Cisco ASR 903 Router Chassis Software Configuration Guide, IOS XE Release 3.7
Configuring Clocking and Timing
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Table of Contents

Configuring Clocking and Timing

Clocking and Timing Restrictions

Clocking and Timing Overview

Understanding PTP

PTP Redundancy

Hybrid Clocking

Transparent Clocking

Time of Day (TOD)

Timing Port Specifications

BITS Framing Support

Synchronous Ethernet ESMC and SSM

Configuring Clocking and Timing

Configuring an Ordinary Clock

Configuring a Master Ordinary Clock

Configuring a Slave Ordinary Clock

Configuring a Boundary Clock

Configuring a Transparent Clock

Configuring a Hybrid Clock

Configuring a Hybrid Boundary Clock

Configuring a Hybrid Ordinary Clock

Configuring PTP Redundancy

Configuring PTP Redundancy in Slave Clock Mode

Configuring PTP Redundancy in Boundary Clock Mode

Synchronizing the System Time to a Time-of-Day Source

Synchronizing the System Time to a Time-of-Day Source (Master Mode)

Synchronizing the System Time to a Time-of-Day Source (Slave Mode)

Configuring Time-of-Day and 1PPS Input

Configuring Time of Day Input in Master Mode

Configuring Time of Day Input in Slave Mode

Verifying the Configuration

Configuration Examples

Configuring Clocking and Timing

This chapter explains how to configure timing ports on the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router Route Switch Processor (RSP) modules and includes the following sections:

Clocking and Timing Restrictions

The following clocking and timing restrictions apply to the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router:

  • You can configure only a single clocking input source within each group of 8 ports (0–7 and 8–15) on the T1/E1 interface module using the network-clock input-source command.
  • Multicast timing is not supported.
  • Precision Time Protocol (PTP) is supported only on loopback interfaces.
  • Time of Day (ToD) and 1 Packet per Second (1PPS) input is not supported when the router is in boundary clock mode.
  • Multiple ToD clock sources are not supported
  • PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode; you can configure up to 3 master clocks in redundancy mode.
  • In order to configure time of day input, you must configure both an input 10MHZ and an input 1PPS source.
  • PTP over IPv6 is not supported.
  • PTP functionality is restricted by license type. The following table summarizes the PTP functionality available by license type:

 

License
PTP Support

Metro Services

Not supported

Metro IP Service

Ordinary Slave Clock

Metro Aggregation Service

Ordinary Slave Clock

Metro IP Service + IEEE 1588-2008 BC/MC

All PTP functionality including boundary and master clock

Metro Aggregation Service + IEEE 1588-2008 BC/MC

All PTP functionality including boundary and master clock


NoteIf you install the IEEE 1588-2008 BC/MC license, you must reload the router to use the full PTP functionality. If you install the IEEE 1588-2008 BC/MC license, you must reload the router to use the full PTP functionality.


Clocking and Timing Overview

The Cisco ASR 903 Series Router has the following timing ports:

  • 1PPS Input/Output
  • 10MHZ Input/Output
  • ToD
  • Building Integrated Timing Supply (BITS)

You can use the timing ports on the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router to do the following:

  • Provide or receive 1PPS messages
  • Provide or receive time of day (ToD) messages
  • Provide output clocking at 10MHZ, 2.048MHZ, and 1.544MHZ
  • Receive input clocking at 10MHZ, 2.048MHZ, and 1.544MHZ

NoteTiming input and output is handled by the active RSP. Timing input and output is handled by the active RSP.



NoteFor timing redundancy, you can use a Y cable to connect a GPS timing source to multiple RSPs. For more information, see the Cisco ASR 903 Hardware Installation Guide. For timing redundancy, you can use a Y cable to connect a GPS timing source to multiple RSPs. For more information, see the Cisco ASR 903 Hardware Installation Guide.


The following sections describe how to configure clocking and timing features on the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router.

Understanding PTP

The Precision Time Protocol (PTP), as defined in the IEEE 1588 standard, synchronizes with nanosecond accuracy the real-time clocks of the devices in a network. The clocks in are organized into a master-member hierarchy. PTP identifies the switch port that is connected to a device with the most precise clock. This clock is referred to as the master clock. All the other devices on the network synchronize their clocks with the master and are referred to as members. Constantly exchanged timing messages ensure continued synchronization.

PTP is particularly useful for industrial automation systems and process control networks, where motion and precision control of instrumentation and test equipment are important.

 

Table 11-1 Nodes within a PTP Network

Network Element
Description

Grandmaster

A network device physically attached to the primary time source. All clocks are synchronized to the grandmaster clock.

Ordinary Clock

An ordinary clock is a 1588 clock with a single PTP port that can operate in one of the following modes:

  • Master mode—Distributes timing information over the network to one or more slave clocks, thus allowing the slave to synchronize its clock to the master.
  • Slave mode—Synchronizes its clock to a master clock. You can enable the slave mode on up to two interfaces simultaneously in order to connect to two different master clocks.

