Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide
Configuring Frame Relay on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router
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Configuring Frame Relay on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Table Of Contents

Configuring Frame Relay on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Contents

Prerequisites for Configuring Frame Relay

Information About Frame Relay Interfaces

Frame Relay Encapsulation

LMI

Multilink Frame Relay (FRF.16)

Multilink Frame Relay High Availability

Multilink Frame Relay Configuration Overview

End-to-End Fragmentation (FRF.12)

Configuring Frame Relay

Modifying the Default Frame Relay Configuration on an Interface

Prerequisites

Restrictions

Disabling LMI on an Interface with Frame Relay Encapsulation

Configuring Multilink Frame Relay Bundle Interfaces

Prerequisites

Restrictions

Configuring FRF.12 End-to-End Fragmentation on a Channelized Frame Relay Serial Interface

Configuration Examples for Frame Relay

Optional Frame Relay Parameters: Example

Multilink Frame Relay: Example

End-to-End Fragmentation: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance


Configuring Frame Relay on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router


This module describes the optional configurable Frame Relay parameters available on Packet-over-SONET/SDH (POS), multilink, and serial interfaces configured with Frame Relay encapsulation.

Feature History for Configuring Frame Relay Interfaces on Cisco IOS XR Software

Release
Modification

Release 4.0.0

Support for Frame Relay was added for the following SPAs:

Cisco 2-Port Channelized OC-12c/DS0 SPA

Cisco 1-Port Channelized OC-48/STM-16 SPA

Cisco 8-Port OC-12c/STM-4 POS SPA

Cisco 2-Port OC-48c/STM-16 POS/RPR SPA

Cisco 1-Port OC-192c/STM-64 POS/RPR XFP SPA

Support for the following Frame Relay features was added for the Cisco 2-Port Channelized OC-12c/DSO SPA:

Multilink Frame Relay (FRF.16)

End-to-End Fragmentation (FRF.12)

Release 4.0.1

Support for Frame Relay was added for the following SPAs:

Cisco 1-Port Channelized OC-3/STM-1 SPA

Cisco 2-Port and 4-Port Clear Channel T3/E3 SPA

Cisco 4-Port OC-3c/STM-1 POS SPA

Cisco 8-Port OC-3c/STM-1 POS SPA

Release 4.1.0

Support for Frame Relay was added for the following SPAs:

Cisco 4-Port Channelized T3 SPA

Cisco 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA


Contents

Prerequisites for Configuring Frame Relay

Information About Frame Relay Interfaces

Configuring Frame Relay

Configuration Examples for Frame Relay

Additional References

Prerequisites for Configuring Frame Relay

You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Before configuring Frame Relay, be sure that the following conditions are met:

Your hardware must support POS or serial interfaces.

You have enabled Frame Relay encapsulation on your interface with the encapsulation frame relay command, as described in the appropriate module:

To enable Frame Relay encapsulation on a multilink bundle interface, see the "Configuring Multilink Frame Relay Bundle Interfaces" section.

To enable Frame Relay encapsulation on a POS interface, see the "Configuring POS Interfaces on Cisco IOS XR Softwareon the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router" module in this manual.

To enable Frame Relay encapsulation on a serial interface, see the Configuring Serial Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router module in this manual.

Information About Frame Relay Interfaces

The following sections explain the various aspects of configuring Frame Relay interfaces:

Frame Relay Encapsulation

Multilink Frame Relay (FRF.16)

End-to-End Fragmentation (FRF.12)

Frame Relay Encapsulation

On the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, Frame Relay is supported on POS and serial main interfaces, and on PVCs that are configured under those interfaces. To enable Frame Relay encapsulation on an interface, use the encapsulation frame-relay command in interface configuration mode.

Frame Relay interfaces support two types of encapsulated frames:

Cisco (this is the default)

IETF

Use the encapsulation frame-relay command in interface configuration mode to configure Cisco or IETF encapsulation on a PVC.


Note If the encapsulation type is not configured explicitly for a PVC with the encapsulation command, then that PVC inherits the encapsulation type from the main interface.


The encapsulation frame relay and encap (PVC) commands are described in the following modules:

To enable Frame Relay encapsulation on a POS interface, see the "Configuring POS Interfaces on Cisco IOS XR Softwareon the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router" module in this manual.

To enable Frame Relay encapsulation on a serial interface, see the Configuring Serial Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router module in this manual.

When an interface is configured with Frame Relay encapsulation and no additional configuration commands are applied, the default interface settings shown in Table 14 are present. These default settings can be changed by configuration as described in this module.

Table 14 Frame Relay Encapsulation Default Settings

Parameter
Configuration File Entry
Default Settings
Command Mode

PVC Encapsulation

encap {cisco | ietf}

cisco

Note When the encap command is not configured, the PVC encapsulation type is inherited from the Frame Relay main interface.

PVC configuration

Type of support provided by the interface

frame-relay intf-type {dce | dte}

dte

Interface configuration

LMI type supported on the interface

frame-relay lmi-type [ansi | cisco | q933a]

For a DCE, the default setting is cisco.

For a DTE, the default setting is synchronized to match the LMI type supported on the DCE.

Note To return an interface to its default LMI type, use the no frame-relay lmi-type [ansi | cisco | q933a] command.

Interface configuration

Disable or enable LMI

frame-relay lmi disable

LMI is enabled by default on Frame Relay interfaces.

To reenable LMI on an interface after it has been disabled, use the no frame-relay lmi disable command.

Interface configuration



Note The default settings of LMI polling-related commands appear in Table 15 and Table 16.


