Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Configuration Guide, Release 4.2.x
Implementing Point to Point Layer 2 Services
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Table of Contents

Implementing Point to Point Layer 2 Services

Contents

Prerequisites for Implementing Point to Point Layer 2 Services

Information About Implementing Point to Point Layer 2 Services

Layer 2 Virtual Private Network Overview

Layer 2 Local Switching Overview

ATMoMPLS with L2VPN Overview

Virtual Circuit Connection Verification on L2VPN

Ethernet over MPLS

Ethernet Port Mode

VLAN Mode

Inter-AS Mode

QinQ Mode

QinAny Mode

Quality of Service

High Availability

Preferred Tunnel Path

Multisegment Pseudowire

Pseudowire Redundancy

Pseudowire Load Balancing

Ethernet Wire Service

IGMP Snooping

IP Interworking

Any Transport over MPLS

Control Word Processing

High-level Data Link Control over MPLS

PPP over MPLS

Frame Relay over MPLS

MPLS Transport Profile

Circuit Emulation Over Packet Switched Network

Benefits of Circuit Emulation over Packet Switched Network

How to Implement Point to Point Layer 2 Services

Configuring an Interface or Connection for L2VPN

Configuring Local Switching

Configuring Local Connection Redundancy

Configuring Static Point-to-Point Cross-Connects

Configuring Dynamic Point-to-Point Cross-Connects

Configuring Inter-AS

Configuring L2VPN Quality of Service

Restrictions

Configuring an L2VPN Quality of Service Policy in Port Mode

Configuring an L2VPN Quality of Service Policy in VLAN Mode

Configuring Multisegment Pseudowire

Provisioning a Multisegment Pseudowire Configuration

Provisioning a Global Multisegment Pseudowire Description

Provisioning a Cross-Connect Description

Provisioning Switching Point TLV Security

Enabling Multisegment Pseudowires

Configuring Pseudowire Redundancy

Configuring a Backup Pseudowire

Configuring Point-to-Point Pseudowire Redundancy

Forcing a Manual Switchover to the Backup Pseudowire

Configuring Preferred Tunnel Path

Configuring PW Status OAM

Enabling Flow-based Load Balancing

Enabling Flow-based Load Balancing for a Pseudowire Class

Setting Up Your Multicast Connections

Configuring AToM IP Interworking

Configuring Circuit Emulation Over Packet Switched Network

Adding CEM attachment circuit to a Pseudowire

Associating a Pseudowire Class

Enabling Pseudowire Status

Configuring a Backup Pseudowire

Configuration Examples for Point to Point Layer 2 Services

L2VPN Interface Configuration: Example

Local Switching Configuration: Example

Point-to-Point Cross-connect Configuration: Examples

Inter-AS: Example

L2VPN Quality of Service: Example

Pseudowires: Examples

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires at T-PE1 Node: Example

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires at S-PE1 Node: Example

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires at T-PE2 Node: Example

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires and Preferred Paths at T-PE1 Node: Example

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires and Preferred Paths at S-PE1 Node: Example

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires and Preferred Paths at T-PE2 Node: Example

Configuring Static Pseudowires at T-PE1 Node: Example

Configuring Static Pseudowires at S-PE1 Node: Example

Configuring Static Pseudowires at T-PE2 Node: Example

Preferred Path: Example

MPLS Transport Profile: Example

Configuring Preferred Tunnel Path: Example

Configuring PW Status OAM: Example

Viewing Pseudowire Status: Example

show l2vpn xconnect

show l2vpn xconnect detail

Configuring Any Transport over MPLS: Example

Configuring AToM IP Interworking: Example

Configuring Circuit Emulation Over Packet Switched Network: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Implementing Point to Point Layer 2 Services

This module provides conceptual and configuration information for point-to-point Layer 2 (L2) connectivity on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.

These point-to-point services are supported:

  • local switching—A point-to-point circuit internal to a single Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, also known as local connect.
  • pseudowires—A virtual point-to-point circuit from a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router. Pseudowires are implemented over MPLS.

NoteFor more information about MPLS Layer 2 VPN on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router and for descriptions of the commands listed in this module, see the“Related Documents” section. To locate documentation for other commands that might appear while executing a configuration task, search online in the Cisco IOS XR software master command index.


Feature History for Implementing MPLS Layer 2 VPN on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers

 

Release
Modification

Release 3.7.2

This feature was introduced on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers.

Release 3.9.0

Scale enhancements were introduced. See Table 4 for more information on scale enhancements.

Release 4.0.0

Support was added for Any Transport over MPLS (AToM) features.

Release 4.0.1

Support was added for these features:

  • Pseudowire Load Balancing
  • Any Transport over MPLS (AToM) features:

HDLC over MPLS (HDLCoMPLS)

PPP over MPLS (PPPoMPLS)

Release 4.1.0

Support was added for the Flexible Router ID feature.

Release 4.2.0

Support was added for these features:

  • MPLS Transport Profile
  • Circuit EMulation (CEM) over Packet

Prerequisites for Implementing Point to Point Layer 2 Services

You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command.

If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Information About Implementing Point to Point Layer 2 Services

To implement Point to Point Layer 2 Services, you should understand These concepts:

Layer 2 Virtual Private Network Overview

Layer 2 Virtual Private Network (L2VPN) emulates the behavior of a LAN across an L2 switched, IP or MPLS-enabled IP network, allowing Ethernet devices to communicate with each other as they would when connected to a common LAN segment. Point-to-point L2 connections are vital when creating L2VPNs.

As Internet service providers (ISPs) look to replace their Frame Relay or Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) infrastructures with an IP infrastructure, there is a need to provide standard methods of using an L2 switched, IP or MPLS-enabled IP infrastructure. These methods provide a serviceable L2 interface to customers; specifically, to provide virtual circuits between pairs of customer sites.

Building a L2VPN system requires coordination between the ISP and the customer. The ISP provides L2 connectivity; the customer builds a network using data link resources obtained from the ISP. In an L2VPN service, the ISP does not require information about a the customer's network topology, policies, routing information, point-to-point links, or network point-to-point links from other ISPs.

The ISP requires provider edge (PE) routers with these capabilities:

  • Encapsulation of L2 protocol data units (PDU) into Layer 3 (L3) packets.
  • Interconnection of any-to-any L2 transports.
  • Emulation of L2 quality-of-service (QoS) over a packet switch network.
  • Ease of configuration of the L2 service.
  • Support for different types of tunneling mechanisms (MPLS, IPSec, GRE, and others).
  • L2VPN process databases include all information related to circuits and their connections.

Layer 2 Local Switching Overview

Local switching allows you to switch L2 data between two interfaces of the same type, (for example, Ethernet to Ethernet) and on the same router. The interfaces can be on the same line card, or on two different line cards. During these types of switching, Layer 2 address is used instead of the Layer 3 address. A local switching connection switches L2 traffic from one attachment circuit (AC) to the other. The two ports configured in a local switching connection are ACs with respect to that local connection. A local switching connection works like a bridge domain that has only two bridge ports; traffic enters one port of the local connection and leaves the other. However, because there is no bridging involved in a local connection, there is neither MAC learning nor flooding. Also, the ACs in a local connection are not in the UP state if the interface state is DOWN. (This behavior is also different when compared to that of a bridge domain.)

Local switching ACs utilize a full variety of L2 interfaces, including L2 trunk (main) interfaces, bundle interfaces, and EFPs.

Additionally, same-port local switching allows you to switch Layer 2 data between two circuits on the same interface.

ATMoMPLS with L2VPN Overview

ATMoMPLS is a type of Layer 2 point-to-point connection over an MPLS core.

To implement the ATMoMPLS feature, the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router plays the role of provider edge (PE) router at the edge of a provider network in which customer edge (CE) devices are connected to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers.

Virtual Circuit Connection Verification on L2VPN

Virtual Circuit Connection Verification (VCCV) is an L2VPN Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) feature that allows network operators to run IP-based provider edge-to-provider edge (PE-to-PE) keepalive protocol across a specified pseudowire to ensure that the pseudowire data path forwarding does not contain any faults. The disposition PE receives VCCV packets on a control channel, which is associated with the specified pseudowire. The control channel type and connectivity verification type, which are used for VCCV, are negotiated when the pseudowire is established between the PEs for each direction.

Two types of packets can arrive at the disposition egress:

  • Type 1—Specifies normal Ethernet-over-MPLS (EoMPLS) data packets.
  • Type 2—Specifies VCCV packets.

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers supports Label Switched Path (LSP) VCCV Type 1, which uses an inband control word if enabled during signaling. The VCCV echo reply is sent as IPv4 that is the reply mode in IPv4. The reply is forwarded as IP, MPLS, or a combination of both.

VCCV pings counters that are counted in MPLS forwarding on the egress side. However, on the ingress side, they are sourced by the route processor and do not count as MPLS forwarding counters.

Ethernet over MPLS

Ethernet-over-MPLS (EoMPLS) provides a tunneling mechanism for Ethernet traffic through an MPLS-enabled L3 core and encapsulates Ethernet protocol data units (PDUs) inside MPLS packets (using label stacking) to forward them across the MPLS network.

EoMPLS features are described in These subsections:

Ethernet Port Mode

In Ethernet port mode, both ends of a pseudowire are connected to Ethernet ports. In this mode, the port is tunneled over the pseudowire or, using local switching (also known as an attachment circuit-to-attachment circuit cross-connect ) switches packets or frames from one attachment circuit (AC) to another AC attached to the same PE node.

Figure 1 provides an example of Ethernet port mode.

Figure 1 Ethernet Port Mode Packet Flow

VLAN Mode

In VLAN mode, each VLAN on a customer-end to provider-end link can be configured as a separate L2VPN connection using virtual connection (VC) type 4 or VC type 5. VC type 5 is the default mode.

As illustrated in Figure 2, the Ethernet PE associates an internal VLAN-tag to the Ethernet port for switching the traffic internally from the ingress port to the pseudowire; however, before moving traffic into the pseudowire, it removes the internal VLAN tag.

Figure 2 VLAN Mode Packet Flow

 

At the egress VLAN PE, the PE associates a VLAN tag to the frames coming off of the pseudowire and after switching the traffic internally, it sends out the traffic on an Ethernet trunk port.


NoteBecause the port is in trunk mode, the VLAN PE doesn't remove the VLAN tag and forwards the frames through the port with the added tag.


Inter-AS Mode

Inter-AS is a peer-to-peer type model that allows extension of VPNs through multiple provider or multi-domain networks. This lets service providers peer up with one another to offer end-to-end VPN connectivity over extended geographical locations.

EoMPLS support can assume a single AS topology where the pseudowire connecting the PE routers at the two ends of the point-to-point EoMPLS cross-connects resides in the same autonomous system; or multiple AS topologies in which PE routers can reside on two different ASs using iBGP and eBGP peering.

Figure 3 illustrates MPLS over Inter-AS with a basic double AS topology with iBGP/LDP in each AS.

Figure 3 EoMPLS over Inter-AS: Basic Double AS Topology

 

QinQ Mode

QinQ is an extension of 802.1Q for specifying multiple 802.1Q tags (IEEE 802.1QinQ VLAN Tag stacking). Layer 3 VPN service termination and L2VPN service transport are enabled over QinQ sub-interfaces.

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers implement the Layer 2 tunneling or Layer 3 forwarding depending on the subinterface configuration at provider edge routers. This function only supports up to two QinQ tags on the SPA and fixed PLIM:

  • Layer 2 QinQ VLANs in L2VPN attachment circuit: QinQ L2VPN attachment circuits are configured under the Layer 2 transport subinterfaces for point-to-point EoMPLS based cross-connects using both virtual circuit type 4 and type 5 pseudowires and point-to-point local-switching-based cross-connects including full interworking support of QinQ with 802.1q VLANs and port mode.
  • Layer 3 QinQ VLANs: Used as a Layer 3 termination point, both VLANs are removed at the ingress provider edge and added back at the remote provider edge as the frame is forwarded.

Layer 3 services over QinQ include:

  • IPv4 unicast and multicast
  • IPv6 unicast and multicast
  • MPLS
  • Connectionless Network Service (CLNS) for use by Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) Protocol

In QinQ mode, each CE VLAN is carried into an SP VLAN. QinQ mode should use VC type 5, but VC type 4 is also supported. On each Ethernet PE, you must configure both the inner (CE VLAN) and outer (SP VLAN).

Figure 4 illustrates QinQ using VC type 4.

Figure 4 EoMPLS over QinQ Mode

 

QinAny Mode

In the QinAny mode, the service provider VLAN tag is configured on both the ingress and the egress nodes of the provider edge VLAN. QinAny mode is similar to QinQ mode using a Type 5 VC, except that the customer edge VLAN tag is carried in the packet over the pseudowire, as the customer edge VLAN tag is unknown.

Quality of Service

Using L2VPN technology, you can assign a quality of service (QoS) level to both Port and VLAN modes of operation.

L2VPN technology requires that QoS functionality on PE routers be strictly L2-payload-based on the edge-facing interfaces (also know as attachment circuits ). Figure 5 illustrates L2 and L3 QoS service policies in a typical L2VPN network.

Figure 5 L2VPN QoS Feature Application

 

Figure 6 shows four packet processing paths within a provider edge device where a QoS service policy can be attached. In an L2VPN network, packets are received and transmitted on the edge-facing interfaces as L2 packets and transported on the core-facing interfaces as MPLS (EoMPLS) packets.

Figure 6 L2VPN QoS Reference Model

 

High Availability

L2VPN uses control planes in both route processors and line cards, as well as forwarding plane elements in the line cards.

The availability of L2VPN meets these requirements:

  • A control plane failure in either the route processor or the line card will not affect the circuit forwarding path.
  • The router processor control plane supports failover without affecting the line card control and forwarding planes.
  • L2VPN integrates with existing Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) graceful restart mechanism.

Preferred Tunnel Path

Preferred tunnel path functionality lets you map pseudowires to specific traffic-engineering tunnels. Attachment circuits are cross-connected to specific MPLS traffic engineering tunnel interfaces instead of remote PE router IP addresses (reachable using IGP or LDP). Using preferred tunnel path, it is always assumed that the traffic engineering tunnel that transports the L2 traffic runs between the two PE routers (that is, its head starts at the imposition PE router and its tail terminates on the disposition PE router).


Note • Currently, preferred tunnel path configuration applies only to MPLS encapsulation.


 

Multisegment Pseudowire

Pseudowires transport Layer 2 protocol data units (PDUs) across a public switched network (PSN). A multisegment pseudowire is a static or dynamically configured set of two or more contiguous pseudowire segments. These segments act as a single pseudowire, allowing you to:

  • Manage the end-to-end service by separating administrative or provisioning domains.
  • Keep IP addresses of provider edge (PE) nodes private across interautonomous system (inter-AS) boundaries. Use IP address of autonomous system boundary routers (ASBRs) and treat them as pseudowire aggregation routers. The ASBRs join the pseudowires of the two domains.

A multisegment pseudowire can span either an inter-AS boundary or two multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) networks.

A pseudowire is a tunnel between two PE nodes. There are two types of PE nodes:

  • A Switching PE (S-PE) node

Terminates PSN tunnels of the preceding and succeeding pseudowire segments in a multisegment pseudowire.

Switches control and data planes of the preceding and succeeding pseudowire segments of the multisegment pseudowire.

  • A Terminating PE (T-PE) node

Located at both the first and last segments of a multisegment pseudowire.

Where customer-facing attachment circuits (ACs) are bound to a pseudowire forwarder.

Pseudowire Redundancy

Pseudowire redundancy allows you to configure your network to detect a failure in the network and reroute the Layer 2 service to another endpoint that can continue to provide service. This feature provides the ability to recover from a failure of either the remote provider edge (PE) router or the link between the PE and customer edge (CE) routers.

L2VPNs can provide pseudowire resiliency through their routing protocols. When connectivity between end-to-end PE routers fails, an alternative path to the directed LDP session and the user data takes over. However, there are some parts of the network in which this rerouting mechanism does not protect against interruptions in service.

Pseudowire redundancy enables you to set up backup pseudowires. You can configure the network with redundant pseudowires and redundant network elements.

Prior to the failure of the primary pseudowire, the ability to switch traffic to the backup pseudowire is used to handle a planned pseudowire outage, such as router maintenance.


NotePseudowire redundancy is provided only for point-to-point Virtual Private Wire Service (VPWS) pseudowires.


Pseudowire Load Balancing

To maximize networks while maintaining redundancy typically requires traffic load balancing over multiple links. To achieve better and more uniformed distribution, load balancing on the traffic flows that are part of the provisioned pipes is desirable. Load balancing can be flow based according to the IP addresses, Mac addresses, or a combination of those. Load balancing can be flow based according to source or destination IP addresses, or source or destination MAC addresses. Traffic falls back to default flow based MAC addresses if the IP header cannot proceed or IPv6 is be flow based.

This feature applies to pseudowires under L2VPN; this includes both VPWS and VPLS.


NoteEnabling virtual circuit (VC) label based load balancing for a pseudowire class overrides global flow based load balancing under L2VPN.


