Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router MPLS Configuration Guide, Release 5.1.x
Implementing MPLS Transport Profile
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 1.54MB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 5.55MB) | Feedback

Implementing MPLS Transport Profile

Implementing MPLS Transport Profile

This module describes how to implement MPLS transport profile (MPLS-TP) on the router. MPLS-TP supported by IETF enables the migration of transport networks to a packet-based network that efficiently scale to support packet services in a simple and cost-effective way. MPLS-TP combines the necessary existing capabilities of MPLS with additional minimal mechanisms in order that it can be used in a transport role.

MPLS transport profile enables you to create tunnels that provide the transport network service layer over which IP and MPLS traffic traverse.

Feature History for Implementing MPLS Transport Profile

Release

Modification

Release 4.2.0

This feature was introduced.

Restrictions for MPLS-TP

  • Penultimate hop popping is not supported. Only ultimate hop popping is supported, because label mappings are configured at the MPLS-TP endpoints.
  • MPLS-TP links must be configured with IP addresses.
  • IPv6 addressing is not supported.

L2VPN Restrictions

  • Pseudowire ID Forward Equivalence Class (FEC) (type 128) is supported, but generalized ID FEC (type 129) is not supported.
  • BFD over pseudowire is not supported. Static pseudowire OAM protocol is used to signal fault on static pseudowire placed over TP tunnels using pseudowire status.
  • Only Ethernet pseudowire type is supported.

Information About Implementing MPLS Transport Profile

To implement MPLS-TP, you should understand these concepts:

MPLS Transport Profile

MPLS Transport Profile (TP) enables you to create tunnels that provide the transport network service layer over which IP and MPLS traffic traverse. MPLS-TP tunnels enable a transition from Synchronous Optical Networking (SONET) and Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) time-division multiplexing (TDM) technologies to packet switching, to support services with high bandwidth utilization and low cost. Transport networks are connection oriented, statically provisioned, and have long-lived connections. Transport networks usually avoid control protocols that change identifiers like labels. MPLS-TP tunnels provide this functionality through statically provisioned bidirectional label switched paths (LSPs). This figure shows the MPLS-TP tunnel:

Figure 1. MPLS Transport Profile Tunnel



MPLS-TP combines the necessary existing capabilities of MPLS with additional minimal mechanisms in order that it can be used in a transport role. You can set up MPLS-TP through a CLI or a network management system.

MPLS-TP tunnels have these characteristics:
  • An MPLS-TP tunnel can be associated with working LSP, protect LSP, or both LSP
  • Statically provisioned bidirectional MPLS-TP label switched paths (LSPs)
  • Symmetric or asymmetric bandwidth reservation
  • 1:1 path protection with revertive mode for MPLS-TP LSP with revertive mode for MPLS-TP LSP
  • Use of Generic Alert Label (GAL) and Generic Associated Channel Header (G-ACH) to transport control packets; for example, BFD packets and pseudowire OAM packets
  • BFD is used as a continuity check (CC) mechanism over MPLS-TP LSP
  • Remote Defect Indication (RDI) based on BFD
  • Fault OAM functions
These services are supported over MPLS-TP tunnels:
  • Dynamic spoke pseudowire (for H-VPLS) over static MPLS-TP tunnels.
  • Static spoke pseudowire (for H-VPLS) over static MPLS-TP tunnels.
  • MS-PW services where static and dynamic pseudowire segments can be concatenated.
  • MPLS ping and traceroute over MPLS TP LSP and PW.
  • Static routes over MPLS-TP tunnels.
  • Pseudowire redundancy for static pseudowire.
  • VPWS using static or dynamic pseudowire pinned down to MPLS-TP tunnels.
  • VPLS and H-VPLS using static or dynamic pseudowire pinned down to MPLS-TP tunnels.

Bidirectional LSPs

MPLS transport profile (MPLS-TP) LSPs are bidirectional and congruent where LSPs traverse the same path in both directions. An MPLS-TP tunnel can be associated with either working MPLS-TP LSP, protect MPLS-TP LSP, or both. The working LSP is the primary LSP backed up by the protect LSP. When a working LSP goes down, protect LSP is automatically activated. In order for an MPLS-TP tunnel to be operationally up, it must be configured with at least one LSP.