Boundary Clock

The device participates in selecting the best master clock and can act as the master clock if no better clocks are detected.

Boundary clock starts its own PTP session with a number of downstream slaves. The boundary clock mitigates the number of network hops and results in packet delay variations in the packet network between the Grand Master and Slave.

Transparent Clock

A transparent clock is a device or a switch that calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay, making the device transparent in terms of time calculations.

PTP Redundancy

PTP redundancy is an implementation on different clock nodes. This helps the PTP slave clock node achieve the following:

  • Interact with multiple master ports such as grand master, boundary clock nodes, and so on.
  • Open PTP sessions.
  • Select the best master from the existing list of masters (referred to as the primary PTP master port or primary clock source).
  • Switch to the next best master available in case the primary master fails, or the connectivity to the primary master fails.

NoteThe Cisco ASR 903 Series Router supports unicast-based timing as specified in the 1588-2008 standard. Hybrid mode is not supported with PTP 1588 redundancy. The Cisco ASR 903 Series Router supports unicast-based timing as specified in the 1588-2008 standard. Hybrid mode is not supported with PTP 1588 redundancy.


For instructions on how to configure PTP redundancy, see Configuring PTP Redundancy

Hybrid Clocking

The Cisco ASR 903 Series Router supports a hybrid clocking mode that uses clock frequency obtained from the synchronous Ethernet port while using phase (ToD or 1PPS) obtained using PTP. The combination of multiple time and phase sources for the same master clock improves performance over using PTP alone. The router can act as a hybrid clock in both master ordinary clock and slave ordinary clock.


NoteWhen configuring a hybrid clock, ensure that the frequency and phase sources are traceable to the same master clock. When configuring a hybrid clock, ensure that the frequency and phase sources are traceable to the same master clock.


For instructions on how to configure hybrid clocking, see Configuring a Hybrid Clock.

Transparent Clocking

A transparent clock is a network device such as a switch that calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay, making the device transparent in terms of timing calculations. The transparent clock ports have no state because the transparent clock does not need to synchronize to the grandmaster clock.

There are two kinds of transparent clocks:

  • End-to-end transparent clock—Measures the residence time of a PTP message and accumulates the times in the correction field of the PTP message or an associated follow-up message.
  • Peer-to-peer transparent clock— Measures the residence time of a PTP message and computes the link delay between each port and a similarly equipped port on another node that shares the link. For a packet, this incoming link delay is added to the residence time in the correction field of the PTP message or an associated follow-up message.

NoteThe Cisco ASR 903 Series Router does not currently support peer-to-peer transparent clock mode. The Cisco ASR 903 Series Router does not currently support peer-to-peer transparent clock mode.


For information on how to configure the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router as a transparent clock, see Configuring a Transparent Clock.

Time of Day (TOD)

You can use the time of day (ToD) and 1PPS ports on the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router to exchange ToD clocking. In master mode, the router can receive time of day (ToD) clocking from an external GPS unit; the router requires a ToD, 1PPS, and 10MHZ connection to the GPS unit.

In slave mode, the router can recover ToD from a PTP session and repeat the signal on ToD and 1PPS interfaces.

For instructions on how to configure ToD on the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router, see the Configuring Time-of-Day and 1PPS Input.

Synchronizing the System Clock to Time of Day

You can set the router’s system time to synchronize with the time of day retrieved from an external GPS device. For information on how to configure this feature, see Synchronizing the System Time to a Time-of-Day Source.

Timing Port Specifications

The following sections provide specifications for the timing ports on the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router.

BITS Framing Support

Table 11-2 lists the supported framing modes for a BITS port.

 

Table 11-2 Framing Modes for a BITS Port on a Cisco ASR 903 Series Router

BITS or SSU Port Support Matrix
Framing Modes Supported
SSM or QL Support
Tx Port
Rx Port

T1

T1 ESF

Yes

Yes

Yes

T1

T1 SF

No

Yes

Yes

E1

E1 CRC4

Yes

Yes

Yes

E1

E1 FAS

No

Yes

Yes

2048 kHz

2048 kHz

No

Yes

Yes

The BITS port behaves similarly to the T1/E1 ports on the T1/E1 interface module; for more information about configuring T1/E1 interfaces, see Chapter8, “Configuring T1/E1 Interfaces”

Synchronous Ethernet ESMC and SSM

The Cisco ASR 903 Series Router supports Ethernet Synchronization Message Channel (ESMC) and Synchronization Status Message (SSM) to provide clock synchronization on Synchronous Ethernet. For more information about Ethernet ESMC and SSM, see Chapter12, “Configuring Synchronous Ethernet ESMC and SSM”

Configuring Clocking and Timing

The following sections describe how to configure clocking and timing features on the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router:

Configuring an Ordinary Clock

The following sections describe how to configure the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router as an ordinary clock.