LMI

The Local Management Interface (LMI) protocol monitors the addition, deletion, and status of PVCs. LMI also verifies the integrity of the link that forms a Frame Relay User-Network Interface (UNI).

Frame Relay interfaces supports the following types of LMI on UNI interfaces:

ANSI—ANSI T1.617 Annex D

Q.933—ITU-T Q.933 Annex A

Cisco

Use the frame-relay lmi-type command to configure the LMI type to be used on an interface.


Note The LMI type that you use must correspond to the PVCs configured on the main interface. The LMI type must match on both ends of a Frame Relay connection.


If your router functions as a switch connected to another non-Frame Relay router, use the frame-relay intf-type dce command to configure the LMI type to support data communication equipment (DCE).

If your router is connected to a Frame Relay network, use the frame-relay intf-type dte command to configure the LMI type to support data terminal equipment (DTE).


Note LMI type auto-sensing is supported on DTE interfaces by default.


Use the show frame-relay lmi and show frame-relay lmi-info commands in EXEC mode to display information and statistics for the Frame Relay interfaces in your system. (When specifying the type and interface-path-id arguments, you must specify information for the main interface.) You can modify the error threshold, event count, and polling verification timer and then use the show frame-relay lmi command to gather information that can help you monitor and troubleshoot Frame Relay interfaces.

If the LMI type is cisco (the default LMI type), the maximum number of PVCs that can be supported under a single interface is related to the MTU size of the main interface. Use the following formula to calculate the maximum number of PVCs supported on a card or SPA :

(MTU - 13)/8 = maximum number of PVCs

The default number of PVCs supported on POS PVCs configured with cisco LMI is 557, while the default number of PVCs supported on serial PVCs configured with cisco LMI is 186.

For LMI types that are not from Cisco, up to 992 PVCs are supported under a single main interface.


Note If a specific LMI type is configured on an interface, use the no frame-relay lmi-type [ansi | cisco | q933a] command to bring the interface back to the default LMI type.


Table 15 describes the commands that can be used to modify LMI polling options on PVCs configured for a DCE.

Table 15 LMI Polling Configuration Commands for DCE

Parameter
Configuration File Entry
Default Settings

Sets the error threshold on a DCE interface.

lmi-n392dce threshold

3

Sets the monitored event count.

lmi-n393dce events

4

Sets the polling verification timer on the DCE end.

lmi-t392dce seconds

15


Table 16 describes the commands that can be used to modify LMI polling options on PVCs configured for a DTE.

Table 16 LMI Polling Configuration Commands for DTE

Parameter
Configuration File Entry
Default Settings

Set the number of Line Integrity Verification (LIV) exchanges performed before requesting a full status message.

lmi-n391dte polling-cycles

6

Sets the error threshold.

lmi-n392dte threshold

3

Sets the monitored event count.

lmi-n393dte events

4

Sets the polling interval (in seconds) between each status inquiry from the DTE end.

frame-relay lmi-t391dte seconds

10


Multilink Frame Relay (FRF.16)

Multilink Frame Relay (MFR) is supported only on the following shared port adapters (SPAs):

Cisco 1-Port Channelized STM-1/OC-3 SPA

Cisco 2-Port Channelized OC-12c/DSO SPA

Multilink Frame Relay High Availability

MFR supports the following levels of high availability support:

MFR supports a process restart, but some statistics will be reset during a restart of certain processes.

MFR member links remain operational during a route switch processor (RSP) switchover.

Multilink Frame Relay Configuration Overview

A multilink Frame Relay interface is part of a multilink bundle that allows Frame Relay encapsulation on its interfaces. You create a multilink Frame Relay interface by configuring the following components:

MgmtMultilink controller

Multilink bundle interface that allows Frame Relay encapsulation

Bundle identifier name

Multilink Frame Relay subinterfaces

Bundle interface bandwidth class

Serial interfaces

MgmtMultilink Controller

You configure a multilink bundle under a controller, using the following commands:

controller MgmtMultilink rack/slot/bay/controller-id

bundle bundleId

This configuration creates the controller for a generic multilink bundle. The controller ID number is the zero-based index of the controller chip. Currently, the SPAs that support multilink Frame Relay have only one controller per bay; therefore, the controller ID number is always zero (0).

Multilink Bundle Interface

After you create the multilink bundle, you create a multilink bundle interface that allows Frame Relay encapsulation, using the following commands:

interface multilink interface-path-id

encapsulation frame-relay

This configuration allows you to create multilink Frame Relay subinterfaces under the multilink bundle interface.


Note After you set the encapsulation on a multilink bundle interface to Frame Relay, you cannot change the encapsulation if the interface has member links or any member links associated with a multilink bundle.


Bundle Identifier Name


Note Bundle identifier name is configurable only under Frame Relay Forum 16.1 (FRF 16.1).


The bundle identifier (bid) name value identifies the bundle interface at both endpoints of the interface. The bundle identifier name is exchanged in the information elements to ensure consistent link assignments.

By default, the interface name, for example, Multilink 0/4/1/0/1, is used as the bundle identifier name. However, you can optionally create a name using the frame-relay multilink bid command.


Note Regardless of whether you use the default name or create a name using the frame-relay multilink bid command, it is recommended that each bundle have a unique name.


The bundle identifier name can be up to 50 characters including the null termination character. The bundle identifier name is configured at the bundle interface level and is applied to each member link.

You configure the bundle identifier name using the following commands:

interface multilink interface-path-id

frame-relay multilink bid bundle-id-name

Multilink Frame Relay Subinterfaces

You configure a multilink Frame Relay subinterface, using the following command:

interface multilink interface-path-id[.subinterface {l2transport | point-to-point}]

You can configure up to 992 subinterfaces on a multilink bundle interface.