Ethernet Wire Service

An Ethernet Wire Service is a service that emulates a point-to-point Ethernet segment. This is similar to Ethernet private line (EPL), a Layer 1 point-to-point service, except the provider edge operates at Layer 2 and typically runs over a Layer 2 network. The EWS encapsulates all frames that are received on a particular UNI and transports these frames to a single-egress UNI without reference to the contents contained within the frame. The operation of this service means that an EWS can be used with VLAN-tagged frames. The VLAN tags are transparent to the EWS (bridge protocol data units [BPDUs])—with some exceptions. These exceptions include IEEE 802.1x, IEEE 802.2ad, and IEEE 802.3x, because these frames have local significance and it benefits both the customer and the Service Provider to terminate them locally.

The customer side has these types:

  • Untagged
  • Single tagged
  • Double tagged
  • 802.1q
  • 802.1ad

E-Line Service

E-Line service provides a point-to-point EVC between two UNIs. There are two types of E-Line services:

  • Ethernet Private Line (EPL)

No service multiplexing allowed

Transparent

No coordination between customer and SP on VLAN ID map

  • Ethernet Virtual Private Line (EVPL)

Allows service multiplexing

No need for full transparency of service frames

Ethernet LAN (E-LAN) Service

E-LAN service provides multipoint connectivity (can connect two or more UNIs). All sites have Ethernet connectivity with each other (inside the cloud is a multipoint-to-multipoint EVC).

Types of E-LAN services:

Transparent LAN Service (TLS)

  • Bundled service

Ethernet Virtual Connection Service (EVCS)

  • Per-VLAN service-multiplexed service

The Cisco Ethernet Relay Service concept corresponds to the MEF Ethernet Virtual Private Line concept. The Cisco Ethernet Wire Service concept corresponds to the MEF Ethernet Private Line concept. The Cisco Multipoint Service concept corresponds to the MEF Transparent LAN Service concept. The Cisco Multipoint Relay Service concept corresponds to the MEF Ethernet Virtual Connection Service concept. A UNI is the demarcation between the CE and the provider edge (PE).

Ethernet service is what the Service Provider provides between UNIs.

  • Ethernet Line service (E-Line) point-to-point
  • Ethernet LAN service (E-LAN) multipoint
  • Ethernet Tree service (E-Tree) point-to-multipoint

This is Carrier Ethernet. This can replace Frame Relay/ATM within the cloud with the benefits including faster speeds (GigE and 10GigE). VPLS (Virtual Private LAN Service) is an end-to-end architecture that allows MPLS networks to provide Multipoint Ethernet services. It is “Virtual” because multiple instances of this service share the same physical infrastructure. It is “Private” because each instance of the service is independent and isolated from one another. It is “LAN Service” because it emulates Layer 2 multipoint connectivity between subscribers.

IGMP Snooping

IGMP snooping provides a way to constrain multicast traffic at Layer 2. By snooping the IGMP membership reports sent by hosts in the bridge domain, the IGMP snooping application can set up Layer 2 multicast forwarding tables to deliver traffic only to ports with at least one interested member, significantly reducing the volume of multicast traffic.

Configured at Layer 3, IGMP provides a means for hosts in an IPv4 multicast network to indicate which multicast traffic they are interested in and for routers to control and limit the flow of multicast traffic in the network (at Layer 3).

IGMP snooping uses the information in IGMP membership report messages to build corresponding information in the forwarding tables to restrict IP multicast traffic at Layer 2. The forwarding table entries are in the form <Route, OIF List>, where:

  • Route is a <*, G> route or <S, G> route.
  • OIF List comprises all bridge ports that have sent IGMP membership reports for the specified route plus all Multicast Router (mrouter) ports in the bridge domain.

The IGMP snooping feature can provide these benefits to a multicast network:

  • Basic IGMP snooping reduces bandwidth consumption by reducing multicast traffic that would otherwise flood an entire VPLS bridge domain.
  • With optional configuration options, IGMP snooping can provide security between bridge domains by filtering the IGMP reports received from hosts on one bridge port and preventing leakage towards the hosts on other bridge ports.
  • With optional configuration options, IGMP snooping can reduce the traffic impact on upstream IP multicast routers by suppressing IGMP membership reports (IGMPv2) or by acting as an IGMP proxy reporter (IGMPv3) to the upstream IP multicast router.

Refer to the Implementing Layer 2 Multicast with IGMP Snooping module in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Multicast Configuration Guide for information on configuring IGMP snooping.

The applicable IGMP snooping commands are described in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Multicast Command Reference .

IP Interworking

Customer deployments require a solution to support AToM with disparate transport at network ends. This solution must have the capability to translate transport on one customer edge (CE) device to another transport, for example, Frame relay to Ethernet. The Cisco ASR 9000 Series SPA Interface Processor-700 and the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Ethernet line cards enable the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers to support multiple legacy services.

IP Interworking is a solution for transporting Layer 2 traffic over an IP/MPLS backbone. It accommodates many types of Layer 2 frames such as Ethernet and Frame Relay using AToM tunnels. It encapsulates packets at the provider edge (PE) router, transports them over the backbone to the PE router on the other side of the cloud, removes the encapsulation, and transports them to the destination. The transport layer can be Ethernet on one end and Frame relay on the other end. IP interworking occurs between disparate endpoints of the AToM tunnels.


NoteOnly routed interworking is supported between Ethernet and Frame Relay based networks for MPLS and Local-connect scenarios.


Figure 7 shows the interoperability between an Ethernet attachment VC and a Frame Relay attachment VC.

Figure 7 IP Interworking over MPLS Core

 

An attachment circuit (AC) is a physical or logical port or circuit that connects a CE device to a PE device. A pseudowire (PW) is a bidirectional virtual connection (VC) connecting two ACs. In an MPLS network, PWs are carried inside an LSP tunnel. The core facing line card on the PE1 and PE2 could be a Cisco ASR 9000 Series SPA Interface Processor-700 or a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Ethernet line card.

In the IP Interworking mode, the Layer 2 (L2) header is removed from the packets received on an ingress PE, and only the IP payload is transmitted to the egress PE. On the egress PE, an L2 header is appended before the packet is transmitted out of the egress port.

In Figure 7, CE1 and CE2 could be a Frame Relay (FR) interface or a GigabitEthernet (GigE) interface. Assuming CE1 is a FR and CE2 is either a GigE or dot1q, or QinQ. For packets arriving from an Ethernet CE (CE2), ingress LC on the PE (PE2) facing the CE removes L2 framing and forwards the packet to egress PE (PE1) using IPoMPLS encapsulation over a pseudowire. The core facing line card on egress PE removes the MPLS labels but preserves the control word and transmits it to the egress line card facing FR CE (CE1). At the FR PE, after label disposition, the Layer 3 (L3) packets are encapsulated over FR.

Similarly, IP packets arriving from the FR CE are translated into IPoMPLS encapsulation over the pseudowire. At the Ethernet PE side, after label disposition, the PE adds L2 Ethernet packet header back to the packet before transmitting it to the CE, as the packets coming out from the core carry only the IP payload.

These modes support IP Interworking on AToM:

  • Ethernet to Frame Relay

Packets arriving from the Ethernet CE device have MAC (port-mode, untagged, single, double tag), IPv4 header and data. The Ethernet line card removes the L2 framing and then forwards the L3 packet to the egress line card. The egress line card adds the FR L2 header before transmitting it from the egress port.

  • Ethernet to Ethernet

Both the CE devices are Ethernet. Each ethernet interface can be port-mode, untagged, single, or double tag, although this is not a typical scenario for IP interworking.

Any Transport over MPLS

Any Transport over MPLS (AToM) transports Layer 2 packets over a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) backbone. This enables service providers to connect customer sites with existing Layer 2 networks by using a single, integrated, packet-based network infrastructure. Using this feature, service providers can deliver Layer 2 connections over an MPLS backbone, instead of using separate networks.

AToM encapsulates Layer 2 frames at the ingress PE router, and sends them to a corresponding PE router at the other end of a pseudowire, which is a connection between the two PE routers. The egress PE removes the encapsulation and sends out the Layer 2 frame.

The successful transmission of the Layer 2 frames between PE routers is due to the configuration of the PE routers. You set up a connection, called a pseudowire, between the routers. You specify this information on each PE router:

  • The type of Layer 2 data that will be transported across the pseudowire, such as Ethernet and Frame Relay.
  • The IP address of the loopback interface of the peer PE router, which enables the PE routers to communicate
  • A unique combination of peer PE IP address and VC ID that identifies the pseudowire

Control Word Processing

The control word contains forward explicit congestion notification (FECN), backward explicit congestion notification (BECN) and DE bits in case of frame relay connection.

Control word is mandatory for:

  • Frame Relay
  • ATM AAL5
  • Frame Relay to Ethernet bridged interworking
  • cHDLC/PPP IP interworking
  • CEM (Circuit Emulation)

The system does not map bits from one transport end point to another across an AToM IP Interworking connection.

Whenever supported, control word is also recommended for pseudowires, as it enables proper load balancing without packet desequencing independent of L2VPN packet content. Without control word the heuristics used to perform load balancing cannot achieve optimal results in all cases.