MPLS-TP Path Protection

Path protection provides an end-to-end failure recovery mechanism (that is, full path protection) for MPLS-TP tunnels. MPLS-TP LSPs support 1:1 path protection. You can configure the working and protect LSPs as part of configuring the MPLS-TP tunnel. The working LSP is the primary LSP used to route traffic, while the protect LSP is a backup for a working LSP. If the working LSP fails, traffic is switched to the protect LSP until the working LSP is restored, at which time traffic forwarding reverts back to the working LSP (revertive mode).

Fault OAM Support

The fault OAM protocols and messages support the provisioning and maintenance of MPLS-TP tunnels and bidirectional LSPs:

  • Generic Associated Channel

    Generic Associated Channel (G-ACh) is the control channel mechanism associated with MPLS LSPs in addition to MPLS pseudowire. The G-ACh Label (GAL) (Label 13) is a generic alert label to identify the presence of the G-ACh in the label packet. It is taken from the reserved MPLS label space.

    G-ACh or GAL is used to support in-band OAMs of MPLS-TP LSPs and pseudowires. The OAM messages are used for fault management, connection verification, continuity check and other functions.

    These messages are forwarded along the specified MPLS LSP:

    • OAM Fault Management: Alarm Indication Signal (AIS), Link Down Indication (LDI), and Lock Report (LKR) messages (GAL with fault-OAM channel)
    • OAM Connection Verification: Ping and traceroute messages (GAL with IP channel)
    • BFD messages (GAL with BFD channel)

    These messages are forwarded along the specified pseudowire:

    • Static pseudowire OAM messages (static pseudowire status)
    • Pseudowire ping and traceroute messages
  • Fault Management: Alarm Indication Signal (AIS), Link Down Indication (LDI), and Lock Report (LKR) messages

    LDI messages are generated at midpoint nodes when a failure is detected. The midpoint sends the LDI message to the endpoint that is reachable with the existing failure. The midpoint node also sends LKR messages to the reachable endpoint, when an interface is administratively down. AIS messages are not generated by Cisco platforms, but are processed if received. By default, the reception of LDI and LKR on the active LSP at an endpoint will cause a path protection switchover, while AIS will not.

  • Fault Management: Emulated Protection Switching for LSP Lockout

    You can implement a form of Emulated Protection Switching in support of LSP Lockout using customized fault messages. When a Cisco Lockout message is sent, it does not cause the LSP to be administratively down. The Cisco Lockout message causes a path protection switchover and prevents data traffic from using the LSP. The LSP's data path remains up so that BFD and other OAM messages can continue to traverse it. Maintenance of the LSP can take place such as reconfiguring or replacing a midpoint LSR. BFD state over LSP must be up and MPLS ping and traceroute can be used to verify the LSP connectivity, before the LSP is put back into service by removing the lockout. You cannot lockout working and protect LSPs simultaneously.

  • LSP ping and traceroute

    For MPLS-TP connectivity verification, you can use ping mpls traffic-eng tunnel-tp and traceroute mpls traffic-eng tunnel-tp commands. You can specify that the echo requests be sent along the working LSP or the protect LSP. You can also specify that the echo request be sent on a locked out MPLS-TP tunnel LSP (either working or protect) if the working or protect LSP is explicitly specified.

  • Continuity Check through BFD

    BFD session is automatically created on MPLS-TP LSPs with default parameters. You can override the default BFD parameters either through global commands or per-tunnel commands. Furthermore, you can optionally specify different BFD parameters for standby LSPs. For example, when an LSP is in standby, BFD hello messages can be sent at smaller frequency to reduce line-card CPU usage. However, when a standby LSP becomes active (for example, due to protection switching), nominal BFD parameters are used for that LSPs (for example, to run BFD hello messages at higher frequency). For more information about BFD, see the Configuring Bidirectional Forwarding Detection on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide.

MPLS-TP Links and Physical Interfaces

MPLS-TP link IDs may be assigned to physical interfaces only. Bundled interfaces and virtual interfaces are not supported for MPLS-TP link IDs.

The MPLS-TP link is used to create a level of indirection between the MPLS-TP tunnel and midpoint LSP configuration and the physical interface. The MPLS-TP link-id command is used to associate an MPLS-TP link ID with a physical interface and next-hop node address.

Multiple tunnels and LSPs may then refer to the MPLS-TP link to indicate they are traversing that interface. You can move the MPLS-TP link from one interface to another without reconfiguring all the MPLS-TP tunnels and LSPs that refer to the link.

Link IDs must be unique on the router or node. For more information, see the Configuring MPLS-TP Links and Physical Interfaces section.

Tunnel LSPs

Tunnel LSPs, whether endpoint or midpoint, use the same identifying information. However, it is entered differently.

  • A midpoint consists of a forward LSP and a reverse LSP. A MPLS-TP LSP mid point is identified by its name, and forward LSP, reverse LSP, or both are configured under a submode.
  • At the midpoint, determining which end is source and which is destination is arbitrary. That is, if you are configuring a tunnel between your router and a coworker's router, then your router is the source. However, your coworker considers his or her router to be the source. At the midpoint, either router could be considered the source. At the midpoint, the forward direction is from source to destination, and the reverse direction is from destination to source. For more information, see the Configuring MPLS-TP LSPs at Midpoints section.
  • At the midpoint, the LSP number does not assume default values, and hence must be explicitly configured.
  • At the endpoint, the local information (source) either comes from the global node ID and global ID, or from locally configured information using the source command after you enter the interface tunnel-tp number command, where number is the local or source tunnel-number.
  • At the endpoint, the remote information (destination) is configured using the destination command after you enter the interface tunnel-tp number command. The destination command includes the destination node ID, optionally the global ID, and optionally the destination tunnel number. If you do not specify the destination tunnel number, the source tunnel number is used.

MPLS-TP IP-less support

Generally, MPLS-TP functionality can be deployed with or without an IP address. However, the main motivation for the IP-less model is this: an LSR can be inserted into an MPLS-TP network without changing the configurations on adjacent LSRs. In the past Cisco IOS-XR MPLS-TP release, if an interface does not have a valid IP address, BFD packets cannot be transmitted over that link, and hence MPLS-TP LSP cannot be brought up on that link. In this release, the IP-less TP link operates only in a point-to-point mode.

This feature, therefore, makes the need for an IP address on a TP link optional. You may deploy LSRs running Cisco IOS-XR in MPLS-TP networks with or without an IP address. With such extra flexibility, LSRs running Cisco IOS-XR can be easily deployed not only with LSRs running IOS, but with LSRs from other vendors too.

MPLS-TP LSP Wrapping

In the MPLS-TP LSP Wrapping protection scheme, a protected MPLS-TP tunnel is associated with a working LSP and protect LSP. This helps to prevent traffic loss as soon as a mid-point LSR detects a failure at physical layer rather than waiting for BFD to time-out. Also, a delay in activating protection switch due to mid-point failure does not further increase the traffic loss.

MPLS-TP LSP wrapping has to enabled only on the MID node. MPLS-TP LSP wrapping helps in detecting mid-link failure scenarios; other failures and failures on end node is detected by BFD timeout and TP-OAM message.

As shown in the figure below, when an LSR (e.g., Router B) detects a failure, it forwards the incoming traffic over an impacted LSP onto the reverse LSP, if it exists. The traffic re-directed into the reverse LSP is loopback traffic. Looping back traffic is carried out by the forwarding engine without control plane's involvement. The label stack of a loopback packet will be modified such that the source of the traffic identifies the packet.

Figure 2. MPLS-TP LSP Wrapping Mechanism

When the forwarding engine at an end-point recognizes a packet from loopback traffic, it sforwards the packet on protect LSP. As BFD packets over impacted LSPs are also looped-back, the end-point will drop such BFD packets so that BFD sessions over the impacted LSPs is timed-out and protection switching is activated. Optionally, when an end-point receives the first looped-back packet, it activates protection switching.

A working LSP remains wrapped until protection switching is activated. Once activated, protect LSP will carry traffic as usual. When failure is removed and BFD session comes back up resulting in activation of working LSP.

How to Implement MPLS Transport Profile

MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP) supported by IETF enables the migration of transport networks to a packet-based network that efficiently scale to support packet services in a simple and cost effective way.

These procedures are used to implement MPLS-TP:

Configuring the Node ID and Global ID

Perform this task to configure node ID and global ID on the router.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    configure

    2.    mpls traffic-eng

    3.    tp

    4.    node-id node-id

    5.    global-id num

    6.    Use the commit or end command.


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 configure


    Example:
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 2mpls traffic-eng


    Example:
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# mpls traffic-eng
    
     

    Enters MPLS TE configuration mode.

     
    Step 3tp


    Example:
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te)# mpls tp
    
     

    Enters MPLS transport profile (TP) configuration mode. You can configure MPLS TP specific parameters for the router from this mode.

     
    Step 4node-id node-id


    Example:
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te-tp)# node-id 10.0.0.1
    
     

    Specifies the default MPLS TP node ID, which is used as the default source node ID for all MPLS TP tunnels configured on the router.

    Note   

    The node ID is a 32-bit number represented in IPv4 address format, and can be optionally assigned to each node.

     
    Step 5global-id num


    Example:
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te-tp)# global-id 10
    
     

    Specifies the default global ID used for all endpoints and midpoints. This command makes the node ID globally unique in a multi-provider tunnel. Otherwise, the node ID is only locally meaningful.

    Note   

    The global ID is a 32-bit number, and can be assigned to each node.

     
    Step 6 Use the commit or end command.  

    commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

    end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
    • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
    • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
    • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
     

    Configuring Pseudowire OAM Attributes

    Perform this task to configure pseudowire OAM attributes.

    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    configure

      2.    l2vpn

      3.    pw-oam refresh transmit value

      4.    Use the commit or end command.


    DETAILED STEPS
       Command or ActionPurpose
      Step 1 configure


      Example:
      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
       

      Enters global configuration mode.

       
      Step 2 l2vpn


      Example:
      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn
      
       

      Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

       
      Step 3 pw-oam refresh transmit value


      Example:
      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# pw-oam refresh transmit 20
      
       

      Specifies the OAM timeout refresh intervals.

       
      Step 4 Use the commit or end command.  

      commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

      end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
      • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
      • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
      • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
       

      Configuring the Pseudowire Class

      When you create the pseudowire class, you specify the parameters of the pseudowire, such as the use of the control word and preferred path.

      SUMMARY STEPS

        1.    configure

        2.    l2vpn

        3.    pw-class name

        4.    encapsulation mpls

        5.    preferred-path interface tunnel-tp tunnel-number

        6.    Use the commit or end command.


      DETAILED STEPS
         Command or ActionPurpose
        Step 1 configure


        Example:
        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
         

        Enters global configuration mode.

         
        Step 2 l2vpn


        Example:
        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn
        
         

        Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

         
        Step 3pw-class name


        Example:
        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# pw-class foo
        
         

        Creates a pseudowire OAM class named foo and enters pseudowire OAM class configuration mode.

         
        Step 4encapsulation mpls


        Example:
        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls
        
         

        Sets pseudowire encapsulation to MPLS.

         
        Step 5preferred-path interface tunnel-tp tunnel-number


        Example:
        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc-mpls)# preferred-path interface tunnel-tp 10
        
         

        Specifies TP tunnel interface 10 for the preferred-path.

         
        Step 6 Use the commit or end command.  

        commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

        end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
        • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
        • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
        • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
         

        Configuring the Pseudowire

        Perform this task to configure the pseudowire.

        SUMMARY STEPS

          1.    configure

          2.    interface type interface-path-id

          3.    pseudowire-class class-name

          4.    encapsulation mpls

          5.    preferred-path interface tunnel-tp tunnel-number

          6.    Use the commit or end command.


        DETAILED STEPS
           Command or ActionPurpose
          Step 1 configure


          Example:
          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
           

          Enters global configuration mode.

           
          Step 2 interface type interface-path-id


          Example:
          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface tunnel-tp 20
          
           

          Enters MPLS transport protocol tunnel interface configuration mode.

           
          Step 3 pseudowire-class class-name


          Example:
          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# pseudowire-class foo
          
           

          Creates a pseudowire class and enters pseudowire class configuration mode.

           
          Step 4 encapsulation mpls


          Example:
          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# encapsulation mpls
          
           

          Specifies the encapsulation type.

           
          Step 5 preferred-path interface tunnel-tp tunnel-number


          Example:
          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# preferred-path interface tunnel-tp 10
          
           

          Specifies TP tunnel interface 10 for the preferred-path.

          Note   

          When a PW class with tunnel-tp interface as a preferred path is defined, this specified class can be associated with any PW.

           
          Step 6 Use the commit or end command.  

          commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

          end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
          • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
          • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
          • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
           

          Configuring the MPLS TP Tunnel

          On the endpoint routers, create an MPLS TP tunnel and configure its parameters.

          SUMMARY STEPS

            1.    configure

            2.    interface tunnel-tp number

            3.    description tunnel-desc

            4.    bandwidth num

            5.    source source node-ID

            6.    destination destination node-ID [global-id destination global ID] tunnel-id destination tunnel ID]

            7.    working-lsp

            8.    in-label num

            9.    out-label mpls label out-link link ID

            10.    lsp-number value

            11.    exit

            12.    protect-lsp

            13.    in-label num

            14.    out-label mpls label out-link link ID

            15.    lsp-number value

            16.    exit

            17.    Use the commit or end command.


          DETAILED STEPS
             Command or ActionPurpose
            Step 1 configure


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
             

            Enters global configuration mode.

             
            Step 2interface tunnel-tp number


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface tunnel-tp 10
            
             

            Enters tunnel tp interface configuration mode. The range is from 0 to 65535.

             
            Step 3description tunnel-desc


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# description head-end tunnel
            
             

            Specifies a tunnel tp description.

             
            Step 4bandwidth num


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# tp bandwidth 1000
            
             

            Specifies the tunnel bandwidth in kbps. The range is from 0 to 4294967295.

             
            Step 5source source node-ID


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# source 10.0.0.1 
            
             

            Specifies the source node of the tunnel.

             
            Step 6destination destination node-ID [global-id destination global ID] tunnel-id destination tunnel ID]


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# destination 10.0.0.1 global-id 10 tunnel-id 2
            
             

            Specifies the destination node of the tunnel.

             
            Step 7working-lsp


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# working-lsp
            
             

            Specifies a working LSP, also known as the primary LSP. This LSP is used to route traffic.

             
            Step 8in-label num


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-work)# in-label 111
            
             

            Specifies the in-label.

             
            Step 9out-label mpls label out-link link ID


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-work)# out-label 111 out-link 10
            
             

            Specifies the out-label.

             
            Step 10lsp-number value


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-work)# lsp-number 10
            
             

            Specifies the LSP ID of the working LSP.

             
            Step 11exit


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-work)# exit
            
             

            Exits from working LSP interface configuration mode.

             
            Step 12protect-lsp


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# protect-lsp
            
             

            Specifies a backup for a working LSP. If the working LSP fails, traffic is switched to the protect LSP until the working LSP is restored, at which time traffic forwarding reverts back to the working LSP.

             
            Step 13in-label num


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-protect)# in-label 113
            
             

            Specifies the in-label.

             
            Step 14out-label mpls label out-link link ID


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-protect)# out-label 112 out-link 2
            
             

            Specifies the out-label and out-link.

             
            Step 15lsp-number value


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-protect)# lsp-number 10
            
             

            Specifies the LSP ID of the protect LSP.

             
            Step 16exit

            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-protect)# exit
            
             

            Exits from protect LSP interface configuration mode.

             
            Step 17 Use the commit or end command.  

            commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

            end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
            • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
            • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
            • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
             

            Configuring MPLS-TP LSPs at Midpoint

            Perform this task to configure the MPLS-TP LSPs at the midpoint router.


            Note


            When configuring the LSPs at the midpoint routers, make sure that the configuration does not reflect traffic back to the originating node.


            SUMMARY STEPS

              1.    configure

              2.    mpls traffic-eng

              3.    tp mid name

              4.    tunnel-name name

              5.    lsp-number value

              6.    source node -ID tunnel-id number

              7.    destination node -ID tunnel-id number

              8.    Use the commit or end command.


            DETAILED STEPS
               Command or ActionPurpose
              Step 1 configure


              Example:
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
               

              Enters global configuration mode.

