Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide, Release 5.1.x
Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces
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Table of Contents

Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Contents

Prerequisites for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces

Information About Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces

Physical Interface Preconfiguration Overview

Benefits of Interface Preconfiguration

Use of the Interface Preconfigure Command

Active and Standby RSPs and Virtual Interface Configuration

How to Preconfigure Physical Interfaces

Configuration Examples for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces

Preconfiguring an Interface: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

This module describes the preconfiguration of physical interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.

Preconfiguration is supported for the following types of interfaces and controllers:

  • Gigabit Ethernet
  • 10-Gigabit Ethernet
  • Management Ethernet
  • Packet-over-SONET/SDH (POS)
  • Serial
  • SONET controllers and channelized SONET controllers

Preconfiguration allows you to configure modular services cards before they are inserted into the router. When the cards are inserted, they are instantly configured.

The preconfiguration information is created in a different system database tree (known as the preconfiguration directory on the route switch processor [RSP]), rather than with the regularly configured interfaces.

There may be some preconfiguration data that cannot be verified unless the modular services card is present, because the verifiers themselves run only on the modular services card. Such preconfiguration data is verified when the modular services card is inserted and the verifiers are initiated. A configuration is rejected if errors are found when the configuration is copied from the preconfiguration area to the active area.


Note Only physical interfaces can be preconfigured.


Feature History for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces

Release
Modification

Release 3.7.2

Ethernet interface preconfiguration was introduced.

Release 4.0.0

POS interface preconfiguration was introduced.

Prerequisites for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces

You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Before preconfiguring physical interfaces, be sure that the following conditions are met:

  • Preconfiguration drivers and files are installed. Although it may be possible to preconfigure physical interfaces without a preconfiguration driver installed, the preconfiguration files are required to set the interface definition file on the router that supplies the strings for valid interface names.

Information About Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces

To preconfigure interfaces, you must understand the following concepts:

Physical Interface Preconfiguration Overview

Preconfiguration is the process of configuring interfaces before they are present in the system. Preconfigured interfaces are not verified or applied until the actual interface with the matching location (rack/slot/module) is inserted into the router. When the anticipated modular services card is inserted and the interfaces are created, the precreated configuration information is verified and, if successful, immediately applied to the router’s running configuration.


Note When you plug the anticipated modular services card in, make sure to verify any preconfiguration with the appropriate show commands.


Use the show run command to see interfaces that are in the preconfigured state.


Note We recommend filling out preconfiguration information in your site planning guide, so that you can compare that anticipated configuration with the actual preconfigured interfaces when that card is installed and the interfaces are up.



Tip Use the commit best-effort command to save the preconfiguration to the running configuration file. The commit best-effort command merges the target configuration with the running configuration and commits only valid configuration (best effort). Some configuration might fail due to semantic errors, but the valid configuration still comes up.


Benefits of Interface Preconfiguration

Preconfigurations reduce downtime when you add new cards to the system. With preconfiguration, the new modular services card can be instantly configured and actively running during modular services card bootup.

Another advantage of performing a preconfiguration is that during a card replacement, when the modular services card is removed, you can still see the previous configuration and make modifications.

Use of the Interface Preconfigure Command

Interfaces that are not yet present in the system can be preconfigured with the interface preconfigure command in global configuration mode.

The interface preconfigure command places the router in interface configuration mode. Users should be able to add any possible interface commands. The verifiers registered for the preconfigured interfaces verify the configuration. The preconfiguration is complete when the user enters the end command, or any matching exit or global configuration mode command.


Note It is possible that some configurations cannot be verified until the modular services card is inserted.



Note Do not enter the no shutdown command for new preconfigured interfaces, because the no form of this command removes the existing configuration, and there is no existing configuration.


Users are expected to provide names during preconfiguration that will match the name of the interface that will be created. If the interface names do not match, the preconfiguration cannot be applied when the interface is created. The interface names must begin with the interface type that is supported by the router and for which drivers have been installed. However, the slot, port, subinterface number, and channel interface number information cannot be validated.


Note Specifying an interface name that already exists and is configured (or an abbreviated name like e0/3/0/0) is not permitted.


Active and Standby RSPs and Virtual Interface Configuration

The standby RSP is available and in a state in which it can take over the work from the active RSP should that prove necessary. Conditions that necessitate the standby RSP to become the active RSP and assume the active RSP’s duties include:

  • Failure detection by a watchdog
  • Standby RSP is administratively commanded to take over
  • Removal of the active RSP from the chassis

If a second RSP is not present in the chassis while the first is in operation, a second RSP may be inserted and will automatically become the standby RSP. The standby RSP may also be removed from the chassis with no effect on the system other than loss of RSP redundancy.

After failover, the virtual interfaces will all be present on the standby (now active) RSP. Their state and configuration will be unchanged, and there will have been no loss of forwarding (in the case of tunnels) over the interfaces during the failover. The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router uses nonstop forwarding (NSF) over tunnels through the failover of the host RSP.


Note The user does not need to configure anything to guarantee that the standby interface configurations are maintained.


How to Preconfigure Physical Interfaces

This task describes only the most basic preconfiguration of an interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface preconfigure type interface-path-id

3. ipv4 address ip-address subnet-mask

4. Configure additional interface parameters.

5. end
or
commit

6. exit

7. exit

8. show running-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

interface preconfigure type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface preconfigure GigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0

Enters interface preconfiguration mode for an interface, where type specifies the supported interface type that you want to configure and interface-path-id specifies the location where the interface will be located in rack / slot / module / port notation.

Step 3

ipv4 address ip-address subnet-mask

or

ipv4 address ip-address / prefix

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-pre)# ipv4 address 192.168.1.2/32

Assigns an IP address and mask to the interface.

Step 4

Configure additional interface parameters, as described in this manual in the configuration chapter that applies to the type of interface that you are configuring.

Step 5

end

or

commit best-effort

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-pre)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-pre)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
    Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit best-effort command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session. The commit best-effort command merges the target configuration with the running configuration and commits only valid changes (best effort). Some configuration changes might fail due to semantic errors.

Step 6

show running-config

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show running-config

(Optional) Displays the configuration information currently running on the router.

Configuration Examples for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces

This section contains the following example:

Preconfiguring an Interface: Example

Preconfiguring an Interface: Example

The following example shows how to preconfigure a basic Ethernet interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface preconfigure GigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 192.168.1.2/32
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Additional References

The sections that follow provide references related to the preconfiguration of physical interfaces.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Master command reference

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers Master Command Listing

Interface configuration commands

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers Interface and Hardware Component Command Reference

Initial system bootup and configuration information

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Getting Started Guide

Information about user groups and task IDs

Cisco IOS XR Task ID Reference Guide

Standards

Standards
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.

MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link

There are no applicable MIBs for this module.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms using
Cisco IOS XR Software, use the Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml

RFCs

RFCs
Title

No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature, and support for existing RFCs has not been modified by this feature.

Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Technical Support website contains thousands of pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport