Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router MPLS Command Reference, Release 4.1
RSVP Infrastructure Commands
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RSVP Infrastructure Commands

Contents

RSVP Infrastructure Commands

This module describes the commands used to configure and use Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers. RSVP is a signaling protocol used to set up, maintain, and control end-to-end quality-of-service (QoS) reservations over IP. RSVP is specified in Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) RFC 2205 (ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc2205.txt).

The protocol has been extended to signal Multiprotocol Label Switching traffic engineering (MPLS-TE) tunnels, as specified in the IETF RFC 3209, RSVP-TE: Extensions to RSVP for LSP Tunnels . The RSVP implementation supports fault handling as specified in IETF RFC 3473, Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling RSVP-TE extensions. The RSVP implementation also supports cryptographic authentication and refresh overhead reduction as specified in the RFC2747, RSVP Cryptographic Authentication and RFC2961, RSVP Refresh Overhead Reduction Extensions respectively.

For detailed information about MPLS concepts, configuration tasks, and examples, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router MPLS Configuration Guide.

Disable or Enable RSVP Message Checksum

Starting from Cisco IOS XR Release 4.0 RSVP computes and sets the checksum field on all outgoing RSVP messages, by default. RSVP also verifies the received checksum on all RSVP received messsges to ensure its integrity.

A CLI is provided to override this default behavior and revert to the behavior exhibited in prior releases, whereby RSVP neither computes or sets the RSVP checksum field on outgoing RSVP messages, nor does it verify the checksum on received RSVP messages. This CLI is :
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#rsvp signalling checksum disable

Note


When the rsvp signalling checksum disable command is configured, RSVP sets a zero checksum on all outgoing RSVP messages and ignores the checksum on all received RSVP incoming messages.


authentication (RSVP)

To enter RSVP authentication mode, use the authentication command in global configuration mode, RSVP interface configuration mode, or RSVP neighbor configuration mode. To remove authentication parameters in the applicable mode, use the no form of this command.

authentication

no authentication

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

The default value is no authentication, which means that the feature is disabled.

Command Modes

Global configuration

RSVP interface configuration

RSVP neighbor configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to enter RSVP authentication configuration mode from global configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-auth)#
  

The following example shows how to activate the RSVP on an interface and enter RSVP authentication configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/2/1/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if-auth)# 
  

The following example shows how to configure the RSVP neighbor with IP address 1.1.1.1 and enter neighbor authentication configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp neighbor 1.1.1.1 authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-nbor-auth)#
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

key-source key-chain (RSVP)

Specifies the source of the key information to authenticate RSVP signaling messages.

life-time (RSVP)

Controls how long RSVP maintains idle security associations with trusted neighbors.

window-size (RSVP)

Specifies the tolerance to accept out-of-sequence messages.

bandwidth (RSVP)

To configure RSVP bandwidth on an interface using prestandard DS-TE mode, use the bandwidth command in RSVP interface configuration mode. To reset the RSVP bandwidth on that interface to its default value, use the no form of this command.

bandwidth [ total-reservable-bandwidth [largest-reservable-flow] [ sub-pool reservable-bw ] ] [ global-pool bandwidth [ sub-pool reservable-bw ] ] [ bc0 bandwidth [ bc1 reservable-bw ] ]

no bandwidth

Syntax Description

total-reservable-bandwidth

(Optional) Total reservable bandwidth (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps) that RSVP accepts for reservations on this interface. Range is 0 to 4294967295.

largest-reservable-flow

(Optional) Largest reservable flow (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps) that RSVP accepts for reservations on this interface. Range is 0 to 4294967295.

sub-pool reservable-bw

(Optional) Configures the total reservable bandwidth in the sub-pool (in Kbps, Mbps, or Gbps). Range is 0 to 4294967295.

bc0 bandwidth

(Optional) Configures the total reservable bandwidth in the bc0 pool (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps). The default is Kbps. Range is 0 to 4294967295.

bc1 reservable-bw

(Optional) Configures the total reservable bandwidth in the bc1 pool (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps).

global-pool bandwidth

(Optional) Configures the total reservable bandwidth in the global-pool. Range is 0 to 4294967295 Kbps.

Command Default

sub-pool-bw: 0


Note


If the command is entered without the optional arguments, the total bandwidth is set to 75 percent of the intrinsic bandwidth of the interface. (If the interface has zero intrinsic bandwidth, none are reserved.)


Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

RSVP is enabled either using the rsvp interface command or when MPLS is configured on the interface. In addition, there are other instances in which RSVP is enabled automatically; for example, when an RSVP message is received on an interface that is not configured under RSVP or MPLS (such as out-of-band signaling for an Optical User Network Interface application).

If RSVP reservation messages are received on an interface different from the one through which the corresponding Path message was sent out, the interfaces are adjusted such that all resource reservations, such as bandwidth, are done on the outgoing interface of the Path message.

Prestandard DS-TE uses the Cisco proprietary mechanisms for RSVP signaling and IGP advertisements. This DS-TE mode does not interoperate with third-party vendor equipment. Note that prestandard DS-TE is enabled only after configuring the sub-pool bandwidth values on MPLS-enabled interfaces.


Note


You can also configure RSVP bandwidth on an interface using IETF DS-TE mode. This mode supports multiple bandwidth constraint models, including the Russian Doll Model (RDM) and the Maximum Allocation Model (MAM) both with two bandwidth pools.


Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to limit the total of all RSVP reservations on POS interface 0/3/0/0 to 5000 Kbps:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# bandwidth 5000
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

bandwidth mam (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using the MAM bandwidth constraints model.

bandwidth rdm (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using the RDM bandwidth constraints model.

bandwidth mam (RSVP)

To configure RSVP bandwidth on an interface using the Maximum Allocation Model (MAM) bandwidth constraints model, use the bandwidth mam command in RSVP interface configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

bandwidth mam { total-reservable-bandwidth | max-reservable-bw maximum-reservable-bw } [ largest-reservable-flow [ bc0 reservable-bandwidth ] [ bc1 reservable-bw ] ]

no bandwidth mam

Syntax Description

total-reservable- bandwidth

Total reservable bandwidth (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps) that RSVP accepts for reservations on this interface. Range is 0 to 4294967295.

max-reservable-bw maximum-reservable-bw

Configures the maximum reservable bandwidth (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps) that RSVP accepts for reservations on this interface. Range is 0 to 4294967295.

largest-reservable-flow

(Optional) Largest reservable flow (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps) that RSVP accepts for reservations on this interface. Range is 0 to 4294967295.

bc0 reservable-bandwidth

(Optional) Configures the total reservable bandwidth in the bc0 pool (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps).

bc1 reservable-bw

(Optional) Configures the total reservable bandwidth in the bc1 pool (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps).

Command Default

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Both the MAM and RDM models can be configured on a single interface to allow switching between each model.


Note


Non-stop forwarding (NSF) is not guaranteed when the bandwidth constraint model is changed.


Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to limit the total of all RSVP reservations on POS interface 0/3/0/0 to 7500 kbps:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# bandwidth mam 7500
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

bandwidth (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using prestandard DS-TE mode.

bandwidth rdm (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using the RDM bandwidth constraints model.

bandwidth rdm (RSVP)

To configure RSVP bandwidth on an interface using the Russian Doll Model (RDM) bandwidth constraints model, use the bandwidth rdm command in RSVP interface configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

bandwidth rdm { total-reservable-bw | bc0 total-reservable-bw | global-pool total-reservable-bw } [largest-reservable-flow] [ bc1 reservable-bw ] [ sub-pool reservable-bw ]

no bandwidth rdm

Syntax Description

total-reservable-bw

Total reservable bandwidth (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps). The default value is expressed in Kbps.

bc0 total-reservable-bw

Reserves bandwidth in the bc0 pool (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps).

global-pool

Reserves bandwidth in the global pool.

largest-reservable-flow

(Optional) Largest reservable flow (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps). The default value is expressed in Kbps.

bc1

(Optional) Reserves bandwidth in the bc1 pool (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps).

sub-pool

(Optional) Reserves bandwidth in the sub-pool.

reservable-bandwidth

Reservable bandwidth in the sub- and bc1 pools (in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps). The default value is expressed in Kbps.

Command Default

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Both the MAM and RDM bandwidth constraint models support up two bandwidth pools.

Cisco IOS XR software provides global configuration when switching between bandwidth constraint models. Both models are configured on a single interface to allow switching between models.


Note


Non-stop forwarding (NSF) is not guaranteed when the bandwidth constraint model is changed.


The global pool and sub-pool keywords are included in this command for backward compatibility with prestandard DS-TE. The global pool keyword is equivalent to the bc0 keyword. The sub-pool keyword is equivalent to the bc1 keyword.

RDM is the default bandwidth constraint model used in both pre-standard and IETF mode.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to limit the total of all RSVP reservations on POS interface 0/3/0/0 to 7500 kbps, and allows each single flow to reserve no more than 1000 kbps:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# bandwidth rdm 7500 1000
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

bandwidth (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using prestandard DS-TE mode.

bandwidth mam (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using the MAM bandwidth constraints model.

clear rsvp authentication

To eliminate RSVP security association (SA) before the lifetime expires, use the clear rsvp authentication command in EXEC mode.

clear rsvp authentication [ type interface-path-id ] [ destination IP address ] [ source IP address ]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

destination IP address

(Optional) Eliminates the RSVP security associations (SA) before their lifetimes expire. All SAs with this destination IP address are cleared.

source IP address

(Optional) Eliminates the RSVP security associations (SA) before their lifetimes expire. All SAs with this source IP address are cleared.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Use the clear rsvp authentication command for the following reasons:

  • To eliminate security associations before their lifetimes expire
  • To free up memory
  • To resolve a problem with a security association being in an indeterminate state

You can delete all RSVP security associations if you do not enter an optional filter (interface, source, or destination IP address).