High-level Data Link Control over MPLS

The attachment circuit (AC) is a main interface configured with HDLC encapsulation. Packets to or from the AC are transported using an AToM pseudowire (PW) of VC type 0x6 to or from the other provider edge (PE) router over the MPLS core network.

With HDLC over MPLS, the entire HDLC packet is transported. The ingress PE router removes only the HDLC flags and FCS bits.

PPP over MPLS

The attachment circuit (AC) is a main interface configured with PPP encapsulation. Packets to or from the AC are transported through an AToM PW of VC type 0x7 to or from the other provider edge (PE) routers over the MPLS core network.

With PPP over MPLS, the ingress PE router removes the flags, address, control field, and the FCS bits.

Frame Relay over MPLS

Frame Relay over MPLS (FRoMPLS) provides leased line type of connectivity between two Frame Relay islands. Frame Relay traffic is transported over the MPLS network.


NoteThe Data Link Connection Identifier (DLCI) DCLI-DLCI mode is supported. A control word (required for DLCI-DLCI mode) is used to carry additional control information.


When a Provider Edge (PE) router receives a Frame Relay protocol packet from a subscriber site, it removes the Frame Relay header and Frame Check Sequence (FCS) and appends the appropriate Virtual Circuit (VC) label. The removed Backward Explicit Congestion Notification (BECN), Forward Explicit Congestion Notification (FECN), Discard Eligible (DE) and Command/Response (C/R) bits are (for DLCI-DLCI mode) sent separately using a control word.

MPLS Transport Profile

MPLS transport profile (MPLS-TP) tunnels provide the transport network service layer over which IP and MPLS traffic traverse. Within the MPLS-TP environment, pseudowires (PWs) use MPLS-TP tunnels as the transport mechanism. MPLS-TP tunnels help transition from SONET/SDH TDM technologies to packet switching, to support services with high bandwidth utilization and low cost. Transport networks are connection oriented, statically provisioned, and have long-lived connections. Transport networks usually avoid control protocols that change identifiers (like labels). MPLS-TP tunnels provide this functionality through statically provisioned bidirectional label switched paths (LSPs).

For more information on configuring MPLS transport profile, refer to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router MPLS Configuration Guide .

MPLS-TP supports these combinations of static and dynamic multisegment pseudowires:

  • Static-static
  • Static-dynamic
  • Dynamic-static
  • Dynamic-dynamic

MPLS-TP supports one-to-one L2VPN pseudowire redundancy for these combinations of static and dynamic pseudowires:

  • Static pseudowire with a static backup pseudowire
  • Static pseudowire with a dynamic backup pseudowire
  • Dynamic pseudowire with a static backup pseudowire
  • Dynamic pseudowire with a dynamic backup pseudowire

The existing TE preferred path feature is used to pin down a PW to an MPLS-TP transport tunnel. See Configuring Preferred Tunnel Path for more information on configuring preferred tunnel path. For a dynamic pseudowire, PW status is exchanged through LDP whereas for static PW, status is transported in PW OAM message. See Configuring PW Status OAM for more information on configuring PW status OAM. By default, alarms are not generated when the state of a PW changes due to change in the state of MPLS TP tunnel carrying that PW. See for more information on configuring PW event suppression.

Circuit Emulation Over Packet Switched Network

Circuit Emulation over Packet (CEoP) is a method of carrying TDM circuits over packet switched network. CEoP is similar to a physical connection. The goal of CEoP is to replace leased lines and legacy TDM networks (Figure 8).

CEoP operates in two major modes:

  • Unstructured mode is called SAToP (Structure Agnostic TDM over Packet)

SAToP addresses only structure-agnostic transport, i.e., unframed E1, T1, E3 and T3. It segments all TDM services as bit streams and then encapsulates them for transmission over a PW tunnel. This protocol can transparently transmit TDM traffic data and synchronous timing information. SAToP completely disregards any structure and provider edge routers (PEs) do not need to interpret the TDM data or to participate in the TDM signaling. The protocol is a simple way for transparent transmission of PDH bit-streams.

  • Structured mode is named CESoPSN (Circuit Emulation Service over Packet Switched Network)

Compared with SAToP, CESoPSN transmits emulated structured TDM signals. That is, it can identify and process the frame structure and transmit signaling in TDM frames. It may not transmit idle timeslot channels, but only extracts useful timeslots of CE devices from the E1 traffic stream and then encapsulates them into PW packets for transmission.CEoP SPAs are half-height (HH) Shared Port Adapters (SPA) and the CEoP SPA family consists of 24xT1/E1, 2xT3/E3, and 1xOC3/STM1 unstructured and structured (NxDS0) quarter rate, half height SPAs.

The CEM functionality is supported only on Engine 5 line cards having CEoP SPAs. CEM is supported on:

  • 1-port Channelized OC3 STM1 ATM CEoP SPA (SPA-1CHOC3-CE-ATM)

Figure 8 Enterprise Data Convergence using Circuit Emulation over Packet

 

CESoPSN and SAToP can use MPLS, UDP/IP, and L2TPv3 as the underlying transport mechanism. This release supports only MPLS transport mechanism.

CEoP SPA supports these modes of operation:

  • Circuit Emulation Mode (CEM)
  • ATM Mode
  • IMA Mode

NoteOnly CEM mode is supported.


Benefits of Circuit Emulation over Packet Switched Network

CEM offers thse benefits to the service provider and end-users:

  • Saving cost in installing equipment.
  • Saving cost in network operations; as leased lines are expensive, limiting their usage to access only mode saves significant costs.
  • Ensuring low maintenance cost because only the core network needs to be maintained.
  • Utilizing the core network resources more efficiently with packet switched network, while keeping investment in access network intact.
  • Providing cheaper services to the end-user.

How to Implement Point to Point Layer 2 Services

This section describes the tasks required to implement L2VPN:

Configuring an Interface or Connection for L2VPN

Perform this task to configure an interface or a connection for L2VPN.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface type interface-path-id

3. l2transport

4. exit

5. interface type interface-path-id

6. end
or
commit

7. show interface type interface-id

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0/0

Enters interface configuration mode and configures an interface.

Step 3

l2transport

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# l2transport

Enables L2 transport on the selected interface.

Step 4

exit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-l2)# exit

Exits the current configuration mode.

Step 5

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0

Enters interface configuration mode and configures an interface.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 7

show interface type interface-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show interface gigabitethernet 0/0/0/0

(Optional) Displays the configuration settings you committed for the interface.

Configuring Local Switching

Perform this task to configure local switching.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. xconnect group group-name

4. p2p xconnect-name

5. interface type interface-path-id

6. interface type interface-path-id

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group grp_1

Enters the name of the cross-connect group.

Step 4

p2p xconnect-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p vlan1

Enters a name for the point-to-point cross-connect.

Step 5

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface TenGigE 0/7/0/6.5

Specifies the interface type ID. The choices are:

  • GigabitEthernet: Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces
  • TenGigE: TenGigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces
  • CEM: Circuit Emulation interface

Step 6

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface GigabitEthernet0/4/0/30

Specifies the interface type ID. The choices are:

  • GigabitEthernet: Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces
  • TenGigE: TenGigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Local Connection Redundancy

Perform this task to configure local connection redundancy.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. xconnect group group-name

4. p2p xconnect-name

5. backup interface type interface-path-id

6. interface type interface-path-id

7. interface type interface-path-id

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group grp_1

Enters the name of the cross-connect group.

Step 4

p2p xconnect-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p vlan1

Enters a name for the point-to-point cross-connect.

Step 5

backup interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# backup interface Bundle-Ether 0/7/0/6.5

Configures local connect redundancy.

Step 6

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface Bundle-Ether 0/7/0/6.2

Specifies the interface type ID. The choices are:

  • GigabitEthernet: Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.
  • TenGigE: TenGigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.
  • CEM: Circuit Emulation interface

Step 7

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface Bundle-Ether 0/7/0/6.1

Specifies the interface type ID. The choices are:

  • GigabitEthernet: Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.
  • TenGigE: TenGigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Static Point-to-Point Cross-Connects

Perform this task to configure static point-to-point cross-connects.

Please consider this information about cross-connects when you configure static point-to-point cross-connects:

  • An cross-connect is uniquely identified with the pair; the cross-connect name must be unique within a group.
  • A segment (an attachment circuit or pseudowire) is unique and can belong only to a single cross-connect.
  • A static VC local label is globally unique and can be used in one pseudowire only.
  • No more than 16,000 cross-connects can be configured per router.

NoteStatic pseudowire connections do not use LDP for signaling.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. xconnect group group-name

4. p2p xconnect-name

5. interface type interface-path-id

6. neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id pseudowire-id

7. mpls static label local { value } remote { value }

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group grp_1

Enters the name of the cross-connect group.

Step 4

p2p xconnect-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p vlan1

Enters a name for the point-to-point cross-connect.

