing for the same traffic, although the security appliance does not restrict you from configuring this.

Examples

The following example enables traffic shaping for all traffic on the outside interface, and prioritizes traffic within VPN tunnel-grp1 with the DSCP bit set to ef:

hostname(config)# class-map TG1-voice
hostname(config-cmap)# match tunnel-group tunnel-grp1
hostname(config-cmap)# match dscp ef

hostname(config)# policy-map priority-sub-policy
hostname(config-pmap)# class TG1-voice
hostname(config-pmap-c)# priority

hostname(config-pmap-c)# policy-map shape_policy
hostname(config-pmap)# class class-default
hostname(config-pmap-c)# shape
hostname(config-pmap-c)# service-policy priority-sub-policy

hostname(config-pmap-c)# service-policy shape_policy interface outside

Related Commands

Command
Description

class

Identifies the class map on which you want to perform actions in a policy map.

police

Enables QoS policing.

policy-map

Identifies actions to apply to traffic in a service policy.

priority

Enables QoS priority queueing.

service-policy (class)

Applies a hierarchical policy map.

service-policy (global)

Applies a service policy to interface(s).

show service-policy

Shows QoS statistics.


show aaa local user

To show the list of usernames that are currently locked, or to show details about the username, use the show aaa local user command in global configuration mode.

show aaa local user [locked]

Syntax Description

locked

(Optional) Shows the list of usernames that are currently locked.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Global configuration


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

If you omit the optional keyword locked, the security appliance displays the failed-attempts and lockout status details for all AAA local users.

You can specify a single user by using the username option or all users with the all option.

This command affects only the status of users that are locked out.

The administrator cannot be locked out of the device.

Examples

The following example shows use of the show aaa local user command to display the lockout status of all usernames:

This example shows the use of the show aaa local user command to display the number of failed authentication attempts and lockout status details for all AAA local users, after the limit has been set to 5:

hostname(config)# aaa local authentication attempts max-fail 5
hostname(config)# show aaa local user
Lock-time  Failed-attempts      Locked  User
    -                   6       Y       test
    -                   2       N       mona
    -                   1       N       cisco
    -                   4       N       newuser
hostname(config)# 

This example shows the use of the show aaa local user command with the lockout keyword to display the number of failed authentication attempts and lockout status details only for any locked-out AAA local users, after the limit has been set to 5:

hostname(config)# aaa local authentication attempts max-fail 5
hostname(config)# show aaa local user
Lock-time  Failed-attempts      Locked  User
    -                   6       Y       test
hostname(config)# 

Related Commands

Command
Description

aaa local authentication attempts max-fail

Configures the maximum number of times a user can enter a wrong password before being locked out.

clear aaa local user fail-attempts

Resets the number of failed attempts to 0 without modifying the lockout status.

clear aaa local user lockout

Clears th e lockout status of the specified user or all users and sets their failed attempts counters to 0.


show aaa-server

To display AAA server statistics for AAA servers, use the show aaa-server command in privileged EXEC mode:

show aaa-server [LOCAL | groupname [host hostname] | protocol protocol]

Syntax Description

LOCAL

(Optional) Shows statistics for the LOCAL user database.

groupname

(Optional) Shows statistics for servers in a group.

host hostname

(Optional) Shows statistics for a particular server in the group.

protocol protocol

(Optional) Shows statistics for servers of the specified protocol:

http form

kerberos

ldap

nt

radius

sdi

tacacs+


Defaults

By default, all AAA server statistics display.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

Preexisting

This command was preexisting.

7.1(1)

The http form protocol was added.


