Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide
Configuring Link Bundling on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router
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Configuring Link Bundling on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Table Of Contents

Configuring Link Bundling on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Contents

Prerequisites for Configuring Link Bundling

Prerequisites for Configuring Link Bundling on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Information About Configuring Link Bundling

Link Bundling Overview

Features and Compatible Characteristics of Link Bundles

Link Aggregation Through LACP

IEEE 802.3ad Standard

Load Balancing

Layer 2 Ingress Load Balancing on Link Bundles

Layer 3 Egress Load Balancing on Link Bundles

Dynamic Load Balancing for LAG

QoS and Link Bundling

VLANs on an Ethernet Link Bundle

Link Bundle Configuration Overview

Nonstop Forwarding During Card Failover

Link Failover

How to Configure Link Bundling

Configuring Ethernet Link Bundles

Configuring EFP Load Balancing on an Ethernet Link Bundle

Configuring VLAN Bundles

Configuration Examples for Link Bundling

Configuring an Ethernet Link Bundle: Example

Configuring a VLAN Link Bundle: Example

Configuring EFP Load Balancing on an Ethernet Link Bundle: Example

Enabling Layer 3 Load Balancing on Layer 2 Link Bundles: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance


Configuring Link Bundling on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router


This module describes the configuration of link bundle interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.

A link bundle is a group of one or more ports that are aggregated together and treated as a single link.

The different links within a single bundle must be the same speed.

Each bundle has a single MAC, a single IP address, and a single configuration set (such as ACLs).


Note The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router supports both Layer 2 and Layer 3 Link Bundles. If the Link Bundle is a Layer 3 interface, an IP address is required. If the Link Bundle is a Layer 2 interface, an IP address is not required. A Link Bundle on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router may contain Layer 2 and Layer 3 subinterfaces within it. In which case, the Layer 3 subinterfaces require IP addresses, but the Link Bundle interface does not require an IP address.


The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router supports bundling for the following types of interfaces:

Ethernet interfaces

Feature History for Configuring Link Bundling

Release
Modification

Release 3.7.2

This feature was introduced on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router.

Release 3.9.0

Support for load balancing was added.

Bundle member links are put into new err-disable link interface status and admin-down protocol state when a bundle interface is shut down.

 

Release 3.9.1

Support for Layer 3 load balancing on Layer 2 link bundles was added.

Release 4.0.0

The following support was added:

Up to a maximum of 64 member links per bundle.

IPv6 addressing.

Release 4.0.1

Support for Dynamic Load Balancing for Link Aggregation (LAG) members was added.

The hw-module load-balance bundle l2-service l3-params command is replaced by the load-balancing flow command in L2VPN configuration mode. For more information see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Configuration Guide and Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Command Reference.


Contents

This module includes the following sections:

Prerequisites for Configuring Link Bundling

Information About Configuring Link Bundling

How to Configure Link Bundling

Configuration Examples for Link Bundling

Additional References

Prerequisites for Configuring Link Bundling

You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

The prerequisites for link bundling depend on the platform on which you are configuring this feature. This section includes the following information:

Prerequisites for Configuring Link Bundling on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Prerequisites for Configuring Link Bundling on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Before configuring Link Bundling, be sure that the following tasks and conditions are met:

You know the interface IP address (Layer 3 only).

You know which links should be included in the bundle you are configuring.

If you are configuring an Ethernet link bundle, you have at least one of the following Ethernet line cards installed in the router:

4-port 10-Gigabit Ethernet line card

8-port 10-Gigabit Ethernet line card

40-port Gigabit Ethernet line card


Note For more information about physical interfaces, PLIMs, and modular services cards, refer to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Hardware Installation Guide.


Information About Configuring Link Bundling

To implement the Link Bundling feature, you must understand the following concepts:

Link Bundling Overview

Link Aggregation Through LACP

QoS and Link Bundling

Load Balancing

VLANs on an Ethernet Link Bundle

Link Bundle Configuration Overview

Nonstop Forwarding During Card Failover

Link Failover

Link Bundling Overview

The Link Bundling feature allows you to group multiple point-to-point links together into one logical link and provide higher bidirectional bandwidth, redundancy, and load balancing between two routers. A virtual interface is assigned to the bundled link. The component links can be dynamically added and deleted from the virtual interface.