Configuring a Master Ordinary Clock

Follow these steps to configure the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router to act as a master ordinary clock.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

4. priority1 priorityvalue

5. priority2 priorityvalue

6. clock-port port-name { master | slave }

7. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

8. clock-destination source-address

9. sync interval interval

10. announce interval interval

11. exit

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2

ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

 

Router(config)# ptp clock ordinary domain 0

Router(config-ptp-clk)#

Configures the PTP clock. You can create the following clock types:

  • Ordinary—A 1588 clock with a single PTP port that can operate in Master or Slave mode.
  • Boundary—Participates in selecting the best master clock and can act as the master clock if no better clocks are detected.
  • Transparent—Calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay.

Step 3

priority1 priorityvalue

 

Router(config-ptp-clk)# priority1 priorityvalue

Sets the preference level for a clock. Slave devices use the priority1 value when selecting a master clock: a lower priority1 value indicates a preferred clock. The priority1 value is considered above all other clock attributes.

Valid values are from 0-255. The default value is 128.

Step 4

priority2 priorityvalue

 

Router(config-ptp-clk)# priority2 priorityvalue

Sets a secondary preference level for a clock. Slave devices use the priority2 value when selecting a master clock: a lower priority2 value indicates a preferred clock. The priority2 value is considered only when the router is unable to use priority1 and other clock attributes to select a clock.

Valid values are from 0-255. The default value is 128.

Step 5

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 

Router(config-ptp-clk)# clock-port Master master

Router(config-ptp-port)#

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in master mode, the port exchanges timing packets with PTP slave devices.

Step 6

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 

Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 7

clock-destination source-address

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock-source 8.8.8.1

Specifies the IP address of a clock destination when the router is in PTP master mode.

Step 8

sync interval interval

 

Router(config-ptp-port)# sync interval -4

Specifies the interval used to send PTP synchronization messages. The intervals are set using log base 2 values, as follows:

  • 1—1 packet every 2 seconds
  • 0—1 packet every second
  • -1—1 packet every 1/2 second, or 2 packets per second
  • -2—1 packet every 1/4 second, or 4 packets per second
  • -3—1 packet every 1/8 second, or 8 packets per second
  • -4—1 packet every 1/16 seconds, or 16 packets per second.
  • -5—1 packet every 1/32 seconds, or 32 packets per second.
  • -6—1 packet every 1/64 seconds, or 64 packets per second.
  • -7—1 packet every 1/128 seconds, or 128 packets per second.

Step 9

announce interval interval

 

Router(config-ptp-port)# announce interval 2

Specifies the interval for PTP announce messages. The intervals are set using log base 2 values, as follows:

  • 3—1 packet every 8 seconds
  • 2—1 packet every 4 seconds
  • 1—1 packet every 2 seconds
  • 0—1 packet every second
  • -1—1 packet every 1/2 second, or 2 packets per second
  • -2—1 packet every 1/4 second, or 4 packets per second
  • -3—1 packet every 1/8 second, or 8 packets per second

Step 10

Router(config-ptp-port)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Configuring a Slave Ordinary Clock

Follow these steps to configure the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router to act as a slave ordinary clock.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

4. clock-port port-name { master | slave }

5. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

6. clock-source source-address

7. announce timeout value

8. delay-req interval interval

9. end

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

 

Router(config)# ptp clock ordinary domain 0

Configures the PTP clock. You can create the following clock types:

  • Ordinary—A 1588 clock with a single PTP port that can operate in Master or Slave mode.
  • Boundary—Participates in selecting the best master clock and can act as the master clock if no better clocks are detected.
  • Transparent—Calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay.

Step 3

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 

Router(config-ptp-clk)# clock-port Slave slave

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in slave mode, the port exchanges timing packets with a PTP master clock.

Step 4

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 

Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 5

clock-source source-address

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock-source 8.8.8.1

Specifies the address of a PTP master clock.

Step 6

announce timeout value

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# announce timeout 8

Specifies the number of PTP announcement intervals before the session times out. Valid values are 1-10.

Step 7

delay-req interval interval

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# delay-req interval 1

Configures the minimum interval allowed between PTP delay-request messages when the port is in the master state.

The intervals are set using log base 2 values, as follows:

  • 3—1 packet every 8 seconds
  • 2—1 packet every 4 seconds
  • 1—1 packet every 2 seconds
  • 0—1 packet every second
  • -1—1 packet every 1/2 second, or 2 packets per second
  • -2—1 packet every 1/4 second, or 4 packets per second
  • -3—1 packet every 1/8 second, or 8 packets per second
  • -4—1 packet every 1/16 seconds, or 16 packets per second.
  • -5—1 packet every 1/32 seconds, or 32 packets per second.
  • -6—1 packet every 1/64 seconds, or 64 packets per second.
  • -7—1 packet every 1/128 seconds, or 128 packets per second.

Step 8

Router(config-ptp-port)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Configuring a Boundary Clock

Follow these steps to configure the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router to act as a boundary clock.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

4. clock-port port-name { master | slave }

5. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

6. clock-source source-address [priority]

7. clock-port port-name { master | slave }

8. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

9. exit

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

Router(config)# ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

 
Router(config)# ptp clock boundary domain 0

Configures the PTP clock. You can create the following clock types:

  • Ordinary—A 1588 clock with a single PTP port that can operate in Master or Slave mode.
  • Boundary—Participates in selecting the best master clock and can act as the master clock if no better clocks are detected.
  • Transparent—Calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay.

Step 3

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# clock-port SLAVE slave

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in slave mode, the port exchanges timing packets with a PTP master clock.

Step 4

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 0 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 5

clock-source source-address [priority]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock source 133.133.133.133

Specifies the address of a PTP master clock. You can specify a priority value as follows:

  • No priority value—Assigns a priority value of 0.
  • 1—Assigns a priority value of 1.
  • 2—Assigns a priority value of 2, the highest priority.

Step 6

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock-port Master master

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in master mode, the port exchanges timing packets with PTP slave devices.

Note The master clock-port does not establish a clocking session until the slave clock-port is phase aligned.

Step 7

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 1 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 8

Router(config-ptp-port)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Configuring a Transparent Clock

Follow these steps to configure the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router as an end-to-end transparent clock.


NoteThe Cisco ASR 903 Series Router does not support peer-to-peer transparent clock mode. The Cisco ASR 903 Series Router does not support peer-to-peer transparent clock mode.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ptp clock e2e-transparent domain domain-number

4. exit

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

 
Router(config)# ptp clock e2e-transparent domain domain-number

Configures the router as an end-to-end transparent clock.

Note Peer-to-peer transparent clock mode is not supported.

Step 3

Router(config)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Configuring a Hybrid Clock

The following sections describe how to configure the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router to act as a hybrid clock.

Configuring a Hybrid Boundary Clock

Follow these steps to configure a hybrid clocking in boundary clock mode.


NoteWhen configuring a hybrid clock, ensure that the frequency and phase sources are traceable to the same master clock. When configuring a hybrid clock, ensure that the frequency and phase sources are traceable to the same master clock.


 

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

4. clock-port port-name { master | slave }

5. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

6. clock-source source-address [priority]

7. clock-port port-name { master | slave }

8. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

9. exit

10. network-clock input-source priority { interface interface-type interface-number | { external { R0 | R1 } [ t1 { sf | efs | d4 } | e1 [ crc4 | fas | cas [ crc4 ] | 10m ]}}| { ptp domain domain-number }

11. network-clock synchronization mode ql-enabled

12. network-clock hold-off { 0 | milliseconds }

13. end

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

 
Router(config)# ptp clock boundary domain 0 hybrid

Configures the PTP clock. You can create the following clock types:

  • Ordinary—A 1588 clock with a single PTP port that can operate in Master or Slave mode.

Note Hybrid mode is only supported with slave clock-ports; master mode is not supported.

  • Boundary—Participates in selecting the best master clock and can act as the master clock if no better clocks are detected.
  • Transparent—Calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay.

Step 3

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# clock-port SLAVE slave

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in slave mode, the port exchanges timing packets with a PTP master clock.

Note Hybrid mode is only supported with slave clock-ports; master mode is not supported.

Step 4

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 0 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 5

clock-source source-address [priority]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock source 133.133.133.133

Specifies the address of a PTP master clock. You can specify a priority value as follows:

  • No priority value—Assigns a priority value of 0.
  • 1—Assigns a priority value of 1.
  • 2—Assigns a priority value of 2, the highest priority.

Step 6

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock-port MASTER master

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in master mode, the port exchanges timing packets with PTP slave devices.

Step 7

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface Lo1 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 8

exit

Exit clock-port configuration.

Step 9

network-clock input-source priority { interface interface-type interface-number | { external { R0 | R1 } [10m ] [ t1 { sf | efs | d4 } | e1 [ crc4 | fas | cas [ crc4 ] }} | { ptp domain domain-number }

 
Router(config)# network-clock input-source 1 external R0 10m

Specifies an external timing input interface, such as a synchronous Ethernet interface, BITS interface, TDM interface, or PTP clock. You can specify a priority value for clock selection.

Step 10

network-clock synchronization mode ql-enabled

 

Router(config)# network-clock synchronization mode ql-enabled

Enables automatic selection of a clock source based on quality level (QL).

Note This command is disabled by default.

For more information about this command, see Chapter12, “Configuring Synchronous Ethernet ESMC and SSM”

Step 11

network-clock hold-off { 0 | milliseconds }

 

Router(config)# network-clock hold-off 0

(Optional) Configures a global hold-off timer specifying the amount of time that the router waits when a synchronous Ethernet clock source fails before taking action.

Note You can also specify a hold-off value for an individual interface using the network-clock hold-off command in interface mode.

For more information about this command, see Chapter12, “Configuring Synchronous Ethernet ESMC and SSM”

Step 12

Router(config-ptp-clk)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Configuring a Hybrid Ordinary Clock

Follow these steps to configure a hybrid clocking in ordinary clock slave mode.


NoteWhen configuring a hybrid clock, ensure that the frequency and phase sources are traceable to the same master clock. When configuring a hybrid clock, ensure that the frequency and phase sources are traceable to the same master clock.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

4. clock-port port-name { master | slave }

5. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

6. clock-source source-address [priority]

7. exit

8. network-clock input-source priority { interface interface-type interface-number | { external { R0 | R1 } [ t1 { sf | efs | d4 } | e1 [ crc4 | fas | cas [ crc4 ] | 10m ]}}| { ptp domain domain-number }

9. network-clock synchronization mode ql-enabled

10. network-clock hold-off { 0 | milliseconds }

11. end

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

 
Router(config)# ptp clock ordinary domain 0 hybrid

Configures the PTP clock. You can create the following clock types:

  • Ordinary—A 1588 clock with a single PTP port that can operate in Master or Slave mode.

Note Hybrid mode is only supported with slave clock-ports; master mode is not supported.

  • Boundary—Participates in selecting the best master clock and can act as the master clock if no better clocks are detected.
  • Transparent—Calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay.

Step 3

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# clock-port SLAVE slave

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in slave mode, the port exchanges timing packets with a PTP master clock.

Note Hybrid mode is only supported with slave clock-ports; master mode is not supported.

Step 4

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 0 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 5

clock-source source-address [priority]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock source 133.133.133.133

Specifies the address of a PTP master clock. You can specify a priority value as follows:

  • No priority value—Assigns a priority value of 0.
  • 1—Assigns a priority value of 1.
  • 2—Assigns a priority value of 2, the highest priority.

Step 6

exit

Exit clock-port configuration.

Step 7

network-clock input-source priority { interface interface-type interface-number | { external { R0 | R1 } [ t1 { sf | efs | d4 } | e1 [ crc4 | fas | cas [ crc4 ] | 10m ]}}| { ptp domain domain-number }

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# network-clock input-source 10 interface loopback 0

Specifies an external timing input interface, such as a synchronous Ethernet interface, BITS interface, TDM interface, or PTP clock. You can specify a priority value for clock selection.

Step 8

network-clock synchronization mode ql-enabled

 

Router(config)# network-clock synchronization mode ql-enabled

Enables automatic selection of a clock source based on quality level (QL).

Note This command is disabled by default.

For more information about this command, see Chapter12, “Configuring Synchronous Ethernet ESMC and SSM”

Step 9

network-clock hold-off { 0 | milliseconds }

 

Router(config)# network-clock hold-off 0

(Optional) Configures a global hold-off timer specifying the amount of time that the router waits when a synchronous Ethernet clock source fails before taking action.

Note You can also specify a hold-off value for an individual interface using the network-clock hold-off command in interface mode.

For more information about this command, see Chapter12, “Configuring Synchronous Ethernet ESMC and SSM”

Step 10

Router(config-ptp-clk)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Configuring PTP Redundancy

The following sections describe how to configure PTP redundancy on the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router:

Configuring PTP Redundancy in Slave Clock Mode

Follow these steps to configure clocking redundancy in slave clock mode:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ptp clock ordinary domain domain-number

4. clock-port port-name slave

5. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

6. clock-source source-address [priority]

7. clock-source source-address [priority]

8. clock-source source-address [priority]

9. end

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

 

Router(config#)# ptp clock ordinary domain 0

Configures the PTP clock. You can create the following clock types:

  • Ordinary—A 1588 clock with a single PTP port that can operate in Master or Slave mode.
  • Boundary—Participates in selecting the best master clock and can act as the master clock if no better clocks are detected.
  • Transparent—Calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay.

Step 3

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# clock-port SLAVE slave

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in slave mode, the port exchanges timing packets with a PTP master clock.

Step 4

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 0 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 5

clock-source source-address [priority]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock source 133.133.133.133 1

Specifies the address of a PTP master clock. You can specify a priority value as follows:

  • No priority value—Assigns a priority value of 0.
  • 1—Assigns a priority value of 1.
  • 2—Assigns a priority value of 2, the highest priority.

Step 6

clock-source source-address [priority]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock source 133.133.133.134 2

Specifies the address of an additional PTP master clock; repeat this step for each additional master clock. You can configure up to 3 master clocks.

Step 7

clock-source source-address [priority]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock source 133.133.133.135

Specifies the address of an additional PTP master clock; repeat this step for each additional master clock. You can configure up to 3 master clocks.

Step 8

Router(config-ptp-port)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Configuring PTP Redundancy in Boundary Clock Mode

Follow these steps to configure clocking redundancy in boundary clock mode:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

4. clock-port port-name { master | slave }

5. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

6. clock-source source-address [priority]

7. clock-source source-address [priority]

8. clock-port port-name master

9. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

10. exit

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

 
Router(config)# ptp clock boundary domain 0

Configures the PTP clock. You can create the following clock types:

  • Ordinary—A 1588 clock with a single PTP port that can operate in Master or Slave mode.
  • Boundary—Participates in selecting the best master clock and can act as the master clock if no better clocks are detected.
  • Transparent—Calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay.