Note You configure specific Frame Relay interface features at the subinterface level.


Multilink Frame-Relay Subinterface Features

The following commands are available to set specific features on a multilink Frame Relay bundle subinterface:

mtu MTU size

description

shutdown

bandwidth bandwidth

service-policy {input | output} policymap-name


Note When entering the service-policy command, which enables you to attach a policy map to a multilink Frame Relay bundle subinterface, you must do so while in Frame Relay PVC configuration mode. For more information, see Configuring Multilink Frame Relay Bundle Interfaces.


Bundle Interface Bandwidth Class


Note Bandwidth class is configurable only under a multilink bundle interface.


You can configure one of three types of bandwidth classes on a multilink Frame Relay interface:

a—Bandwidth Class A

b—Bandwidth Class B

c—Bandwidth Class C

When Bandwidth Class A is configured and one or more member links are up (PH_ACTIVE), the bundle interface is also up and BL_ACTIVATE is signaled to the Frame Relay connections. When all the member links are down, the bundle interface is down and BL_DEACTIVATE is signaled to the Frame Relay connections.

When Bandwidth Class B is configured and all the member links are up (PH_ACTIVE), the bundle interface is up and BL_ACTIVATE is signaled to the Frame Relay connections. When any member link is down, the bundle interface is down and BL_ACTIVATE is signaled to the Frame Relay connections.

When Bandwidth Class C is configured, you must also set the bundle link threshold to a value between 1 and 255. The threshold value is the minimum number of links that must be up (PH_ACTIVE) for the bundle interface to be up and for BL_ACTIVATE to be signaled to the Frame Relay connections. When the number of links that are up falls below this threshold, the bundle interface goes down and BL_DEACTIVATE is signaled to the Frame Relay connections. When 1 is entered as the threshold value, the behavior is identical to Bandwidth Class A. If you enter a threshold value that is greater than the number of member links that are up, the bundle remains down.

You configure the bandwidth class for a Frame Relay multilink bundle interface using the following commands:

interface multilink interface-path-id

frame-relay multilink bandwidth-class {a | b | c [threshold]}

The default is a (Bandwidth Class A).

Serial Interfaces

After the T3 and T1 controllers are configured, you can add serial interfaces to the multilink Frame Relay bundle subinterface by configuring the serial interface, encapsulating it as multilink Frame Relay (mfr), assigning it to the bundle interface (specified by the multilink group number), and configuring a name for the link. You may also configure MFR acknowledge timeout value, retry count for retransmissions and hello interval, for the bundle link.

You configure a multilink Frame Relay serial interface using the following commands:

interface serial rack/slot/module/port/t1-num:channel-group-number

encapsulation mfr

multilink group group number

frame-relay multilink lid link-id name

frame-relay multilink ack ack-timeout

frame-relay multilink hello hello-interval

frame-relay multilink retry retry-count


Note All serial links in an MFR bundle inherit the value of the mtu command from the multilink interface. Therefore, you should not configure the mtu command on a serial interface before configuring it as a member of an MFR bundle. The Cisco IOS XR software blocks attempts to configure a serial interface as a member of an MFR bundle if the interface is configured with a nondefault MTU value as well as attempts to change the mtu command value for a serial interface that is configured as a member of an MFR bundle.


Show Commands

You can verify a multilink Frame Relay serial interface configuration using the following show commands:

show frame-relay multilink location node id

show frame-relay multilink interface serial interface-path-id [detail | verbose]

The following example shows the display output of the show frame-relay multilink location command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show frame-relay multilink  location  0/4/cpu0
Member interface: Serial0/4/2/0/9:0, ifhandle 0x05007b00 
HW state = Up, link state = Up
Member of bundle interface Multilink0/4/2/0/2 with ifhandle 0x05007800 

Bundle interface: Multilink0/4/2/0/2, ifhandle 0x05007800 
    Member Links: 4 active, 0 inactive
    State = Up,   BW Class = C (threshold   3)
    Member Links:
    Serial0/4/2/0/12:0, HW state = Up, link state = Up
    Serial0/4/2/0/11:0, HW state = Up, link state = Up
    Serial0/4/2/0/10:0, HW state = Up, link state = Up
    Serial0/4/2/0/9:0, HW state = Up, link state = Up

Member interface: Serial0/4/2/0/10:0, ifhandle 0x05007c00 
HW state = Up, link state = Up
Member of bundle interface Multilink0/4/2/0/2 with ifhandle 0x05007800 

Member interface: Serial0/4/2/0/11:0, ifhandle 0x05007d00 
HW state = Up, link state = Up
Member of bundle interface Multilink0/4/2/0/2 with ifhandle 0x05007800 

Member interface: Serial0/4/2/0/12:0, ifhandle 0x05007e00 
HW state = Up, link state = Up
Member of bundle interface Multilink0/4/2/0/2 with ifhandle 0x05007800 

The following example shows the display output of

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show frame-relay multilink interface serial 0/4/2/0/10:0 

Member interface: Serial0/4/2/0/10:0, ifhandle 0x05007c00 
HW state = Up, link state = Up
Member of bundle interface Multilink0/4/2/0/2 with ifhandle 0x05007800 

End-to-End Fragmentation (FRF.12)

You can configure an FRF.12 end-to-end fragmentation connection using the data-link connection identifier (DLCI). However, it must be done on a channelized Frame Relay serial interface.


Note The fragment end-to-end command is not allowed on Packet-over-SONET/SDH (POS) interfaces or under the DLCI of a multilink Frame Relay bundle interface.