The virtual interface is treated as a single interface on which one can configure an IP address and other software features used by the link bundle. Packets sent to the link bundle are forwarded to one of the links in the bundle.

A link bundle is simply a group of ports that are bundled together and act as a single link. The advantages of link bundles are as follows:

Multiple links can span several line cards to form a single interface. Thus, the failure of a single link does not cause a loss of connectivity.

Bundled interfaces increase bandwidth availability, because traffic is forwarded over all available members of the bundle. Therefore, traffic can flow on the available links if one of the links within a bundle fails. Bandwidth can be added without interrupting packet flow.

All the individual links within a single bundle must be of the same type and the same speed.

Cisco IOS XR software supports the following methods of forming bundles of Ethernet interfaces:

IEEE 802.3ad—Standard technology that employs a Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) to ensure that all the member links in a bundle are compatible. Links that are incompatible or have failed are automatically removed from a bundle.

EtherChannel —Cisco proprietary technology that allows the user to configure links to join a bundle, but has no mechanisms to check whether the links in a bundle are compatible.

Features and Compatible Characteristics of Link Bundles

The following list describes the properties and limitations of link bundles on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers:

Any type of Ethernet interfaces can be bundled, with or without the use of LACP (Link Aggregation Control Protocol).

Bundle membership can span across several line cards that are installed in a single router.

A single bundle supports maximum of 64 physical links. If you add more than 64 links to a bundle, only 64 of the links are in distributing state, and the remaining links are in waiting state..

A single Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router supports a maximum of 128 bundles.

All the individual links within a single bundle must be the same speed.

Physical layer and link layer configuration are performed on individual member links of a bundle.

Configuration of network layer protocols and higher layer applications is performed on the bundle itself.

IPv4 and IPv6 addressing is supported on link bundles.

A bundle can be administratively enabled or disabled. Beginning in Cisco IOS XR Release 3.9.0, when you shut down a bundle interface, the member links are put into err-disable link interface status and admin-down line protocol state. You can show the status of a bundle interface and its members using the show interfaces command.

Each individual link within a bundle can be administratively enabled or disabled.

Ethernet link bundles are created in the same way as Ethernet channels, where the user enters the same configuration on both end systems.

The MAC address that is set on the bundle becomes the MAC address of the links within that bundle.

When LACP configured, each link within a bundle can be configured to allow different keepalive periods on different members..

Load balancing (the distribution of data between member links) is done by flow instead of by packet. Data is distributed to a link in proportion to the bandwidth of the link in relation to its bundle.

QoS is supported and is applied proportionally on each bundle member.

Link layer protocols, such as CDP and HDLC keepalives, work independently on each link within a bundle.

Upper layer protocols, such as routing updates and hellos, are sent over any member link of an interface bundle.

All links within a single bundle must terminate on the same two systems. Both systems must be directly connected.

Bundled interfaces are point-to-point.

A link must be in the up state before it can be in distributing state in a bundle.

All links within a single bundle must be configured either to run 802.3ad (LACP) or Etherchannel (non-LACP). Mixed links within a single bundle are not supported.

A bundle interface can contain physical links and VLAN subinterfaces only. Tunnels cannot be bundle members.

Access Control List (ACL) configuration on link bundles is identical to ACL configuration on regular interfaces.

Multicast traffic is load balanced over the members of a bundle. For a given flow, internal processes select the member link and all traffic for that flow is sent over that member.

Link Aggregation Through LACP

The optional Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) is defined in the IEEE 802 standard. LACP communicates between two directly connected systems (or peers) to verify the compatibility of bundle members. For the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, the peer can be either another router or a switch. LACP monitors the operational state of link bundles to ensure the following:

All links terminate on the same two systems.

Both systems consider the links to be part of the same bundle.

All links have the appropriate settings on the peer.

LACP transmits frames containing the local port state and the local view of the partner system's state. These frames are analyzed to ensure both systems are in agreement.

IEEE 802.3ad Standard

The IEEE 802.3ad standard typically defines a method of forming Ethernet link bundles.

For each link configured as bundle member, the following information is exchanged between the systems that host each end of the link bundle:

A globally unique local system identifier

An identifier (operational key) for the bundle of which the link is a member

An identifier (port ID) for the link

The current aggregation status of the link

This information is used to form the link aggregation group identifier (LAG ID). Links that share a common LAG ID can be aggregated. Individual links have unique LAG IDs.

The system identifier distinguishes one router from another, and its uniqueness is guaranteed through the use of a MAC address from the system. The bundle and link identifiers have significance only to the router assigning them, which must guarantee that no two links have the same identifier, and that no two bundles have the same identifier.

The information from the peer system is combined with the information from the local system to determine the compatibility of the links configured to be members of a bundle.

Bundle MAC addresses in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router come from a set of reserved MAC addresses in the backplane.This MAC address stays with the bundle as long as the bundle interface exists. The bundle uses this MAC address until the user configures a different MAC address. The bundle MAC address is used by all member links when passing bundle traffic. Any unicast or multicast addresses set on the bundle are also set on all the member links.


Note We recommend that you avoid modifying the MAC address, because changes in the MAC address can affect packet forwarding.


Load Balancing

Load balancing is a forwarding mechanism that distributes traffic over multiple links based on certain parameters. The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router supports load balancing for all links in a bundle using Layer 2, Layer 3, and Layer 4 routing information.

This section describes load balancing support on link bundles.

For more information about other forms of load balancing on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, see the following references:

Per-flow load balancing on non-bundle interfaces using Layer 3 and 4 routing information— See the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router IP Addresses and Services Configuration Guide.

Pseudowire (PW) Load Balancing beginning in Cisco IOS XR 4.0.1—See the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Configuration Guide.

Layer 2 Ingress Load Balancing on Link Bundles

By default, load balancing on Layer 2 link bundles is done based on the MAC source and destination address (SA/DA) fields in the incoming packet header. Table 1 shows a summary of the parameters used for load balancing of incoming traffic at Layer 2 based on whether the default mode, EFP-based, or flow-based load balancing is in use.

Per-flow load balancing is supported on all links in the bundle. This scheme achieves load sharing by allowing the router to distribute packets over one of the links in the bundle, that is determined through a hash calculation. The hash calculation is an algorithm for link selection based on certain parameters.

The standard hash calculation is a 5-tuple hashing, using the following parameters:

IP source address

IP destination address

Router ID

Layer 4 source port

Layer 4 destination port

When per-flow load balancing is enabled, all packets for a certain source-destination pair will go through the same link, though there are multiple links available. Per-flow load balancing ensures that packets for a certain source-destination pair arrive in order.


Note Load balancing for multicast traffic applies only when outgoing interfaces are link bundle interfaces or subinterfaces.


Table 1 Bundle Load Balancing for Incoming Traffic 

Ingress Unicast, Flood, or Multicast Traffic
Parameters
Configuration

Default

Source MAC address

Destination MAC address

n/a

EFP-based auto mode

XID of the xconnect

Auto mode is enabled using the bundle load-balancing hash auto command.

EFP-based with user hash

User hash

A user hash is configured using the bundle load-balancing hash-value command.

Flow-based with IP source and destination

Source IP address

Destination IP address

Enabled using the L2VPN load-balancing flow src-dst-ip command.

Flow-based with MAC source and destination

Source MAC address

Destination MAC address

Enabled using the L2VPN load-balancing flow src-dst-mac command.


Layer 3 Egress Load Balancing on Link Bundles

Layer 3 load balancing support began on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router in Cisco IOS XR 3.9.1, with changes introduced in Cisco IOS XR Release 4.0.1.

Layer 3 Load Balancing Before Cisco IOS XR Release 4.0.1

In Cisco IOS XR 3.9.1 through Cisco IOS XR 4.0, Layer 3 load balancing for link bundles is done on Ethernet Flow Points (EFPs) and is based on the IPv4 source and destination addresses in the packet. When Layer 3 service-specific load balancing is configured, all egressing bundles are load balanced based on the IPv4 source and destination addresses. When packets do not have IPv4 addresses, default load-balancing is used.

Layer 3 load balancing for link bundles is enabled globally, using the following command:

hw-module load-balance bundle l2-service l3-params

Layer 3 Load Balancing Beginning in Cisco IOS XR Release 4.0.1

Layer 3 load balancing for link bundles is done when outgoing interfaces are either bundles or bundle subinterfaces. 5-tuple hashing is used for load balancing among bundle member links, using the following parameters:

IP source address

IP destination address

Router ID

Layer 4 source port

Layer 4 destination port

The ingress linecard does bundle member selection and forwards the packet to the linecard and network processor (NP) corresponding to the selected bundle member. The same hash value is used for both ingress and egress linecards. Therefore, even though the egress linecard also does bundle member selection, it selects the same bundle member that was selected by the ingress linecard.