Step 5

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/9

Specifies the interface type and instance.

Step 6

neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id pseudowire-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.2.2.2 pw-id 2000

Configures the pseudowire segment for the cross-connect.

Use the A.B.C.D argument to specify the IP address of the cross-connect peer.

Note A.B.C.D can be a recursive or non-recursive prefix.

Optionally, you can disable the control word or set the transport-type to Ethernet or VLAN.

Step 7

mpls static label local { value } remote { value }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# mpls static label local 699 remote 890

Configures local and remote label ID values.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Dynamic Point-to-Point Cross-Connects

Perform this task to configure dynamic point-to-point cross-connects.


NoteFor dynamic cross-connects, LDP must be up and running.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. xconnect group group-name

4. p2p xconnect-name

5. interface type interface-path-id

6. neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id pseudowire-id

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters the configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group grp_1

Enters the name of the cross-connect group.

Step 4

p2p xconnect-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p vlan1

Enters a name for the point-to-point cross-connect.

Step 5

interface type interface-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0.1

Specifies the interface type ID. The choices are:

  • GigabitEthernet: GigabitEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.
  • TenGigE: TenGigabitEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.
  • CEM: Circuit Emulation interface

Step 6

neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id pseudowire-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.2.2.2 pw-id 2000

Configures the pseudowire segment for the cross-connect.

Optionally, you can disable the control word or set the transport-type to Ethernet or VLAN.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Inter-AS

The Inter-AS configuration procedure is identical to the L2VPN cross-connect configuration tasks (see “Configuring Static Point-to-Point Cross-Connects” section and “Configuring Dynamic Point-to-Point Cross-Connects” section) except that the remote PE IP address used by the cross-connect configuration is now reachable through iBGP peering.


NoteYou must be knowledgeable about IBGP, EBGP, and ASBR terminology and configurations to complete this configuration.


Configuring L2VPN Quality of Service

This section describes how to configure L2VPN quality of service (QoS) in port mode and VLAN mode.

Restrictions

The l2transport command cannot be used with any IP address, L3, or CDP configuration.

Configuring an L2VPN Quality of Service Policy in Port Mode

This procedure describes how to configure an L2VPN QoS policy in port mode.


NoteIn port mode, the interface name format does not include a subinterface number; for example, GigabitEthernet0/1/0/1.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface type interface-path-id

3. l2transport

4. service-policy [ input | output ] [policy-map-name]

5. end
or
commit

6. show qos interface type interface-path-id service-policy [ input | output ] [ policy-map-name ]

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters the configuration mode.

Step 2

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0

Specifies the interface attachment circuit.

Step 3

l2transport

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# l2transport

Configures an interface or connection for L2 switching.

Step 4

service-policy [ input | output ] [ policy-map-name ]

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service-policy input servpol1

Attaches a QoS policy to an input or output interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 6

show qos interface type interface-id service-policy [input | output] [policy-map-name]

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show qos interface gigabitethernet 0/0/0/0 input serpol1

(Optional) Displays the QoS service policy you defined.

Configuring an L2VPN Quality of Service Policy in VLAN Mode

This procedure describes how to configure a L2VPN QoS policy in VLAN mode.


NoteIn VLAN mode, the interface name must include a subinterface. For example:
GigabitEthernet 0/1/0/1.1
The l2transport command must follow the interface type on the same CLI line. For example:
interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0/0.1 l2transport


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface type interface-path-id.subinterface l2transport

3. service-policy [ input | output ] [policy-map-name]

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters the configuration mode.

Step 2

interface type interface-path-id.subinterface l2transport

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0.1 l2transport

Configures an interface or connection for L2 switching.

Note In VLAN Mode, you must enter the l2transport keyword on the same line as the interface.

Step 3

service-policy [ input | output ] [policy-map-name]

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service-policy input servpol1

Attaches a QoS policy to an input or output interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Provisioning a Multisegment Pseudowire Configuration

Configure a multisegment pseudowire as a point-to-point (p2p) cross-connect. For more information on P2P cross-connects, see the “Configuring Static Point-to-Point Cross-Connects” section.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. xconnect group group-name

4. p2p xconnect-name

5. neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id value

6. pw-class class-name

7. exit

8. neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id value

9. pw-class class-name

10. commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters Layer 2 VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group MS-PW1

Configures a cross-connect group name using a free-format 32-character string.

Step 4

p2p xconnect-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p ms-pw1

Enters P2P configuration submode.

Step 5

neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id value

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.200.25 pw-id 100

Configures a pseudowire for a cross-connect.

The IP address is that of the corresponding PE node.

The pw-id must match the pw-id of the PE node.

Step 6

pw-class class-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

Enters pseudowire class submode, allowing you to define a pseudowire class template.

Step 7

exit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# exit

Exits pseudowire class submode and returns the router to the parent configuration mode.

Step 8

neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id value

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.202.158 pw-id 300

Configures a pseudowire for a cross-connect.

The IP address is that of the corresponding PE node.

The pw-id must match the pw-id of the PE node.

Step 9

pw-class class-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

Enters pseudowire class submode, allowing you to define a pseudowire class template.

Step 10

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Saves configuration changes to the running configuration file and remains in the configuration session.

Provisioning a Global Multisegment Pseudowire Description

S-PE nodes must have a description in the Pseudowire Switching Point Type-Length-Value (TLV). The TLV records all the switching points the pseudowire traverses, creating a helpful history for troubleshooting.

Each multisegment pseudowire can have its own description. For instructions, see the “Provisioning a Cross-Connect Description” section. If it does not have one, this global description is used.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. description value

4. commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters Layer 2 VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

description value

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# description S-PE1

Populates the Pseudowire Switching Point TLV. This TLV records all the switching points the pseudowire traverses.

Each multisegment pseudowire can have its own description. If it does not have one, this global description is used.

Step 4

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# commit

Saves configuration changes to the running configuration file and remains in the configuration session.

Provisioning a Cross-Connect Description

S-PE nodes must have a description in the Pseudowire Switching Point TLV. The TLV records all the switching points the pseudowire traverses, creating a history that is helpful for troubleshooting.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. xconnect group group-name

4. p2p xconnect-name

5. description value

6. commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters Layer 2 VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group MS-PW1

Configures a cross-connect group name using a free-format 32-character string.

Step 4

p2p xconnect-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p ms-pw1

Enters P2P configuration submode.

Step 5

description value

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# description MS-PW from T-PE1 to T-PE2

Populates the Pseudowire Switching Point TLV. This TLV records all the switching points the pseudowire traverses.

Each multisegment pseudowire can have its own description. If it does not have one, a global description is used. For more information, see the “Provisioning a Multisegment Pseudowire Configuration” section.

Step 6

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# commit

Saves configuration changes to the running configuration file and remains in the configuration session.

Provisioning Switching Point TLV Security

For security purposes, the TLV can be hidden, preventing someone from viewing all the switching points the pseudowire traverses.

Virtual Circuit Connection Verification (VCCV) may not work on multisegment pseudowires with the switching-tlv parameter set to “hide”. For more information on VCCV, see the “Virtual Circuit Connection Verification on L2VPN” section.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. pw-class class-name

4. encapsulation mpls

5. protocol ldp

6. switching-tlv hide

7. commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config)# l2vpn

Enters Layer 2 VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

pw-class class-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

Enters pseudowire class submode, allowing you to define a pseudowire class template.

Step 4

encapsulation mpls

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

Sets pseudowire encapsulation to MPLS.

Step 5

protocol ldp

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# protocol ldp

Sets pseudowire signaling protocol to LDP.

Step 6

switching-tlv hide

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# switching-tlv hide

Sets pseudowire TLV to hide.

Step 7

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# commit

Saves configuration changes to the running configuration file and remains in the configuration session.

Enabling Multisegment Pseudowires

Use the pw-status command after you enable the pw-status command. The pw-status command is disabled by default. Changing the pw-status command reprovisions all pseudowires configured under L2VPN.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. pw-status

4. commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config)# l2vpn

Enters Layer 2 VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

pw-status

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn)# pw-status

Enables all pseudowires configured on this Layer 2 VPN.

Note Use the pw-status disable command to disable pseudowire status.

Step 4

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn)# commit

Saves configuration changes to the running configuration file and remains in the configuration session.

Configuring Pseudowire Redundancy

Pseudowire redundancy allows you to configure a backup pseudowire in case the primary pseudowire fails. When the primary pseudowire fails, the PE router can switch to the backup pseudowire. You can elect to have the primary pseudowire resume operation after it becomes functional.

These topics describe how to configure pseudowire redundancy:

Configuring a Backup Pseudowire

Perform this task to configure a backup pseudowire for a point-to-point neighbor.


NoteWhen you reprovision a primary pseudowire, traffic resumes in two seconds. However, when you reprovision a backup pseudowire, traffic will resume after a delay of 45 to 60 seconds. This is expected behavior.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. xconnect group group-name

4. p2p { xconnect-name }

5. neighbor { A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

6. backup { neighbor A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)#

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/O/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group A

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)#

Enters the name of the cross-connect group.

Step 4

p2p { xconnect-name }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p xc1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)#

Enters a name for the point-to-point cross-connect.

Step 5

neighbor { A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.1.1.2 pw-id 2

Configures the pseudowire segment for the cross-connect.

Step 6

backup {neighbor A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# backup neighbor 10.2.2.2 pw-id 5

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)#

Configures the backup pseudowire for the cross-connect.

  • Use the neighbor keyword to specify the peer to cross-connect. The IP address argument ( A.B.C.D ) is the IPv4 address of the peer.
  • Use the pw-id keyword to configure the pseudowire ID. The range is from 1 to 4294967295.

Step 7

end
or
commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)# end
or
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Point-to-Point Pseudowire Redundancy

Perform this task to configure point-to-point pseudowire redundancy for a backup delay.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. pw-class { class-name }

4. backup disable { delay value | never }

5. exit

6. xconnect group group-name

7. p2p { xconnect-name }

8. neighbor { A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

9. pw-class { class-name }

10. backup { neighbor A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

11. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)#

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

pw-class {class- name }

 

RP/O/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# pw-class path1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc)#

Configures the pseudowire class name.

Step 4

backup disable { delay value | never }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc)# backup disable delay 20

This command specifies how long the primary pseudowire should wait after it becomes active to take over from the backup pseudowire.

  • Use the delay keyword to specify the number of seconds that elapse after the primary pseudowire comes up before the secondary pseudowire is deactivated. The range is from 0 to 180.
  • Use the never keyword to specify that the secondary pseudowire does not fall back to the primary pseudowire if the primary pseudowire becomes available again, unless the secondary pseudowire fails.

Step 5

exit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc)# exit

RP/O/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)#

Exits the current configuration mode.

Step 6

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group A

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)#

Enters the name of the cross-connect group.

Step 7

p2p { xconnect-name }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p xc1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)#

Enters a name for the point-to-point cross-connect.

Step 8

neighbor { A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.1.1.2 pw-id 2

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)#

Configures the pseudowire segment for the cross-connect.

Step 9

pw-class {class- name }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class path1

Configures the pseudowire class name.

Step 10

backup { neighbor A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# backup neighbor 10.2.2.2 pw-id 5

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)#

Configures the backup pseudowire for the cross-connect.

  • Use the neighbor keyword to specify the peer to the cross-connect. The A.B.C.D argument is the IPv4 address of the peer.
  • Use the pw-id keyword to configure the pseudowire ID. The range is from 1 to 4294967295.

Step 11

end
or
commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)# end
or
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Forcing a Manual Switchover to the Backup Pseudowire

To force the router to switch over to the backup or switch back to the primary pseudowire, use the l2vpn switchover command in EXEC mode.

A manual switchover is made only if the peer specified in the command is actually available and the cross-connect moves to the fully active state when the command is entered.

Configuring Preferred Tunnel Path

This procedure describes how to configure a preferred tunnel path.


NoteThe tunnel used for the preferred path configuration is an MPLS Traffic Engineering (MPLS-TE) tunnel.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. pw-class { name }

4. encapsulation mpls

5. preferred-path { interface } { tunnel-ip value | tunnel-te value | tunnel-tp value } [ fallback disable ]

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters the configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

pw-class { name }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# pw-class path1

Configures the pseudowire class name.

Step 4

encapsulation mpls

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

Configures the pseudowire encapsulation to MPLS.

Step 5

preferred-path { interface } { tunnel-ip value | tunnel-te value | tunnel-tp value } [ fallback disable ]

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-
mpls)# preferred-path interface tunnel-te 11 fallback disable

Configures preferred path tunnel settings. If the fallback disable configuration is used and once the TE/TP tunnel is configured as the preferred path goes down, the corresponding pseudowire can also go down.

Note Ensure that fallback is supported.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-
mpls)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-
mpls-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring PW Status OAM

Perform this task to configure pseudowire status OAM.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. pw-oam refresh transmit seconds

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters the configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

pw-oam refresh transmit seconds

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# pw-oam refresh transmit 100

Enables pseudowire OAM functionality.

Note The refresh transmit interval ranges from 1 to 40 seconds.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Enabling Flow-based Load Balancing

Perform this task to enable flow-based load balancing.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. load-balancing flow { src-dst-mac | src-dst-ip }

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters the configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

load-balancing flow { src-dst-mac | src-dst-ip }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# load-balancing flow src-dst-ip

Enables flow based load balancing for all the pseudowires and bundle EFPs under L2VPN, unless otherwise explicitly specified for pseudowires via pseudowire class and bundles via EFP-hash.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Enabling Flow-based Load Balancing for a Pseudowire Class

Perform this task to enable flow-based load balancing for a pseudowire class.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. pw-class { name }

4. encapsulation mpls

5. load-balancing pw-label

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters the configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

pw-class { name }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# pw-class path1

Configures the pseudowire class name.

Step 4

encapsulation mpls

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

Configures the pseudowire encapsulation to MPLS.

Step 5

load-balancing pw-lab el

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-
mpls)# load-balancing pw-label

Enables all pseudowires using the defined class to use virtual circuit based load balancing.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-
mpls)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-
mpls)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Setting Up Your Multicast Connections

Refer to the Implementing Multicast Routing on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers module of the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Multicast Configuration Guide and the Multicast Routing and Forwarding Commands on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers module of the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Multicast Command Reference .

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. multicast-routing

3. address-family ipv4

4. nsf

5. interface all enable

6. accounting per-prefix

7. router pim

8. vrf default address-family ipv4

9. rp-address

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

multicast-routing [ address-family ipv4 ]

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# multicast-routing

Enters multicast routing configuration mode.

  • These multicast processes are started: MRIB, MFWD, PIM, and IGMP.
  • For IPv4, IGMP version 3 is enabled by default.
  • For IPv4, use the address-family ipv4 keywords.

Step 3

interface all enable

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mcast-ipv4)# interface all enable

Enables multicast routing and forwarding on all new and existing interfaces.

Step 4

exit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mcast-ipv4)# exit

Exits multicast routing configuration mode, and returns the router to the parent configuration mode.

Step 5

router igmp

 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# router igmp

(Optional) Enters router IGMP configuration mode.

Step 6

version { 1 | 2 | 3 }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-igmp)# version 3

(Optional) Selects the IGMP version that the router interface uses.

  • The default for IGMP is version 3.
  • Host receivers must support IGMPv3 for PIM-SSM operation.
  • If this command is configured in router IGMP configuration mode, parameters are inherited by all new and existing interfaces. You can override these parameters on individual interfaces from interface configuration mode.

Step 7

end
or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-igmp)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-igmp)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 8

show pim [ ipv4 ] group-map [ ip-address-name ] [ info-source ]

 

RP/0//CPU0:router# show pim ipv4 group-map

(Optional) Displays group-to-PIM mode mapping.

Step 9

show pim [ vrf vrf-name ] [ ipv4 ] topology [ source-ip-address [ group-ip-address ] | entry-flag flag | interface-flag | summary ] [ route-count ]

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show pim topology

(Optional) Displays PIM topology table information for a specific group or all groups.

Configuring AToM IP Interworking

Perform this task to configure AToM IP Interworking.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. xconnect group group-name

4. p2p xconnect-name

5. interworking ipv4

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group grp_1

Enters the name of the cross-connect group.

Step 4

p2p xconnect-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p vlan1

Enters a name for the point-to-point cross-connect.

Step 5

interworking ipv4

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interworking ipv4

Configures IPv4 interworking under P2P.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Circuit Emulation Over Packet Switched Network

Perform these tasks to configure CEoP:

Adding CEM attachment circuit to a Pseudowire

Perform this task to add a CEM attachment circuit to a pseudowire.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. xconnect group group-name

4. p2p xconnect-name

5. interface type interface-path-id

6. neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id pseudowire-id

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group grp_1

Enters the name of the cross-connect group.

Step 4

p2p xconnect-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p vlan1

Enters a name for the point-to-point cross-connect.

Step 5

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface CEM0/1/0/9:10

Specifies the interface type and instance.

Step 6

neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id pseudowire-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.2.2.2 pw-id 11

Configures the pseudowire segment for the cross-connect.

Use the A.B.C.D argument to specify the IP address of the cross-connect peer.

Note A.B.C.D can be a recursive or non-recursive prefix.

Optionally, you can disable the control word or set the transport-type to Ethernet or VLAN.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Associating a Pseudowire Class

Perform this task to associate the attachment circuit with a pseudowire class.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. pw-class class-name

4. encapsulation mpls

5. protocol ldp

6. end

7. xconnect group group-name

8. p2p xconnect-name

9. interface type interface-path-id

10. neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id pseudowire-id

11. pw-class class-name

12. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config)# l2vpn

Enters Layer 2 VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

pw-class class-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn)# pw-class class_cem

Enters pseudowire class submode, allowing you to define a pseudowire class template.

Step 4

encapsulation mpls

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

Sets pseudowire encapsulation to MPLS.

Step 5

protocol ldp

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# protocol ldp

Sets pseudowire signaling protocol to LDP.

Step 6

end

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# end

System prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Step 7

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group grp_1

Configures a cross-connect group.

Step 8

p2p xconnect-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p vlan1

Configures a point-to-point cross-connect.

Step 9

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface CEM0/1/0/9:20

Specifies the interface type and instance.

Step 10

neighbor A.B.C.D pw-id pseudowire-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.2.2.2 pw-id 11

Configures the pseudowire segment for the cross-connect.

Use the A.B.C.D argument to specify the IP address of the cross-connect peer.

Note A.B.C.D can be a recursive or non-recursive prefix.

Optionally, you can disable the control word or set the transport-type to Ethernet or VLAN.

Step 11

pw-class class-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# pw-class class_cem

Associates the P2P attachment circuit with the specified pseudowire class.

Step 12

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Enabling Pseudowire Status

Perform this task to enable pseudowire status.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. pw-status

4. commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config)# l2vpn

Enters Layer 2 VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

pw-status

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn)# pw-status

Enables all pseudowires configured on this Layer 2 VPN.

Note Use the pw-status disable command to disable pseudowire status.

Step 4

commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn)# commit

Saves configuration changes to the running configuration file and remains in the configuration session.

Configuring a Backup Pseudowire

Perform this task to configure a backup pseudowire for a point-to-point neighbor.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. l2vpn

3. xconnect group group-name

4. p2p { xconnect-name }

5. neighbor { A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

6. backup { neighbor A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2

l2vpn

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)#

Enters L2VPN configuration mode.

Step 3

xconnect group group-name

 

RP/O/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group A

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)#

Enters the name of the cross-connect group.

Step 4

p2p { xconnect-name }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p xc1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)#

Enters a name for the point-to-point cross-connect.

Step 5

interface type interface-path-id

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface CEM0/1/0/9:20

Specifies the interface type and instance.

Step 6

neighbor { A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.1.1.2 pw-id 11

Configures the pseudowire segment for the cross-connect.

Step 7

pw-class class-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)# pw-class class_cem

Enters pseudowire class submode, allowing you to define a pseudowire class template.

Step 8

backup {neighbor A.B.C.D } { pw-id value }

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# backup neighbor 10.2.2.2 pw-id 5

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)#

Configures the backup pseudowire for the cross-connect.

  • Use the neighbor keyword to specify the peer to cross-connect. The IP address argument ( A.B.C.D ) is the IPv4 address of the peer.
  • Use the pw-id keyword to configure the pseudowire ID. The range is from 1 to 4294967295.

Step 9

pw-class class-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)# pw-class class_cem

Enters pseudowire class submode, allowing you to define a pseudowire class template.

Step 10

end
or
commit

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)# end
or
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw-backup)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuration Examples for Point to Point Layer 2 Services

This section includes these configuration examples:

L2VPN Interface Configuration: Example

This example shows how to configure an L2VPN interface:

configure
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0.1 l2transport
encapsulation dot1q 1
rewrite ingress pop 1 symmetric
end

Local Switching Configuration: Example

This example shows how to configure Layer 2 local switching:

configure
l2vpn
xconnect group examples
p2p example1
interface TenGigE0/7/0/6.5
interface GigabitEthernet0/4/0/30
commit
end
 
show l2vpn xconnect group examples
Legend: ST = State, UP = Up, DN = Down, AD = Admin Down, UR = Unresolved,
SB = Standby, SR = Standby Ready
 
XConnect Segment 1 Segment 2
Group Name ST Description ST Description ST
------------------------ ------------------------- -------------------------
examples example1 UP Te0/7/0/6.5 UP Gi0/4/0/30 UP
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 

Point-to-Point Cross-connect Configuration: Examples

This section includes configuration examples for both static and dynamic p2p cross-connects.

Static Configuration

This example shows how to configure a static point-to-point cross-connect:

configure
l2vpn
xconnect group vlan_grp_1
p2p vlan1
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0.1
neighbor 10.2.1.1 pw-id 1
mpls static label local 699 remote 890
commit

Dynamic Configuration

This example shows how to configure a dynamic point-to-point cross-connect:

configure
l2vpn
xconnect group vlan_grp_1
p2p vlan1
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0.1
neighbor 10.2.1.1 pw-id 1
commit

Inter-AS: Example

This example shows how to set up an AC to AC cross-connect from AC1 to AC2:

router-id Loopback0
 
interface Loopback0
ipv4 address 10.0.0.5 255.255.255.255
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.1 l2transport
encapsulation dot1q 1
!
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3
ipv4 address 10.45.0.5 255.255.255.0
keepalive disable
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/4
ipv4 address 10.5.0.5 255.255.255.0
keepalive disable
!
router ospf 100
log adjacency changes detail
area 0
interface Loopback0
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/4
!
!
!
router bgp 100
address-family ipv4 unicast
allocate-label all
!
neighbor 10.2.0.5
remote-as 100
update-source Loopback0
address-family ipv4 unicast
!
address-family ipv4 labeled-unicast
!
!
!
l2vpn
xconnect group cisco
p2p cisco1
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.1
neighbor 10.0.1.5 pw-id 101
!
p2p cisco2
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.2
neighbor 10.0.1.5 pw-id 102
!
p2p cisco3
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.3
neighbor 10.0.1.5 pw-id 103
!
p2p cisco4
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.4
neighbor 10.0.1.5 pw-id 104
!
p2p cisco5
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.5
neighbor 10.0.1.5 pw-id 105
!
p2p cisco6
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.6
neighbor 10.0.1.5 pw-id 106
!
p2p cisco7
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.7
neighbor 10.0.1.5 pw-id 107
!
p2p cisco8
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.8
neighbor 10.0.1.5 pw-id 108
!
p2p cisco9
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.9
neighbor 10.0.1.5 pw-id 109
!
p2p cisco10
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.10
neighbor 10.0.1.5 pw-id 110
!
!
!
mpls ldp
router-id Loopback0
log
neighbor
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/4
!
!
end

L2VPN Quality of Service: Example

This example shows how to attach a service-policy to an L2 interface in port mode:

configure
interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0/0
l2transport
service-policy input pmap_1
commit

Pseudowires: Examples

The examples include these devices and connections:

  • T-PE1 node has:

Cross-connect with an AC interface (facing CE1)

Pseudowire to S-PE1 node

IP address 209.165.200.225

  • T-PE2 node

Cross-connect with an AC interface (facing CE2)

Pseudowire to S-PE1 node

IP address 209.165.200.254

  • S-PE1 node

Multisegment pseudowire cross-connect with a pseudowire segment to T-PE1 node

Pseudowire segment to T-PE2 node

IP address 209.165.202.158

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires at T-PE1 Node: Example

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1# configure

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1 (config-l2vpn)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# protocol ldp

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# control-word disable

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group XCON1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p xc1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# description T-PE1 MS-PW to 10.165.202.158 via 10.165.200.254

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/0.1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.200.254 pw-id 100

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires at S-PE1 Node: Example

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1# configure

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# protocol ldp

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# control-word disable

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group MS-PW1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p ms-pw1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# description S-PE1 MS-PW between 10.165.200.225 and 10.165.202.158

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.200.225 pw-id 100

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.202.158 pw-id 300

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires at T-PE2 Node: Example

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2# configure

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2 (config-l2vpn)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2 (config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2 (config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# protocol ldp

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2 (config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# control-word disable

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2 (config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2 (config-l2vpn-pwc)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group XCON1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p xc1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# description T-PE2 MS-PW to 10.165.200.225 via 10.165.200.254

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface gigabitethernet 0/2/0/0.4

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.200.254 pw-id 300

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires and Preferred Paths at T-PE1 Node: Example

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1# configure

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# protocol ldp

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# control-word disable

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# preferred-path interface tunnel-te 1000

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group XCON1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p xc1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# description T-PE1 MS-PW to 10.165.202.158 via 10.165.200.254

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/0.1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.200.254 pw-id 100

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires and Preferred Paths at S-PE1 Node: Example

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1# configure

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn)# pw-class dynamic_mpls1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# protocol ldp

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# control-word disable

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# preferred-path interface tunnel-te 1000

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn)# pw-class dynamic_mpls2

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# protocol ldp

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# control-word disable

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# preferred-path interface tunnel-te 2000

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group MS-PW1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p ms-pw1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# description S-PE1 MS-PW between 10.165.200.225 and 10.165.202.158

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.200.225 pw-id 100

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class dynamic_mpls1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.202.158 pw-id 300

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class dynamic_mpls2

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Configuring Dynamic Pseudowires and Preferred Paths at T-PE2 Node: Example

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2# configure

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn)# pw -class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-pwc)# encapsulation mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# protocol ldp

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# control-word disable

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# preferred-path interface tunnel-te 2000

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-pwc-encap-mpls)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-pwc)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group XCON1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p xc1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# description T-PE2 MS-PW to 10.165.200.225 via 10.165.200.254

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface gigabitethernet 0/2/0/0.4

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.200.254 pw-id 300

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# pw-class dynamic_mpls

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Configuring Static Pseudowires at T-PE1 Node: Example

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1# configure

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group XCON1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p xc1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/0.1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.200.254 pw-id 100

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# mpls static label local 50 remote 400

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Configuring Static Pseudowires at S-PE1 Node: Example

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1# configure

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group MS-PW1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p ms-pw1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.200.225 pw-id 100

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# mpls static label local 400 remote 50

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.202.158 pw-id 300

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# mpls static label local 40 remote 500

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:S-PE1(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Configuring Static Pseudowires at T-PE2 Node: Example

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2# configure

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config)# l2vpn

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn)# xconnect group XCON1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc)# p2p xc1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# interface gigabitethernet 0/2/0/0.4

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p)# neighbor 10.165.200.254 pw-id 300

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# mpls static label local 500 remote 40

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:T-PE2(config-l2vpn-xc-p2p-pw)# commit

Preferred Path: Example

This example shows how to configure preferred tunnel path:

configure
l2vpn
pw-class path1
encapsulation mpls
preferred-path interface tunnel tp 50 fallback disable

MPLS Transport Profile: Example

This section provides examples for:

Configuring Preferred Tunnel Path: Example

This sample configuration shows how to configure preferred tunnel path:

l2vpn
pw-class foo
encapsulation mpls
preferred-path interface tunnel-tp 100 fallback disable
commit
 

Configuring PW Status OAM: Example

This sample configuration shows how to configure PW status OAM functionality:

l2vpn
pw-oam refresh transmit 100
commit
 

Viewing Pseudowire Status: Example

show l2vpn xconnect

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show l2vpn xconnect

Legend: ST = State, UP = Up, DN = Down, AD = Admin Down, UR = Unresolved,

LU = Local Up, RU = Remote Up, CO = Connected

XConnect Segment 1 Segment 2

Group Name ST Description ST Description ST

------------------------ ------------------------- -------------------------

MS-PW1 ms-pw1 UP 10.165.200.225 100 UP 10.165.202.158 300 UP

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

show l2vpn xconnect detail

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show l2vpn xconnect detail

Group MS-PW1, XC ms-pw1, state is up; Interworking none

PW: neighbor 10.165.200.225, PW ID 100, state is up ( established )

PW class not set

Encapsulation MPLS, protocol LDP

PW type Ethernet VLAN, control word enabled, interworking none

PW backup disable delay 0 sec

Sequencing not set

PW Status TLV in use

MPLS Local Remote

------------ ------------------------------ -----------------------------

Label 16004 16006

Group ID 0x2000400 0x2000700

Interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/2.2 GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.3

MTU 1500 1500

Control word enabled enabled

PW type Ethernet VLAN Ethernet VLAN

VCCV CV type 0x2 0x2

(LSP ping verification) (LSP ping verification)

VCCV CC type 0x5 0x7

(control word) (control word)

(router alert label)

(TTL expiry) (TTL expiry)

------------ ------------------------------ -----------------------------

Incoming PW Switching TLVs (Label Mapping message):

None

Incoming Status (PW Status TLV and accompanying PW Switching TLV):

Status code: 0x0 (no fault) in Notification message

Outgoing PW Switching TLVs (Label Mapping message):

Local IP Address: 10.165.200.254 , Remote IP address: 10.165.202.158 , PW ID: 300

Description: S-PE1 MS-PW between 10.165.200.225 and 10.165.202.158

Outgoing Status (PW Status TLV and accompanying PW Switching TLV):

Status code: 0x0 (no fault) in Notification message

Local IP Address: 10.165.200.254

Create time: 04/04/2008 23:18:24 (00:01:24 ago)

Last time status changed: 04/04/2008 23:19:30 (00:00:18 ago)

Statistics:

packet totals: receive 0

byte totals: receive 0

PW: neighbor 10.165.202.158 , PW ID 300, state is up ( established )

PW class not set

Encapsulation MPLS, protocol LDP

PW type Ethernet VLAN, control word enabled, interworking none

PW backup disable delay 0 sec

Sequencing not set

PW Status TLV in use

MPLS Local Remote

------------ ------------------------------ -----------------------------

Label 16004 16006

Group ID 0x2000800 0x2000200

Interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0.3 GigabitEthernet0/1/0/2.2

MTU 1500 1500

Control word enabled enabled

PW type Ethernet VLAN Ethernet VLAN

VCCV CV type 0x2 0x2

(LSP ping verification) (LSP ping verification)

VCCV CC type 0x5 0x7

(control word) (control word)

(router alert label)

(TTL expiry) (TTL expiry)

------------ ------------------------------ -----------------------------

Incoming PW Switching TLVs (Label Mapping message):

None

Incoming Status (PW Status TLV and accompanying PW Switching TLV):

Status code: 0x0 (no fault) in Notification message

Outgoing PW Switching TLVs (Label Mapping message):

Local IP Address: 10.165.200.254 , Remote IP address: 10.165.200.225, PW ID: 100

Description: S-PE1 MS-PW between 10.165.200.225 and 10.165.202.158

Outgoing Status (PW Status TLV and accompanying PW Switching TLV):

Status code: 0x0 (no fault) in Notification message

Local IP Address: 10.165.200.254

Create time: 04/04/2008 23:18:24 (00:01:24 ago)

Last time status changed: 04/04/2008 23:19:30 (00:00:18 ago)

Statistics:

packet totals: receive 0

byte totals: receive 0

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router#

""Show l2vpn xconnect summary": added PW-PW count.

"Show l2vpn forwarding location <> (no change: does not display MS-PWs)

"Show l2vpn forwarding summary location <> (no change: does not display MS-PWs)

Configuring Any Transport over MPLS: Example

This example shows you how to configure Any Transport over MPLS (AToM):

config
l2vpn
xconnect group test
p2p test
interface POS 0/1/0/0.1
neighbor 10.1.1.1 pw-id 100
 

Configuring AToM IP Interworking: Example

This example shows you how to configure IP interworking:

config
l2vpn
xconnect group test
p2p test
interworking ipv4
 

Configuring Circuit Emulation Over Packet Switched Network: Example

This example shows you how to configure Circuit Emulation Over Packet Switched Network:

Adding CEM Attachment Circuit to PW

 
l2vpn
xconnect group gr1
p2p p1
interface CEM 0/0/0/0:10
neighbor 3.3.3.3 pw-id 11
!
!

Associating Pseudowire Class

l2vpn
pw-class class-cem
encapsulation mpls
protocol ldp
!
!
xconnect group gr1
p2p p1
interface CEM0/0/0/0:20
neighbor 1.2.3.4 pw-id 11
pw-class class-cem
!

Enabling Pseudowire Status

l2vpn
pw-status
commit

 

Disabling Pseudowire Status

l2vpn
pw-status disable
commit

Configuring Backup Pseudowire

l2vpn
pw-status
pw-class class-cem
encapsulation mpls
protocol ldp
!
!
xconnect group gr1
p2p p1
interface CEM0/0/0/0:20
neighbor 1.2.3.4 pw-id 11
pw-class class-cem
backup neighbor 9.9.9.9 pw-id 1221
pw-class class-cem
!
!

 

Additional References

For additional information related to implementing MPLS Layer 2 VPN, refer to these.

Related Documents

 

Related Topic
Document Title

Cisco IOS XR L2VPN commands

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Command Reference

Layer 2 VPNs

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Configuration Guide

MPLS VPNs over IP Tunnels

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Configuration Guide

Getting started material

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting Started Guide

Standards

 

Standards 1
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.

1.Not all supported standards are listed.

MIBs

 

MIBs
MIBs Link

To locate and download MIBs using Cisco IOS XR software, use the Cisco MIB Locator found at this URL and choose a platform under the Cisco Access Products menu: http://cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml

RFCs

 

RFCs
Title

RFC 4447

Pseudowire Setup and Maintenance Using the Label Distribution Protocol (LDP), April 2006

RFC 4448

Encapsulation Methods for Transport of Ethernet over MPLS Networks , April 2006

Technical Assistance

 

Description
Link

The Cisco Technical Support website contains thousands of pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport