Cisco CRS Carrier Routing System Multishelf System Interconnection and Cabling Guide
Cabling for System Management, Alarms, and Network Clocking
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Cabling for System Management, Alarms, and Network Clocking

Table Of Contents

Cabling for System Management, Alarms, and Network Clocking

Console Port Cabling

Auxiliary Port Cabling

Management Ethernet Port Cabling

Alarm Module Alarm-Out Cabling

What to Do Next


Cabling for System Management, Alarms, and Network Clocking


The multishelf system supports several options for system management connections, and it provides connections for triggering external alarms and controlling optical cable clocking. A console port connection must be established before the system can be configured and become operational. The optional external alarm and network clocking features can be cabled at any time.

This chapter describes the following cabling options:

Console Port Cabling

Auxiliary Port Cabling

Management Ethernet Port Cabling

Alarm Module Alarm-Out Cabling

What to Do Next


Note Although some of the cabling described in this chapter is used to control the router, the control network is a separate cabling component and is described in Chapter 3 "Cabling the Control Network Using 22-Port Shelf Controller Gigabit Ethernet Cards."


Console Port Cabling

The initial configuration of an RP coupled with a 22-port SCGE card takes place through the console port. Although these devices have Ethernet ports, the Ethernet ports cannot be used until they are configured. The 22-port SCGE card in the FCC has a console port, but because the multishelf system is configured on an RP, the console port on the 22-port SCGE card is generally used only for troubleshooting.

To connect to any of the console ports in the multishelf system, use a rollover cable with an RJ-45 connector on the end that connects to the multishelf system component. Typically, the other end of the rollover cable also uses an RJ-45 connector. The other end of the rollover cable may connect to a terminal, computer running terminal emulation software, or terminal server. Adapters are available to connect the RJ-45 connector on the rollover cable to a variety of serial ports. For more information on rollover cables and connectors, see the following web page:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/switches/wan/mgx/mgx_8850/software/mgx_r3/rpm/rpm_r1.5/configuration/guide/rpmappb.html#wp1003614

For information on connecting to the console port on an RP, see Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide.

Auxiliary Port Cabling

Auxiliary ports are provided on the RP and SCGE (2-port or 22-port) cards for remote connections through modems. RP auxiliary ports can be used to configure the multishelf system. As with the console port, the SCGE auxiliary port is typically used for troubleshooting.

The typical connection to the auxiliary ports uses a serial cable with RJ-45 connectors at each end. As with the rollover cable, adapters are available to connect the RJ-45 connector at the other end to a variety of serial port types. Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide provides illustrations that show how RP auxiliary ports are connected through modems to a remote terminal.

Management Ethernet Port Cabling

Each RP provides a Management Ethernet port that can be used to manage the RP through an Ethernet network. This port can also be used to download software to RPs in the multishelf system or transfer files to remote servers for analysis or backup storage.

The typical connection to the Management Ethernet port uses an Ethernet cable with RJ-45 connectors at each end. The other end of the cable typically connects to an Ethernet switch, hub, or router that provides connectivity between the multishelf system and networks from which system management is desired.

For information on connecting to the Management Ethernet port on an RP, see Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide.

Alarm Module Alarm-Out Cabling

Each AC or DC power shelf in LCCs and FCCs contains an alarm module that monitors the status of the power shelf and provides an external interface for system alarms. The same alarm module is used in all power shelves. For more information on alarm module connections, see the following documents:

Cisco CRS Carrier Routing System Multishelf System Description

Cisco CRS Carrier Routing System 16-Slot Line Card Chassis System Description

What to Do Next

When you have completed the cabling connections described in this chapter, document these connections and forward them to the people who will configure the system. For example, if you have cabled the console port to a terminal server so that people can access the console port from a network, they need the IP address of the terminal server and corresponding port number before they can use the console port.