Step 3

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# clock-port SLAVE slave

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in slave mode, the port exchanges timing packets with a PTP master clock.

Step 4

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 0 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 5

clock-source source-address [priority]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock source 133.133.133.133 1

Specifies the address of a PTP master clock. You can specify a priority value as follows:

  • No priority value—Assigns a priority value of 0.
  • 1—Assigns a priority value of 1.
  • 2—Assigns a priority value of 2, the highest priority.

Step 6

clock-source source-address [priority]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock source 133.133.133.134 2

Specifies the address of an additional PTP master clock; repeat this step for each additional master clock. You can configure up to 3 master clocks.

Step 7

clock-source source-address [priority]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock source 133.133.133.135

Specifies the address of an additional PTP master clock; repeat this step for each additional master clock. You can configure up to 3 master clocks.

Step 8

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock-port MASTER master

Specifies the address of a PTP master clock.

Step 9

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 1 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 10

Router(config-ptp-port)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Synchronizing the System Time to a Time-of-Day Source

The following sections describe how to synchronize the system time to a time of day (ToD) clock source.

Synchronizing the System Time to a Time-of-Day Source (Master Mode)

Follow these steps to configure the system clock to a ToD source in master mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. tod-clock input-source priority { gps { R0 | R1 } | ptp domain domain }

4. exit

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

tod-clock input-source priority { gps { R0 | R1 } | ptp domain domain }

 
Router(config)# TOD-clock 2 gps R0/R1

In master mode, specify a GPS port connected to a ToD source.

Step 3

Router(config)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Synchronizing the System Time to a Time-of-Day Source (Slave Mode)

Follow these steps to configure the system clock to a ToD source in slave mode. In slave mode, specify a PTP domain as a ToD input source.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. tod-clock input-source priority { gps { R0 | R1 } | ptp domain domain }

4. exit

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

tod-clock input-source priority { gps { R0 | R1 } | ptp domain domain }

 
Router(config)# TOD-clock 10 ptp domain 0

In slave mode, specify a PTP domain as a ToD input source.

Step 3

Router(config)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Configuring Time-of-Day and 1PPS Input

The following sections describe how to configure ToD and 1PPS input on the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router.

Configuring Time of Day Input in Master Mode

Follow these steps to configure Time of Day (ToD) input in master clock mode. This mode uses two connections to the GPS unit; the ToD port for ToD, and the 1PPS port for phase.


NoteThis mode requires you to configure the 10MHZ port as an input source in order to use the 1PPS port as an input source. This mode requires you to configure the 10MHZ port as an input source in order to use the 1PPS port as an input source.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. network-clock input-source priority { interface interface-type interface-number | { external { R0 | R1 } [ t1 { sf | efs | d4 } | e1 [ crc4 | fas | cas [ crc4 ]] | 10m ]}} | { ptp domain domain-number }

4. network-clock synchronization mode ql-enabled

5. network-clock hold-off { 0 | milliseconds }

6. tod-clock wait-to-restore seconds

7. ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

8. tod { R0 | R1} { iso8601 | ubx | nmea | cisco | ntp } [ delay delay-amount ]

9. input [ 1pps ] { R0 | R1}

10. clock-port port-name { master | slave }

11. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

12. end

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

network-clock input-source priority { interface interface-type interface-number | { external { R0 | R1 } [ t1 { sf | efs | d4 } | e1 [ crc4 | fas | cas [ crc4 ]] | 10m ]}} | { ptp domain domain-number }

 
Router(config)# network-clock input-source 1 external R0 10m

Specifies an external timing input interface, such as a synchronous Ethernet interface, BITS interface, TDM interface, or PTP clock. You can specify a priority value for clock selection.

Step 3

network-clock synchronization mode ql-enabled

 

Router(config)# network-clock synchronization mode ql-enabled

Enables automatic selection of a clock source based on quality level (QL).

Note This command is disabled by default.

Step 4

network-clock hold-off { 0 | milliseconds }

 

Router(config)# network-clock hold-off 0

(Optional) Configures a global hold-off timer specifying the amount of time that the router waits when a synchronous Ethernet clock source fails before taking action.

Note You can also specify a hold-off value for an individual interface using the network-clock hold-off command in interface mode.

Step 5

tod-clock wait-to-restore seconds

 

Router(config)# tod-clock wait-to-restore 70

(Optional) Configures a global wait-to-restore timer for ToD clock sources. The timer specifies how long the router waits before including a restored clock source in the clock selection process.

Valid values are 0 to 86400 seconds. The default value is 300 seconds.

Note You can also specify a wait-to-restore value for an individual interface using the tod-clock wait-to-restore command in interface mode.

Step 6

ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

 
Router(config)# ptp clock ordinary domain 1

Configures the PTP clock. You can create the following clock types:

  • Ordinary—A 1588 clock with a single PTP port that can operate in Master or Slave mode.
  • Boundary—Participates in selecting the best master clock and can act as the master clock if no better clocks are detected.
  • Transparent—Calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay.