Multicast IPv4 and IPv6 Traffic

For outbound multicast IPv4 or IPv6 traffic, a set of egress linecards is predetermined by the system. If a bundle interface or bundle subinterface is an outgoing interface, the system selects the bundle member for each outgoing interface in a route based on the multicast group address. This helps with load distribution of multicast routed traffic to different bundle members, while providing traffic sequencing within a specific route.

The egress linecard does NP selection using the same approach, when bundle members are spread across multiple NPs within the egress linecard.

When the packet arrives on an egress NP, it uses the 5-tuple hash to select a bundle member within an NP for each packet. This provides better resiliency for bundle member state changes within an NP.

Dynamic Load Balancing for LAG

Beginning in Cisco IOS XR Release 4.0.1, the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router supports a method of dynamic load balancing among link aggregation (LAG) members. With dynamic load balancing, the hash algorithms for link selection include up to a maximum of 64 links, and are based on the current number of active members in the bundle.

QoS and Link Bundling

On the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, when QoS is applied on the bundle for either the ingress or egress direction, QoS is applied at each member interface. For complete information on configuring QoS on link bundles on the Cisco CRS router, refer to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Modular Quality of Service Configuration Guide and the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Modular Quality of Service Command Reference.

VLANs on an Ethernet Link Bundle

802.1Q VLAN subinterfaces can be configured on 802.3ad Ethernet link bundles. Keep the following information in mind when adding VLANs on an Ethernet link bundle:

The maximum number of VLANs allowed per bundle is 4096.

The maximum number of bundled VLANs allowed per router is 16384.


Note The memory requirement for bundle VLANs is slightly higher than standard physical interfaces.


To create a VLAN subinterface on a bundle, include the VLAN subinterface instance with the interface Bundle-Ether command, as follows:

interface Bundle-Ether interface-bundle-id.subinterface

After you create a VLAN on an Ethernet link bundle, all VLAN subinterface configuration is supported on that link bundle.

VLAN subinterfaces can support multiple Layer 2 frame types and services, such as Ethernet Flow Points - EFPs) and Layer 3 services.

Layer 2 EFPs are configured as follows:

interface bundle-ether instance.subinterface l2transport. encapsulation dot1q xxxxx

Layer 3 VLAN subinterfaces are configured as follows:

interface bundle-ether instance.subinterface, encapsulation dot1q xxxxx

Note The difference between the Layer 2 and Layer 3 interfaces is the l2transport keyword. Both types of interfaces use dot1q encapsulation.


Link Bundle Configuration Overview

The following steps provide a general overview of the link bundle configuration process. Keep in mind that a link must be cleared of all previous network layer configuration before it can be added to a bundle:

1. In global configuration mode, create a link bundle. To create an Ethernet link bundle, enter the interface Bundle-Ether command.

2. Assign an IP address and subnet mask to the virtual interface using the ipv4 address command.

3. Add interfaces to the bundle you created in Step 1 with the bundle id command in the interface configuration submode. You can add up to 64 links to a single bundle.


Note A link is configured as a member of a bundle from the interface configuration submode for that link.


Nonstop Forwarding During Card Failover

Cisco IOS XR software supports nonstop forwarding during failover between active and standby paired RSP cards. Nonstop forwarding ensures that there is no change in the state of the link bundles when a failover occurs.

For example, if an active RSP fails, the standby RSP becomes operational. The configuration, node state, and checkpoint data of the failed RSP are replicated to the standby RSP. The bundled interfaces will all be present when the standby RSP becomes the active RSP.


Note Failover is always onto the standby RSP.



Note You do not need to configure anything to guarantee that the standby interface configurations are maintained.


Link Failover

When one member link in a bundle fails, traffic is redirected to the remaining operational member links and traffic flow remains uninterrupted.

How to Configure Link Bundling

This section contains the following procedures:

Configuring Ethernet Link Bundles

Configuring EFP Load Balancing on an Ethernet Link Bundle

Configuring VLAN Bundles

Configuring Ethernet Link Bundles

This section describes how to configure an Ethernet link bundle.