You configure FRF.12 end-to-end fragmentation on a DLCI connection using the following command:

fragment end-to-end fragment-size

The fragment-size argument defines the size of the fragments, in bytes, for the serial interface.


Note On a DLCI connection, we highly recommend that you configure an egress service policy that classifies packets into high and low priorities, so that interleaving of high-priority and low-priority fragments occurs.


Configuring Frame Relay

The following sections describe how to configure Frame Relay interfaces.

Modifying the Default Frame Relay Configuration on an Interface

Disabling LMI on an Interface with Frame Relay Encapsulation

Configuring Multilink Frame Relay Bundle Interfaces

Configuring FRF.12 End-to-End Fragmentation on a Channelized Frame Relay Serial Interface

Modifying the Default Frame Relay Configuration on an Interface

Perform this task to modify the default Frame Relay parameters on a Packet-over-SONET/SDH (POS), multilink, or serial interface with Frame Relay encapsulation.

Prerequisites

Before you can modify the default Frame Relay configuration, you need to enable Frame Relay on the interface, as described in the following modules:

To enable Frame Relay encapsulation on a POS interface, see the "Configuring POS Interfaces on Cisco IOS XR Softwareon the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router" module in this manual.

To enable Frame Relay encapsulation on a serial interface, see the Configuring Serial Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router module in this manual.


Note Before enabling Frame Relay encapsulation on a POS or serial interface, make certain that you have not previously assigned an IP address to the interface. If an IP address is assigned to the interface, you will not be able to enable Frame Relay encapsulation. For Frame Relay, the IP address and subnet mask are configured on the subinterface.


Restrictions

The LMI type must match on both ends of the connection for the connection to be active.

Before you can remove Frame Relay encapsulation on an interface and reconfigure that interface with PPP or HDLC encapsulation, you must remove all interfaces, subinterface, LMI, and Frame Relay configuration from that interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface type interface-path-id

3. frame-relay intf-type {dce | dte}

4. frame-relay lmi-type [ansi | cisco | q933a]

5. encap {cisco | ietf}

6. end
or
commit

7. show interfaces [summary | [type interface-path-id] [brief | description | detail | accounting [rates]]] [location node-id]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

interface type interface-path-id

Example:
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface pos 
0/4/0/1

Enters interface configuration mode.

Step 3 

frame-relay intf-type {dce | dte}

Example:
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay 
intf-type dce

Configures the type of support provided by the interface.

If your router functions as a switch connected to another router, use the frame-relay intf-type dce command to configure the LMI type to support data communication equipment (DCE).

If your router is connected to a Frame Relay network, use the frame-relay intf-type dte command to configure the LMI type to support data terminal equipment (DTE).

Note The default interface type is DTE.

Step 4 

frame-relay lmi-type [ansi | q933a | cisco]

Example:
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay 
lmi-type ansi

Selects the LMI type supported on the interface.

Enter the frame-relay lmi-type ansi command to use LMI as defined by ANSI T1.617a-1994 Annex D.

Enter the frame-relay lmi-type cisco command to use LMI as defined by Cisco (not standard).

Enter the frame-relay lmi-type q933a command to use LMI as defined by ITU-T Q.933 (02/2003) Annex A.

Note The default LMI type is Cisco.

Step 5 

encap {cisco | ietf}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-fr-vc)# encap ietf

Configures the encapsulation for a Frame Relay PVC.

Note If the encapsulation type is not configured explicitly for a PVC, then that PVC inherits the encapsulation type from the main interface.

Step 6 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 7 

show interfaces [summary | [type interface-path-id] [brief | description | detail | accounting [rates]]] [location node-id]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show interface pos 0/4/0/1

(Optional) Verifies the configuration for the specified interface.

Disabling LMI on an Interface with Frame Relay Encapsulation

Perform this task to disable LMI on interfaces that have Frame Relay encapsulation.


Note LMI is enabled by default on interfaces that have Frame Relay encapsulation enabled. To reenable LMI on an interface after it has been disabled, use the no frame-relay lmi disable command in interface configuration mode.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface type interface-path-id

3. frame-relay lmi disable

4. end
or
commit

5. show interfaces [summary | [type interface-path-id] [brief | description | detail | accounting [rates]]] [location node-id]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

interface type interface-path-id

Example:
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 
0/4/0/1

Enters interface configuration mode.

Step 3 

frame-relay lmi disable

Example:
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay 
lmi disable

Disables LMI on the specified interface.

Step 4 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 5 

show interfaces [summary | [type interface-path-id] [brief | description | detail | accounting [rates]]] [location node-id]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show interfaces POS 0/1/0/0

(Optional) Verifies that LMI is disabled on the specified interface.

Configuring Multilink Frame Relay Bundle Interfaces

Perform these steps to configure a multilink Frame Relay (MFR) bundle interface and its subinterfaces.

Prerequisites

Before configuring MFR bundles, be sure you have the following SPA installed:

1-Port Channelized STM-1/OC-3 SPA

2-Port Channelized OC-12c/DS0 SPA

Restrictions

All member links in a multilink Frame Relay bundle interface must be of the same type (for example, T1s or E1s). The member links must have the same framing type, such as point-to-point, and they must have the same bandwidth class.

All member links must be full T1s or E1s. Fractional links, such as DS0s, are not supported.

All member links must reside on the same SPA; otherwise, they are considered to be unrelated bundles.

All member links must be connected to the same line card or SPA at the far end.

A maximum of 992 MFR subinterfaces is supported on each main interface, based on the supported DLCI range 16-1007.

The Cisco 1-Port Channelized OC-3/STM-1 SPA and 2-Port Channelized OC-12c/DS0 SPA have the following additional guidelines:

A maximum of 700 MFR bundles per line card is supported.