Step 7

tod { R0 | R1} { iso8601 | ubx | nmea | cisco | ntp } [ delay delay-amount ]

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# tod R0 ntp

Specifies the source for ToD input.

Step 8

input [ 1pps ] { R0 | R1}

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# input 1pps R0

Specifies the source for 1PPS input.

Step 9

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock-port master master

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in slave mode, the port exchanges timing packets with a PTP master clock.

Step 10

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 11

Router(config)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Configuring Time of Day Input in Slave Mode

When acting as a slave ordinary clock, you can configure ToD input via PTP. Follow these steps to configure ToD input in slave mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

4. tod { R0 | R1} { iso8601 | ubx | nmea | cisco | ntp } [ delay delay-amount ]

5. output 1pps { R0 | R1} [ offset offset-value [ negative ]] [ pulse-width pulse-amount { ns | us | ms }]

6. clock-port port-name { master | slave }

7. transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

8. clock-source source-address [priority]

9. end

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration mode.

Step 2

ptp clock { ordinary | boundary | e2e-transparent } domain domain-number [ hybrid ]

 
Router(config)# ptp clock ordinary domain 0

Configures the PTP clock. You can create the following clock types:

  • Ordinary—A 1588 clock with a single PTP port that can operate in Master or Slave mode.
  • Boundary—Participates in selecting the best master clock and can act as the master clock if no better clocks are detected.
  • Transparent—Calculates the time it requires to forward traffic and updates the PTP time correction field to account for the delay.

Step 3

tod-clock hold-off { 0 | milliseconds }

 

Router(config)# tod-clock hold-off 0

(Optional) Configures a global hold-off timer specifying the amount of time that the router waits when a ToD clock source fails before taking action.

Note You can also specify a hold-off value for an individual interface using the tod-clock hold-off command in interface mode.

Step 4

tod-clock wait-to-restore seconds

 

Router(config)# tod-clock wait-to-restore 70

(Optional) Configures a global wait-to-restore timer for ToD clock sources. The timer specifies how long the router waits before including a restored clock source in the clock selection process.

Valid values are 0 to 86400 seconds. The default value is 300 seconds.

Note You can also specify a wait-to-restore value for an individual interface using the tod-clock wait-to-restore command in interface mode.

Step 5

tod { R0 | R1} { iso8601 | ubx | nmea | cisco | ntp } [ delay delay-amount ]

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# tod R0 ntp

Specifies the source for ToD input.

Step 6

output 1pps { R0 | R1} [ offset offset-value [ negative ]] [ pulse-width pulse-amount { ns | us | ms }]

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# output 1pps R0

Enables 1PPS output.

Step 7

clock-port port-name { master | slave }

 
Router(config-ptp-clk)# clock-port SLA slave

Sets the clock port to PTP master or slave mode; in slave mode, the port exchanges timing packets with a PTP master clock.

Step 8

transport ipv4 unicast interface interface-type interface-number [ negotiation ]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0 negotiation

Sets port transport parameters.

The negotiation keyword configures the router to discover a PTP master clock from all available PTP clock sources.

Note PTP redundancy is supported only on unicast negotiation mode.

Step 9

clock-source source-address [priority]

 
Router(config-ptp-port)# clock source 133.133.133.133 1

Specifies the address of a PTP master clock. You can specify a priority value as follows:

  • No priority value—Assigns a priority value of 0.
  • 1—Assigns a priority value of 1.
  • 2—Assigns a priority value of 2, the highest priority.

Step 10

Router(config-ptp-port)# end

Exit configuration mode.

Verifying the Configuration

You can use the following commands to verify a clocking configuration:

  • show ptp clock dataset
  • show ptp port dataset
  • show ptp clock running
  • show platform software ptpd statistics
  • show platform ptp all
  • show platform ptp tod all

Configuration Examples

This section contains sample configurations for clocking features on the Cisco ASR 903 Series Router.


NoteThis section contains partial router configurations intended to demonstrate a specific feature. This section contains partial router configurations intended to demonstrate a specific feature.


Ordinary Clock—Slave

ptp clock ordinary domain 0
clock-port Slave slave
transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0 negotiation
clock-source 8.8.8.1
announce timeout 7
delay-req interval 100
 

Ordinary Clock—Master

ptp clock ordinary domain 0
clock-port Master master
transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0 negotiation
 

Unicast Configuration—Slave Mode

ptp clock ordinary domain 0
clock-port Slave slave
transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0
clock-source 8.8.8.1
 

Unicast Configuration—Master Mode

ptp clock ordinary domain 0
clock-port Master master
transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0
clock-destination 8.8.8.2
sync interval 1
announce interval 2
 

Unicast Negotiation—Slave

ptp clock ordinary domain 0
clock-port Slave slave
transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0 negotiation
clock-source 8.8.8.1
 