Examples

This example shows the use of the show aaa-server command to display statistics for a particular host in server group group1:

hostname(config)# show aaa-server group1 host 192.68.125.60
Server Group:          			group1
Server Protocol:       			RADIUS
Server Address:       			192.68.125.60
Server port:        			1645      
Server status:     			ACTIVE/FAILED. Last transaction (success) at 11:10:08 UTC  Fri Aug 22
Number of pending requests 20
Average round trip time					4ms
Number of authentication requests					20
Number of authorization requests					 0
Number of accounting requests					 0
Number of retransmissions					1
Number of accepts					16
Number of rejects					4
Number of challenges						5
Number of malformed responses					0
Number of bad authenticators						0
Number of pending requests					0
Number of timeouts					0
Number of unrecognized responses					0
hostname(config)# 

This example shows the use of the show aaa-server command to show the statistics for all servers in a small, inactive system:

hostname(config)# show aaa-server
Server Group: 					LOCAL
Server Protocol:			 		Local database
Server Address: 					None
Server port:					None
Server status:					ACTIVE, Last transaction at unknown
Number of pending requests									0
Average round trip time									0ms
Number of authentication requests									0
Number of authorization requests									0
Number of accounting requests									0
Number of retransmissions									0
Number of accepts									0
Number of rejects									0
Number of challenges									0
Number of malformed responses									0
Number of bad authenticators 									0
Number of timeouts									0
Number of unrecognized responses									0
hostname(config)#

Related Commands

show running-config aaa-server

Display statistics for all servers in the indicated server group or for a particular server.

clear aaa-server statistics

Clear the AAA server statistics.


show access-list

To display the counters for an access list, use the show access-list command in privileged EXEC mode.

show access-list id

Syntax Description

id

Identifies the access list.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

Preexisting

This command was preexisting.


Examples

The following is sample output from the show access-list command:

hostname# show access-list
access-list cached ACL log flows: total 0, denied 0 (deny-flow-max 4096)
             alert-interval 300
access-list 101; 10 elements
access-list 101 line 1 extended permit tcp any eq www any (hitcnt=0) 0xa14fc533 
access-list 101 line 2 extended permit tcp any eq www any eq www (hitcnt=0) 0xaa73834e 
access-list 101 line 3 extended permit tcp any eq www any range telnet www (hitcnt=0) 
0x49ac02e6 
access-list 101 line 4 extended permit tcp any range telnet www any range telnet www 
(hitcnt=0) 0xa0021a9f 
access-list 101 line 5 extended permit udp any range biff www any (hitcnt=0) 0xf89a7328 
access-list 101 line 6 extended permit udp any lt ntp any (hitcnt=0) 0x8983c43 access-list 
101 line 7 extended permit udp any any lt ntp (hitcnt=0) 0xf361ffb6 
access-list 101 line 8 extended permit udp any any range ntp biff (hitcnt=0) 0x219581 
access-list 101 line 9 extended permit icmp any any (hitcnt=0) 0xe8fa08e1 
access-list 101 line 10 extended permit icmp any any echo (hitcnt=0) 0x2eb8deea 
access-list 102; 1 elements access-list 102 line 1 extended permit icmp any any echo 
(hitcnt=0) 0x59e2fea8 

The output contains a unique hexamdecimal identifier for each access control entry at the end of each 
line. 

Related Commands

Command
Description

access-list ethertype

Configures an access list that controls traffic based on its EtherType.

access-list extended

Adds an access list to the configuration and configures policy for IP traffic through the firewall.

clear access-list

Clears an access list counter.

clear configure access-list

Clears an access list from the running configuration.

show running-config access-list

Displays the current running access-list configuration.


show activation-key

To display the commands in the configuration for features that are enabled by your activation key, including the number of contexts allowed, use the show activation-key command in privileged EXEC mode.

show activation-key

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

This command has no default settings.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC

·

·

·

·

·


Command History

Release
Modification

PIX Version 7.0

Support for this command was introduced on the security appliance.


Usage Guidelines

The show activation-key command output indicates the status of the activation key as follows:

If the activation key in the security appliance Flash file system is the same as the activation key running on the security appliance, then the show activation-key output reads as follows:

The flash activation key is the SAME as the running key.

If the activation key in the security appliance Flash file system is different from the activation key running on the security appliance, then the show activation-key output reads as follows:

The flash activation key is DIFFERENT from the running key.
The flash activation key takes effect after the next reload.