A maximum of 2600 MFR bundles per system is supported.

A maximum of 4000 Frame Relay Layer 3 subinterfaces per line card is supported.

A maximum of 8000 Frame Relay Layer 3 subinterfaces per system is supported.

Fragmentation on a Frame Relay subinterface that is part of an MLFR bundle is not supported.

All serial links in an MFR bundle inherit the value of the mtu command from the multilink interface. Therefore, you should not configure the mtu command on a serial interface before configuring it as a member of an MFR bundle. The Cisco IOS XR software blocks the following:

Attempts to configure a serial interface as a member of an MFR bundle if the interface is configured with a nondefault MTU value.

Attempts to change the mtu command value for a serial interface that is configured as a member of an MFR bundle.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. controller MgmtMultilink rack/slot/bay/controller-id

3. exit

4. controller t3 interface-path-id

5. mode type

6. clock source {internal | line}

7. exit

8. controller {t1 | e1} interface-path-id

9. channel-group channel-group-number

10. timeslots range

11. exit

12. exit

13. interface multilink interface-path-id[.subinterface {l2transport | point-to-point}]

14. encapsulation frame-relay

15. frame-relay multilink bid bundle-id-name

16. frame-relay multilink bandwidth-class {a | b | c [threshold]}

17. exit

18. interface multilink interface-path-id[.subinterface {l2transport | point-to-point}]

19. ipv4 address ip-address

20. pvc dlci

21. service-policy {input | output} policy-map

22. exit

23. exit

24. interface serial interface-path-id

25. encapsulation mfr

26. multilink group group-id

27. frame-relay multilink lid link-id name

28. frame-relay multilink ack ack-timeout

29. frame-relay multilink hello hello-interval

30. frame-relay multilink retry retry-count

31. exit

32. end
or
commit

33. exit

34. show frame-relay multilink interface type interface-path-id [detail | verbose]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure
Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# config

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

controller MgmtMultilink rack/slot/bay/controller-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# controller MgmtMultilink 0/1/0/0

Creates the controller for a generic multilink bundle in the rack/slot/bay/controller-id notation and enters the multilink management configuration mode. The controller ID number is the zero-based index of the controller chip. Currently, the SPAs that support multilink Frame Relay have only one controller per bay; therefore, the controller ID number is always zero (0).

Step 3 

exit
Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mgmtmultilink)# exit

Exits the multilink management configuration mode.

Step 4 

controller t3 interface-path-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# controller t3 0/1/0/0

Specifies the T3 controller name in the rack/slot/module/port notation and enters T3 configuration mode.

Step 5 

mode type

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# mode t1

Configures the type of multilinks to channelize; for example, 28 T1s.

Step 6 

clock source {internal | line}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# clock source internal

(Optional) Sets the clocking for individual E3 links.

Note The default clock source is internal.

Note When configuring clocking on a serial link, you must configure one end to be internal, and the other end to be line. If you configure internal clocking on both ends of a connection, framing slips occur. If you configure line clocking on both ends of a connection, the line does not come up.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# exit

Exits T3/E3 controller configuration mode.

Step 8 

controller {t1 | e1} interface-path-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# controller t1 0/1/0/0/0

Enters T1 or E1 configuration mode.

Step 9 

channel-group channel-group-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1)# channel-group 0

Creates a T1 channel group and enters channel group configuration mode for that channel group.

Step 10 

timeslots range

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1-channel_group)# timeslots 1-24

Associates one or more DS0 time slots to a channel group and creates an associated serial subinterface on that channel group.

For T1 controllers—Range is from 1 to 24 time slots.

For E1 controllers—Range is from 1 to 31 time slots.

You can assign all time slots to a single channel group, or you can divide the time slots among several channel groups.

Step 11 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1-channel_group)# exit

Exits channel group configuration mode.

Step 12 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1)# exit

Exits T1 configuration mode.

Step 13 

interface multilink interface-path-id[.subinterface {l2transport | point-to-point}]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface Multilink 0/1/0/0/100

Creates a multilink bundle interface where you can specify Frame Relay encapsulation for the bundle. You create multilink Frame Relay subinterfaces under the multilink bundle interface.

Step 14 

encapsulation frame-relay

Example:

Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay

Specifies the Frame Relay encapsulation type.

Step 15 

frame-relay multilink bid bundle-id-name
Example:
Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink bid 
MFRBundle

Note (Optional) By default, the interface name, for example, Multilink 0/4/1/0/1, is used as the bundle identifier name. However, you can optionally create a name using the frame-relay multilink bid command.

Step 16 

frame-relay multilink bandwidth-class {a | b | c [threshold]}

Example:
Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink 
bandwidth-class a 

Configures one of three types of bandwidth classes on a multilink Frame Relay interface:

a—Bandwidth Class A

b—Bandwidth Class B

c—Bandwidth Class C

The default is a (Bandwidth Class A).

Step 17 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit

Exits interface configuration mode.

Step 18 

interface multilink interface-path-id[.subinterface {l2transport | point-to-point}]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface Multilink 0/1/0/0/100.16 point-to-point

Creates a multilink subinterface in the rack/slot/bay/controller-id bundleId.subinterace [point-to-point | l2transport ] notation and enters the subinterface configuration mode.

l2transport—Treat as an attachment circuit

point-to-point—Treat as a point-to-point link

You can configure up to 992 subinterfaces on a multilink bundle interface. The DLCIs are 16 to 1007.