If you delete a security association, it is recreated as needed.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

execute

Examples

The following example shows how to clear each SA:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp authentication
  

The following example shows how to clear each SA with the destination address1.1.1.1:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp authentication destination 1.1.1.1
            

The following example shows how to clear each SA with the source address 2.2.2.2:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp authentication source 2.2.2.2

The following example shows how to clear each SA with the POS interface 0/2/1/0:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp authentication POS 0/2/1/0

The following example shows how to clear each SA on the POS interface 0/2/1/0, destination address 1.1.1.1, and source address 2.2.2.2:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp authentication POS 0/2/1/0 destination 1.1.1.1 source 2.2.2.2

Related Commands

Command

Description

life-time (RSVP)

Controls how long RSVP maintains idle security associations with other trusted RSVP neighbors.

clear rsvp counters authentication

To eliminate RSVP counters for each security association (SA), use the clear rsvp counters authentication command in EXEC mode.

clear rsvp counters authentication [ type interface-path-id ] [ destination IP address ] [ source IP address ]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

destination IP address

(Optional) Eliminates authentication-related statistics for each security association (SA) with this destination IP address.

source IP address

(Optional) Eliminates authentication-related statistics for each security association (SA) with this source IP address.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

execute

Examples

The following example shows how to clear authentication counters for each SA:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp counters authentication

The following example shows how to clear authentication counters for each SA with the destination address 1.1.1.1:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp counters authentication destination 1.1.1.1

The following example shows how to clear authentication counters for each SA with the source address 2.2.2.2:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp counters authentication source 2.2.2.2

The following example shows how to clear authentication counters for each SA with the POS interface 0/2/1/0:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp counters authentication POS 0/2/1/0

The following example shows how to clear authentication counters for each SA on the POS interface 0/2/1/0, destination address 1.1.1.1, and source address 2.2.2.2:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp counters authentication POS 0/2/1/0 destination 1.1.1.1 source 2.2.2.2

clear rsvp counters all

To clear (set to zero) all RSVP message and event counters that are being maintained by the router, use the clear rsvp counters all command in EXEC mode.

clear rsvp counters all [ type interface-path-id ]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to clear all message and event counters:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp counters all

Related Commands

Command

Description

clear rsvp counters events

Clears all RSVP event counters that are being maintained by the router.

clear rsvp counters messages

Clears all RSVP message counters that are being maintained by the router.

show rsvp counters

Shows all RSVP message/event counters that are being maintained by the router.

clear rsvp counters chkpt

To clear RSVP checkpoint counters, use the clear rsvp counters chkpt command in EXEC mode.

clear rsvp counters chkpt

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to clear all message and event counters:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# clear rsvp counters chkpt

Related Commands

Command

Description

clear rsvp counters events

Clears all RSVP event counters that are being maintained by the router.

clear rsvp counters messages

Clears all RSVP message counters that are being maintained by the router.

show rsvp counters

Shows all RSVP message/event counters that are being maintained by the router.

clear rsvp counters events

To clear (set to zero) all RSVP event counters that are being maintained by the router, use the clear rsvp counters events command in EXEC mode.

clear rsvp counters events [ type interface-path-id ]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Use the clear rsvp counters events command to set all RSVP event counters to zero.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to clear all event counters:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:routerclear rsvp counters events

Related Commands

Command

Description

clear rsvp counters messages

Clears all RSVP message counters that are being maintained by the router.

show rsvp counters

Shows RSVP event counters that are being maintained by the router when the events option is specified.

clear rsvp counters messages

To clear (set to zero) all RSVP message counters that are being maintained by the router, use the clear rsvp counters messages command in EXEC mode.

clear rsvp counters messages [ type interface-path-id ]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Use the clear rsvp counters messages command to set all RSVP message counters to zero.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to set all RSVP message counters for POS interface 0/3/0/2 to zero:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:routerclear rsvp counters messages pos0/3/0/2

Related Commands

Command

Description

show rsvp counters

Displays the number of RSVP messages sent and received.

clear rsvp counters oor

To clear internal RSVP counters on out of resources (OOR) events, use the clear rsvp counters oor command in EXEC mode.

clear rsvp counters oor [ type interface-path-id ]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Use the clear rsvp counters oor command to set RSVP OOR counters to zero.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example show how to clear all RSVP message counters for POS interface 0/3/0/2 to zero:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:routerclear rsvp counters oor pos0/3/0/2

Related Commands

Command

Description

show rsvp counters oor

Displays the internal RSVP counters on OOR events.

clear rsvp counters prefix-filtering

To clear internal prefix-filtering related RSVP counters, use the clear rsvp counters prefix-filtering command in EXEC mode.

clear rsvp counters prefix-filtering { interface [ type interface-path-id ] | access-list [aclname] }

Syntax Description

interface

Clears RSVP prefix-filtering counters for all interfaces.

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

access-list

Clears RSVP prefix-filtering counters for access control list.

aclname

(Optional) Name of the access list.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Use the clear rsvp counters prefix-filtering command to set RSVP prefix-filtering related RSVP counters to zero.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to set all RSVP message counters for POS interface 0/3/0/2 to zero:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:routerclear rsvp counters prefix-filtering interface pos0/3/0/2

The following example shows how to set all RSVP prefix-filtering counters for access-list banks to zero:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:routerclear rsvp counters prefix-filtering access-list banks

Related Commands

Command

Description

show rsvp counters prefix-filtering

Displays the internal prefix-filtering related RSVP counters.

key-source key-chain (RSVP)

To specify the source of the key information to authenticate RSVP messages, use the key-source key-chain command in the appropriate RSVP authentication configuration mode. To remove the key source from the appropriate RSVP authentication configuration mode, use the no form of this command.

key-source key-chain key-chain-name

no key-source key-chain key-chain-name

Syntax Description

key-chain-name

Name of the keychain. The maximum number of characters is 32.

Command Default

The default value is none, which means that the key source is not specified.

Command Modes

RSVP authentication configuration

RSVP interface authentication configuration

RSVP neighbor authentication configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.


Note


  • RSVP authentication is enabled regardless of whether or not the specified keychain exists or has no available keys to use. If the specified keychain does not exist or there are no available keys in the keychain, RSVP authentication processing fails.
  • The key-source key-chain command does not create a keychain but just specifies which keychain to use. You must configure a keychain first. For an example of how a key chain is configured, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router  System Security Configuration Guide.

  • The no key-source key-chain command does not necessarily disable the authentication.
  • RSVP authentication supports only keyed-hash message authentication code (HMAC)-type algorithms.

For inheritance procedures, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router MPLS Configuration Guide.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows that the source of the key information is specified for the keychain mpls-keys in RSVP authentication configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-auth)# key-source key-chain mpls-keys
  

The following example shows that the source of the key information is specified for the keychain mpls-keys for a POS interface in RSVP authentication configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface POS 0/2/1/0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if-auth)# key-source key-chain mpls-keys

The following example shows that the source of the key information is specified for the keychain mpls-keys in RSVP neighbor authentication configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp neighbor 1.1.1.1 authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-nbor-auth)# key-source key-chain mpls-keys
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

life-time (RSVP)

Controls how long RSVP maintains idle security associations with other trusted RSVP neighbors.

window-size (RSVP)

Specifies the tolerance to accept out-of-sequence messages.

life-time (RSVP)

To control how long RSVP maintains idle security associations with other trusted RSVP neighbors, use the life-time command in the appropriate RSVP authentication configuration mode. To disable the lifetime setting, use the no form of this command.

life-time seconds

no life-time seconds

Syntax Description

seconds

Length of time, in seconds, that RSVP maintains security associations with other trusted RSVP neighbors. Range is 30 to 86400.

Command Default

seconds: 1800 (30 minutes)

Command Modes

RSVP authentication configuration

RSVP interface authentication configuration

RSVP neighbor authentication configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

For inheritance procedures, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router MPLS Configuration Guide.

Use the life-time (RSVP) command to indicate when to end idle security associations with RSVP trusted neighbors.

By setting a larger lifetime, the router remembers the state for a long period time which provides better protection against a replay attack.

Use the clear rsvp authentication command to free security associations before their lifetimes expire.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to configure a lifetime of 2000 seconds for each SA in RSVP authentication configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-auth)# life-time 2000
  

The following example shows how to configure a lifetime of 2000 seconds for each SA in RSVP neighbor authentication configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp neighbor 1.1.1.1 authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-nbor-auth)# life-time 2000

The following example shows how to configure a lifetime of 2000 seconds for each SA in RSVP interface authentication configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface POS 0/2/1/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if-auth)# life-time 2000
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

clear rsvp authentication

Clears out RSVP security associations.

key-source key-chain (RSVP)

Specifies the source of the key information to authenticate RSVP signaling messages.

window-size (RSVP)

Specifies the tolerance to accept out-of-sequence messages.

rsvp

To enable functionality for Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) and enter RSVP configuration commands, use the rsvp command in global configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

rsvp

no rsvp

Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to enable RSVP functionality and enter the sub-mode for RSVP configuration commands:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp)#

rsvp bandwidth mam

To configure the RSVP default interface bandwidth for the maximum reservable bandwidth parameters using the Maximum Allocation Model (MAM) bandwidth constraints model, use the rsvp bandwidth mam command in global configuration mode. To return to the default of 75% for the global (BC0) and BC1 pools, use the no form of this command.

rsvp bandwidth mam percentage max-reservable percent [ bc0 bc0-percent ] [ bc1 bc1-percent ]

no rsvp bandwidth mam percentage max-reservable percent [ bc0 bc0-percent ] [ bc1 bc1-percent ]

Syntax Description

percentage

Configures bandwidths as percentages of physical link bandwidth.

max-reservable

Configures the maximum reservable bandwidth.

percent

Configures the maximum reservable bandwidth interface percentage.

bc0

(Optional) Configures the BC0 global pool bandwidth percentage.

bc0-percent
Percentage for the BC0 pool bandwidth interface. Range is from 0 to 10000. Use this range to under-book or over-book RSVP bandwidth on the interface.
Note   

Before you configure the percentage for the BC0 pool, configure the maximum reservable bandwidth pool.

bc1

(Optional) Configures the BC1 subpool bandwidth percentage.

bc1-percent
Percentage for the BC1 pool bandwidth interface. Range is from 0 to 10000. Use this range to under-book or over-book RSVP bandwidth on the interface .
Note   

Before you configure the percentage for the BC1 pool, configure the maximum reservable bandwidth for the BC0 pool.

Command Default

If the command is entered without the optional arguments, the RSVP total bandwidth is set to 75 percent of the intrinsic bandwidth of the interface. If the interface has no (0) intrinsic bandwidth, then no bandwidth is reserved for RSVP.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release Modification
Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Release 4.3.1

The percentage keyword was positioned as a global option for the command in the syntax.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.


Note


The percentage keyword was positioned as a global option in the command syntax, thus changing the command syntax from rsvp bandwidth mam max-reservable percentage percent [bc0 percentage bc0-percent] [bc1 percentage bc1-percent] to rsvp bandwidth mam percentage max-reservable percent [bc0 bc0-percent] [bc1 bc1-percent].


The percentage keyword allows for over-booking. The configured value overwrites the current default value of 75%.

RSVP and MPLS-TE uses these defaults to automatically set the BC0 (global pool) and BC1 (subpool) for any RSVP configured interface without specifying an absolute bandwidth.

The bandwidth is configured as a percentage instead of an absolute number. Automatic adjustment is based on the total interface bandwidth changes. The maximum reservable bandwidth automatically is readjusted when the interface bandwidth changes, for example, when adding or removing a bundle member.

You can specify the default percentage for the maximum reservable bandwidth, BC0 (global pool), BC1 (subpool), or either pool.

To configure a default for the BC0 pool, first configure one for the global pool. To configure a default for the BC1 pool, first configure one for the BC0 pool.

Each pool uses the following values:
  • Explicit value configured on the interface for this pool.
  • Default percentage value configured for this pool.
  • Pool parent value (global is parent of both BC0 and BC1). This does not apply to the global pool since it does not have a parent.

