Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration Guide for the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, Release 4.1
Implementing Certification Authority Interoperability
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Implementing Certification Authority Interoperability

Contents

Implementing Certification Authority Interoperability

Certification authority (CA) interoperability is provided in support of the IP Security (IPSec), Secure Socket Layer (SSL), and Secure Shell (SSH) protocols. CA interoperability permits Cisco XR 12000 Series Router devices and CAs to communicate so that your device can obtain and use digital certificates from the CA. Although IPSec can be implemented in your network without the use of a CA, using a CA provides manageability and scalability for IPSec.

This module describes the tasks that you need to implement CA interoperability on your Cisco IOS XR software network.


Note


For a complete description of the public key infrastructure (PKI) commands used in this chapter, refer to the Public Key Infrastructure Commands module in Cisco IOS XR System Security Command Reference for the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router. To locate documentation for other commands that appear in this chapter, use the command reference master index, or search online.


Feature History for Implementing Certification Authority Interoperability

Release

Modification

Release 3.2

This feature was introduced.

Release 3.4.0

A procedure was added on how to declare the trustpoint certification authority (CA).

Release 5.2

A section was added on trust pool management

Prerequisites for Implementing Certification Authority

The following prerequisites are required to implement CA interoperability:

  • You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.
  • You must install and activate the Package Installation Envelope (PIE) for the security software. For detailed information about optional PIE installation, refer to Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide for the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router
  • You need to have a CA available to your network before you configure this interoperability feature. The CA must support Cisco Systems PKI protocol, the simple certificate enrollment protocol (SCEP) (formerly called certificate enrollment protocol [CEP]).

Restrictions for Implementing Certification Authority

Cisco IOS XR software does not support CA server public keys greater than 2048 bits.

Information About Implementing Certification Authority

To implement CA, you need to understand the following concepts:

Supported Standards for Certification Authority Interoperability

Cisco supports the following standards:

  • IPSec—IP Security Protocol. IPSec is a framework of open standards that provides data confidentiality, data integrity, and data authentication between participating peers. IPSec provides these security services at the IP layer; it uses Internet Key Exchange (IKE) to handle negotiation of protocols and algorithms based on local policy, and to generate the encryption and authentication keys to be used by IPSec. IPSec can be used to protect one or more data flows between a pair of hosts, a pair of security gateways, or a security gateway and a host.
  • IKE—A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the Internet Security Association Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. Although IKE can be used with other protocols, its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs).
  • Public-Key Cryptography Standard #7 (PKCS #7)—A standard from RSA Data Security Inc. used to encrypt and sign certificate enrollment messages.
  • Public-Key Cryptography Standard #10 (PKCS #10)—A standard syntax from RSA Data Security Inc. for certificate requests.
  • RSA keys—RSA is the public key cryptographic system developed by Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir, and Leonard Adelman. RSA keys come in pairs: one public key and one private key.
  • SSL—Secure Socket Layer protocol.
  • X.509v3 certificates—Certificate support that allows the IPSec-protected network to scale by providing the equivalent of a digital ID card to each device. When two devices want to communicate, they exchange digital certificates to prove their identity (thus removing the need to manually exchange public keys with each peer or specify a shared key at each peer). These certificates are obtained from a CA. X.509 as part of the X.500 standard of the ITU.

Certification Authorities

The following sections provide background information about CAs:

Purpose of CAs

CAs are responsible for managing certificate requests and issuing certificates to participating IPSec network devices. These services provide centralized key management for the participating devices.

CAs simplify the administration of IPSec network devices. You can use a CA with a network containing multiple IPSec-compliant devices, such as routers.

Digital signatures, enabled by public key cryptography, provide a means of digitally authenticating devices and individual users. In public key cryptography, such as the RSA encryption system, each user has a key pair containing both a public and a private key. The keys act as complements, and anything encrypted with one of the keys can be decrypted with the other. In simple terms, a signature is formed when data is encrypted with a user’s private key. The receiver verifies the signature by decrypting the message with the sender’s public key. The fact that the message could be decrypted using the sender’s public key indicates that the holder of the private key, the sender, must have created the message. This process relies on the receiver’s having a copy of the sender’s public key and knowing with a high degree of certainty that it does belong to the sender and not to someone pretending to be the sender.