Step 19 

ipv4 address ip-address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# ipv4 address 3.1.100.16 255.255.255.0

Assigns an IP address and subnet mask to the interface in the format:

A.B.C.D/prefix or A.B.C.D/mask

Step 20 

pvc dlci

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-subif)# pvc 16

Creates a POS permanent virtual circuit (PVC) and enters Frame Relay PVC configuration submode.

Replace dlci with a PVC identifier, in the range from 16 to 1007.

Note Only one PVC is allowed per subinterface.

Step 21 

service-policy {input | output} policy-map

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-fr-vc)# service-policy output policy-mapA


Attaches a policy map to an input subinterface or output subinterface. When attached, the policy map is used as the service policy for the subinterface.

Note For information on creating and configuring policy maps, refer to Cisco IOS XR Modular Quality of Service Configuration Guide.

Step 22 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-fr-vc)# exit

Exits the Frame-Relay virtual circuit mode.

Step 23 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# exit

Exits the subinterface configuration mode.

Step 24 

interface serial interface-path-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface serial 0/1/0/0/0/0:0

Specifies the complete interface number with the rack/slot/module/port/T3Num/T1num:instance notation.

Step 25 

encapsulation mfr

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# encapsulation mfr

Enables multilink Frame Relay on the serial interface.

Step 26 

multilink group group-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# multilink group 100

Specifies the multilink group ID for this interface.

Step 27 

frame-relay multilink lid link-id name

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink lid sj1

Note Configures a name for the Frame Relay multilink bundle link.

Step 28 

frame-relay multilink ack ack-timeout

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink ack 5


Configures the acknowledge timeout value for the Frame Relay multilink bundle link.

Step 29 

frame-relay multilink hello hello-interval

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink hello 60


Configures the hello interval for the Frame Relay multilink bundle link.

Step 30 

frame-relay multilink retry retry-count

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink retry 2


Configures the retry count for retransmissions for the Frame Relay multilink bundle link.

Step 31 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit

Exits interface configuration mode.

Step 32 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 33 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# exit

Exits global configuration mode.

Step 34 

show frame-relay multilink interface type interface-path-id [detail | verbose]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show frame-relay multilink interface Multilink 0/5/1/0/1

Shows the information retrieved from the interface description block (IDB), including bundle-specific information and Frame Relay information.

Configuring FRF.12 End-to-End Fragmentation on a Channelized Frame Relay Serial Interface

Perform the following steps to configure FRF.12 end-to-end fragmentation on a channelized Frame Relay serial interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config

2. controller t3 interface-path-id

3. mode type

4. clock source {internal | line}

5. exit

6. controller t1 interface-path-id

7. channel-group channel-group-number

8. timeslots range

9. exit

10. exit

11. interface serial interface-path-id

12. encapsulation frame-relay

13. exit

14. interface serial interface-path-id

15. ipv4 address ip-address

16. pvc dlci

17. service-policy {input | output} policy-map

18. fragment end-to-end fragment-size

19. exit

20. exit

21. exit

22. end
or
commit

23. exit

24. show frame-relay pvc [ dlci | interface | location ]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

config
Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# config

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

controller t3 interface-path-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# controller t3 0/1/0/0

Specifies the T3 controller name in the rack/slot/module/port notation and enters T3 configuration mode.

Step 3 

mode type

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# mode t1

Configures the type of multilinks to channelize; for example, 28 T1s.

Step 4 

clock source {internal | line}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# clock source internal

(Optional) Sets the clocking for individual E3 links.

Note The default clock source is internal.

Note When configuring clocking on a serial link, you must configure one end to be internal, and the other end to be line. If you configure internal clocking on both ends of a connection, framing slips occur. If you configure line clocking on both ends of a connection, the line does not come up.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# exit

Exits T3/E3 or T1/E1 controller configuration mode.

Step 6 

controller t1 interface-path-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# controller t1 0/1/0/0/0

Enters T1 configuration mode.

Step 7 

channel-group channel-group-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1)# channel-group 0

Creates a T1 channel group and enters channel group configuration mode for that channel group.

Step 8 

timeslots range

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1-channel_group)# timeslots 1-24

Associates one or more DS0 time slots to a channel group and creates an associated serial subinterface on that channel group.

Range is from 1 to 24 time slots.

You can assign all 24 time slots to a single channel group, or you can divide the time slots among several channel groups.

Note Each individual T1 controller supports a total of 24 DS0 time slots.

Step 9 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1-channel_group)# exit

Exits channel group configuration mode.

Step 10 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1)# exit

Exits T1 configuration mode.

Step 11 

interface serial interface-path-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface serial 0/1/0/0/0/0:0

Specifies the complete interface number with the rack/slot/module/port/T3Num/T1num:instance notation.

Step 12 

encapsulation frame-relay

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay

Specifies the Frame Relay encapsulation type.

Step 13 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit

Exits interface configuration mode.

Step 14 

interface serial interface-path-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface serial 1/0/0/0/0:0.1

Specifies the complete subinterface number with the rack/slot/module/port[/channel-num:channel-group-number].subinterface notation.

Step 15 

ipv4 address ip-address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# ipv4 address 3.1.100.16 255.255.255.0

Assigns an IP address and subnet mask to the interface in the format:

A.B.C.D/prefix or A.B.C.D/mask

Step 16 

pvc dlci

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-subif)# pvc 100

Creates a POS permanent virtual circuit (PVC) and enters Frame Relay PVC configuration submode.

Replace dlci with a PVC identifier, in the range from 16 to 1007.

Note Only one PVC is allowed per subinterface.

Step 17 

service-policy {input | output} policy-map

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-fr-vc)# service-policy output policy-mapA

Attaches a policy map to an input subinterface or output subinterface. When attached, the policy map is used as the service policy for the subinterface.