Task ID

Task ID Operation
mpls-te

read, write

ouni

read, write

Examples

This example shows how to configure RSVP default interface bandwidth percentage for the maximum reservable bandwidth using MAM.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router#configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#rsvp bandwidth mam percentage max-reservable 1000 bc0 1000 bc1 1000

Related Commands

Command Description
bandwidth mam (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using the Maximum Allocation Model (MAM) bandwidth constraints model.

bandwidth rdm (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using the Russian Doll Model (RDM) bandwidth constraints model.

rsvp bandwidth rdm

Configures the RSVP default interface bandwidth for the maximum reservable bandwidth parameters using the Russian Doll Model (RDM) bandwidth constraints model.

show rsvp interface

Displays information about all interfaces with RSVP enabled.

rsvp bandwidth rdm

To configure the RSVP default interface bandwidth for the maximum reservable bandwidth parameters using the Russian Doll Model (RDM) bandwidth constraints model, use the rsvp bandwidth rdm command in global configuration mode. To return to the default of 75% for the maximum reservable BC0 pool and 0% for the BC1 pools, use the no form of this command.

rsvp bandwidth rdm percentage max-reservable-bc0 percent [ bc1 bc1-percent ]

no rsvp bandwidth rdm percentage max-reservable-bc0 percent [ bc1 bc1-percent ]

Syntax Description

percentage

Configures bandwidths as percentages of physical link bandwidth.

max-reservable-bc0

Configures the maximum reservable bandwidth for the BC0 global pool.

percent

Percentage for the BC0 pool bandwidth interface. Range is from 0 to 10000. Use this range to under-book or over-book RSVP bandwidth on the interface

bc1

Optional) Configures the BC1 subpool percentage for the bandwidth.

bc1-percent
Percentage for the BC1 pool bandwidth interface. Range is from 0 to 10000.
Note   

Before you configure the percentage for the BC1 pool, configure the maximum reservable bandwidth for the BC0 pool.

Command Default

If the command is entered without the optional arguments, the RSVP total bandwidth is set to 75 percent of the intrinsic bandwidth of the interface. If the interface has no (0) intrinsic bandwidth, then no bandwidth is reserved for RSVP.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release Modification
Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Release 4.3.1

The percentage keyword was positioned as a global option for the command in the syntax.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.


Note


The percentage keyword was positioned as a global option in the command syntax, thus changing the command syntax from rsvp bandwidth rdm max-reservable-bc0 percentage percent [bc1 percentage bc1-percent to rsvp bandwidth rdm percentage max-reservable-bc0 percent [bc1 bc1-percent].


The percentage keyword allows for over-booking. The configured value overwrites the current default value of 75%.

RSVP and MPLS-TE use these defaults to automatically set the BC0 (global pool) and BC1 (subpool) for any RSVP configured interface without specifying an absolute bandwidth.

The bandwidth is configured as a percentage instead of an absolute number. Automatic adjustment is based on the total interface bandwidth changes. The maximum reservable bandwidth is automatically readjusted when the interface bandwidth changes, for example, when adding or removing a bundle member.

You can specify the default percentage for the maximum reservable bandwidth for the BC0 (global pool), BC1 (subpool), or either pool.

Each pool uses the following values:
  • Explicit value configured on the interface for this pool.
  • Default percentage value configured for this pool.

Task ID

Task ID Operation

mpls-te

read, write

ouni

read, write

Examples

This example shows how to configure RSVP default interface bandwidth percentage for the maximum reservable bandwidth using RDM:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router#configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#rsvp bandwidth rdm percentage max-reservable-bc0 1000 bc1 1000

Related Commands

Command Description
bandwidth mam (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using the Maximum Allocation Model (MAM) bandwidth constraints model.

bandwidth rdm (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using the Russian Doll Model (RDM) bandwidth constraints model.

rsvp bandwidth mam

Configures the RSVP default interface bandwidth for the maximum reservable bandwidth parameters using the Maximum Allocation Model (MAM) bandwidth constraints model.

show rsvp interface

Displays information about all interfaces with RSVP enabled.

rsvp interface

To configure RSVP on an interface, use the rsvp interface command in global configuration mode. To disable RSVP on that interface, use the no form of this command.

rsvp interface type interface-path-id

no rsvp interface type interface-path-id

Syntax Description

type

Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

Command Default

RSVP is enabled by default on an interface under the following conditions. (Enabling RSVP on an interface means that interface can be used by RSVP to send and receive RSVP messages).

  • RSVP is configured on that interface using the rsvp interface command.
  • MPLS is configured on that interface.
  • Automatically enabled as in the case of out-of-band signaling for the Optical User Network Interface (O-UNI) application, where an RSVP message could be received on an interface which is not configured under RSVP or MPLS.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

When RSVP is enabled on an interface by any of the three methods mentioned in the above section, the default bandwidth is 0. Use the bandwidth command in RSVP interface configuration mode to configure the bandwidth on an interface.

If the interface bandwidth is 0, RSVP can be used only to signal flows that do not require bandwidth on this interface.

The rsvp interface command enables the RSVP interface configuration mode.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to enable the RSVP interface configuration mode and to enable RSVP on this interface with 0 bandwidth:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/3/0/0
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

bandwidth (RSVP)

Configures RSVP bandwidth on an interface using prestandard DS-TE mode.

signalling dscp (RSVP)

Gives all RSVP packets sent out on a specific interface higher priority in the network by marking them with a particular DSCP.

rsvp neighbor

To specify an RSVP neighbor, use the rsvp neighbor command in global configuration mode. To deactivate authentication for a neighbor, use the no form of this command.

rsvp neighbor IP-address authentication

no rsvp neighbor IP-address authentication

Syntax Description

IP-address

IP address of the neighbor. A single IP address of a specific neighbor; usually one of the neighbor's physical or logical (loopback) interfaces.

authentication

Configures RSVP authentication parameters.

Command Default

No default values or behaviors

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.


Note


RSVP neighbor configuration mode can be used only if you want to configure authentication for a particular neighbor.


Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to enter RSVP neighbor authentication configuration mode for IP address 1.1.1.1:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp neighbor 1.1.1.1 authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-nbor-auth)#
 

Related Commands

Command

Description

key-source key-chain (RSVP)

Specifies the source of the key information to authenticate RSVP signaling messages.

life-time (RSVP)

Controls how long RSVP maintains idle security associations with other trusted RSVP neighbors.

window-size (RSVP)

Specifies the tolerance to accept out-of-sequence messages.

show rsvp authentication

To display the database for the security association that RSVP has established with other RSVP neighbors, use the show rsvp authentication command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp authentication [ type interface-path-id ] [ destination IP-address ] [detail] [ mode { receive | send } ] [ neighbor IP-address ] [ source IP-address ]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

destination IP-address

(Optional) Displays the database for the security association (SA) for the destination IP address. The IP address argument is the IP address of the destination address.

detail

(Optional) Displays additional information about RSVP security SAs.

mode

(Optional) Specifies the SA type. An SA is used to authenticate either incoming (receive) or outgoing (send) messages.

receive

Displays SAs for incoming messages.

send

Displays SAs for outgoing messages.

neighbor IP-address

(Optional) Displays the RSVP authentication information for the neighbor IP address. The IP-address argument is the IP address of the neighbor. For the send SA, the neighbor address is the destination address. For receive, the neighbor address is the source address.

source IP-address

(Optional) Displays the database for the SA for the source IP address. The IP-address argument is the IP address of the source address.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read

Examples

The following sample output displays information for RSVP authentication:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp authentication
  
  Codes: S - static, G - global, N - neighbor, I -interface, C - chain
  
  Source Address  Dest Address    Interface   Mode Key-Source Key-ID Code
  3.0.0.1          3.0.0.2        PO0/7/0/2   Send mpls-keys    1    SGC
  3.0.0.2          3.0.0.1        PO0/7/0/2   Recv mpls-keys    1    SGC
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 1 show rsvp authentication Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Source Address

IP address of the sender. For Send mode, this is the local address (either the address of the Interface field or the local router ID). For Recv mode, this is the address of the RSVP neighbor.

Dest Address

IP address of the receiver. For Send mode, this is the address of the RSVP neighbor. For Recv mode, this is the local address (either the address of the Interface field or the local router ID).

Interface

Name of the interface over which the security association is being maintained.

Mode

Direction of the association for the following mode types:
Send

Authenticates messages that you forward.

Recv

Authenticates messages that you receive.

Key-Source

Key source identification string that is currently set to the configured keychain name.

Key-ID

The last successful key ID that is used for authentication and maps to the keychain ID configuration. If the value is too large to fit into the column, it is truncated and a (..) suffix is appended. Use the detail mode to see the non-truncated key ID.

Code

Code field has the following terms:
Static

Key is static and configured.

Global

Key is global-based.

Neighbor

Key is neighbor-based.

Interface

Key is interface-based.

Chain

Key is part of a keychain.

The following sample output shows detailed information about a Send mode SA that is followed by a Receive mode SA:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp authentication detail
  
  RSVP Authentication Information:
    Source Address:         3.0.0.1
    Destination Address:    3.0.0.2
    Neighbour Address:      3.0.0.2
    Interface:              POS0/7/0/2
    Direction:              Send
    LifeTime:               1800 (sec)
    LifeTime left:          1305 (sec)
    KeyType:                Static Global KeyChain
    Key Source:             name1
    Key Status:             No error
    KeyID:                  1
    Digest:                 HMAC MD5 (16)
    Challenge:              Not supported
    TX Sequence:            5023969459702858020 (0x45b8b99b00000124)
    Messages successfully authenticated:    245       
    Messages failed authentication:         0         
   
  Receive Errors:
      Incomplete security association:      0         
      Missing INTEGRITY object:             0         
      Incorrect digest:                     0         
      Digest type mismatch:                 0         
      Duplicate sequence number:            0         
      Out-of-range sequence number:         0         
      Invalid message format:               0 
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 2 show rsvp authentication detail Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Source Address

IP address of the sender. For Send mode, this is the local address (either the address of the Interface field or the local router ID). For Recv mode, this is the address of the RSVP neighbor.

Destination Address

IP address of the receiver. For Send mode, this is the address of the RSVP neighbor. For Recv mode, this is the local address (either the address of the Interface field or the local router ID).

Neighbor Address

IP address of the RSVP neighbor with which the security association is being maintained.

Interface

Name of the interface over which the security association is being maintained.

Direction

Direction of the association for the following mode types:
Send

Authenticates messages that you forward.

Recv

Authenticates messages that you receive.

LifeTime

Configured expiration timer value.

LifeTime left

Number of seconds until the expiration timer expires.

KeyType

Keys that are used:
Static

Key is static and configured.

Global

Key is global-based.

Neighbor

Key is neighbor-based.

Interface

Key is interface-based.

Chain

Key is part of a keychain.

Key-Source

Key source identification string that is currently set to the configured keychain name.

Key Status

Last status reported from the key source.

Key-ID

Last successful key ID that is used for authentication and that maps to the keychain ID configuration. If the value is too large to fit into the column, it is truncated and a (..) suffix is appended. (Use the detail mode to see the non-truncated key ID.)

Digest

Digest algorithm that is used. The algorithms are either HMAC-MD5 or HMAC-SHA1.

Challenge

Current challenge status (always not supported) reported.

Tx Sequence

Last sequence number that was sent.

Messages successfully authenticated

Number of messages authenticated by using this SA.

Messages failed authentication

Number of messages that failed authentication using this SA.

Sequence Window Size

Maximum configured RX sequence number window.

Sequence Window Count

Currently used size of the RX sequence number window.

Incomplete security association

Number of messages that are dropped due to a key failure.

Incorrect digest

Number of messages that are dropped due to an incorrect digest.

Digest type mismatch

Number of messages that are dropped due to an incorrect digest length, which implies an algorithm mismatch.

Duplicate sequence number

Number of messages that are dropped due to a duplicate sequence number.

Out-of-range sequence number

Number of messages that are dropped due to a sequence number range (window-size) checking.

Invalid message format

Number of messages that are dropped due to formatting errors, such as incorrect objects.

show rsvp counters

To display internal RSVP counters, use the show rsvp counters command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp counters { messages [ type interface-path-id | summary ] | events | database }

Syntax Description

messages

Displays a historical count of the number of messages RSVP has received and sent on each interface along with a summation.

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

summary

(Optional) Displays the aggregate counts of all interfaces.

events

Displays the number of states expired for lack of refresh and a count of received No Acknowledgements (NACKs).

database

Displays counters on RSVP database, including number of paths, session, and so on.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Release 3.9.0

The summary keyword was added.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

In message counters, bundle messages are counted as single bundle messages. The component messages are not counted separately.

The messages keyword shows the counters for all the interfaces. In addition, the aggregate summary is shown by using both the messages and summary keywords.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp counters messages command for POS0/3/0/0:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp counters messages POS 0/3/0/0

    POS0/3/0/0             Recv     Xmit                        Recv     Xmit
      Path                  24        1    Resv                   0        0
      PathError              0        0    ResvError              0        0
      PathTear               5        1    ResvTear               0        0
      ResvConfirm            0        0    Ack                   34        0
      Bundle                 0             Hello                  0        0
      SRefresh           10118        0    OutOfOrder             0         
      Retransmit                      0    Rate Limited                    0
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 3 show rsvp counters messages Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Path

Number of Path messages sent downstream or received from an upstream node.

PathError

Number of PathError messages received from a downstream neighbor or sent to an upstream neighbor.

PathTear

Number of PathTear messages sent downstream, or messages received, from upstream neighbors.

ResvConfirm

Number of ResvConfirm messages received from an upstream neighbor or sent to a downstream neighbor.

Bundle

Number of Bundle messages containing RSVP messages sent and received by the neighbor.

SRefresh

Number of Summary Refresh messages sent to and received by a neighbor to refresh the path and reservation states.

Retransmit

Number of messages retransmitted to ensure reliable messaging (related to refresh reduction).

Resv

Number of Reservation messages received from a downstream neighbor or sent to an upstream neighbor to reserve resources.

ResvError

Number of Reservation Error messages received from a upstream neighbor or sent to a downstream neighbor.

ResvTear

Number of Reservation Tear messages received from a downstream neighbor or sent to an upstream neighbor to tear down RSVP flows.

Ack

Number of Acknowledgement messages sent and received by a neighbor acknowledging receipt of a message.

Hello

Number of Hello messages sent to and received by a neighbor.

OutOfOrder

Number of messages received that are out of order.

Rate Limited

Number of RSVP packets affected by rate limiting.

The following is sample output from the show rsvp counters events command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp counters events
  
  Ethernet0/0/0/0                         tunnel1                                 
   Expired Path states           0         Expired Path states           0        
   Expired Resv states           0         Expired Resv states           0        
   NACKs received                0         NACKs received                0        
  POS0/3/0/1                              POS0/3/0/2                              
   Expired Path states           0         Expired Path states           0        
   Expired Resv states           0         Expired Resv states           0        
   NACKs received                0         NACKs received                0        
  POS0/3/0/3                              All RSVP Interfaces                     
   Expired Path states           0         Expired Path states           0        
   Expired Resv states           0         Expired Resv states           0        
   NACKs received                0         NACKs received                0
  
 

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 4 show rsvp counters events Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Expired Path states

Number of Path states expired for lack of refresh.

Expired Reserve states

Number of Resv states expired for lack of refresh.

NACKS received

Number of NACKS received.

The following is sample output from the show rsvp counters database command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp counters database
  
  Sessions: 0
  Locally created and incoming paths: 0
  Outgoing paths: 0
  Locally created and incoming Reservations: 0
  Outgoing Reservations: 0
  Interfaces: 4
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 5 show rsvp counters database Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Sessions

RSVP sessions.

Locally created and incoming paths

Path states created by a:

  • Local application on the node.
  • Path message received from the network.

Outgoing paths

Outgoing path states.

Locally created and incoming Reservations

Reservations created by a:

  • Local application on the node.
  • Path message received from the network.

Outgoing Reservations

Outgoing reservation (request) states.

Interfaces

Known RSVP interfaces.

show rsvp counters oor

To display internal RSVP counters on out of resources (OOR) events, use the show rsvp counters oor command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp counters oor [ type interface-path-id | summary ]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfacescommand to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

summary

(Optional) Displays a summary of OOR events.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp counters oor command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp counters oor
  
  POS 0/3/0/0            Rejected
      Path                  24
  POS 0/3/0/2            Rejected
      Path                  31
  All RSVP Interfaces    Rejected
      Path                  55
 

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 6 show rsvp counters oor Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Path

Number of Path messages received on the interface that were rejected due to oor conditions.

show rsvp counters prefix-filtering

To display internal prefix-filtering related RSVP counters, use the show rsvp counters prefix-filtering command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp counters prefix-filtering interface [ type interface-path-id | summary ] access-list [aclname]

Syntax Description

interface

Displays RSVP prefix-filtering counters for all interfaces.

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

summary

(Optional) Displays a summary of RSVP prefix-filtering counters on all interfaces.

access-list

Displays RSVP prefix-filtering counters for the access control list.

aclname

(Optional) Name of the access control list.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.


Note


Counters do not increment if you have not configured an access control list for prefix-filtering.


Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp counters prefix-filtering command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp counters prefix-filtering interface
  
  Routed        Fwd        Local        Drop         Def-Drop       Def-Proc      Total
  Path            4                                                                   4
  PathTear        0                                                                   0
  ResvConfirm     0                                                                   0
  Total           4                                                                   4
  
  POS0/5/0/1      Fwd        Local        Drop         Def-Drop       Def-Proc     Total
  Path                         1           0              219             2         222
  PathTear                     0           0               31             0          31
  ResvConfirm                  0           0                0             0           0
  Total                        1           0              219             2         253
  
  POS0/5/0/2    Fwd        Local        Drop         Def-Drop       Def-Proc       Total
  Path                         0           0               0             1             1
  PathTear                     0           0               0             0             0
  ResvConfirm                  0           0               0             0             0
  Total                        0           0               0             1             1
  
  ALL RSVP 
  Interfaces    Fwd        Local        Drop         Def-Drop       Def-Proc       Total
  Path            4            1           0              219             3          227
  PathTear        0            0           0               31             0           31
  ResvConfirm     0            0           0                0             0            0
  Total           4            1           0              250             3          258
  

The following is sample output from the show rsvp counters prefix-filtering interface type interface-path-idcommand:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp counters prefix-filtering interface POS 0/5/0/1
  
  POS0/5/0/1      Fwd        Local        Drop         Def-Drop       Def-Proc      Total
  Path                         1           0             219             2           222
  PathTear                     0           0              31             0            31
  ResvConfirm                  0           0               0             0             0
  Total                        1           0             250             2           253
  

The following is sample output from the show rsvp counters prefix-filtering interface summary command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp counters prefix-filtering interface summary
  
  ALL RSVP 
  Interfaces    Fwd        Local        Drop         Def-Drop       Def-Proc       Total
  Path            4            1           0              219             3          227
  PathTear        0            0           0               31             0           31
  ResvConfirm     0            0           0                0             0            0
  Total           4            1           0              250             3          258
  

The following is sample output from the show rsvp counters prefix-filtering access-list bankscommand:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp counters prefix-filtering access-list banks
  
  ACL: banks            Forward          Local          Drop           Total
  Path                      0              0             0               0
  PathTear                  0              0             0               0
  ResvConfirm               0              0             0               0
  Total                     0              0             0               0
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 7 show rsvp counters prefix-filtering interface and summary CommandField Descriptions

Field

Description

Fwd

Number of messages forwarded to the next router.

Note   

The messages are counted against the routed interface only because RSVP has no record of what interface the messages will be forwarded to.

Local

Number of messages not forwarded (because they are locally destined).

Drop

Number of messages dropped.

Def-Drop

Number of messages dropped when an access control list match returns an implicit deny. (Results when RSVP is configured to drop implicit deny messages.)

Def-Proc

Number of messages processed by RSVP when an access control list match returns an implicit deny.

Path

Number of Path messages.

PathTear

Number of Path Tear messages.

ResvConfirm

Number of ResvConfirm messages.

show rsvp fast-reroute

To display RSVP Fast-Reroute (FRR) information, use the show rsvp fast-reroute command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp fast-reroute [ destination IP -address ] [ dst-port port ] [ source IP-address ] [ src-port source-port ] [summary]

Syntax Description

destination IP-address

(Optional) Displays the entries that match the specified address.

dst-port port

(Optional) Displays the port address of the destination router.

source IP-address

(Optional) Displays the IP address of the source network.

src-port source-port

(Optional) Displays the port number of the source router.

summary

(Optional) Displays summarized information about the FRR database.

Command Default

None

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

This is sample output from the show rsvp fast-reroute command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp fast-reroute
  
  Type            Destination          TunID          Source           PSBs           RSBs
  --------      ---------------     -----------    ------------       ---------      -------
  LSP4            70.70.70.70            1          50.50.50.50        Ready          Ready
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 8 show rsvp fast-reroute Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Type

Type of session.

Destination

Destination address of session.

TunID

Tunnel ID number.

Source

Source address of session.

PSBs

PSB FRR1 state.

RSBs

RSB FRR state.

1 Fast reroute.

This is sample output from the show rsvp fast-reroute summary command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp fast-reroute summary
  
  States            Total          Ready          Act-Wait           Active
  PSBs                1              1               0                  0
  RSBs                1              1               0                  0
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 9 show rsvp fast-reroute summary Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

States

FRR2 state.

Total

Total number of path and reservation states.

Ready

Number of states in FRR ready state. No FRR processing has been done on these states.

Act-Wait

Number of states in “Active Wait” FRR state.

  • For PSBs, this indicates that after FRR the path message has not yet been sent.
  • For RSBs, this indicates that after FRR, the reservation message has not yet been received.

Active

Number of states in “Active” FRR state.

  • For PSBs, this indicates that after FRR the path message has been sent.
  • For RSBs, this indicates that after FRR, the reservation message has been received.
2 Fast reroute.

Related Commands

Command

Description

show mrib mpls traffic-eng fast-reroute

Configures the multicast routing information base MPLS traffic engineering fast reroute information.

show rsvp graceful-restart

To display the local graceful-restart information for RSVP, use the show rsvp graceful-restart command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp graceful-restart [neighbors] [IP-address] [detail]

Syntax Description

neighbors

(Optional) Displays single-line status for each neighbor. If this keyword is not specified, only a multiline table entry is displayed showing local graceful-restart information.

IP-address

(Optional) Address of the neighbor you are displaying. Displays a specific neighbor with that destination address only. If this keyword is not specified, all neighbors are displayed.

detail

(Optional) Displays multiline status for each neighbor. If this keyword is not specified, only a single-line table entry is displayed.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Graceful-restart neighbors are displayed in ascending order of neighbor IP address.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp graceful-restart command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp graceful-restart
  
  Graceful restart: enabled  Number of global neighbors: 1
  Local MPLS router id: 192.168.55.55  
  Restart time: 60 seconds  Recovery time: 120 seconds
  Recovery timer: Not running
  Hello interval: 5000 milliseconds Maximum Hello miss-count: 4
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 10 show rsvp graceful-restart Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Graceful restart

Indicates whether graceful restart is configured locally.

Number of global neighbors

Number of neighbors identified by a unique router ID.

Local MPLS router id

Local router ID used for the MPLS applications.

Restart time

Amount of time after a loss in hello messages within which RSVP hello session is reestablished. This setting is manually configurable.

Recovery time

Local recovery time advertised to neighbors. This is dynamically computed based on the number of LSPs established and is the time used by neighbors to refresh states in the event of a failure.

Recovery timer

Countdown timer which, upon expiry, causes un-refreshed data forwarding states to be deleted (usually beginning with a value that is equivalent to the sum of the restart and recovery times).

Hello interval

Interval at which hello messages are sent to neighbors.

Maximum hello miss-count

Number of hellos from a neighbor that can be missed before declaring hellos down.

The following is sample output from the show rsvp graceful-restart neighbors command, which displays information about graceful restart neighbors in the router:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp graceful-restart neighbors
  
  Neighbor          App  State Recovery       Reason                Since  LostCnt
  --------------- ----- ------ -------- ------------ -------------------- --------
  192.168.77.77 MPLS     UP     DONE          N/A  19/12/2002 17:02:25        0
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 11 show rsvp graceful-restart neighbors Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Neighbor

Router ID of a global neighbor.

App

Application type of a global neighbor (MPLS ).

State

State of the hello session to a global neighbor (up, down, INIT).

Recovery

State at which the local node is recovering a global neighbor.

Reason

Last reason for which communication has been lost for a global neighbor. If none has occurred, this field is marked as N/A.

Since

Time at which the current hello state for a global neighbor has been established.

LostCnt

Number of times hello communication has been lost with a global neighbor.

The following is sample output from the show rsvp graceful-restart neighbors detail command, which displays detailed information about all graceful restart neighbors:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp graceful-restart neighbors detail
  
  Neighbor: 192.168.77.77 Source: 192.168.55.55 (MPLS)
    Hello instance for application MPLS
      Hello State: UP        (for 00:20:52)
      Number of times communications with neighbor lost: 0
      Reason: N/A
    Recovery State: DONE
    Number of Interface neighbors: 1
      address: 192.168.55.0
    Restart time: 120 seconds  Recovery time: 120 seconds
    Restart timer: Not running
    Recovery timer: Not running
    Hello interval: 5000 milliseconds  Maximum allowed missed Hello messages: 4
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 12 show rsvp graceful-restart neighbors detail Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Neighbor

Router ID of a global neighbor.

Source

Local router ID and application type.

Hello State

State of the hello instance for the global neighbor (up, down, or init) and duration of the current state.

Number of times communications with neighbor lost

Number of times hello communication has been lost with a global neighbor.

Reason

Last reason indicating why communication was lost for a global neighbor. If none has occurred, this field is marked as N/A.

Recovery State

State at which the local node is recovering a global neighbor.

Number of Interface neighbors

Number of interfaces belonging to a global neighbor.

Address

IP address of the interface neighbor.

Recovery timer

Remote recovery time for a global neighbor.

Hello interval

Interval at which hello messages are sent by the remote global neighbor.

Maximum allowed missed Hello messages

Number of hellos that can be missed by the remote global neighbor before declaring hellos down.

show rsvp hello instance

To display the RSVP hello instances, use the show rsvp hello instance command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp hello instance [ Hostname or IP-address ] [detail]

Syntax Description

Hostname or IP-address

(Optional) Address of the neighbor you are displaying. If this argument is not specified, all neighbors are displayed.

detail

(Optional) Displays multiline status for each hello instance. If this keyword is not specified, only a single-line table entry is displayed.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Hello instances are displayed in ascending order of neighbor IP address.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp hello instance command, which displays brief information about all hello instances in the router:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp hello instance
  
  Neighbor         Type    State    Interface    LostCnt 
  ---------------- ------  -------- ------------ --------
  192.168.77.77    ACTIVE  UP       None         0
  
 

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 13 show rsvp hello instance Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Neighbor

Router ID of a global neighbor hosting the hello instance.

Type

Hello instance type (active or passive). Active type indicates that a node is sending hello requests and passive indicates that a node is sending hello acknowledgements.

State

State of the hello session to a global neighbor (up, down, or init).

Interface

Interface for interface bound hello's used for FRR3. Hello instances bound to a global neighbor show Interface as None. Hellos used for FRR are currently not supported.

LostCnt

Number of times hello communication has been lost with a global neighbor.

3 Fast reroute.

The following is sample output from the show rsvp hello instance command, which displays detailed information about all hello instances in the router:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp hello instance detail
  
  Neighbor: 192.168.77.77 Source: 192.168.55.55 (MPLS)
    State: UP        (for 00:07:14)
    Type: ACTIVE   (sending requests)
    I/F: None
    Hello interval (msec) (used when ACTIVE)
    Configured: 5000
    Src_instance 0x484b01, Dst_instance 0x4d4247
    Counters:
    Communication with neighbor lost:
      Num of times: 0    Reasons:
        Missed acks:             0
        New Src_Inst received:   0
        New Dst_Inst received:   0
        I/f went down:           0
        Neighbor disabled Hello: 0
    Msgs Received:   93
      Sent:       92
      Suppressed: 87
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 14 show rsvp hello instance detail Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Neighbor

Router ID of a global neighbor.

Source

Local router ID and application type.

State

State of the hello instance for the global neighbor (up, down or init) and duration of the current state.

Type

Hello instance type (active or passive). Active type indicates that a node is sending hello requests and passive indicates that a node is sending hello acks.

I/F

Interface for interface bound hellos. Hello instances for Graceful restart show interface as None.

show rsvp hello instance interface-based

To display the RSVP hello instances on a specific interface, use the show rsvp hello instance interface-based command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp hello instance interface-based [IP-address] [detail]

Syntax Description

IP-address

(Optional) Address of the neighboring interface. you are displaying. If this argument is not specified, all neighbors are displayed.

detail

(Optional) Displays detailed information for the specified interface.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Hello instances are displayed in ascending order of neighbor IP address.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp hello instance interface-based command, which displays detailed information about hello instances on a specific interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp hello instance interface-based 10.10.10.10
  
  Neighbor         Type    State    Interface    LostCnt 
  ---------------- ------  -------- ------------ --------
  10.10.10.10      ACTIVE  UP       None         0
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 15 show rsvp hello instance interface-based Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Neighbor

Router ID of a global neighbor hosting the hello instance.

Type

Hello instance type (active or passive). Active type indicates that a node is sending hello requests and passive indicates that a node is sending hello acknowledgements.

State

State of the hello session to a global neighbor (up, down, or init).

Interface

Interface for interface bound hello's used for FRR4. Hello instances bound to a global neighbor show interface as none. Hellos used for FRR are currently not supported.

LostCnt

Number of times hello communication has been lost with a global neighbor.

4 Fast reroute.

show rsvp interface

To display information about all interfaces with RSVP enabled, use the show rsvp interface command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp interface [ type interface-path-id ] [detail]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type. For more information, use the question mark (?) online help function.

interface-path-id

Physical interface or a virtual interface.

Note   

Use the show interfaces command to see a list of all possible interfaces currently configured on the router.

For more information about the syntax for the router, use the question mark (?) online help function.

detail

(Optional) Displays multiline status for each interface. If this keyword is not specified, only a single-line table entry is displayed.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Release 3.9.0

Sample output was modified.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Use the show rsvp interface command to display various configuration settings such as the list of neighbors and their refresh reduction capabilities.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp interface command, which displays brief information about the RSVP-configured interfaces running in prestandard DS-TE mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp interface gigabitEthernet 0/3/0/0

Thu Oct 22 20:35:07.737 UTC
INTERFACE: GigabitEthernet0/3/0/0 (ifh=0x4000300).
 BW (bits/sec): Max=750M. MaxFlow=750M.
                Allocated=0 (0%). 
                BC0=750M. BC1=0.

The following is sample output from the show rsvp interface command, which displays brief information about the RSVP-configured interfaces for the GigabitEthernet interface type:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp interface gigabitEthernet 0/3/0/0

Thu Oct 22 20:35:42.323 UTC
Interface   MaxBW (bps) MaxFlow (bps) Allocated (bps)      MaxSub (bps)
----------- ----------- ------------- -------------------- ------------
Gi0/3/0/0          750M          750M             0 (  0%)            0

This following is sample output from the show rsvp interfaces detail command running in standard DS-TE mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp interface gigabitEthernet 0/3/0/0 detail 
  
Thu Oct 22 20:35:11.638 UTC
INTERFACE: GigabitEthernet0/3/0/0 (ifh=0x4000300).
 VRF ID: 0x60000000 (Default).
 BW (bits/sec): Max=750M. MaxFlow=750M.
                Allocated=0 (0%). 
                BC0=750M. BC1=0.
 Signalling: No DSCP marking. No rate limiting.
 States in: 0. Max missed msgs: 4.
 Expiry timer: Not running. Refresh interval: 45s.
 Normal Refresh timer: Not running. Summary refresh timer: Running.
 Refresh reduction local: Enabled. Summary Refresh: Enabled (1472 bytes max).
 Reliable summary refresh: Disabled. Bundling: Enabled. (1500 bytes max).
 Ack hold: 400 ms, Ack max size: 1500 bytes. Retransmit: 900ms.
 Neighbor information:
    Neighbor-IP    Nbor-MsgIds States-out  Refresh-Reduction Expiry(min::sec)
 -------------- -------------- ---------- ------------------ ----------------
        9.0.0.1              0          6            Enabled 14::56
    10.10.10.10              0          0            Enabled 14::33

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 16 show rsvp interface detail Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Bandwidth

Configured values on the interface and currently allocated bandwidth.

Ack hold

Time, in milliseconds, before RSVP responds with an acknowledgment.

Neighbor-IP

Address of peer that RSVP is exchanging messages on that interface.

Nbor-msglds

Message IDs received from the neighbor (corresponding to the number of LSPs with reliable messaging).

States-out

States (including paths or reservations) sent on this interface to the neighbor.

Refresh Reduction

Neighbor Refresh Reduction capability.

Expiry

Time a neighbor entry in the interface database expires if there is no activity on this interface with the corresponding neighbor.

Related Commands

Commands

Description

show rsvp counters

Displays internal RSVP counters.

show rsvp neighbor

To display information about RSVP neighbors, use the show rsvp neighbor command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp neighbor [detail]

Syntax Description

detail

(Optional) Displays detailed information about RSVP neighbors.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Use the show rsvp interface command to display various configuration settings such as the list of neighbors and their refresh reduction capabilities.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp neighbor command using the detail keyword:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp neighbor detail
  
  Global Neighbor: 40.40.40.40 
  Interface Neighbor: 1.1.1.1 
  Interface: POS0/0/0/0 
  Refresh Reduction: "Enabled" or "Disabled". 
  Remote epoch: 0xXXXXXXXX 
  Out of order messages: 0 
  Retransmitted messages: 0 
  Interface Neighbor: 2.2.2.2 
  Interface: POS0/1/0/0 
  Refresh Reduction: "Enabled" or "Disabled". 
  Remote epoch: 0xXXXXXXXX 
  Out of order messages: 0 
  Retransmitted messages: 0 
  

show rsvp request

To list all the requests that RSVP knows about on a router, use the show rsvp request command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp request [ destination IP-address ] [detail] [ dst-port port-num ] [ source IP-address ] [ src-port port-num ]

Syntax Description

detail

(Optional) Displays multiline status for each path. If this keyword is not specified, only a single-line table entry is displayed.

destination IP-address

(Optional) Displays the entries that match the specified address.

dst-port port-num

(Optional) Displays destination port and tunnel information.

source IP-address

(Optional) Displays source address information.

src-port port-num

(Optional) Displays port and LSP ID information.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

This command displays information about upstream reservations only; that is, reservations being sent to upstream hops. Information about downstream reservations (that is, incoming or locally created reservations) is available using the show rsvp reservation command.

Reservations are displayed in ascending order of destination IP address, destination port, source IP address, and source port.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp request command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp request
  
         Dest Addr DPort      Source Addr SPort Pro   OutputIF Sty Serv Rate Burst
  ---------------- ----- ---------------- ----- --- ---------- --- ---- ---- -----
     192.168.40.40 2001     192.168.67.68     2   0  PO0/7/0/1  SE LOAD    0    1K
  

The following is sample output from the show rsvp request detail command, which displays detailed information about all requests in the router. Requests are reservation states for the reservation messages sent upstream:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp request detail
  
  REQ:  IPv4-LSP Session addr: 192.168.40.40. TunID: 2001. LSPId: 2.
   Source addr: 192.168.67.68. ExtID: 192.168.67.68.
   Output interface: POS0/7/0/1. Next hop: 192.168.67.68 (lih: 0x19700001).
   Flags: Local Receiver.
   Style: Shared-Explicit. Service: Controlled-Load.
   Rate: 0 bits/sec. Burst: 1K bytes. Peak: 0 bits/sec.
   MTU min: 0, max: 500 bytes. 
   Policy:  Forwarding. Policy source(s): MPLS/TE.
   Number of supporting PSBs: 1
   Destination Add DPort       Source Add SPort Pro     Input IF Rate Burst Prot
    192.168.40.40  2001        192.168.67.68 2   0    PO0/7/0/1    0   1K    Off
   Number of supporting RSBs: 1
   Destination Add DPort       Source Add SPort Pro   Input IF Sty Serv Rate Burst
     192.168.40.40  2001       65.66.67.68  2   0      None SE LOAD     0    1K 
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 17 show rsvp request detail Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Number of supporting PSBs

Number of senders for this session (typically, 1).

Number of supporting RSBs

Number of reservations per session (typically, 1).

Policy

Admission control status.

Policy source

Entity performing the admission control (MPLS-TE or COPS).

Related Commands

Commands

Description

show rsvp reservation

Displays internal RSVP reservation counters.

show rsvp reservation

To display all reservations that RSVP knows about on a router, use the show rsvp reservation command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp reservation [ destination IP address ] [detail] [ dst-port port-num ] [ source IP-address ] [ src-port port-num ]

Syntax Description

detail

(Optional) Displays multiline status for each reservation. If the detail keyword is not specified, only a single-line table entry is displayed.

destination IP-address

(Optional) Displays the entries that match the specified address.

dst-port port-num

(Optional) Displays destination port and tunnel ID information.

source IP-address

(Optional) Displays source address information.

src-port port-num

(Optional) Displays source port and LSP ID information.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

The show rsvp reservation command displays information about downstream reservations only (that is, reservations received on this device or created by application program interface (API) calls). Upstream reservations or requests are displayed using the show rsvp request command.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp reservation command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp reservation
  
         Dest Addr DPort      Source Addr SPort Pro   Input IF Sty Serv Rate Burst
  ---------------- ----- ---------------- ----- --- ---------- --- ---- ---- -----
     192.168.40.40  2001   192.168.67.68     2   0       None  SE LOAD     0    1K
     192.168.67.68  2000     10.40.40.40    15   0  PO0/7/0/1  SE LOAD     0    1K
  

The following example displays detailed information about all reservations in the router:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp reservation detail
  
  RESV: IPv4-LSP Session addr: 192.168.40.40. TunID: 2001. LSPId: 2.
   Source addr: 192.168.67.68. ExtID: 192.168.67.68.
   Input adjusted interface: None. Input physical interface: None.
   Next hop: 0.0.0.0 (lih: 0x0).
   Style: Shared-Explicit. Service: Controlled-Load.
   Rate: 0 bits/sec. Burst: 1K bytes. Peak: 0 bits/sec.
   MTU min: 40, max: 500 bytes. 
   Flags: Local Receiver.
   State expires in 0.000 sec.
   Policy:  Accepted. Policy source(s): MPLS/TE.
   Header info: RSVP TTL=255. IP TTL=255. Flags: 0x0. TOS=0xff.
   Resource: 
    Labels: Local downstream: 3.
  
  RESV: IPv4-LSP Session addr: 192.168.67.68. TunID: 2000. LSPId: 15.
   Source addr: 192.168.40.40. ExtID: 10.10.40.40.
   Input adjusted interface: PO0/7/0/1. Input physical interface: PO0/7/0/1.
   Next hop: 10.66.67.68 (lih: 0x8DE00002).
   Style: Shared-Explicit. Service: Controlled-Load.
   Rate: 0 bits/sec. Burst: 1K bytes. Peak: 0 bits/sec.
   MTU min: 0, max: 500 bytes. 
   Flags: None.
   State expires in 361.184 sec.
   Policy:  Accepted. Policy source(s): MPLS/TE.
   Header info: RSVP TTL=254. IP TTL=254. Flags: 0x1. TOS=0xff.
   Resource: 
    Labels: Outgoing downstream: 3.
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 18 show rsvp reservation detail Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Input adjusted interface

Interface to reflect the path’s outgoing interface.

Input physical interface

Interface where the reservation was received.

Next hop

Address of the downstream node that sent the reservation to this node.

Lih

Logical interface handle sent in the hop object of path returned to us in the reservation to figure out what interface the path was sent on.

Flags

Indicates path state, including as Local Repair, Local Sender (LSP5 ingress node), and others.

Policy

Admission control status.

Policy source

Entity performing the admission control on the LSP.

Header info

RSVP header information as described in RFC 2205.

5 Link-state packet

Related Commands

Command

Description

show rsvp request

Lists all the requests that RSVP knows about on a router.

show rsvp sender

To display all path states that RSVP knows about on this router, use the show rsvp sender command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp sender [ destination IP-address ] [detail] [ dst-port port-num ] [ source IP-address ] [ src-port port-num ]

Syntax Description

detail

(Optional) Displays multiline status for each path. If the detail keyword is not specified, only a single-line table entry is displayed.

destination IP-address

(Optional) Displays the entries that match the specified address.

dst-port port-num

(Optional) Displays destination port and tunnel ID information.

source IP-address

(Optional) Displays source address information.

src-port port-num

(Optional) Displays source port and LSP ID information.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

The show rsvp sender command displays information about path states.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp sendercommand:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp sender
   
  Dest Addr        DPort    Source Addr SPort   Pro  Input IF    Rate Burst Prot
  ---------------- ----- ---------------- ----- --- ------------ ---- ----- ----
  10.40.40.40     2001      10.66.67.68     2   0    PO0/7/0/1    0    1K  Off
  10.66.67.68     2000      10.40.40.40    15   0    None         0    1K  Off
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 19 show rsvp sender Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

DProt

Destination port number and tunnel-id.

Dest Address

Destination and session address of LSP6.

SPort

Source port and LSP ID.

Source Addr

Address of the ingress node of the LSP.

Input IF

Interface on which the Path message was received.

6 Link-state packet

The following example displays detailed information about all paths in the system:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp sender detail
  
  PATH: IPv4-LSP Session addr: 65.66.67.68. TunID: 1. LSPId: 25.
   Source addr: 40.40.40.40. ExtID: 40.40.40.40.
   Prot: Off. Backup tunnel: None.
   Setup Priority: 7, Reservation Priority: 0
   Rate: 0 bits/sec. Burst: 1K bytes. Peak: 0 bits/sec.
   Min unit: 40 bytes, Max unit: 500 bytes
   Flags: Bidirectional.
   State expires in 370.154 sec.
   Policy:  Accepted. Policy source(s): Default.
   Header info: RSVP TTL=254. IP TTL=254. Flags: 0x1. TOS=0xc0.
   Input interface: PO0/3/0/0. Previous hop: 40.40.40.40 (lih: 0x40600001).
   Resource: 
    Labels: Outgoing upstream: 3.
   Class-Type: None.
   Explicit Route (Incoming):
       Strict, 65.66.67.68(interface-path-id 5)    
       Strict, 65.66.67.68/32 
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 20 show rsvp sender detail Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Prot

LSP configured as a protected tunnel.

Backup tunnel

Name of the backup tunnel assigned to protect this LSP7.

Flags

Path state, including as local repair, local sender (LSP ingress node), and others.

Policy

Admission control status for Path message in the incoming direction.

Policy source

Entity doing the admission control, such as COPS or MPLS-TE8.

Header info

RSVP header information as described in RFC 2205.

Input interface

Interface on which the path was received. At ingress mode, it is None.

Previous hop

Address of the upstream peer who sent us the Path message. May be the interface address or node-id depending on LSP (packet or optical).

Lih

Logical interface handle received in the hop object of the path.

Output interface

Interface on which the path was forwarded to the downstream neighbor

Policy

Admission control status for the path in the outgoing direction.

Explicit route

Explicit route specified in the explicit-route object of the Path message.

7 Link-state packet
8 MPLS-Traffic Engineering

show rsvp session

To list all sessions that RSVP knows about on this router, use the show rsvp session command in EXEC mode.

show rsvp session [ destination IP-address ] [detail] [ dst-port port-num ] [ tunnel-name tunnel-name ]

Syntax Description

detail

(Optional) Displays multiline status for each path. If the detail keyword is not specified, only a single-line table entry is displayed.

destination IP-address

(Optional) Displays the entries that match the specified address.

dst-port port-num

(Optional) Displays destination port and tunnel ID information.

tunnel-name tunnel-name

(Optional) Displays status for the session matching the specified tunnel-name.

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Sessions are displayed in ascending order of destination IP address, destination port, and source IP address.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following is sample output from the show rsvp session command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp session
  
  Type    Session Addr  Port  Proto/ExtTunID  PSBs  RSBs  Reqs 
  ---- --------------- ----- --------------- ----- ----- -----
  LSP4     10.40.40.40  2001     10.66.67.68     1     1     1
  LSP4     10.66.67.68  2000     10.40.40.40     1     1     0
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 21 show rsvp session Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Type

Type of data flow (Traffic-Engineering LSP (LSP4) or IPV4 session).

Session Addr

Destination address of the data packets and also tail of the LSP.

Port

Destination port or tunnel ID in case of TE tunnels.

Proto/ExtTunID

Source address of TE tunnels or protocol as in the case of IPV4 sessions.

PSBs

Number of path state blocks for this session.

RSBs

Number of reservation state blocks pertaining to incoming or local reservations for this session.

Reqs

Number of requests. State data structure representing reservations sent up-stream.

The following is sample output for the show rsvp session detail command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show rsvp session detail
  
  SESSION: IPv4-LSP Addr: 65.66.67.68, TunID: 1, ExtID: 40.40.40.40
   PSBs: 1, RSBs: 1, Requests: 0
   LSPId: 1
   Tunnel Name: newhead_t1
    RSVP Path Info:
     InLabel: No intf, No label
     Incoming Address: Unknown
     Explicit Route:
       Strict, 65.66.67.68(interface-path-id 5)
       Strict, 65.66.67.68/32
     Record Route: None
     Tspec: avg rate=0, burst=1K, peak rate=0
    RSVP Resv Info:
     OutLabel: POS0/7/0/1, 5
     FRR OutLabel: No intf, No label
     Record Route:
       Node-id 65.66.67.68, interface index 5
     Fspec: avg rate=0, burst=1K, peak rate=0
  

This table describes the significant fields shown in the display.



Table 22 show rsvp session detail Command Field Descriptions

Field

Description

TunID

Tunnel identifier and the destination port of the LSP9.

ExtID

Ingress node address of LSP.

Tunnel Instance

Source port of the LSP (with the ExtId forming the source parameters).

Tunnel Name

Name of the tunnel and LSP.

InLabel

Incoming interface and label info for the LSP in the upstream direction. At the egress node, using penultimate hop popping at the egress node, (implicit-null) appears as No Label.

Incoming Address

Address of the ingress interface.

Explicit Route

Explicit route specified in the explicit-route object of the Path message.

Record Route

Record route object in either the path or reservation message.

Tspec

Traffic parameters.

OutLabel

Outgoing interface and label sent downstream.

FRR OutLabel

For FRR10, displays the backup tunnel and Merge-point label.

Fspec

Flow spec parameters for specified QoS.

9 Link-state packet.
10 Fast reroute.

signalling dscp (RSVP)

To give all RSVP signaling packets sent out on a specific interface higher priority in the network by marking them with a particular Differentiated Service Code Point (DSCP), use the signalling dscp command in RSVP interface configuration submode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling dscp dscp

no signalling dscp

Syntax Description

dscp

DSCP priority number. Range is 0 to 63.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

DSCP marking improves signaling setup and teardown times.

Ordinarily, when a router receives Path messages for a particular state marked with a DSCP value, it sends out Path messages for that state marked with the same DSCP value. This command overrides that DSCP persistence and ensures that all messages sent out a particular interface are marked with a specified DSCP.

Though this command controls RSVP signaling packets, it has no effect on ordinary IP or MPLS data packets traveling along the path created or reserved by this RSVP session.

DSCP persistence operates on a per-state basis, but this command operates on a per-interface basis. So, if some incoming message (for example, multicast Path) with DSCP 10 causes two outgoing messages on interfaces A and B, ordinarily both are sent with DSCP 10. If signalling dscp 5 is configured for RSVP on interface A, the Path messages being sent out interface A is marked with DSCP 5, but the Path messages being sent out interface B are marked with DSCP 10.

There is a difference between the signalling dscp 0 and no signalling dscp commands. The first command instructs RSVP to explicitly set to 0 the DSCP on all packets sent out this interface. The second command removes any override on the packets being sent out this interface, and allows the DSCP of received packets that created this state to persist on packets forwarded out this interface.

The RFC specifies a standard mapping from the eight IP precedence values to eight values in the 64-value DSCP space. You can use those special DSCP values to specify IP precedence bits only.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to mark all RSVP packets going out on POS interface 0/1/0/1 as DSCP 20:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/1/0/1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling dscp 20
  

The following example shows how to disable DSCP marking of signaling packets going out POS interface 0/1/0/1:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/1/0/1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# interface pos 0/1/0/1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no signalling dscp
  

signalling graceful-restart

To enable or disable RSVP signaling graceful restart, use the signalling graceful-restart command in RSVP configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling graceful-restart [ recovery-time time | restart-time time ]

no signalling graceful-restart

Syntax Description

recovery-time

(Optional) Configures the recovery time that is advertised in the Restart Cap object in the Hello messages.

time

Time, in seconds, for the neighbor to wait for the node to recover (replay) existing states after the Hello session is reestablished before initiating TEARs. Range is 0 to 3600.

restart-time

(Optional) Configures the restart time that is advertised in the Restart Cap object in hello messages.

time

Time, in seconds, after a control-plane restart that RSVP can start exchanging hello messages. Range is 60 to 3600. Default is 120.

Command Default

RSVP signaling graceful restart is disabled.

Command Modes

RSVP configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Release 3.9.0

The recovery-time keyword was added.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

The signalling graceful-restart command provides a mechanism that helps minimize the negative effects on MPLS traffic for the following types of faults. This is an implementation of the fault handling section of the IETF standard RFC 3473:

Control-channel-failure

Disruption of communication channels between 2 nodes when the communication channels are separated from the data channels.

Node-failure

Control plane of a node fails, but the node preserves its data forwarding states.

The signalling graceful-restart command instigates the exchange of RSVP hello messages between the router and its neighbor nodes. After the hello messages are established with a given neighbor, RSVP can detect these types of faults when they occur.

If no hello messages are received from a neighbor within a certain number of hello intervals, a node assumes that communication with the neighbor has been lost. The node waits the amount of time advertised by the last restart time communicated by the neighbor, before invoking procedures for recovery from communication loss.

The configured restart time is important in case of recovery from failure. The configured value should accurately reflect the amount of time within which, after a control-plane restart, RSVP can start exchanging hello messages.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to enable RSVP signalling graceful restart:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp)# signalling graceful-restart
  

The following example shows how to set the restart time:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp)# signalling graceful-restart restart-time 200
  

The following example shows how to reset the restart time to the default of 120 seconds:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp)# no signalling graceful-restart restart-time
  

signalling hello graceful-restart interface-based

To enable RSVP to accept interface-based hello requests from the neighbor on an interface and send a Hello Acknowledgment to it, use the signalling hello graceful-restart interface-based command in RSVP configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling hello graceful-restart interface-based

no signalling hello graceful-restart interface-based

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to enable interface-based graceful restart:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface tunnel-te 66         
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling hello graceful-restart interface based

signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

To configure the interval at which RSVP graceful-restart hello messages are sent to each neighbor, use the signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval command in RSVP configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval refresh-interval

no signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Syntax Description

refresh-interval

Interval, in milliseconds, at which RSVP graceful-restart hello messages are sent to each neighbor. Range is 3000 to 30000.

Command Default

refresh interval: 5000

Command Modes

RSVP configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

The signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval command determines how often hello messages are sent to each neighbor. If the interval is made short, the hello messages are sent more frequently. Although a short interval may help detect failures quickly, it also results in increased network traffic. Optimizations in the RSVP hello mechanism exist to reduce the number of hello messages traveling over the network.

When an RSVP hello message is received, the receiving node acknowledges the hello and restarts its hello timer to the neighbor. By doing this, a hello is transmitted to the neighbor only if a hello is not received before the hello refresh interval has expired.

If two neighboring nodes do not have the same hello interval, the node with the larger hello interval has to acknowledge its neighbor’s (more frequent) hellos. For instance, if node A has a hello interval of 5 seconds, and node B has a hello interval of 10 seconds, node B still has to send hello messages every 5 seconds.

The hello backoff mechanism is an optimization that is tailored to minimize the number of hello messages from a neighbor that either does not have graceful restart enabled, or that fails to come back up during the restart interval. The restart interval is provided by the neighbor in the restart cap object.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example sets the hello graceful-restart refresh interval to 4000 msecs:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp)# signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval 4000
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Configures the number of consecutive missed RSVP hello messages before a neighbor is declared down or unreachable.

signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

To configure the number of consecutive missed RSVP hello messages before a neighbor is declared down or unreachable, use the signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command in RSVP configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses refresh-misses

no signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Syntax Description

refresh-misses

Number of misses for hello messages before a neighbor is declared down or unreachable. Range is 1 to 10. Default is 3.

Command Default

refresh-misses: 3

Command Modes

RSVP configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

If no hello messages (request or ACK) are received from a neighbor within the configured number of refresh misses, the node assumes that communication with the neighbor has been lost.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to set hello graceful-restart refresh misses to 4:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure        
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp)# signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses 4 
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Configures the interval at which RSVP graceful restart hello messages are sent per neighbor.

signalling prefix-filtering access-list

To specify the extended access control list to use for prefix filtering of RSVP Router Alert messages, use the signalling prefix-filtering access-list command in RSVP configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling prefix-filtering access-list access list name

no signalling prefix-filtering access-list access list name

Syntax Description

access list name

Extended access-list name as a string (maximum 32 characters).

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

RSVP configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.


Note


The extended access control list containing the source and destination prefixes used for packet filtering is configured separately.


Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the access control list name banks for prefix-filtering of RSVP Router Alert messages:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp)# signalling prefix-filtering access-list banks
  

The following example shows how to disable RSVP prefix-filtering of RSVP Router Alert messages:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp)# no signalling prefix-filtering access-list banks

Related Commands

Command

Description

signalling prefix-filtering default-deny-action

Configures RSVP to drop messages when an access control list match yields an implicit deny.

signalling prefix-filtering default-deny-action

To configure RSVP to drop RSVP Router Alert messages when an access control list match returns an implicit deny, use the signalling prefix-filtering default-deny-action command in RSVP configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling prefix-filtering default-deny-action drop

no signalling prefix-filtering default-deny-action drop

Syntax Description

drop

Specifies when RSVP router alert messages are dropped.

Command Default

Performs normal RSVP processing of Path, Path Tear, and ResvConfirm message packets.

Command Modes

RSVP configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to configure RSVP Router Alert messages when an access control list match returns an implicit deny:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp)# signalling prefix-filtering default-deny-action drop
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

signalling prefix-filtering access-list

Configures extended access control lists for prefix-filtering of an RSVP Router Alert messages.

signalling rate-limit

To limit the rate of RSVP signaling messages being sent out a particular interface, use the signalling rate-limit command in RSVP interface configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling rate-limit [ rate messages ] [ interval interval-length ]

no signalling rate-limit [ rate messages ] [ interval interval-length ]

Syntax Description

rate messages

(Optional) Configures the number of messages sent per scheduling interval. Range is 1 to 500 messages.

interval interval-length

(Optional) Specifies the length, in milliseconds, between scheduling intervals. Range is 250 to 2000.

Command Default

messages: 100

interval-length: 1,000 (1 second)

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Use the rate-limiting feature with caution. Limiting the rate of RSVP signaling has the advantage of avoiding an overload of the next hop router’s input queue, because such overloads would cause the next hop router to drop RSVP messages. However, reliable messaging and rapid retransmit usually enable the router to recover very rapidly from message drops; so rate limiting might not be necessary.

If the rate is set too low, it causes slower convergence times. This command limits all RSVP messages except acknowledgments (ACK) and SRefresh messages. The command does not let you make a router generate messages faster than its inherent limit. (That limit differs among router models.)

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to enable rate-limiting:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface POS0/3/0/0       
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling rate-limit
  

The following example shows how to limit the rate to 50 messages per second:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling rate-limit rate 50 
  

The following example shows how to set a limit at 40 messages for every 250 milliseconds:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling rate-limit rate 40 interval 250 

The following example shows how to restore the rate to the default of 100 messages per second:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no signalling rate-limit rate

The following example shows how to disable rate-limiting:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no signalling rate-limit
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

signalling refresh reduction bundle-max-size

Specifies the maximum bundle size of maximum size of single RSVP bundle message.

signalling refresh interval

To change the frequency with which a router updates the network about the RSVP state of a particular interface, use the signalling refresh interval command in RSVP interface configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling refresh interval seconds

no signalling refresh interval

Syntax Description

seconds

Number of seconds the router waits to update the network about the RSVP state of an interface, in seconds. Range is 10 to 180. Default is 45.

Command Default

seconds: 45

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

RSVP relies on a soft-state mechanism to maintain state consistency in the face of network losses. That mechanism is based on continuous refresh messages to keep a state current. Each RSVP router is responsible for sending periodic refresh messages to its neighbors.

The router attempts to randomize network traffic and reduce metronomic burstiness by jittering the actual interval between refreshes by as much as 50 percent. As a result, refreshes may not be sent at exactly the interval specified. However, the average rate of refreshes are within the specified refresh interval.

Lengthening the interval reduces the refresh load of RSVP on the network but causes downstream nodes to hold state longer. This reduces the responsiveness of the network to failure scenarios. Shortening the interval improves network responsiveness but expands the messaging load on the network.

The reliable messaging extension, implemented through the signalling refresh reduction reliable command, may cause new or changed messages to be temporarily refreshed at a more rapid rate than specified to improve network responsiveness.

The use of reliable messaging with rapid retransmit substantially improves network responsiveness in case of transient message loss; if the refresh interval is changed when using the reliable messaging feature, it is more useful to lengthen the interval than to shorten it.

The summary refresh extension, implemented through the signalling refresh reduction summary command, provides a lower-cost mechanism to refresh RSVP state. The router uses the same refresh interval between successive refreshes of a single state when using summary refresh and when using ordinary message-based refresh.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to specify a refresh interval of 30 seconds:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface tunnel-te 2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling refresh interval 30
  

The following example shows how to restore the refresh interval to the default value of 45 seconds:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface tunnel-te 2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no signalling refresh interval
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

signalling refresh missed

Specifies the number of successive missed refresh messages before RSVP deems the state expired and tears it down.

signalling refresh reduction reliable

Customizes acknowledgment message size and hold interval, and the RSVP message retransmit interval.

signalling refresh reduction summary

Enables and configures the maximum size of the SRefresh message.

signalling refresh missed

To specify the number of successive refresh messages that can be missed before the RSVP deems a state to be expired (resulting in the state to be torn down), use the signalling refresh missed command in RSVP interface configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling refresh missed number

no signalling refresh missed

Syntax Description

number

Number of successive missed refresh messages. Range is 1 to 8. Default is 4.

Command Default

number: 4

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Decreasing the missed-message number improves RSVP responsiveness to major failures like router failure or link faults, but decreases the resilience of RSVP resulting in packet drops or temporary network congestion. The latter condition makes RSVP too sensitive.

Increasing the missed-message number increases the resilience of RSVP to such transient packet loss, but decreases the RSVP responsiveness to more intransient network failures such as router failure or link fault.

The default value of 4 provides a balance of resilience and responsiveness factors.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to specify a missed refresh limit of six (6) messages:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface tunnel-te 2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling refresh missed 6
  

The following example shows how to return the missed refresh limit to the default value of four (4):

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface tunnel-te 2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no signalling refresh missed
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

signalling refresh interval

Changes the frequency with which a router updates the network about the RSVP state of an interface.

signalling refresh reduction reliable

Customizes acknowledgment message size and hold interval, and the RSVP message retransmit interval.

signalling refresh reduction summary

Enables and configures the maximum size of the SRefresh message.

signalling refresh reduction bundle-max-size

To configure the maximum size of a single RSVP bundle message, use the signalling refresh reduction bundle-max-size command in RSVP interface configuration mode.

signalling refresh reduction bundle-max-size size

Syntax Description

size

Maximum size, in bytes, of a single RSVP bundle message. Range is 512 to 65000.

Command Default

size: 4096

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to set the maximum bundle size of a single RSVP bundle message to 4000:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface tunnel-te 2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling refresh reduction bundle-max-size 4000
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

show rsvp interface

Displays information about all interfaces with RSVP enabled.

signalling refresh reduction disable

To disable RSVP refresh reduction on an interface, use the signalling refresh reduction disable command in RSVP interface configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling refresh reduction disable

no signalling refresh reduction disable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

The following features of the IETF refresh reduction standard RFC 2961 are enabled with this command:

  • Setting the refresh-reduction-capable bit in message headers
  • Message-ID usage
  • Reliable messaging with rapid retransmit, acknowledgment (ACK), and NACK messages
  • Summary refresh extension

Because refresh reduction relies on cooperation of the neighbor, the neighbor must also support the standard. If the router detects that a neighbor is not supporting the refresh reduction standard (either through observing the refresh-reduction-enabled bit in messages received from the next hop, or by sending a Message-ID object to the next hop and receiving an error), refresh reduction is not used on this link. That information is obtained through use of the show rsvp interface detail command.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to disable RSVP refresh reduction on an interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface tunnel-te 2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling refresh reduction disable

The following example shows how to enable RSVP refresh reduction on the interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface tunnel-te 2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no signalling refresh reduction disable

Related Commands

Command

Description

show rsvp interface

Displays information about all interfaces with RSVP enabled.

signalling refresh interval

Changes the frequency with which a router updates the network about the RSVP state of an interface.

signalling refresh reduction reliable

Customizes acknowledgment message size and hold interval, and the RSVP message retransmit interval.

signalling refresh reduction summary

Enables and configures the maximum size of the signalling refresh message.

signalling refresh reduction reliable

To configure the parameters of reliable messaging, use the signalling refresh reduction reliable command in RSVP interface configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling refresh reduction reliable { ack-max-size bytes | ack-hold-time milliseconds | retransmit-time milliseconds | summary-refresh }

no signalling refresh reduction reliable { ack-max-size bytes | ack-hold-time milliseconds | retransmit-time milliseconds | summary-refresh }

Syntax Description

ack-max-size

Specifies the maximum size of the RSVP component within a single acknowledgment message.

bytes

Number of bytes that define the maximum size of an RSVP component. Range is 20 to 65000.

ack-hold-time

Specifies the maximum amount of time a router holds an acknowledgment before sending it, in an attempt to bundle several acknowledgments into a single acknowledgment message.

milliseconds

Number of milliseconds that define the acknowledgment hold time. Range is 100 to 5000.

retransmit-time

Specifies the amount of time the router initially waits for an acknowledgment message before resending the RSVP message.

milliseconds

Number of milliseconds that define the retransmit time. Range is 100 to 10000.

summary-refresh

Enables the use of reliable transmission for RSVP summary refresh messages.

Command Default

ack-max-size bytes: 4096

ack-hold-time milliseconds: 400 (0.4 seconds)

retransmit-time milliseconds: 900 (0.9 seconds)

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

For reliable messaging to work properly, configure the retransmit time on the send router (A) and acknowledgment hold time on the peer router (B). (Vice versa for messages in reverse direction.)

The retransmit time must be greater than the acknowledgment hold time, so that the acknowledgment message has time to get back to the sender before the message retransmits. We recommend that the retransmit-time interval be at least twice the acknowledgment hold-time interval. If the retransmit-time value is smaller than the acknowledgment hold-time value, then router A retransmits the message even though router B may have received the message and is waiting for an acknowledgment hold time to time out to send the acknowledgment. This causes unnecessary network traffic.

Reducing the value of ack-max-size causes more acknowledgment messages to be issued, with fewer acknowledgments contained within each acknowledgment message. However, reducing the acknowledgment-max-size does not speed up the rate at which acknowledgment messages are issued because their frequency is still controlled by the time values (acknowledgment hold time and retransmit time).

To use reliable messaging for summary refresh messages, use thersvp interface interface-name and signalling refresh reduction summary commands.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to set the maximum acknowledgment message size to 4096 bytes on POS interface 0/4/0/1:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/4/0/1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling refresh reduction reliable ack-max-size 4096
  

The following example shows how to return the maximum acknowledgment message size to the default of 1000 bytes on POS interface 0/4/0/1:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/4/0/1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no rsvp signalling refresh reduction reliable

The following example shows how to set the acknowledgment hold time to 1 second:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/4/0/1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling refresh reduction reliable ack-hold-time 1000
            

The following example shows how to return the acknowledgment hold time to the default of 0.4 second:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/4/0/1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no signalling refresh reduction reliable ack-hold-time

The following example shows how to set the retransmit timer to 2 seconds:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/4/0/1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling refresh reduction reliable retransmit-time 2000

The following example shows how to return the retransmit timer to the default of 0.9 seconds:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface pos 0/4/0/1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no signalling refresh reduction reliable

The following example shows how to enable the use of reliable transmission for RSVP summary refresh messages:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling refresh reduction reliable summary-refresh
  

The following example shows how to disable the use of reliable transmission for RSVP summary refresh messages:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no signalling refresh reduction reliable summary-refresh

Related Commands

Command

Description

signalling refresh reduction disable

Disables RSVP refresh reduction on an interface.

signalling refresh reduction summary

To configure RSVP summary refresh message size on an interface, use the signalling refresh reduction summary command in RSVP interface configuration mode. To return to the default behavior, use the no form of this command.

signalling refresh reduction summary max-size bytes

no signalling refresh reduction summary max-size bytes

Syntax Description

max-size bytes

Specifies the maximum size, in bytes, of a single RSVP summary refresh message. Range is 20 to 65000.

Command Default

bytes: 4096

Command Modes

RSVP interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Use the signalling refresh reduction summary command to specify the maximum size of the summary refresh messages sent. Message size is verified using the show rsvp interface detail command.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to change the summary message maximum size on an interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface tunnel-te 2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# signalling refresh reduction summary max-size 6000

The following example shows how to return the summary message maximum size to the default value on an interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface tunnel-te 2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# no signalling refresh reduction summary max-size 6000
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

show rsvp interface

Displays information about all interfaces with RSVP enabled.

signalling refresh interval

Changes the frequency with which a router updates the network about the RSVP state of an interface.

window-size (RSVP)

To specify the maximum number of RSVP authenticated messages that can be received out of sequence, use the window-size command in RSVP authentication configuration mode, RSVP interface authentication configuration mode, or RSVP neighbor authentication configuration mode. To disable the window size, use the no form of this command.

window-size N

no window-size

Syntax Description

N

Size of the window to restrict out-of-sequence messages. Range is 1 to 64. Default is 1. All out-of-sequence messages are dropped.

Command Default

N: 1

Command Modes

RSVP authentication configuration

RSVP interface authentication configuration

RSVP neighbor authentication configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes appropriate task IDs. If the user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Use the window-size command to specify the maximum number of authenticated messages that are received out of sequence. All RSVP authenticated messages include a sequence number that is used to prevent replays of RSVP messages.

With a default window size of one message, RSVP rejects any out-of-order or out-of-sequence authenticated messages because they are assumed to be replay attacks. However, sometimes bursts of RSVP messages become reordered between RSVP neighbors. If this occurs on a regular basis, and you can verify that the node sending the burst of messages is trusted, you can use the window-size option to adjust the burst size such that RSVP does not discard such reordered bursts. RSVP checks for duplicate messages within these bursts.

Task ID

Task ID

Operations

mpls-te

read, write

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the size of the window to 33 in RSVP neighbor authentication configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp neighbor 1.1.1.1 authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-nbor-auth)# window-size 33
  

The following example shows how to configure the size of the window to 33 in RSVP authentication configuration mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-auth)# window-size 33

The following example shows how to configure the size of the window to 33 in RSVP interface authentication configuration mode by using the rsvp interface command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# rsvp interface POS 0/2/1/0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if)# authentication
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-rsvp-if-auth)# window-size 33
  

Related Commands

Command

Description

key-source key-chain (RSVP)

Specifies the source of the key information to authenticate RSVP signaling messages.

life-time (RSVP)

Controls how long RSVP maintains idle security associations with other trusted RSVP neighbors.