Unicast Negotiation—Master

ptp clock ordinary domain 0
clock-port Master master
transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0 negotiation
sync interval 1
announce interval 2
 

Boundary Clock

ptp clock boundary domain 0
clock-port SLAVE slave
transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 0 negotiation
clock source 133.133.133.133
clock-port MASTER master
transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 1 negotiation
 

Transparent Clock

ptp clock e2e-transparent domain 0
 

Hybrid Clock—Boundary

ptp clock boundary domain 0 hybrid
clock-port SLAVE slave
transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback0 negotiation
clock source 133.133.133.133
clock-port MASTER master
transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback1 negotiation
 
Network-clock input-source 10 interface gigabitEthernet 0/4/0
 

Hybrid Clock—Slave

ptp clock ordinary domain 0 hybrid
clock-port SLAVE slave
transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 0 negotiation
clock source 133.133.133.133
 
Network-clock input-source 10 interface gigabitEthernet 0/4/0
 

PTP Redundancy—Slave

ptp clock ordinary domain 0
clock-port SLAVE slave
transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 0 negotiation
clock source 133.133.133.133 1
clock source 55.55.55.55 2
clock source 5.5.5.5
 

PTP Redundancy—Boundary

ptp clock boundary domain 0
clock-port SLAVE slave
transport ipv4 unicast interface Loopback 0 negotiation
clock source 133.133.133.133 1
clock source 55.55.55.55 2
clock source 5.5.5.5
clock-port MASTER master
transport ipv4 unicast interface Lo1 negotiation
 

Time of Day Source—Master

TOD-clock 10 gps R0/R1
 

Time of Day Source—Slave

TOD-clock 10 ptp domain 0
 

Clock Selection Parameters

network-clock synchronization automatic
network-clock synchronization mode QL-enabled
network-clock input-source 1 ptp domain 3
 

ToD/1PPS Configuration—Master

network-clock input-source 1 external R010m
ptp clock ordinary domain 1
tod R0 ntp
input 1pps R0
clock-port master master
transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0
 

ToD/1PPS Configuration—Slave

ptp clock ordinary domain 1
tod R0 ntp
output 1pps R0
clock-port SLA slave
transport ipv4 unicast interface loopback 0 negotiation
clock source 33.1.1.
 

Show Commands

Router# show ptp clock dataset ?
current currentDS dataset
default defaultDS dataset
parent parentDS dataset
time-properties timePropertiesDS dataset
 
 
Router#show ptp port dataset ?
foreign-master foreignMasterDS dataset
port portDS dataset
 
Router#show ptp clock running domain 0
PTP Ordinary Clock [Domain 0]
State Ports Pkts sent Pkts rcvd Redundancy Mode
ACQUIRING 1 98405 296399 Track one
 
PORT SUMMARY
PTP Master
Name Tx Mode Role Transport State Sessions Port Addr
SLAVE unicast slave Lo0 Slave 1 8.8.8.8
 
SESSION INFORMATION
SLAVE [Lo0] [Sessions 1]
Peer addr Pkts in Pkts out In Errs Out Errs
8.8.8.8 296399 98405 0 0
Router#
 
Router#show platform software ptpd stat stream 0
LOCK STATUS : PHASE LOCKED
SYNC Packet Stats
Time elapsed since last packet: 0.0
Configured Interval : 0, Acting Interval 0
Tx packets : 0, Rx Packets : 169681
Last Seq Number : 0, Error Packets : 1272
Delay Req Packet Stats
Time elapsed since last packet: 0.0
Configured Interval : 0, Acting Interval : 0
Tx packets : 84595, Rx Packets : 0
Last Seq Number : 19059, Error Packets : 0
!output omitted for brevity
Current Data Set
Offset from master : 0.4230440
Mean Path Delay : 0.0
Steps Removed 1
General Stats about this stream
Packet rate : 0, Packet Delta (ns) : 0
Clock Stream handle : 0, Index : 0
Oper State : 6, Sub oper State : 7
Log mean sync Interval : -5, log mean delay req int : -4
 
 
Router#show platform ptp all
Slave info : [Loopback0][0x38A4766C]
--------------------------------
clock role : SLAVE
Slave Port hdl : 486539266
Tx Mode : Unicast-Negotiation
Slave IP : 4.4.4.4
Max Clk Srcs : 1
Boundary Clock : FALSE
Lock status : HOLDOVER
Refcnt : 1
Configured-Flags : 0x7F - Clock Port Stream
Config-Ready-Flags : Port Stream
-----------
PTP Engine Handle : 0
Master IP : 8.8.8.8
Local Priority : 0
Set Master IP : 8.8.8.8
 
 
Router#show platform ptp tod all
--------------------------------
ToD/1PPS Info for 0/0
--------------------------------
ToD CONFIGURED : YES
ToD FORMAT : NMEA
ToD DELAY : 0
1PPS MODE : OUTPUT
OFFSET : 0
PULSE WIDTH : 0
ToD CLOCK : Mon Jan 1 00:00:00 UTC 1900