Note For effective FRF.12 functionality (interleave specifically), you should configure an egress service policy with priority.

Note For information on creating and configuring policy maps, refer to Cisco IOS XR Modular Quality of Service Configuration Guide,

Step 18 

fragment end-to-end fragment-size

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-fr-vc)# fragment end-to-end 100

(Optional) Enables fragmentation of Frame Relay frames on an interface and specifies the size (in bytes) of the payload from the original frame that will go into each fragment. This number excludes the Frame Relay header of the original frame.

Valid values are from 64 to 512, depending on your hardware.

Step 19 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-fr-vc)# exit

Exits the Frame-Relay virtual circuit mode.

Step 20 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# exit

Exits the subinterface configuration mode.

Step 21 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit

Exits interface configuration mode.

Step 22 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 23 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# exit

Exits global configuration mode.

Step 24 

show frame-relay pvc [ dlci | interface | location ]
Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show frame-relay pvc 100

Displays the information for the specified PVC DLCI, interface, or location.

Configuration Examples for Frame Relay

This section provides the following configuration examples:

Optional Frame Relay Parameters: Example

Multilink Frame Relay: Example

End-to-End Fragmentation: Example

Optional Frame Relay Parameters: Example

The following example shows how to bring up and configure a POS interface with Frame Relay encapsulation. In this example, the user modifies the default Frame Relay configuration so that the interface supports ANSI T1.617a-1994 Annex D LMI on DCE.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay IETF
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay intf-type dce
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay lmi-type ansi
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

Uncommitted changes found, commit them? [yes]: yes

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config)# interface pos 0/3/0/0.10 point-to-point

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-subif)#ipv4 address 10.46.8.6/24

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-subif)# pvc 20

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-fr-vc)# encap ietf

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# commit


The following example shows how to disable LMI on a POS interface that has Frame Relay encapsulation configured:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface pos 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay lmi disable
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

Uncommitted changes found, commit them? [yes]: yes

The following example shows how to reenable LMI on a serial interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface serial 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no frame-relay lmi disable
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

Uncommitted changes found, commit them? [yes]: yes

The following example shows how to display Frame Relay statistics for LMI on all interfaces:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show frame-relay lmi

LMI Statistics for interface POS0/1/0/0/ (Frame Relay DCE) LMI TYPE = ANSI
Invalid Unnumbered Info 0             Invalid Prot Disc 0
Invalid Dummy Call Ref 0              Invalid Msg Type 0
Invalid Status Message 0              Invalid Lock Shift 9
Invalid Information ID 0              Invalid Report IE Len 0
Invalid Report Request 0              Invalid Keep IE Len 0
Num Status Enq. Rcvd 9444             Num Status Msgs Sent 9444
Num Full Status Sent 1578             Num St Enq. Timeouts 41
Num Link Timeouts 7
 
   
LMI Statistics for interface POS0/1/0/1/ (Frame Relay DCE) LMI TYPE = CISCO
Invalid Unnumbered Info 0             Invalid Prot Disc 0
Invalid Dummy Call Ref 0              Invalid Msg Type 0
Invalid Status Message 0              Invalid Lock Shift 0
Invalid Information ID 0              Invalid Report IE Len 0
Invalid Report Request 0              Invalid Keep IE Len 0
Num Status Enq. Rcvd 9481             Num Status Msgs Sent 9481
Num Full Status Sent 1588             Num St Enq. Timeouts 16
Num Link Timeouts 4

The following example shows how to create a serial subinterface with a PVC on the main serial interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface serial 0/3/0/0/0:0.10 point-to-point
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-subif)#ipv4 address 10.46.8.6/24
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-subif)# pvc 20
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router (config-fr-vc)# encapsulation ietf
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# commit

The following example shows how to display information about all PVCs configured on your system:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0router# show frame-relay pvc

PVC Statistics for interface Serial0/3/2/0 (Frame Relay DCE)

              Active     Inactive      Deleted       Static
  Local          4           0            0             0
  Switched       0           0            0             0
  Dynamic        0           0            0             0

DLCI = 612, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, ENCAP = CISCO, INHERIT = TRUE, PVC STATUS = ACTI
VE, INTERFACE = Serial0/3/2/0.1
  input pkts 0          output pkts 0           in bytes 0
  out bytes 0           dropped pkts 0          in FECN packets 0
  in BECN pkts 0        out FECN pkts 0         out BECN pkts 0
  in DE pkts 0          out DE pkts 0
  out bcast pkts 0      out bcast bytes 0
  pvc create time 00:00:00      last time pvc status changed 00:00:00

DLCI = 613, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, ENCAP = CISCO, INHERIT = TRUE, PVC STATUS = ACTI
VE, INTERFACE = Serial0/3/2/0.2
  input pkts 0          output pkts 0           in bytes 0
  out bytes 0           dropped pkts 0          in FECN packets 0
  in BECN pkts 0        out FECN pkts 0         out BECN pkts 0
  in DE pkts 0          out DE pkts 0
  out bcast pkts 0      out bcast bytes 0
  pvc create time 00:00:00      last time pvc status changed 00:00:00

DLCI = 614, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, ENCAP = CISCO, INHERIT = TRUE, PVC STATUS = ACTI
VE, INTERFACE = Serial0/3/2/0.3
  input pkts 0          output pkts 0           in bytes 0
  out bytes 0           dropped pkts 0          in FECN packets 0
  in BECN pkts 0        out FECN pkts 0         out BECN pkts 0
  in DE pkts 0          out DE pkts 0
  out bcast pkts 0      out bcast bytes 0
  pvc create time 00:00:00      last time pvc status changed 00:00:00