If you downgrade your activation key, the display shows that the running key (the old key) differs from the key that is stored in the Flash (the new key). When you restart, the security appliance uses the new key.

If you upgrade your key to enable extra features, the new key starts running immediately without a restart.

For the PIX Firewall platform, if there is any change in the failover feature (R/UR/FO) between the new key and the oldkey, it prompts for confimation. If the user enters n, it aborts the change; otherwise it updates the key in the Flash file system. When you restart the security appliance uses the new key.

Examples

This example shows how to display the commands in the configuration for features that are enabled by your activation key:

hostname(config)# show activation-key 
Serial Number:  P3000000134 Running Activation Key: 0xyadayada 0xyadayada 0xyadayada 
0xyadayada 0xyadayada

License Features for this Platform:
Maximum Physical Interfaces : Unlimited
Maximum VLANs               : 50
Inside Hosts                : Unlimited
Failover                    : Enabled
VPN-DES                     : Enabled
VPN-3DES-AES                : Disabled
Cut-through Proxy           : Enabled
Guards                      : Enabled
URL-filtering               : Enabled
Security Contexts           : 20
GTP/GPRS                    : Disabled
VPN Peers                   : 5000

The flash activation key is the SAME as the running key.
hostname(config)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

activation-key

Changes the activation key.


show admin-context

To display the context name currently assigned as the admin context, use the show admin-context command in privileged EXEC mode.

show admin-context

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following is sample output from the show admin-context command. The following example shows the admin context called "admin" and stored in the root directory of flash:

hostname# show admin-context
Admin: admin flash:/admin.cfg

Related Commands

Command
Description

admin-context

Sets the admin context.

changeto

Changes between contexts or the system execution space.

clear configure context

Removes all contexts.

mode

Sets the context mode to single or multiple.

show context

Shows a list of contexts (system execution space) or information about the current context.


show arp

To view the ARP table, use the show arp command in privileged EXEC mode.

show arp

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(8)/7.2(4)

Added dynamic ARP age to the display.


Usage Guidelines

The display output shows dynamic, static, and proxy ARP entries. Dynamic ARP entries include the age of the ARP entry in seconds. Static ARP entries include a dash (-) instead of the age, and proxy ARP entries state "alias."

Examples

The following is sample output from the show arp command. The first entry is a dynamic entry aged 2 seconds. The second entry is a static entry, and the third entry is from proxy ARP.

hostname# show arp
        outside 10.86.194.61 0011.2094.1d2b 2
        outside 10.86.194.1 001a.300c.8000 -
        outside 10.86.195.2 00d0.02a8.440a alias

Related Commands

Command
Description

arp

Adds a static ARP entry.

arp-inspection

For transparent firewall mode, inspects ARP packets to prevent ARP spoofing.

clear arp statistics

Clears ARP statistics.

show arp statistics

Shows ARP statistics.

show running-config arp

Shows the current configuration of the ARP timeout.


show arp-inspection

To view the ARP inspection setting for each interface, use the show arp-inspection command in privileged EXEC mode.

show arp-inspection

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following is sample output from the show arp-inspection command:

hostname# show arp-inspection
interface                arp-inspection         miss
----------------------------------------------------
inside1                  enabled                flood
outside                  disabled                -

The miss column shows the default action to take for non-matching packets when ARP inspection is enabled, either "flood" or "no-flood."

Related Commands

Command
Description

arp

Adds a static ARP entry.

arp-inspection

For transparent firewall mode, inspects ARP packets to prevent ARP spoofing.

clear arp statistics

Clears ARP statistics.

show arp statistics

Shows ARP statistics.

show running-config arp

Shows the current configuration of the ARP timeout.


show arp statistics

To view ARP statistics, use the show arp statistics command in privileged EXEC mode.

show arp statistics

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

Preexisting

This command was preexisting.


Examples

The following is sample output from the show arp statistics command:

hostname# show arp statistics
        Number of ARP entries:
        ASA : 6
        Dropped blocks in ARP: 6
        Maximum Queued blocks: 3
        Queued blocks: 1
        Interface collision ARPs Received: 5
        ARP-defense Gratuitous ARPS sent: 4
        Total ARP retries: 15
        Unresolved hosts: 1
        Maximum Unresolved hosts: 2

Table 2 shows each field description.

Table 24-2 show arp statistics Fields 

Field
Description

Number of ARP entries

The total number of ARP table entries.

Dropped blocks in ARP

The number of blocks that were dropped while IP addresses were being resolved to their corresponding hardware addresses.

Maximum queued blocks

The maximum number of blocks that were ever queued in the ARP module, while waiting for the IP address to be resolved.

Queued blocks

The number of blocks currently queued in the ARP module.

Interface collision ARPs received

The number of ARP packets received at all security appliance interfaces that were from the same IP address as that of a security appliance interface.

ARP-defense gratuitous ARPs sent

The number of gratuitous ARPs sent by the security appliance as part of the ARP-Defense mechanism.

Total ARP retries

The total number of ARP requests sent by the ARP module when the address was not resolved in response to first ARP request.

Unresolved hosts

The number of unresolved hosts for which ARP requests are still being sent out by the ARP module.

Maximum unresolved hosts

The maximum number of unresolved hosts that ever were in the ARP module since it was last cleared or the security appliance booted up.


Related Commands

Command
Description

arp-inspection

For transparent firewall mode, inspects ARP packets to prevent ARP spoofing.

clear arp statistics

Clears ARP statistics and resets the values to zero.

show arp

Shows the ARP table.

show running-config arp

Shows the current configuration of the ARP timeout.


show asdm history

To display the contents of the ASDM history buffer, use the show asdm history command in privileged EXEC mode.

show asdm history [view timeframe] [snapshot] [feature feature] [asdmclient]

Syntax Description

asdmclient

(Optional) Displays the ASDM history data formatted for the ASDM client.

feature feature

(Optional) Limits the history display to the specified feature. The following are valid values for the feature argument:

all—Displays the history for all features (default).

blocks—Displays the history for the system buffers.

cpu—Displays the history for CPU usage.

failover—Displays the history for failover.

ids—Displays the history for IDS.

interface if_name—Displays the history for the specified interface. The if_name argument is the name of the interface as specified by the nameif command.

memory—Displays memory usage history.

perfmon—Displays performance history.

sas—Displays the history for Security Associations.

tunnels—Displays the history for tunnels.

xlates—Displays translation slot history.

snapshot

(Optional) Displays only the last ASDM history data point.

view timeframe

(Optional) Limits the history display to the specified time period. Valid values for the timeframe argument are:

all—all contents in the history buffer (default).

12h—12 hours

5d—5 days

60m—60 minutes

10m—10 minutes


Defaults

If no arguments or keywords are specified, all history information for all features is displayed.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was changed from the show pdm history command to the show asdm history command.


Usage Guidelines

The show asdm history command displays the contents of the ASDM history buffer. Before you can view ASDM history information, you must enable ASDM history tracking using the asdm history enable command.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show asdm history command. It limits the output to data for the outside interface collected during the last 10 minutes.

hostname# show asdm history view 10m feature interface outside

Input KByte Count:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ] 62640 62636 62633 62628 62622 62616 62609 
Output KByte Count:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ] 25178 25169 25165 25161 25157 25151 25147 
Input KPacket Count:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]   752   752   751   751   751   751   751 
Output KPacket Count:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]    55    55    55    55    55    55    55 
Input Bit Rate:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]  3397  2843  3764  4515  4932  5728  4186 
Output Bit Rate:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]  7316  3292  3349  3298  5212  3349  3301 
Input Packet Rate:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     5     4     6     7     6     8     6 
Output Packet Rate:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     1     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Input Error Packet Count:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
No Buffer:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Received Broadcasts:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ] 375974 375954 375935 375902 375863 375833 375794 
Runts:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Giants:       
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
CRC:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Frames:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Overruns:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Underruns:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Output Error Packet Count:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Collisions:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
LCOLL:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Reset:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Deferred:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Lost Carrier:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Hardware Input Queue:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]   128   128   128   128   128   128   128 
Software Input Queue:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Hardware Output Queue:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Software Output Queue:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
Drop KPacket Count:
        [  10s:12:46:41 Mar 1 2005  ]     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 
hostname#  

The following is sample output from the show asdm history command. Like the previous example, it limits the output to data for the outside interface collected during the last 10 minutes. However, in this example the output is formatted for the ASDM client.

hostname# show asdm history view 10m feature interface outside asdmclient

MH|IBC|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|62439|62445|62453|62457|62464|6
2469|62474|62486|62489|62496|62501|62506|62511|62518|62522|62530|62534|62539|62542|62547|6
2553|62556|62562|62568|62574|62581|62585|62593|62598|62604|62609|62616|62622|62628|62633|6
2636|62640|62653|62657|62665|62672|62678|62681|62686|62691|62695|62700|62704|62711|62718|6
2723|62728|62733|62738|62742|62747|62751|62761|62770|62775|
MH|OBC|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|25023|25023|25025|25025|25025|2
5026|25026|25032|25038|25044|25052|25056|25060|25064|25070|25076|25083|25087|25091|25096|2
5102|25106|25110|25114|25118|25122|25128|25133|25137|25143|25147|25151|25157|25161|25165|2
5169|25178|25321|25327|25332|25336|25341|25345|25349|25355|25359|25363|25367|25371|25375|2
5381|25386|25390|25395|25399|25403|25410|25414|25418|25422|
MH|IPC|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|749|749|749|749|749|750|750|750
|750|750|750|750|750|750|750|750|750|750|750|750|751|751|751|751|751|751|751|751|751|751|7
51|751|751|751|751|752|752|752|752|752|752|752|752|752|752|752|752|752|752|753|753|753|753
|753|753|753|753|753|753|753|
MH|OPC|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|5
5|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|55|5
5|55|55|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|56|
MH|IBR|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|7127|5155|6202|3545|5408|3979|4
381|9492|3033|4962|4571|4226|3760|5923|3265|6494|3441|3542|3162|4076|4744|2726|4847|4292|5
401|5166|3735|6659|3837|5260|4186|5728|4932|4515|3764|2843|3397|10768|3080|6309|5969|4472|
2780|4492|3540|3664|3800|3002|6258|5567|4044|4059|4548|3713|3265|4159|3630|8235|6934|4298|
MH|OBR|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|82791|57|1410|588|57|639|0|4698
|5068|4992|6495|3292|3292|3352|5061|4808|5205|3931|3298|3349|5064|3439|3356|3292|3343|3349
|5067|3883|3356|4500|3301|3349|5212|3298|3349|3292|7316|116896|5072|3881|3356|3931|3298|33
49|5064|3292|3349|3292|3292|3349|5061|3883|3356|3931|3452|3356|5064|3292|3349|3292|
MH|IPR|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|12|8|6|5|7|5|6|14|5|7|7|5|6|9|5
|8|6|5|5|7|6|5|6|5|6|7|6|8|6|6|6|8|6|7|6|4|5|19|5|8|7|6|4|7|5|6|6|5|7|8|6|6|7|5|5|7|6|9|7|
6|
MH|OPR|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|12|0|1|0|0|0|0|4|0|2|2|0|0|0|0|
1|1|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|1|0|0|0|0|0|0|1|28|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|
MH|IERR|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|NB|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|RB|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|374874|374911|374943|374967|3750
10|375038|375073|375113|375140|375160|375181|375211|375243|375289|375316|375350|375373|375
395|375422|375446|375481|375498|375535|375561|375591|375622|375654|375701|375738|375761|37
5794|375833|375863|375902|375935|375954|375974|375999|376027|376075|376115|376147|376168|3
76200|376224|376253|376289|376315|376365|376400|376436|376463|376508|376530|376553|376583|
376614|376668|376714|376749|
MH|RNT|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|GNT|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|CRC|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|FRM|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|OR|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|UR|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|OERR|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|COLL|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|LCOLL|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|
MH|RST|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|DEF|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|LCR|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|HIQ|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128
|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|1
28|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|128
|128|128|128|128|128|128|128|
MH|SIQ|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|HOQ|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|SOQ|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
MH|DPC|10|CURFACT|0|CURVAL|0|TIME|1109703031|MAX|60|NUM|60|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|
hostname# 