Digital certificates provide the link. A digital certificate contains information to identify a user or device, such as the name, serial number, company, department, or IP address. It also contains a copy of the entity’s public key. The certificate is itself signed by a CA, a third party that is explicitly trusted by the receiver to validate identities and to create digital certificates.

To validate the signature of the CA, the receiver must first know the CA’s public key. Normally, this process is handled out-of-band or through an operation done at installation. For instance, most web browsers are configured with the public keys of several CAs by default. IKE, an essential component of IPSec, can use digital signatures to authenticate peer devices for scalability before setting up SAs.

Without digital signatures, a user must manually exchange either public keys or secrets between each pair of devices that use IPSec to protect communication between them. Without certificates, every new device added to the network requires a configuration change on every other device with which it communicates securely. With digital certificates, each device is enrolled with a CA. When two devices want to communicate, they exchange certificates and digitally sign data to authenticate each other. When a new device is added to the network, a user simply enrolls that device with a CA, and none of the other devices needs modification. When the new device attempts an IPSec connection, certificates are automatically exchanged and the device can be authenticated.

IPSec Without CAs

Without a CA, if you want to enable IPSec services (such as encryption) between two Cisco routers, you must first ensure that each router has the key of the other router (such as an RSA public key or a shared key). This requirement means that you must manually perform one of the following operations:

  • At each router, enter the RSA public key of the other router.
  • At each router, specify a shared key to be used by both routers.

If you have multiple Cisco routers in a mesh topology and want to exchange IPSec traffic passing among all of those routers, you must first configure shared keys or RSA public keys among all of those routers.

Every time a new router is added to the IPSec network, you must configure keys between the new router and each of the existing routers.

Consequently, the more devices there are that require IPSec services, the more involved the key administration becomes. This approach does not scale well for larger, more complex encrypting networks.

IPSec with CAs

With a CA, you need not configure keys between all the encrypting routers. Instead, you individually enroll each participating router with the CA, requesting a certificate for the router. When this enrollment has been accomplished, each participating router can dynamically authenticate all the other participating routers.

To add a new IPSec router to the network, you need only configure that new router to request a certificate from the CA, instead of making multiple key configurations with all the other existing IPSec routers.

IPSec with Multiple Trustpoint CAs

With multiple trustpoint CAs, you no longer have to enroll a router with the CA that issued a certificate to a peer. Instead, you configure a router with multiple CAs that it trusts. Thus, a router can use a configured CA (a trusted root) to verify certificates offered by a peer that were not issued by the same CA defined in the identity of the router.

Configuring multiple CAs allows two or more routers enrolled under different domains (different CAs) to verify the identity of each other when using IKE to set up IPSec tunnels.

Through SCEP, each router is configured with a CA (the enrollment CA). The CA issues a certificate to the router that is signed with the private key of the CA. To verify the certificates of peers in the same domain, the router is also configured with the root certificate of the enrollment CA.

To verify the certificate of a peer from a different domain, the root certificate of the enrollment CA in the domain of the peer must be configured securely in the router.

During IKE phase one signature verification, the initiator will send the responder a list of its CA certificates. The responder should send the certificate issued by one of the CAs in the list. If the certificate is verified, the router saves the public key contained in the certificate on its public key ring.

With multiple root CAs, Virtual Private Network (VPN) users can establish trust in one domain and easily and securely distribute it to other domains. Thus, the required private communication channel between entities authenticated under different domains can occur.

How IPSec Devices Use CA Certificates

When two IPSec routers want to exchange IPSec-protected traffic passing between them, they must first authenticate each other—otherwise, IPSec protection cannot occur. The authentication is done with IKE.

Without a CA, a router authenticates itself to the remote router using either RSA-encrypted nonces or preshared keys. Both methods require keys to have been previously configured between the two routers.

With a CA, a router authenticates itself to the remote router by sending a certificate to the remote router and performing some public key cryptography. Each router must send its own unique certificate that was issued and validated by the CA. This process works because the certificate of each router encapsulates the public key of the router, each certificate is authenticated by the CA, and all participating routers recognize the CA as an authenticating authority. This scheme is called IKE with an RSA signature.

Your router can continue sending its own certificate for multiple IPSec sessions and to multiple IPSec peers until the certificate expires. When its certificate expires, the router administrator must obtain a new one from the CA.

When your router receives a certificate from a peer from another domain (with a different CA), the certificate revocation list (CRL) downloaded from the CA of the router does not include certificate information about the peer. Therefore, you should check the CRL published by the configured trustpoint with the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) URL to ensure that the certificate of the peer has not been revoked.

To query the CRL published by the configured trustpoint with the LDAP URL, use the query url command in trustpoint configuration mode.

CA Registration Authorities

Some CAs have a registration authority (RA) as part of their implementation. An RA is essentially a server that acts as a proxy for the CA so that CA functions can continue when the CA is offline.

How to Implement CA Interoperability

This section contains the following procedures:

Configuring a Router Hostname and IP Domain Name

This task configures a router hostname and IP domain name.

You must configure the hostname and IP domain name of the router if they have not already been configured. The hostname and IP domain name are required because the router assigns a fully qualified domain name (FQDN) to the keys and certificates used by IPSec, and the FQDN is based on the hostname and IP domain name you assign to the router. For example, a certificate named router20.example.com is based on a router hostname of router20 and a router IP domain name of example.com.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    configure

    2.    hostname name

    3.    domain name domain-name

    4.    Use the commit or end command.


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 configure


    Example:
    RP/0/0/CPU0:router# configure
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 2hostname name


    Example:
    RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# hostname myhost
    
     

    Configures the hostname of the router.

     
    Step 3domain name domain-name


    Example:
    RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# domain name mydomain.com
    
     

    Configures the IP domain name of the router.

     
    Step 4 Use the commit or end command.  

    commit—Saves the configuration changes and remains within the configuration session.

    end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
    • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
    • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
    • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
     

    Generating an RSA Key Pair

    This task generates an RSA key pair.

    RSA key pairs are used to sign and encrypt IKE key management messages and are required before you can obtain a certificate for your router.

    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    crypto key generate rsa [usage keys | general-keys] [keypair-label]

      2.    crypto key zeroize rsa [keypair-label]

      3.    show crypto key mypubkey rsa


    DETAILED STEPS
       Command or ActionPurpose
      Step 1crypto key generate rsa [usage keys | general-keys] [keypair-label]


      Example:
      RP/0/0/CPU0:router# crypto key generate rsa general-keys
      
       

      Generates RSA key pairs.

      • Use the usage keys keyword to specify special usage keys; use the general-keys keyword to specify general- purpose RSA keys.
      • The keypair-label argument is the RSA key pair label that names the RSA key pairs.
       
      Step 2crypto key zeroize rsa [keypair-label]


      Example:
      RP/0/0/CPU0:router# crypto key zeroize rsa key1
      
       

      (Optional) Deletes all RSAs from the router.

      • Under certain circumstances, you may want to delete all RSA keys from you router. For example, if you believe the RSA keys were compromised in some way and should no longer be used, you should delete the keys.
      • To remove a specific RSA key pair, use the keypair-label argument.
       
      Step 3show crypto key mypubkey rsa


      Example:
      RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show crypto key mypubkey rsa
      
       

      (Optional) Displays the RSA public keys for your router.

       

      Importing a Public Key to the Router

      This task imports a public key to the router.

      A public key is imported to the router to authenticate the user.

      SUMMARY STEPS

        1.    crypto key import authentication rsa [usage keys | general-keys] [keypair-label]

        2.    show crypto key mypubkey rsa


      DETAILED STEPS
         Command or ActionPurpose
        Step 1crypto key import authentication rsa [usage keys | general-keys] [keypair-label]


        Example:
        RP/0/0/CPU0:router# crypto key import authentication rsa general-keys
        
         

        Generates RSA key pairs.

        • Use the usage keys keyword to specify special usage keys; use the general-keys keyword to specify general- purpose RSA keys.
        • The keypair-label argument is the RSA key pair label that names the RSA key pairs.
         
        Step 2show crypto key mypubkey rsa


        Example:
        RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show crypto key mypubkey rsa
        
         

        (Optional) Displays the RSA public keys for your router.

         

        Declaring a Certification Authority and Configuring a Trusted Point

        This task declares a CA and configures a trusted point.

        SUMMARY STEPS

          1.    configure

          2.    crypto ca trustpoint ca-name

          3.    enrollment url CA-URL

          4.    query url LDAP-URL

          5.    enrollment retry period minutes

          6.    enrollment retry count number

          7.    rsakeypair keypair-label

          8.    Use the commit or end command.


        DETAILED STEPS
           Command or ActionPurpose
          Step 1 configure


          Example:
          RP/0/0/CPU0:router# configure
           

          Enters global configuration mode.

           
          Step 2crypto ca trustpoint ca-name


          Example:
          RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# crypto ca trustpoint myca
          
           

          Declares a CA.

          • Configures a trusted point with a selected name so that your router can verify certificates issued to peers.
          • Enters trustpoint configuration mode.
           
          Step 3enrollment url CA-URL


          Example:
          RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-trustp)# enrollment url http://ca.domain.com/certsrv/mscep/mscep.dll
          
           

          Specifies the URL of the CA.

          • The URL should include any nonstandard cgi-bin script location.
           
          Step 4query url LDAP-URL


          Example:
          RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-trustp)# query url ldap://my-ldap.domain.com
          
           

          (Optional) Specifies the location of the LDAP server if your CA system supports the LDAP protocol.

           
          Step 5enrollment retry period minutes


          Example:
          RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-trustp)# enrollment retry period 2
          
           

          (Optional) Specifies a retry period.

          • After requesting a certificate, the router waits to receive a certificate from the CA. If the router does not receive a certificate within a period of time (the retry period) the router will send another certificate request.
          • Range is from 1 to 60 minutes. Default is 1 minute.
           
          Step 6enrollment retry count number


          Example:
          RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-trustp)# enrollment retry count 10
          
           

          (Optional) Specifies how many times the router continues to send unsuccessful certificate requests before giving up.

          • The range is from 1 to 100.
           
          Step 7rsakeypair keypair-label


          Example:
          RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-trustp)# rsakeypair mykey
          
           

          (Optional) Specifies a named RSA key pair generated using the crypto key generate rsa command for this trustpoint.

          • Not setting this key pair means that the trustpoint uses the default RSA key in the current configuration.
           
          Step 8 Use the commit or end command.  

          commit—Saves the configuration changes and remains within the configuration session.

          end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
          • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
          • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
          • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
           

          Authenticating the CA

          This task authenticates the CA to your router.

          The router must authenticate the CA by obtaining the self-signed certificate of the CA, which contains the public key of the CA. Because the certificate of the CA is self-signed (the CA signs its own certificate), manually authenticate the public key of the CA by contacting the CA administrator to compare the fingerprint of the CA certificate.

          SUMMARY STEPS

            1.    crypto ca authenticate ca-name

            2.    show crypto ca certificates


          DETAILED STEPS
             Command or ActionPurpose
            Step 1crypto ca authenticate ca-name


            Example:
            RP/0/0/CPU0:router# crypto ca authenticate myca
            
             

            Authenticates the CA to your router by obtaining a CA certificate, which contains the public key for the CA.

             
            Step 2 show crypto ca certificates


            Example:
            RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show crypto ca certificates
            
             

            (Optional) Displays information about the CA certificate.

             

            Requesting Your Own Certificates

            This task requests certificates from the CA.

            You must obtain a signed certificate from the CA for each of your router’s RSA key pairs. If you generated general-purpose RSA keys, your router has only one RSA key pair and needs only one certificate. If you previously generated special usage RSA keys, your router has two RSA key pairs and needs two certificates.

            SUMMARY STEPS

              1.    crypto ca enroll ca-name

              2.    show crypto ca certificates


            DETAILED STEPS
               Command or ActionPurpose
              Step 1crypto ca enroll ca-name


              Example:
              RP/0/0/CPU0:router# crypto ca enroll myca
              
               

              Requests certificates for all of your RSA key pairs.

              • This command causes your router to request as many certificates as there are RSA key pairs, so you need only perform this command once, even if you have special usage RSA key pairs.
              • This command requires you to create a challenge password that is not saved with the configuration. This password is required if your certificate needs to be revoked, so you must remember this password.
              • A certificate may be issued immediately or the router sends a certificate request every minute until the enrollment retry period is reached and a timeout occurs. If a timeout occurs, contact your system administrator to get your request approved, and then enter this command again.
               
              Step 2 show crypto ca certificates


              Example:
              RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show crypto ca certificates
              
               

              (Optional) Displays information about the CA certificate.

               

              Configuring Certificate Enrollment Using Cut-and-Paste

              This task declares the trustpoint certification authority (CA) that your router should use and configures that trustpoint CA for manual enrollment by using cut-and-paste.

              SUMMARY STEPS

                1.    configure

                2.    crypto ca trustpoint ca-name

                3.    enrollment terminal

                4.    Use the commit or end command.

                5.    crypto ca authenticate ca-name

                6.    crypto ca enroll ca-name

                7.    crypto ca import ca- name certificate

                8.    show crypto ca certificates


              DETAILED STEPS
                 Command or ActionPurpose
                Step 1 configure


                Example:
                RP/0/0/CPU0:router# configure
                 

                Enters global configuration mode.

                 
                Step 2 crypto ca trustpoint ca-name


                Example:
                 RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# crypto ca trustpoint myca RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-trustp)# 
                 

                Declares the CA that your router should use and enters trustpoint configuration mode.

                • Use the ca-name argument to specify the name of the CA.
                 
                Step 3 enrollment terminal


                Example:
                 RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-trustp)# enrollment terminal 
                 

                Specifies manual cut-and-paste certificate enrollment.

                 
                Step 4 Use the commit or end command.  

                commit—Saves the configuration changes and remains within the configuration session.

                end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                 
                Step 5 crypto ca authenticate ca-name


                Example:
                 RP/0/0/CPU0:router# crypto ca authenticate myca 
                 

                Authenticates the CA by obtaining the certificate of the CA.

                • Use the ca-name argument to specify the name of the CA. Use the same name that you entered in Step 2.
                 
                Step 6 crypto ca enroll ca-name


                Example:
                 RP/0/0/CPU0:router# crypto ca enroll myca 
                 

                Obtains the certificates for your router from the CA.

                • Use the ca-name argument to specify the name of the CA. Use the same name that you entered in Step 2.
                 
                Step 7 crypto ca import ca- name certificate

                Example:
                 RP/0/0/CPU0:router# crypto ca import myca certificate 
                 

                Imports a certificate manually at the terminal.

                • Use the ca-name argument to specify the name of the CA. Use the same name that you entered in Step 2.
                Note   

                You must enter the crypto ca import command twice if usage keys (signature and encryption keys) are used. The first time the command is entered, one of the certificates is pasted into the router; the second time the command is entered, the other certificate is pasted into the router. (It does not matter which certificate is pasted first.

                 
                Step 8 show crypto ca certificates


                Example:
                 RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show crypto ca certificates 
                 

                Displays information about your certificate and the CA certificate.

                 

                Configuration Examples for Implementing Certification Authority Interoperability

                This section provides the following configuration example:

                Configuring Certification Authority Interoperability: Example

                The following example shows how to configure CA interoperability.

                Comments are included within the configuration to explain various commands.

                configure
                hostname myrouter
                domain name mydomain.com
                end
                
                Uncommitted changes found, commit them? [yes]:yes
                
                crypto key generate rsa mykey
                
                The name for the keys will be:mykey
                Choose the size of the key modulus in the range of 360 to 2048 for your General Purpose Keypair
                Choosing a key modulus greater than 512 may take a few minutes.
                How many bits in the modulus [1024]:
                Generating RSA keys ...
                Done w/ crypto generate keypair
                [OK]
                
                show crypto key mypubkey rsa
                
                Key label:mykey
                Type     :RSA General purpose
                Size     :1024
                Created  :17:33:23 UTC Thu Sep 18 2003
                Data     :
                 30819F30 0D06092A 864886F7 0D010101 05000381 8D003081 89028181 00CB8D86 
                 BF6707AA FD7E4F08 A1F70080 B9E6016B 8128004C B477817B BCF35106 BC60B06E 
                 07A417FD 7979D262 B35465A6 1D3B70D1 36ACAFBD 7F91D5A0 CFB0EE91 B9D52C69 
                 7CAF89ED F66A6A58 89EEF776 A03916CB 3663FB17 B7DBEBF8 1C54AF7F 293F3004 
                 C15B08A8 C6965F1E 289DD724 BD40AF59 E90E44D5 7D590000 5C4BEA9D B5020301 
                 0001
                
                ! The following commands declare a CA and configure a trusted point.
                
                configure
                crypto ca trustpoint myca
                enrollment url http://xyz-ultra5
                enrollment retry count 25
                enrollment retry period 2
                rsakeypair mykey
                end
                
                Uncommitted changes found, commit them? [yes]:yes
                
                ! The following command authenticates the CA to your router.
                
                crypto ca authenticate myca
                
                Serial Number  :01
                Subject Name   :
                cn=Root coax-u10 Certificate Manager,ou=HFR,o=Cisco Systems,l=San Jose,st=CA,c=US
                Issued By      :
                cn=Root coax-u10 Certificate Manager,ou=HFR,o=Cisco Systems,l=San Jose,st=CA,c=US
                Validity Start :07:00:00 UTC Tue Aug 19 2003
                Validity End   :07:00:00 UTC Wed Aug 19 2020
                Fingerprint:58 71 FB 94 55 65 D4 64 38 91 2B 00 61 E9 F8 05 
                Do you accept this certificate?? [yes/no]:yes
                
                ! The following command requests certificates for all of your RSA key pairs.
                
                crypto ca enroll myca
                
                % Start certificate enrollment ... 
                % Create a challenge password. You will need to verbally provide this
                  password to the CA Administrator in order to revoke your certificate.
                % For security reasons your password will not be saved in the configuration.
                % Please make a note of it.
                
                Password:
                Re-enter Password:
                    Fingerprint: 17D8B38D ED2BDF2E DF8ADBF7 A7DBE35A 
                
                ! The following command displays information about your certificate and the CA certificate.
                
                show crypto ca certificates
                
                Trustpoint       :myca
                ==========================================================
                CA certificate 
                  Serial Number  :01
                  Subject Name   :
                        cn=Root coax-u10 Certificate Manager,ou=HFR,o=Cisco Systems,l=San Jose,st=CA,c=US
                  Issued By      :
                        cn=Root coax-u10 Certificate Manager,ou=HFR,o=Cisco Systems,l=San Jose,st=CA,c=US
                  Validity Start :07:00:00 UTC Tue Aug 19 2003
                  Validity End   :07:00:00 UTC Wed Aug 19 2020
                Router certificate
                  Key usage      :General Purpose 
                  Status         :Available 
                  Serial Number  :6E
                  Subject Name   :
                        unstructuredName=myrouter.mydomain.com,o=Cisco Systems
                  Issued By      :
                        cn=Root coax-u10 Certificate Manager,ou=HFR,o=Cisco Systems,l=San Jose,st=CA,c=US
                  Validity Start :21:43:14 UTC Mon Sep 22 2003
                  Validity End   :21:43:14 UTC Mon Sep 29 2003
                  CRL Distribution Point
                        ldap://coax-u10.cisco.com/CN=Root coax-u10 Certificate Manager,O=Cisco Systems
                

                Where to Go Next

                After you have finished configuring CA interoperability, you should configure IKE, IPSec, and SSL. IKE configuration is described in the Implementing Internet Key Exchange Security Protocol on the Cisco IOS XR Softwaremodule, IPSec in the Implementing IPSec Network Security on the Cisco IOS XR Softwaremodule, and SSL in the Implementing Secure Socket Layer on the Cisco IOS XR Softwaremodule. These modules are located in Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration Guide for the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router (this publication).

                Additional References

                The following sections provide references related to implementing certification authority interoperability.

                Related Documents

                Related Topic

                Document Title

                PKI commands: complete command syntax, command modes, command history, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples

                Public Key Infrastructure Commands on the Cisco IOS XR Software module in Cisco IOS XR System Security Command Reference for the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router.

                Standards

                Standards

                Title

                No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.

                MIBs

                MIBs

                MIBs Link

                To locate and download MIBs using Cisco IOS XR software, use the Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL and choose a platform under the Cisco Access Products menu: http:/​/​cisco.com/​public/​sw-center/​netmgmt/​cmtk/​mibs.shtml

                RFCs

                RFCs

                Title

                No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature, and support for existing RFCs has not been modified by this feature.

                Technical Assistance

                Description

                Link

                The Cisco Technical Support website contains thousands of pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

                http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​techsupport