               
              Step 2 mpls traffic-eng


              Example:
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# mpls traffic-eng
              
               

              Enters MPLS TE configuration mode.

               
              Step 3 tp mid name


              Example:
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te)# tp mid foo
              
               

              Specifies the MPLS-TP tunnel mid-point identifier.

               
              Step 4 tunnel-name name


              Example:
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te-tp-mid)# tunnel-name midtunnel
              
               

              Specifies the name of the tunnel whose mid point is being configured.

               
              Step 5 lsp-number value


              Example:
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te-tp-mid)# lsp-number 10
              
               

              Specifies the LSP ID.

               
              Step 6 source node -ID tunnel-id number


              Example:
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te-tp-mid-fwd)# source 10.0.0.1 tunnel-id 12
              
               

              Specifies the source node ID and tunnel ID.

               
              Step 7 destination node -ID tunnel-id number


              Example:
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te-tp-mid-rev)# source 10.0.0.2 tunnel-id 12
              
               

              Specifies the destination node ID and tunnel ID.

               
              Step 8 Use the commit or end command.  

              commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

              end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
              • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
              • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
              • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
               

              Configuring MPLS-TP Links and Physical Interfaces

              MPLS-TP link IDs may be assigned to physical interfaces only.


              Note


              Bundled interfaces and virtual interfaces are not supported for MPLS-TP link IDs.


              SUMMARY STEPS

                1.    configure

                2.    mpls traffic-eng

                3.    interface type interface-path-id

                4.    link-id value next-hop address

                5.    Use the commit or end command.


              DETAILED STEPS
                 Command or ActionPurpose
                Step 1 configure


                Example:
                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                 

                Enters global configuration mode.

                 
                Step 2 mpls traffic-eng


                Example:
                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te)# mpls traffic-eng
                
                 

                Enters MPLS TE configuration mode.

                 
                Step 3interface type interface-path-id


                Example:
                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te)# interface POS 0/6/0/0
                 

                Configures an interface type and path ID to be associated with a MPLS TE mode.

                 
                Step 4link-id value next-hop address


                Example:
                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te-if)# link-id 22 next-hop 10.1.1.2
                 

                Configures an interface type and path ID to be associated with a MPLS TE mode.

                Note   

                You must provide the next-hop IP address.

                Note   

                You can define a link ID once. If you attempt to use the same MPLS-TP link ID with different interface or next-hop address, the configuration gets rejected. You have to remove the existing link ID configuration before using the same link ID with a different interface or next-hop address.

                 
                Step 5 Use the commit or end command.  

                commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                 

                Configuring MPLS-TP LSP Wrapping

                Perform this task to configure the MPLS-TP LSP wrapping.


                Note


                When configuring the LSPs at the midpoint routers, make sure that the configuration does not reflect traffic back to the originating node.


                SUMMARY STEPS

                  1.    configure

                  2.    mpls traffic-eng

                  3.    tp mid name

                  4.    tunnel-name name

                  5.    fast-protect

                  6.    Use the commit or end command.


                DETAILED STEPS
                   Command or ActionPurpose
                  Step 1 configure


                  Example:
                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                   

                  Enters global configuration mode.

                   
                  Step 2 mpls traffic-eng


                  Example:
                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# mpls traffic-eng
                  
                   

                  Enters MPLS TE configuration mode.

                   
                  Step 3 tp mid name


                  Example:
                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te)# tp mid midpt1
                  
                   

                  Specifies the MPLS-TP tunnel mid-point identifier.

                   
                  Step 4 tunnel-name name


                  Example:
                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te-tp-mid)# tunnel-name midtunnel
                  
                   

                  (Optional) Specifies the name of the tunnel whose mid point is being configured.

                   
                  Step 5 fast-protect


                  Example:
                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mpls-te-tp-mid)# fast-protect
                  
                   

                  Enables MPLS-TP LSP wrapping.

                   
                  Step 6 Use the commit or end command.  

                  commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                  end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                  • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                  • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                  • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.