The following is sample output from the show asdm history command using the snapshot keyword:

hostname# show asdm history view 10m snapshot

Available 4 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 100
Used 4 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 0
Available 80 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 100
Used 80 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 0
Available 256 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 2100
Used 256 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 0
Available 1550 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 7425
Used 1550 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 1279
Available 2560 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 40
Used 2560 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 0
Available 4096 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 30
Used 4096 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 0
Available 8192 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 60
Used 8192 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 0
Available 16384 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 100
Used 16384 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 0
Available 65536 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 10
Used 65536 byte Blocks:  [  10s] : 0
CPU Utilization:  [  10s] : 31
Input KByte Count:  [  10s] : 62930
Output KByte Count:  [  10s] : 26620
Input KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 755
Output KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 58
Input Bit Rate:  [  10s] : 24561
Output Bit Rate:  [  10s] : 518897
Input Packet Rate:  [  10s] : 48
Output Packet Rate:  [  10s] : 114
Input Error Packet Count:  [  10s] : 0
No Buffer:  [  10s] : 0
Received Broadcasts:  [  10s] : 377331
Runts:  [  10s] : 0
Giants:  [  10s] : 0
CRC:  [  10s] : 0
Frames:  [  10s] : 0
Overruns:  [  10s] : 0
Underruns:  [  10s] : 0
Output Error Packet Count:  [  10s] : 0
Collisions:  [  10s] : 0
LCOLL:  [  10s] : 0
Reset:  [  10s] : 0
Deferred:  [  10s] : 0
Lost Carrier:  [  10s] : 0
Hardware Input Queue:  [  10s] : 128
Software Input Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Hardware Output Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Software Output Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Drop KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 0
Input KByte Count:  [  10s] : 3672
Output KByte Count:  [  10s] : 4051
Input KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 19
Output KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 20
Input Bit Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Output Bit Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Input Packet Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Output Packet Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Input Error Packet Count:  [  10s] : 0
No Buffer:  [  10s] : 0
Received Broadcasts:  [  10s] : 1458
Runts:  [  10s] : 1
Giants:  [  10s] : 0
CRC:  [  10s] : 0
Frames:  [  10s] : 0
Overruns:  [  10s] : 0
Underruns:  [  10s] : 0
Output Error Packet Count:  [  10s] : 0
Collisions:  [  10s] : 63
LCOLL:  [  10s] : 0
Reset:  [  10s] : 0
Deferred:  [  10s] : 15
Lost Carrier:  [  10s] : 0
Hardware Input Queue:  [  10s] : 128
Software Input Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Hardware Output Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Software Output Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Drop KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 0
Input KByte Count:  [  10s] : 0
Output KByte Count:  [  10s] : 0
Input KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 0
Output KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 0
Input Bit Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Output Bit Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Input Packet Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Output Packet Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Input Error Packet Count:  [  10s] : 0
No Buffer:  [  10s] : 0
Received Broadcasts:  [  10s] : 0
Runts:  [  10s] : 0
Giants:  [  10s] : 0
CRC:  [  10s] : 0
Frames:  [  10s] : 0
Overruns:  [  10s] : 0
Underruns:  [  10s] : 0
Output Error Packet Count:  [  10s] : 0
Collisions:  [  10s] : 0
LCOLL:  [  10s] : 0
Reset:  [  10s] : 0
Deferred:  [  10s] : 0
Lost Carrier:  [  10s] : 0
Hardware Input Queue:  [  10s] : 128
Software Input Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Hardware Output Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Software Output Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Drop KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 0
Input KByte Count:  [  10s] : 0
Output KByte Count:  [  10s] : 0
Input KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 0
Output KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 0
Input Bit Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Output Bit Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Input Packet Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Output Packet Rate:  [  10s] : 0
Input Error Packet Count:  [  10s] : 0
No Buffer:  [  10s] : 0
Received Broadcasts:  [  10s] : 0
Runts:  [  10s] : 0
Giants:  [  10s] : 0
CRC:  [  10s] : 0
Frames:  [  10s] : 0
Overruns:  [  10s] : 0
Underruns:  [  10s] : 0
Output Error Packet Count:  [  10s] : 0
Collisions:  [  10s] : 0
LCOLL:  [  10s] : 0
Reset:  [  10s] : 0
Deferred:  [  10s] : 0
Lost Carrier:  [  10s] : 0
Hardware Input Queue:  [  10s] : 128
Software Input Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Hardware Output Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Software Output Queue:  [  10s] : 0
Drop KPacket Count:  [  10s] : 0
Available Memory:  [  10s] : 205149944
Used Memory:  [  10s] : 63285512
Xlate Count:  [  10s] : 0
Connection Count:  [  10s] : 0
TCP Connection Count:  [  10s] : 0
UDP Connection Count:  [  10s] : 0
URL Filtering Count:  [  10s] : 0
URL Server Filtering Count:  [  10s] : 0
TCP Fixup Count:  [  10s] : 0
TCP Intercept Count:  [  10s] : 0
HTTP Fixup Count:  [  10s] : 0
FTP Fixup Count:  [  10s] : 0
AAA Authentication Count:  [  10s] : 0
AAA Authorzation Count:  [  10s] : 0
AAA Accounting Count:  [  10s] : 0
Current Xlates:  [  10s] : 0
Max Xlates:  [  10s] : 0
ISAKMP SAs:  [  10s] : 0
IPSec SAs:  [  10s] : 0
L2TP Sessions:  [  10s] : 0
L2TP Tunnels:  [  10s] : 0
hostname# 

Related Commands

Command
Description

asdm history enable

Enables ASDM history tracking.


show asdm image

To the current ASDM software image file, use the show asdm image command in privileged EXEC mode.

show asdm image

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was changed from the show pdm image command to the show asdm image command.


Examples

The following is sample output from the show asdm image command:

hostname# show asdm image

Device Manager image file, flash:/ASDM

Related Commands

Command
Description

asdm image

Specifies the current ASDM image file.


show asdm log_sessions

To display a list of active ASDM logging sessions and their associated session IDs, use the show asdm log_sessions command in privileged EXEC mode.

show asdm log_sessions

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Each active ASDM session has one or more associated ASDM logging sessions. ASDM uses the logging session to retrieve syslog messages from the security appliance. Each ASDM logging session is assigned a unique session ID. You can use this session ID with the asdm disconnect log_session command to terminate the specified session.


Note Because each ASDM session has at least one ASDM logging session, the output for the show asdm sessions and show asdm log_sessions may appear to be the same.


Examples

The following is sample output from the show asdm log_sessions command:

hostname# show asdm log_sessions

0 192.168.1.1
1 192.168.1.2

Related Commands

Command
Description

asdm disconnect log_session

Terminates an active ASDM logging session.


show asdm sessions

To display a list of active ASDM sessions and their associated session IDs, use the show asdm sessions command in privileged EXEC mode.

show asdm sessions

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

The following table shows the modes in which you can enter the command:

Command Mode
Firewall Mode
Security Context
Routed
Transparent
Single
Multiple
Context
System

Privileged EXEC


Command History

Release
Modification

7.0(1)

This command was changed from the show pdm sessions command to the show asdm sessions command.


Usage Guidelines

Each active ASDM session is assigned a unique session ID. You can use this session ID with the asdm disconnect command to terminate the specified session.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show asdm sessions command:

hostname# show asdm sessions

0 192.168.1.1
1 192.168.1.2

Related Commands

Command
Description

asdm disconnect

Terminates an active ASDM session.