Note MAC accounting is not supported on Ethernet link bundles.



Note In order for an Ethernet bundle to be active, you must perform the same configuration on both connection endpoints of the bundle.


SUMMARY STEPS

The creation of an Ethernet link bundle involves creating a bundle and adding member interfaces to that bundle, as shown in the steps that follow.

1. configure

2. interface Bundle-Ether bundle-id

3. ipv4 address ipv4-address mask

4. bundle minimum-active bandwidth kbps (Optional)

5. bundle minimum-active links links (Optional)

6. bundle maximum-active links links (Optional)

7. exit

8. interface {GigabitEthernet | TenGigE}

9. bundle id bundle-id [mode {active | on | passive}

10. no shutdown

11. exit

12. Repeat Step 8 through Step 11 to add more links to the bundle you created in Step 2.

13. end
or
commit

14. exit

15. exit

16. Perform Step 1 through Step 15 on the remote end of the connection.

17. show bundle Bundle-Ether bundle-id [reasons]

18. show lacp Bundle-Ether bundle-id

Configuring EFP Load Balancing on an Ethernet Link Bundle

This section describes how to configure Ethernet flow point (EFP) Load Balancing on an Ethernet link bundle.

By default, Ethernet flow point (EFP) load balancing is enabled. However, the user can choose to configure all egressing traffic on the fixed members of a bundle to flow through the same physical member link. This configuration is available only on an Ethernet Bundle subinterface with Layer 2 transport (l2transport) enabled.


Note If the active members of the bundle change, the traffic for the bundle may get mapped to a different physical link that has a hash value that matches the configured value.


SUMMARY STEPS

Perform the following steps to configure EFP Load Balancing on an Ethernet link bundle:

1. configure

2. hw-module load-balance bundle l2-service l3-params

3. interface Bundle-Ether bundle-id l2transport

4. bundle load-balance hash hash-value [auto]

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

hw-module load-balance bundle l2-service l3-params

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# hw-module load-balance bundle l2-service l3-params

(Optional) Enables Layer 3 load balancing on Layer 2 link bundles.

Step 3 

interface Bundle-Ether bundle-id l2transport

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router#(config)# interface Bundle-Ether 3 l2transport

Creates a new Ethernet link bundle with the specified bundle-id and with Layer 2 transport enabled.

The range is 1 to 65535.

Step 4 

bundle load-balance hash hash-value [auto]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# bundle load-balancing hash 1

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# bundle load-balancing hash auto

Configures all egressing traffic on the fixed members of a bundle to flow through the same physical member link.

hash-value—Numeric value that specifies the physical member link through which all egressing traffic in this bundle will flow. The values are 1 through 8.

auto—The physical member link through which all egressing traffic on this bundle will flow is automatically chosen.

Step 5 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring VLAN Bundles

This section describes how to configure a VLAN bundle. The creation of a VLAN bundle involves three main tasks:

1. Create an Ethernet bundle.

2. Create VLAN subinterfaces and assign them to the Ethernet bundle.

3. Assign Ethernet links to the Ethernet bundle.

These tasks are describe in detail in the procedure that follows.


Note In order for a VLAN bundle to be active, you must perform the same configuration on both ends of the bundle connection.


SUMMARY STEPS

The creation of a VLAN link bundle is described in the steps that follow.

1. configure

2. interface Bundle-Ether bundle-id

3. ipv4 address ipv4-address mask

4. bundle minimum-active bandwidth kbps (Optional)

5. bundle minimum-active links links (Optional)

6. bundle maximum-active links links (Optional)

7. exit

8. interface Bundle-Ether bundle-id.vlan-id

9. encapsulation dot1q

10. ipv4 address ipv4-address mask

11. no shutdown

12. exit

13. Repeat Step 7 through Step 12 to add more VLANs to the bundle you created in Step 2.

14. end
or
commit

15. exit

16. exit

17. show ethernet trunk bundle-Ether instance

18. configure

19. interface {GigabitEthernet | TenGigE} interface-path-id

20. bundle id bundle-id [mode {active | on | passive}]

21. no shutdown

22. Repeat Step 19 through Step 21 to add more Ethernet interfaces to the bundle you created in Step 2.

23. end
or
commit

24. Perform Step 1 through Step 23 on the remote end of the connection.

25. show bundle Bundle-Ether bundle-id [reasons]

26. show ethernet trunk bundle-Ether instance

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

interface Bundle-Ether bundle-id

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router#(config)# interface Bundle-Ether 3

Creates and names a new Ethernet link bundle.

This interface Bundle-Ether command enters you into the interface configuration submode, where you can enter interface-specific configuration commands. Use the exit command to exit from the interface configuration submode back to the normal global configuration mode.

Step 3 

ipv4 address ipv4-address mask

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.2.3 255.0.0.0

Assigns an IP address and subnet mask to the virtual interface using the ipv4 address configuration subcommand.

Step 4 

bundle minimum-active bandwidth kbps

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-if)# bundle minimum-active bandwidth 580000

(Optional) Sets the minimum amount of bandwidth required before a user can bring up a bundle.

Step 5 

bundle minimum-active links links

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-if)# bundle minimum-active links 2

(Optional) Sets the number of active links required before you can bring up a specific bundle.

Step 6 

bundle maximum-active links links

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-if)# bundle maximum-active links 1

(Optional) Designates one active link and one link in standby mode that can take over immediately for a bundle if the active link fails (1:1 protection).

Note The default number of active links allowed in a single bundle is 8.

Note If the bundle maximum-active command is issued, then only the highest-priority link within the bundle is active. The priority is based on the value from the bundle port-priority command, where a lower value is a higher priority. Therefore, we recommend that you configure a higher priority on the link that you want to be the active link.

Step 7 

exit
Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-if)# exit

Exits the interface configuration submode.

Step 8 

interface Bundle-Ether bundle-id.vlan-id

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router#(config)# interface Bundle-Ether 3.1

Creates a new VLAN, and assigns the VLAN to the Ethernet bundle you created in Step 2.

Replace the bundle-id argument with the bundle-id you created in Step 2.

Replace the vlan-id with a subinterface identifier. Range is from 1 to 4094 inclusive (0 and 4095 are reserved).

Note When you include the .vlan-id argument with the interface Bundle-Ether bundle-id command, you enter subinterface configuration mode.

Step 9 

dot1q vlan vlan-id

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router#(config-subif)# dot1q vlan 10

Assigns a VLAN to the subinterface.

Replace the vlan-id argument with a subinterface identifier. Range is from 1 to 4094 inclusive (0 and 4095 are reserved).

Step 10 

ipv4 address ipv4-address mask

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router#(config-subif)# ipv4 address 10.1.2.3/24

Assigns an IP address and subnet mask to the subinterface.

Step 11 

no shutdown

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router#(config-subif)# no shutdown

(Optional) If a link is in the down state, bring it up. The no shutdown command returns the link to an up or down state depending on the configuration and state of the link.

Step 12 

exit
Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-subif)# exit

Exits subinterface configuration mode for the VLAN subinterface.

Step 13 

Repeat Step 7 through Step 12 to add more VLANs to the bundle you created in Step 2.

(Optional) Adds more subinterfaces to the bundle.

Step 14 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-subif)# end

or

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-subif)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 15 

exit
Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-subif)# exit

Exits interface configuration mode.

Step 16 

exit
Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# exit

Exits global configuration mode.

Step 17 

show ethernet trunk bundle-ether instance

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router# show ethernet trunk bundle-ether 5

(Optional) Displays the interface configuration.

The Ethernet bundle instance range is from 1 through 65535.

Step 18 

configure
Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router # configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 19 

interface {GigabitEthernet | TenGigE} interface-path-id

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/0/0

Enters the interface configuration mode for the Ethernet interface you want to add to the Bundle.

Enter the GigabitEthernet or TenGigE keyword to specify the interface type. Replace the interface-path-id argument with the node-id in the rack/slot/module format.

Note A VLAN bundle is not active until you add an Ethernet interface on both ends of the link bundle.

Step 20 

bundle id bundle-id [mode {active | on | passive}]

Example:
RP/0//CPU0:router(config-if)# bundle-id 3

Adds an Ethernet interface to the bundle you configured in Step 2 through Step 13.

To enable active or passive LACP on the bundle, include the optional mode active or mode passive keywords in the command string.

To add the interface to the bundle without LACP support, include the optional mode on keywords with the command string.

Note If you do not specify the mode keyword, the default mode is on (LACP is not run over the port).

Step 21 

no shutdown

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown

(Optional) If a link is in the down state, bring it up. The no shutdown command returns the link to an up or down state depending on the configuration and state of the link.

Step 22 

Repeat Step 19 through Step 21 to add more Ethernet interfaces to the VLAN bundle.

Step 23 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-subif)# end

or

RP/0//CPU0:router(config-subif)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 24 

Perform Step 1 through Step 23 on the remote end of the VLAN bundle connection.

Brings up the other end of the link bundle.

Step 25 

show bundle Bundle-Ether bundle-id [reasons]
Example:
RP/0//CPU0:router# show bundle Bundle-Ether 3 
reasons

(Optional) Shows information about the specified Ethernet link bundle.

The show bundle Bundle-Ether command displays information about the specified bundle. If your bundle has been configured properly and is carrying traffic, the State field in the show bundle Bundle-Ether command output will show the number "4," which means the specified VLAN bundle port is "distributing."

Step 26 

show ethernet trunk bundle-ether instance

Example:

RP/0//CPU0:router# show ethernet trunk bundle-ether 5

(Optional) Displays the interface configuration.

The Ethernet bundle instance range is from 1 through 65535.

Configuration Examples for Link Bundling

This section contains the following examples:

Configuring an Ethernet Link Bundle: Example

Configuring a VLAN Link Bundle: Example

Configuring EFP Load Balancing on an Ethernet Link Bundle: Example

Configuring an Ethernet Link Bundle: Example

The following example shows how to join two ports to form an EtherChannel bundle running LACP:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router# config
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config)# interface Bundle-Ether 3
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# ipv4 address 1.2.3.4/24
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# bundle minimum-active bandwidth 620000
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# bundle minimum-active links 1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config)# interface TenGigE 0/3/0/0
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# bundle id 3 mode active
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# no shutdown
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config)# interface TenGigE 0/3/0/1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# bundle id 3 mode active
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# no shutdown
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# exit
 
   

Configuring a VLAN Link Bundle: Example

The following example shows how to create and bring up two VLANs on an Ethernet bundle:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router# config
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config)# interface Bundle-Ether 1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# ipv4 address 1.2.3.4/24
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# bundle minimum-active bandwidth 620000
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# bundle minimum-active links 1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config)# interface Bundle-Ether 1.1
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-subif)# dot1q vlan 10
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-subif)# ip addr 10.2.3.4/24
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-subif)# no shutdown
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-subif)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config)# interface Bundle-Ether 1.2
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-subif)# dot1q vlan 20
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-subif)# ip addr20.2.3.4/24
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-subifif)# no shutdown
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-subifif)# exit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config)# interface gig 0/1/5/7
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# bundle-id 1 mode act
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# commit
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Router(config-if)# exit

Configuring EFP Load Balancing on an Ethernet Link Bundle: Example

The following example shows how to configure all egressing traffic on the fixed members of a bundle to flow through the same physical member link automatically.

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configuration terminal 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface bundle-ether 1.1 l2transport
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# bundle load-balancing hash auto
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# 
 
   

The following example shows how to configure all egressing traffic on the fixed members of a bundle to flow through a specified physical member link.

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configuration terminal 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface bundle-ether 1.1 l2transport
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# bundle load-balancing hash 1
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# 
 
   

Enabling Layer 3 Load Balancing on Layer 2 Link Bundles: Example


Note This configuration is not supported beginning in Cisco IOS XR 4.0.1


The following example shows how to change the default EFP load balancing from being based on the MAC source address/destination address (SA/DA) fields in the packet header to Layer 3 load balancing for link bundles based on the IPv4 source and destination addresses in the packet:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configuration terminal 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# hw-module load-balance bundle l2-service l3-params


Additional References

The following sections provide references related to link bundle configuration.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router master command reference

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Master Commands List

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router interface configuration commands

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Interface and Hardware Component Command Reference

Initial system bootup and configuration information for a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router using the Cisco IOS XR Software.

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Getting Started Guide

Information about user groups and task IDs

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Interface and Hardware Component Command Reference

Information about configuring interfaces and other components on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router from a remote Craft Works Interface (CWI) client management application

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Craft Works Interface Configuration Guide


Standards

Standards
Title

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MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link

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To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms using
Cisco IOS XR Software, use the Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml


RFCs

RFCs
Title

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