DLCI = 615, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, ENCAP = CISCO, INHERIT = TRUE, PVC STATUS = ACTI
VE, INTERFACE = Serial0/3/2/0.4
  input pkts 0          output pkts 0           in bytes 0
  out bytes 0           dropped pkts 0          in FECN packets 0
  in BECN pkts 0        out FECN pkts 0         out BECN pkts 0
  in DE pkts 0          out DE pkts 0
  out bcast pkts 0      out bcast bytes 0
  pvc create time 00:00:00      last time pvc status changed 00:00:00

The following example shows how to modify LMI polling options on PVCs configured for a DTE, and then use the show frame-relay lmi and show frame-relay lmi-info commands to display information for monitoring and troublehooting the interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface pos 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay lmi-n391dte 10
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay lmi-n391dte 5
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay lmi-t391dte 15 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# commit


RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show frame-relay lmi interface pos 0/3/0/0
 
   
LMI Statistics for interface pos 0/3/0/0 (Frame Relay DTE) LMI TYPE = ANSI
Invalid Unnumbered Info 0             Invalid Prot Disc 0
Invalid Dummy Call Ref 0              Invalid Msg Type 0
Invalid Status Message 0              Invalid Lock Shift 9
Invalid Information ID 0              Invalid Report IE Len 0
Invalid Report Request 0              Invalid Keep IE Len 0
Num Status Enq. Rcvd 9444             Num Status Msgs Sent 9444
Num Full Status Sent 1578             Num St Enq. Timeouts 41
Num Link Timeouts 7

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show frame-relay lmi-info interface pos 0/3/0/0

LMI IDB Info for interface POS0/3/0/0
  ifhandle:             0x6176840
  Interface type:       DTE
  Interface state:      UP
  Line Protocol:        UP
  LMI type (cnf/oper):  AUTO/CISCO
  LMI type autosense:   OFF
  Interface MTU:        1504
  -------------- DTE -------------
  T391:                 15s
  N391: (cnf/oper):     5/5
  N392: (cnf/oper):     3/0
  N393:                 4
  My seq#:              83
  My seq# seen:         83
  Your seq# seen:       82
  -------------- DCE -------------
  T392:                 15s
  N392: (cnf/oper):     3/0
  N393:                 4
  My seq#:              0
  My seq# seen:         0
  Your seq# seen:       0

Multilink Frame Relay: Example

The following example shows how to configure multilink Frame Relay with serial interfaces:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# config
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# controller MgmtMultilink 0/3/1/0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mgmtmultilink)# bundle 100 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-mgmtmultilink)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# controller T3 0/3/1/0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# mode t1 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# clock source internal 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# controller T1 0/3/1/0/0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1)# channel-group 0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1-channel_group)# timeslots 1-24 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1-channel_group)#  exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1-channel_group)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface Multilink 0/3/1/0/100 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface Multilink 0/3/1/0/100.16 point-to-point 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# ipv4 address 3.1.100.16 255.255.255.0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# pvc 16
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-fr-vc)# service-policy output policy-mapA
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-fr-vc)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface Serial 0/3/1/0/0:0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# encapsulation mfr
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# multilink group 100
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink lid sj1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink ack 5
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink hello 60
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink retry 2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# 

End-to-End Fragmentation: Example

The following example shows how to configure FRF.12 end-to-end fragmentation on a channelized Frame Relay serial interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# config
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# controller T30/3/1/0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# mode t1 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# clock source internal 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t3)# controller T10/3/1/0/0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1)# channel-group 0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1-channel_group)#  timeslots 1-24 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1-channel_group)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-t1-channel_group)# interface Serial 0/3/1/0/0:0 
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# interface Serial 0/3/1/0/0:0.100 point-to-point
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# ipv4 address 3.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)#  pvc 100
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-fr-vc)#  service-policy output LFI
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-fr-vc)# fragment end-to-end 256

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to Frame Relay.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Cisco IOS XR master command reference

Cisco IOS XR Master Commands List

Cisco IOS XR interface configuration commands

Cisco IOS XR Interface and Hardware Component Command Reference

Initial system bootup and configuration information for a router using Cisco IOS XR software

Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide

Cisco IOS XR AAA services configuration information

Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration Guide and
Cisco IOS XR System Security Command Reference


Standards

Standards
Title

FRF.12

Frame Relay Forum .12

FRF.16

Frame Relay Forum .16

ANSI T1.617 Annex D

American National Standards Institute T1.617 Annex D

ITU Q.933 Annex A

International Telecommunication Union Q.933 Annex A


MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link

FRF.16 MIB

Cisco Frame Relay MIB

IF-MIB

Management Information Base for Frame Relay DTEs

Management Information Base for Frame Relay DTEs Using SMIv2

To locate and download MIBs using Cisco IOS XR software, use the Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL and choose a platform under the Cisco Access Products menu: http://cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml


RFCs

RFCs
Title

RFC 1294

Multiprotocol Interconnect Over Frame Relay

RFC 1315

Management Information Base for Frame Relay DTEs

RFC 1490

Multiprotocol Interconnect Over Frame Relay

RFC 1586

Guidelines for Running OSPF Over Frame Relay Networks

RFC 1604

Definitions of Managed Objects for Frame Relay Service

RFC 2115

Management Information Base for Frame Relay DTEs Using SMIv2

RFC 2390

Inverse Address Resolution Protocol

RFC 2427

Multiprotocol Interconnect Over Frame Relay

RFC 2954

Definitions of Managed Objects for Frame Relay Service

RFC 3020

RFC for FRF.16 MIB


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Technical Support website contains thousands of pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport