Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router System Monitoring Configuration Guide
IP Service Level Agreements on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 1.15MB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 5.36MB) | Feedback

Implementing IP Service Level Agreements on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Table Of Contents

Implementing IP Service Level Agreements on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Contents

Prerequisites for Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

Restrictions for Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

Information About Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

About IP Service Level Agreements Technology

Service Level Agreements

Benefits of IP Service Level Agreements

Measuring Network Performance with IP Service Level Agreements

Operation Types for IP Service Level Agreements

IP SLA Responder and IP SLA Control Protocol

Response Time Computation for IP SLA

IP SLA VRF Support

IP SLA Operation Scheduling

IP SLA—Proactive Threshold Monitoring

IP SLA Reaction Configuration

IP SLA Threshold Monitoring and Notifications

MPLS LSP Monitoring

How MPLS LSP Monitoring Works

BGP Next-hop Neighbor Discovery

IP SLA LSP Ping and LSP Traceroute Operations

Proactive Threshold Monitoring for MPLS LSP Monitoring

Multi-operation Scheduling for the LSP Health Monitor

LSP Path Discovery

How to Implement IP Service Level Agreements

Configuring IP Service Levels Using the UDP Jitter Operation

Enabling the IP SLA Responder on the Destination Device

What to Do Next

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Jitter Operation on the Source Device

Prerequisites for Configuring a UDP Jitter Operation on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic UDP Jitter Operation on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Jitter Operation with Additional Characteristics

Configuring the IP SLA for a UDP Echo Operation

Prerequisites for Configuring a UDP Echo Operation on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Echo Operation on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Echo Operation with Optional Parameters on the Source Device

Configuring an ICMP Echo Operation

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic ICMP Echo Operation on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling an ICMP Echo Operation with Optional Parameters on the Source Device

Configuring the ICMP Path-echo Operation

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic ICMP Path-echo Operation on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling an ICMP Path-echo Operation with Optional Parameters on the Source Device

Configuring the ICMP Path-jitter Operation

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic ICMP Path-jitter Operation

Configuring and Scheduling an ICMP Path-jitter Operation with Additional Parameters

Configuring IP SLA MPLS LSP Ping and Trace Operations

Configuring and Scheduling an MPLS LSP Ping Operation

Configuring and Scheduling an MPLS LSP Trace Operation

Configuring IP SLA Reactions and Threshold Monitoring

Configuring Monitored Elements for IP SLA Reactions

Configuring Threshold Violation Types for IP SLA Reactions

Specifying Reaction Events

Configuring the MPLS LSP Monitoring Instance on a Source PE Router

Configuring an MPLS LSP Monitoring Ping Instance

Configuring an MPLS LSP Monitoring Trace Instance

Configuring the Reaction Conditions for an MPLS LSP Monitoring Instance on a Source PE Router

Prerequisites

What to Do Next

Scheduling an MPLS LSP Monitoring Instance on a Source PE Router

LSP Path Discovery

Configuration Examples for Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

Configuring IP Service Level Agreements: Example

Configuring IP SLA Reactions and Threshold Monitoring: Example

Configuring IP SLA MPLS LSP Monitoring: Example

Configuring LSP Path Discovery: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

RFCs

Technical Assistance


Implementing IP Service Level Agreements on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router


IP Service Level Agreements (IP SLAs) is a portfolio of technology embedded in most devices that run Cisco IOS XR software, which allows you to analyze IP service levels for IP applications and services, increase productivity, lower operational costs, and reduce the frequency of network outages.

Using IP SLA, service provider customers can measure and provide service level agreements. IP SLA can perform network assessments, verify quality of service (QoS), ease the deployment of new services, and assist administrators with network troubleshooting.


Note For a complete description of the IP SLA commands used in this chapter, refer to the IP Service Level Agreement Commands on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Software module of Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers System Management Command Reference.


Feature History for Implementing IP Service Level Agreements on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

Release
Modification

Release 3.7.2

This feature was introduced on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router.

Release 3.9.0

No modification.


Contents

Prerequisites for Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

Restrictions for Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

Information About Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

How to Implement IP Service Level Agreements

Configuration Examples for Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

Additional References

Prerequisites for Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

Knowledge of general networking protocols and your specific network design is assumed. Familiarity with network management applications is helpful.

You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.

Restrictions for Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

The maximum number of configurable IP SLA operations that is supported by Cisco IOS XR software is 2048.

We do not recommend scheduling all the operations at the same time as this could negatively affect your performance.

Note that setting the frequency to less than 60 seconds will increase packet scalability exponentially and this could negatively impact your configurable IP SLA operation performance when scheduled operations have same start-time.

IP SLA is not HA capable.

Note that the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router does not support hardware timestamping.

The current validated scale numbers for scheduling of an operation at a same time are as follows:

The maximum number of UDP echo operations is 400 operations with default frequency.

The maximum number of UDP echo operations when measuring reachability only is 2000 operations with default frequency.

The maximum number of UDP jitter operations is 400 operations with default frequency.

The maximum number of UDP jitter operations when measuring reachability only is 1000 operations with default frequency.

The maximum number of ICMP echo operations is 400 operations with default frequency.

The maximum number of ICMP echo operations when measuring reachability only is 2000 operations with default frequency.

The maximum number of ICMP echo-path operations is 400 operations with default frequency.

The maximum number of ICMP echo-path operations when measuring reachability only is 2000 operations with default frequency.

The maximum ICMP jitter operations that can be configured with default frequency with out packet discards is 75.

The maximum MPLS LSP ping operations that can be configured with default frequency with out packet discards is 100.

The maximum MPLS LSP trace operations that can be configured with default frequency with out packet discards is 100.

Information About Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

To implement IP SLA, you must understand the following concepts:

About IP Service Level Agreements Technology

Service Level Agreements

Benefits of IP Service Level Agreements

Measuring Network Performance with IP Service Level Agreements

Operation Types for IP Service Level Agreements

IP SLA Responder and IP SLA Control Protocol

Response Time Computation for IP SLA

IP SLA VRF Support

IP SLA Operation Scheduling

IP SLA—Proactive Threshold Monitoring

MPLS LSP Monitoring

LSP Path Discovery

About IP Service Level Agreements Technology

IP SLA uses active traffic monitoring, which generates traffic in a continuous, reliable, and predictable manner to measure network performance. IP SLA sends data across the network to measure performance between multiple network locations or across multiple network paths. It simulates network data and IP services, and collects network performance information in real time. The following information is collected:

Response times

One-way latency, jitter (interpacket delay variance)

Packet loss

Network resource availability

Hop by Hop ICMP response time, jitter

Proactive notifications

IP SLA originated from the technology previously known as Service Assurance Agent (SAA). IP SLA performs active monitoring by generating and analyzing traffic to measure performance, either between the router or from a router to a remote IP device such as a network application server. Measurement statistics, which are provided by the various IP SLA operations, are used for troubleshooting, problem analysis, and designing network topologies.

Depending on the specific IP SLA operation, statistics of delay, packet loss, jitter, packet sequence, connectivity, and path are monitored by and stored in the router and provided through command-line interface (CLI), Extensive Markup Language (XML), and SNMP MIBs. IP SLA uses the Cisco RTTMON MIB to interact between external Network Management System (NMS) applications and the IP SLA operations that are running on Cisco devices. For a complete description of the object variables that are referenced by IP SLA, see the text of the CISCO-RTTMON-MIB.my file that is available from the Cisco MIB Locator.

Service Level Agreements

Internet commerce has grown significantly in the past few years as the technology has advanced to provide faster, more reliable access to the Internet. Many companies need online access and conduct most of their business on line and any loss of service can affect the profitability of the company. Internet service providers (ISPs) and even internal IT departments now offer a defined level of service—a service level agreement—to provide their customers with a degree of predictability.

Network administrators are required to support service level agreements that support application solutions. Figure 2 shows how IP SLA has taken the traditional concept of Layer 2 service level agreements and applied a broader scope to support end-to-end performance measurement, including support of applications.

Figure 2 Scope of Traditional Service Level Agreement Versus IP SLA

Table 2 lists the improvements with IP SLA over a traditional service level agreement.

Table 2 IP SLA Improvements over a Traditional Service Level Agreement 

Type of Improvement
Description

End-to-end measurements

The ability to measure performance from one end of the network to the other allows a broader reach and more accurate representation of the end-user experience.

Sophistication

Statistics, such as delay, jitter, packet sequence, Layer 3 connectivity, and path and download time, that are divided into bidirectional and round-trip numbers provide more data than just the bandwidth of a Layer 2 link. For more information on Layer 2 links, refer to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide online.

Accuracy

Applications that are sensitive to slight changes in network performance require the precision of the submillisecond measurement of IP SLA.

Ease of deployment

Leveraging the existing Cisco devices in a large network makes IP SLA easier to implement than the physical operations that are often required with traditional service level agreements.

Application-aware monitoring

IP SLA can simulate and measure performance statistics generated by applications running over Layer 3 through Layer 7. Traditional service level agreements can measure only Layer 2 performance. For more information on Layer 2 performance, refer to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide online.

Pervasiveness

IP SLA support exists in Cisco networking devices ranging from low-end to high-end routers and switches. This wide range of deployment gives IP SLA more flexibility over traditional service level agreements.


Benefits of IP Service Level Agreements

Table 3 lists the benefits of implementing IP SLA.

Table 3 List of Benefits for IP SLA 

Benefit
Description

IP SLA monitoring

Provides service level agreement monitoring, measurement, and verification.

Network performance monitoring

Measure the jitter, latency, or packet loss in the network. In addition, IP SLA provides continuous, reliable, and predictable measurements along with proactive notification.

IP service network health assessment

Verifies that the existing QoS is sufficient for the new IP services.

Troubleshooting of network operation

Provides consistent, reliable measurement that immediately identifies problems and saves troubleshooting time.

Proactive notification

Provide application to configure reaction based on the notification to make appropriate action.


Measuring Network Performance with IP Service Level Agreements

IP SLA uses generated traffic to measure network performance between two networking devices, such as routers. Figure 3 shows how IP SLA starts when the IP SLA device sends a generated packet to the destination device. After the destination device receives the packet and if the operation uses an IP SLA component at the receiving end (for example, IP SLA Responder), the reply packet includes information about the delay at the target device. The source device uses this information to improve the accuracy of the measurements. An IP SLA operation is a network measurement to a destination in the network from the source device using a specific protocol, such as User Datagram Protocol (UDP) for the operation.

Figure 3 IP SLA Operations

Operations are divided into two classes, which depend on whether they rely on the IP SLA Responder component to be running at the target device or not. The former is used only with Cisco devices; whereas, the latter is used with any device that has IP connectivity. Operations that are based on Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) are examples of the second class; whereas, UDP-based operations are examples of the first.

In responder-based operations, the IP SLA Responder is enabled in the destination device and provides information such as the processing delays of IP SLA packets. The responder-based operation has improved accuracy over the ICMP operation discussed above, and offers the capability of unidirectional measurements. In replies to the IP SLA source device, the responder includes information about processing delays. The IP SLA source device removes the delays in its final performance calculation. Use of the responder is optional for the UDP echo operation, but it is required for the UDP jitter operation. If no IP SLA Responder is used, the target device should support the UDP echo service. This means the target device should be able to respond UDP echo probes.

In ICMP operations, the source IP SLA device sends several ICMP packets to the destination. The destination device, which is any IP device, echoes with replies. The source IP SLA device uses the sent and received time stamps to calculate the response time. The ICMP echo operation resembles the traditional extended ping utility, and it measures only the response time between the source device and the destination device. ICMP path-echo and path-jitter operations use the traceroute mechanism to identify the whole path. Subsequent ICMP packets are sent to each path node, and the measurements are correlated to provide hop-by-hop round-trip delay and jitter information.

To implement IP SLA network performance measurement, perform these tasks:

1. Enable the IP SLA Responder, if appropriate.

2. Configure the required IP SLA operation type.

3. Configure any operation parameters available for the specified IP SLA operation type.

4. Configure reaction conditions, if required.

5. Schedule the operation to run. Then, let the operation run for a period of time to gather statistics.

6. Display and interpret the results of the operation using Cisco IOS XR CLI, XML, or an NMS system with SNMP.

Operation Types for IP Service Level Agreements

IP SLA configures various types of operations to measure response times, jitter, throughput, and packet loss. Table 4 lists the various types of operations. Also, each operation maps to multiple applications.

Table 4 Types of Operations for IP SLA 

Operation
Description

UDP echo

Measures round-trip delay and helps in accurate measurement of response time of UDP traffic.

UDP jitter

Measures round-trip delay, one-way delay, one-way jitter, two-way jitter, and one-way packet loss.

ICMP echo

Measures round-trip delay for the full path.

ICMP path-echo

Calculates the hop-by-hop response time between the router and any IP device on the network. The path is discovered using the traceroute algorithm and then by measuring the response time between the source router and each intermediate hop in the path. If there are multiple equal-cost routes between source and destination devices, the ICMP path-echo operation can select one of the paths by using the Loose Source Routing (LSR) option, which is configurable.

ICMP path-jitter

Measures hop-by-hop jitter, packet loss, and delay measurement statistics in an IP network.

MPLS LSP ping

Tests the connectivity of a label switched paths (LSP) and measures round-trip delay of the LSP in an MPLS network. The following Forwarding Equivalence Classes (FECs) are supported:

IPv4 Label Distribution Protocol (LDP)

Traffic engineering (TE) tunnels

Pseudowire

An echo request is sent along the same data path as other packets belonging to the FEC. When the echo request packet reaches the end of the path, it is sent to to the control plane of the egress label switching router (LSR). The LSR verifies that it is indeed an egress for the FEC and sends an echo reply packet that contains information about the FEC whose MPLS path is being verified. Only a default VRF table is supported.

MPLS LSP trace

Traces the hop-by-hop route of an LSP path and measures the hop-by-hop round-trip delay for IPv4 LDP prefixes and TE tunnel FECs in an MPLS network.

An echo request packet is sent data to the control plane of each transit LSR, which checks if it is a transit LSR for this path. Each transit LSR also returns information related to the label bound to the FEC that is being tested. Only a default VRF table is supported.


IP SLA Responder and IP SLA Control Protocol

The IP SLA Responder is a component embedded in the destination Cisco routing device that allows the system to anticipate and respond to IP SLA request packets. The IP SLA Responder provides enhanced accuracy for measurements. Additional statistics are also provided, which are not otherwise available through standard ICMP-based measurements. The patented IP SLA Control Protocol is used by the IP SLA Responder, providing a mechanism through which the responder is notified on which port it should listen and respond. Only a Cisco IOS XR device or other Cisco platforms can be a source for a destination IP SLA Responder.

Figure 3 shows where the IP SLA Responder fits relative to the IP network. The IP SLA Responder listens on a specific port for control protocol messages sent by an IP SLA operation. Upon receipt of the control message, the responder enables the UDP port specified in the control message for the specified duration. During this time, the responder accepts the requests and responds to them. The responder disables the port after it responds to the IP SLA packet or packets, or when the specified time expires. For added security, MD5 authentication for control messages is available.

The IP SLA Responder must be used with the UDP jitter service, but it is optional for UDP echo service. If services that are already provided by the target router are chosen, the IP SLA Responder need not be enabled. For devices that are not Cisco devices, the IP SLA Responder cannot be configured, and the IP SLA can send operational packets only to services native to those devices.

Response Time Computation for IP SLA

T3 is the time the reply packet is sent at the IP SLA Responder node, and T1 is the time the request is sent at the source node. Because of other high-priority processes, routers can take tens of milliseconds to process incoming packets. The delay affects the response times, because the reply to test packets might be sitting in a queue while waiting to be processed. In this situation, the response times would not accurately represent true network delays. IP SLA minimizes these processing delays on the source router and on the target router (if IP SLA Responder is being used) to determine true round-trip times. Some IP SLA probe packets contain delay information that are used in the final computation to make measurements more accurate. IP SLA also minimizes these processing delays on the source router by having hardware time stamping. However the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router is not yet equipped with hardware time stamping mechanisms at the time of drafting this document.

When enabled, the IP SLA Responder allows the target device to take two time stamps, both when the packet arrives on the interface (T2) and again just as it is leaving (T2), and accounts for it when calculating the statistics. This time stamping is made with a granularity of submilliseconds. At times of high network activity, an ICMP ping test often shows a long and inaccurate response time, while an IP SLA-based responder shows an accurate response time.

Figure 4 shows how the responder works. Four time stamps are taken to make the calculation for round-trip time. At the target router, with the responder functionality enabled, time stamp 2 (TS2) is subtracted from time stamp 3 (TS3) to produce the time spent processing the test packet as represented by delta. This delta value is then subtracted from the overall round-trip time. At the source router after the test packet arrive computing its complete trip (TS4) is taken and the round trip time is measured by the formula, RTT = T1 ~ T4 ~ delta.

Attempt to configure beyond scalability numbers as mentioned in the restriction section can have negative impact on performance as the processing delay of the packet (T1~T11) would increase exponentially leading to inaccuracy in measurements not reflecting the true network delay.

Figure 4 IP SLA Responder Time Stamping

IP SLA VRF Support

Service providers need to monitor and measure network performance from both the perspective of the core network and a customer's network. To do so, it is necessary to use nondefault VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) tables for IP SLA operations in addition to the default VRF table. Table 4 describes the different IP SLA operations, including information about whether or not an operation supports the use of nondefault VRF tables.

IP SLA Operation Scheduling

After an IP SLA operation is configured, you must schedule the operation to begin capturing statistics and collecting error information. When scheduling an operation, the operation starts immediately or starts at a certain month and day. In addition, an operation can be scheduled to be in pending state, which is used when the operation is a reaction (threshold) operation waiting to be triggered. Normal scheduling of IP SLA operations lets you schedule one operation at a time.

IP SLA—Proactive Threshold Monitoring

This section describes the proactive monitoring capabilities for IP SLA that use thresholds and reaction triggering. IP SLA allows you to monitor, analyze, and verify IP service levels for IP applications and services to increase productivity, lower operational costs, and reduce occurrences of network congestion or outages. IP SLA uses active traffic monitoring to measure network performance.

To perform the tasks that are required to configure proactive threshold monitoring using IP SLA, you should understand the following concepts:

IP SLA Reaction Configuration

IP SLA Threshold Monitoring and Notifications

IP SLA Reaction Configuration

IP SLA is configured to react to certain measured network conditions. For example, if IP SLA measures too much jitter on a connection, IP SLA can generate a notification to a network management application or trigger another IP SLA operation to gather more data.

IP SLA reaction configuration is performed by using the ipsla reaction operation command.

IP SLA Threshold Monitoring and Notifications

IP SLA supports threshold monitoring for performance parameters, such as jitter-average, bidirectional round-trip time, and connectivity. For packet loss and jitter, notifications can be generated for violations in either direction (for example, the source to the destination and the destination to the source) or for round-trip values.

MPLS LSP Monitoring

The IP Service Level Agreements (SLAs) label switched path (LSP) monitor feature provides the capability to proactively monitor Layer 3 Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Virtual Private Networks (VPNs). This feature is useful for determining network availability or testing network connectivity between provider edge (PE) routers in an MPLS VPN. When configured, MPLS LSP monitor automatically creates and deletes IP SLA LSP ping or LSP traceroute operations based on network topology.

The MPLS LSP monitor feature also allows you to perform multioperation scheduling of IP SLA operations and supports proactive threshold violation monitoring through SNMP trap notifications and syslog messages.

To use the MPLS LSP monitor feature, you should understand the following concepts:

How MPLS LSP Monitoring Works

BGP Next-hop Neighbor Discovery

IP SLA LSP Ping and LSP Traceroute Operations

Proactive Threshold Monitoring for MPLS LSP Monitoring

Multi-operation Scheduling for the LSP Health Monitor

How MPLS LSP Monitoring Works

The MPLS LSP monitor feature provides the capability to proactively monitor Layer 3 MPLS VPNs. The general process for how the MPLS LSP monitor works is as follows:

1. The user configures an MPLS LSP monitor instance.

Configuring an MPLS LSP monitor instance is similar to configuring a standard IP SLA operation. To illustrate, all operation parameters for an MPLS LSP monitor instance are configured after an identification number for the operation is specified. However, unlike standard IP SLA operations, these configured parameters are then used as the base configuration for the individual IP SLA LSP ping and LSP traceroute operations that will be created by the MPLS LSP monitor instance.

When the first MPLS LSP monitor instance is configured and scheduled to begin, BGP next-hop neighbor discovery is enabled. See the "BGP Next-hop Neighbor Discovery" section.

2. The user configures proactive threshold violation monitoring for the MPLS LSP monitor instance.

3. The user configures multioperation scheduling parameters for the MPLS LSP monitor instance.

4. Depending on the configuration options chosen, the MPLS LSP monitor instance automatically creates individual IP SLA LSP ping or LSP traceroute operations for each applicable BGP next-hop neighbor.

For any given MPLS LSP monitor operation, only one IP SLA LSP ping or LSP traceroute operation is configured per BGP next-hop neighbor. However, more than one MPLS LSP monitor instance can be running on a particular PE router at the same time. (For more details, see the note at the end of this section.)

5. Each IP SLA LSP ping or LSP traceroute operation measures network connectivity between the source PE router and the discovered destination PE router.


Note More than one MPLS LSP monitor instance can be running on a particular PE router at the same time. For example, one MPLS LSP monitor instance can be configured to discover BGP next-hop neighbors belonging to the VRF named VPN1. On the same PE router, another MPLS LSP monitor instance can be configured to discover neighbors belonging to the VRF named VPN2. In this case, if a BGP next-hop neighbor belonged to both VPN1 and VPN2, then the PE router would create two IP SLA operations for this neighbor—one for VPN1 and one for VPN2.


Adding and Deleting IP SLA Operations from the MPLS LSP Monitor Database

The MPLS LSP monitor instance receives periodic notifications about BGP next-hop neighbors that have been added to or removed from a particular VPN. This information is stored in a queue maintained by the MPLS LSP monitor instance. Based on the information in the queue and user-specified time intervals, new IP SLA operations are automatically created for newly discovered PE routers and existing IP SLA operations are automatically deleted for any PE routers that are no longer valid.

BGP Next-hop Neighbor Discovery

BGP next-hop neighbor discovery is used to find the BGP next-hop neighbors in use by any VRF associated with the source provider edge (PE) router. In most cases, these neighbors are PE routers.

When BGP next-hop neighbor discovery is enabled, a database of BGP next-hop neighbors in use by any VRF associated with the source PE router is generated, based on information from the local VRF and global routing tables. As routing updates are received, new BGP next-hop neighbors are added immediately to the database. However, BGP next-hop neighbors that are no longer valid are removed from the database only periodically, as defined by the user.

Figure 5 shows how BGP next-hop neighbor discovery works for a simple VPN scenario for an Internet service provider (ISP). In this example, there are three VPNs associated with router PE1: red, blue, and green. From the perspective of router PE1, these VPNs are reachable remotely through BGP next-hop neighbors PE2 (router ID: 12.12.12.12) and PE3 (router ID: 13.13.13.13). When the BGP next-hop neighbor discovery process is enabled on router PE1, a database is generated based on the local VRF and global routing tables. The database in this example contains two BGP next-hop router entries, PE2 12.12.12.12 and PE3 13.13.13.13. The routing entries are maintained per next-hop router to distinguish which next-hop routers belong within which particular VRF. For each next-hop router entry, the IPv4 Forward Equivalence Class (FEC) of the BGP next-hop router in the global routing table is provided so that it can be used by the MPLS LSP ping operation.

Figure 5 BGP Next-hop Neighbor Discovery for a Simple VPN

IP SLA LSP Ping and LSP Traceroute Operations

This feature introduces support for the IP SLA LSP ping and IP SLA LSP traceroute operations. These operations are useful for troubleshooting network connectivity issues and determining network availability in an MPLS VPN. When using MPLS LSP monitoring, IP SLA LSP ping and LSP traceroute operations are automatically created to measure network connectivity between the source PE router and the discovered destination PE routers. Individual IP SLA LSP ping and LSP traceroute operations can also be manually configured. Manual configuration of these operations can be useful for troubleshooting a connectivity issue.

For more information about how to configure IP SLA LSP ping or LSP traceroute operations using MPLS LSP monitoring, see the "Configuring an MPLS LSP Monitoring Ping Instance" section and the "Configuring an MPLS LSP Monitoring Trace Instance" section.

The IP SLA LSP ping and IP SLA LSP traceroute operations are based on the same infrastructure used by the MPLS LSP Ping and MPLS LSP Traceroute features, respectively, for sending and receiving echo reply and request packets to test LSPs.

Proactive Threshold Monitoring for MPLS LSP Monitoring

Proactive threshold monitoring support for the MPLS LSP Monitor feature provides the capability for triggering SNMP trap notifications and syslog messages when user-defined reaction conditions (such as a connection loss or timeout) are met. Configuring threshold monitoring for an MPLS LSP monitor instance is similar to configuring threshold monitoring for a standard IP SLAs operation.

Multi-operation Scheduling for the LSP Health Monitor

Multioperation scheduling support for the MPLS LSP Monitor feature provides the capability to easily schedule the automatically created IP SLA operations (for a given MPLS LSP monitor instance) to begin at intervals equally distributed over a specified duration of time (schedule period) and to restart at a specified frequency. Multioperation scheduling is particularly useful in cases where MPLS LSP monitoring is enabled on a source PE router that has a large number of PE neighbors and, therefore, a large number of IP SLAs operations running at the same time.


Note Newly created IP SLA operations (for newly discovered BGP next-hop neighbors) are added to the same schedule period as the operations that are currently running. To prevent too many operations from starting at the same time, the multioperation scheduling feature schedules the operations to begin at random intervals uniformly distributed over the schedule period.


LSP Path Discovery

LSP Path Discovery (LPD) is an enhancement to MPLS LSP monitor (MPLSLM) that allows operations that are part of an MPLSLM instance to initiate the path discovery process and to process the results. This feature relies on the tree trace capabilities provided by the MPLS OAM infrastructure through the LSPV server.

When multiple paths with equal cost exist between two PE routers, also know as equal cost multipath (ECMP), routers between these PE routers perform load balancing on the traffic, based on characteristics of the traffic being forwarded (for example. the destination address in the packet). In network topologies such as this, monitoring only one (or some) of the available paths among PE routers does not provide any guarantee that traffic will be forwarded correctly.

LPD is configured using the path discover command.


Note LPD functionality may create considerable CPU demands when large numbers of path discovery requests are received by the LSPV server at one time.


How to Implement IP Service Level Agreements

This section contains the following procedures:

Configuring IP Service Levels Using the UDP Jitter Operation

Configuring the IP SLA for a UDP Echo Operation

Configuring an ICMP Echo Operation

Configuring the ICMP Path-echo Operation

Configuring the ICMP Path-jitter Operation

Configuring IP SLA MPLS LSP Ping and Trace Operations

Configuring IP SLA Reactions and Threshold Monitoring

Configuring the MPLS LSP Monitoring Instance on a Source PE Router

Configuring the Reaction Conditions for an MPLS LSP Monitoring Instance on a Source PE Router

Scheduling an MPLS LSP Monitoring Instance on a Source PE Router

LSP Path Discovery

Configuring IP Service Levels Using the UDP Jitter Operation

The IP SLA UDP jitter monitoring operation is designed to diagnose network suitability for real-time traffic applications such as VoIP, Video over IP, or real-time conferencing.

Jitter means interpacket delay variance. When multiple packets are sent consecutively from source to destination—for example, 10 ms apart—and if the network is behaving ideally, the destination can receive them 10 ms apart. But if there are delays in the network (for example, queuing, arriving through alternate routes, and so on), the arrival delay between packets can be greater than or less than 10 ms. Using this example, a positive jitter value indicates that the packets arrived more than 10 ms apart. If the packets arrive 12 ms apart, positive jitter is 2 ms; if the packets arrive 8 ms apart, negative jitter is 2 ms. For delay-sensitive networks like VoIP, positive jitter values are undesirable, and a jitter value of 0 is ideal.

However, the IP SLA UDP jitter operation does more than just monitor jitter. The packets that IP SLA generates carry sending sequence and receiving sequence information for the packets, and sending and receiving time stamps from the source and the operational target. Based on these, UDP jitter operations are capable of measuring the following functions:

Per-direction jitter (source to destination and destination to source)

Per-direction packet-loss

Per-direction delay (one-way delay)

Round-trip delay (average round-trip time)

As the paths for the sending and receiving of data may be different (asymmetric), the per-direction data allows you to more readily identify where congestion or other problems are occurring in the network.

The UDP jitter operation functions by generating synthetic (simulated) UDP traffic. By default, ten packet-frames (N), each with a payload size of 32 bytes (S) are generated every 20 ms (T), and the operation is repeated every 60 seconds (F). Each of these parameters is user-configurable, so as to best simulate the IP service you are providing, or want to provide.

This section contains the following procedures:

Enabling the IP SLA Responder on the Destination Device (required)

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Jitter Operation on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Jitter Operation on the Source Device (optional)

Enabling the IP SLA Responder on the Destination Device

The IP SLA Responder must be enabled on the target device, which is the operational target.

By configuring the ipsla responder command, you make the IP SLA Responder open a UDP port 1967 and wait for a control request (not for probes). You can open or close a port dynamically through the IP SLA control protocol (through UDP port 1967). In addition, you can configure permanent ports.

Permanent ports are open until the configuration is removed. Agents can send IP SLA probe packets to the permanent port directly without a control request packet because the port can be opened by the configuration.

If you do not use permanent ports, you have to configure only the ipsla responder command.

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router supports dynamic port acceptance, so the control protocol needs to disabled, using the control disable command, as shown in the following example:

configure
control disable

To use a dynamic port, use the ipsla responder command, as shown in the following example:

configure
ipsla responder
 
   

The dynamic port is opened through the IP SLA control protocol on the responder side when you start an operation on the agent side.

The example is configured as a permanent port on the responder. UDP echo and UDP jitter can use a dynamic port or a permanent port. If you use a permanent port for UDP jitter, not all of the statistics are collected. For example, RTT is collected even if you use a permanent port for UDP jitter.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla responder

3. type udp ipv4 address ip-address port port

4. control disable

5. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla responder

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla responder

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-resp)#

Enables the IP SLA Responder for UDP echo or jitter operations.

Step 3 

type udp ipv4 address ip-address port port

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-resp)# type udp ipv4 address 12.25.26.10 port 10001

Enables the permanent address and port on the IP SLA Responder.

Step 4 

control disable

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-resp)# control disable

Disables the Control Protocol.

Step 5 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-resp)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-resp)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

What to Do Next

After enabling the IP SLA Responder, see the "Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Jitter Operation on the Source Device" section.

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Jitter Operation on the Source Device

The IP SLA operations function by generating synthetic (simulated) network traffic. A single IP SLA operation (for example, IP SLA operation 10) repeats at a given frequency for the lifetime of the operation.

A single UDP jitter operation consists of N UDP packets, each of size S, sent T milliseconds apart, from a source router to a target router, at a given frequency of F. By default, ten packets (N), each with a payload size of 32 bytes (S), are generated every 20 ms (T), and the operation is repeated every 60 seconds (F). Each of these parameters is user configurable, as shown in Table 5.

Table 5 UDP Jitter Operation Parameters 

UDP Jitter Operation Parameter
Default
Configured Using

Number of packets (N)

10 packets

ipsla operation command with the operation-number argument

type udp jitter command

packet count command with the count argument

Payload size per packet (S)

32 bytes

ipsla operation command with the operation-number argument

type udp jitter command

datasize request command with the size argument

Time between packets, in milliseconds (T)

20 ms

ipsla operation command with the operation-number argument

type udp jitter command

packet interval command with the interval argument

Elapsed time before the operation repeats, in seconds (F)

60 seconds

ipsla operation command with the operation-number argument

type udp jitter command

frequency command with the seconds argument


Prerequisites for Configuring a UDP Jitter Operation on the Source Device

Use of the UDP jitter operation requires that the IP SLA Responder be enabled on the target Cisco device. To enable the IP SLA Responder, perform the task in the "Enabling the IP SLA Responder on the Destination Device" section.

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic UDP Jitter Operation on the Source Device

You can configure and schedule a UDP jitter operation.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type udp jitter

4. control disable

5. destination address ipv4address

6. destination port port

7. packet count count

8. packet interval interval

9. frequency seconds

10. exit

11. ipsla schedule operation op-num

12. life {forever | seconds}

13. ageout seconds

14. recurring

15. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

16. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type udp jitter

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type udp jitter

Configures the operation as a UDP jitter operation, and configures characteristics for the operation.

Step 4 

control disable

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# control disable

Disables the Control Protocol.

Step 5 

destination address ipv4address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# destination address 12.25.26.10

Specifies the IP address of the destination for the UDP jitter operation.

Step 6 

destination port port

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# destination port 11111

Specifies the destination port number, in the range from 1 to 65535.

Step 7 

packet count count

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# packet count 30

(Optional) Specifies the number of packets to be transmitted during a probe. For UDP jitter operation, the range is 1 to 60000. For ICMP path-jitter operation, the range is 1 to 100.

The default number of packets sent is 10.

Step 8 

packet interval interval

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# packet interval 30

(Optional) Specifies the time between packets. The default interval between packets is 20 milliseconds.

Step 9 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# frequency 300

(Optional) Sets the rate at which a specified IP SLA operation is sent into the network.

(Optional) Use the seconds argument to specify the number of seconds between the IP SLA operations. Valid values are in the range from 1 to 12604800 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.

Step 10 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits from IP SLA configuration mode and operational mode, and returns the CLI to global configuration mode.

Step 11 

ipsla schedule operation op-num

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 12 

life {forever | seconds}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# life 30

The forever keyword schedules the operation to run indefinitely. The seconds argument schedules the lifetime of the operation, in seconds. The default lifetime of an operation is 3600 seconds (one hour).

Step 13 

ageout seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# ageout 3600

(Optional) Specifies the number of seconds to keep the operation in memory when it is not actively collecting information. The default value of 0 seconds means that the operation never times out.

Step 14 

recurring

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# recurring

(Optional) Specifies that the operation starts automatically at the specified time and for the specified duration every day.

Step 15 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 16 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Jitter Operation with Additional Characteristics

You can configure and schedule a UDP jitter operation.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type udp jitter

4. control disable

5. vrf vrf-name

6. destination address ipv4address

7. destination port port

8. frequency seconds

9. statistics [hourly| interval seconds]

10. buckets hours (valid only with the statistics command with hourly keyword)

11. distribution count slot

12. distribution interval interval

13. datasize request size

14. timeout milliseconds

15. tos number

16. exit

17. ipsla schedule operation op-num

18. life {forever | seconds}

19. ageout seconds

20. recurring

21. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

22. end

or

commit

23. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

24. show ipsla statistics aggregated [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type udp jitter

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type udp jitter

Configures the operation as a UDP jitter operation, and configures characteristics for the operation.

Step 4 

control disable

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# control disable

Disables the Control Protocol.

Step 5 

vrf vrf-name

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# vrf VPN-A

(Optional) Enables the monitoring of a VPN (using a nondefault routing table) in a UDP jitter operation. Maximum length is 32 alphanumeric characters.

Step 6 

destination address ipv4address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# destination address 12.25.26.10

Specifies the IP address of the destination for the proper operation type.

Step 7 

destination port port

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# destination port 11111

Specifies the destination port number, in the range from 1 to 65535.

Step 8 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# frequency 300

(Optional) Sets the rate at which a specified IP SLA operation is sent into the network.

(Optional) Use the seconds argument to specify the number of seconds between the IP SLA operations. Valid values are in the range from 1 to 12604800 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.

Step 9 

statistics [hourly| interval seconds]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# statistics hourly

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op-stats)#

(Optional) Specifies the statistics collection parameters for UDP jitter operation.

Step 10 

buckets hours

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op-stats)# buckets 10

(Optional) Sets the number of hours in which statistics are maintained for the IP SLA operations. This command is valid only with the statistics command with hourly keyword. The range is 0 to 25 hours. The default value is 2 hours.

Step 11 

distribution count slot

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op-stats)# distribution count 15

(Optional) Sets the number of statistic distributions that are kept for each hop during the lifetime of the IP SLA operation. The range is 1 to 20. The default value is 1 distribution.

Step 12 

distribution interval interval

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op-stats)# distribution interval 20

(Optional) Sets the time interval for each statistical distribution. The range is 1 to 100 ms. The default value is 20 ms.

Step 13 

datasize request size

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# datasize request 512

(Optional) Sets the data size in the payload of the operation's request packets. For UDP jitter, the range is from 16 to 1500 bytes.

Step 14 

timeout milliseconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# timeout 10000

Sets the time that the specified IP SLA operation waits for a response from its request packet.

(Optional) Use the milliseconds argument to specify the number of milliseconds that the operation waits to receive a response.

Step 15 

tos number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# tos 255

Specifies the type of service number.

Step 16 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-jitter)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits from IP SLA configuration mode and operational mode, and returns the CLI to global configuration mode.

Step 17 

ipsla schedule operation op-num

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 18 

life {forever | seconds}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# life 30

The forever keyword schedules the operation to run indefinitely. The seconds argument schedules the lifetime of the operation, in seconds. The default lifetime of an operation is 3600 seconds (one hour).

Step 19 

ageout seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# ageout 3600

(Optional) Specifies the number of seconds to keep the operation in memory when it is not actively collecting information. The default value of 0 seconds means that the operation never times out.

Step 20 

recurring

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# recurring

(Optional) Specifies that the operation starts automatically at the specified time and for the specified duration every day.

Step 21 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

(Optional) Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 22 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 23 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays the current statistics.

Step 24 

show ipsla statistics aggregated [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics aggregated 432

Returns the hourly statistics (aggregated data) on the performance of the network.

The UDP jitter operation provides the following hourly statistics:

Jitter statistics—Interprets telephony and multimedia conferencing requirements.

Packet loss and packet sequencing statistics—Interprets telephony, multimedia conferencing, streaming media, and other low-latency data requirements.

One-way latency and delay statistics—Interprets telephony, multimedia conferencing, and streaming media requirements.

Configuring the IP SLA for a UDP Echo Operation

To measure UDP performance on a network, use the IP SLA UDP echo operation. A UDP echo operation measures round-trip delay times and tests connectivity to Cisco devices and devices that are not Cisco devices. The results of a UDP echo operation can be useful in troubleshooting issues with business-critical applications.


Note The UDP echo operation requires a Cisco device that is running the IP SLA Responder or a non-Cisco device that is running the UDP echo service.


Depending on whether you want to configure a basic UDP echo operation or to configure a UDP echo operation with optional parameters, perform one of the following tasks:

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Echo Operation on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Echo Operation with Optional Parameters on the Source Device

Prerequisites for Configuring a UDP Echo Operation on the Source Device

If you are using the IP SLA Responder, ensure that you have completed the "Enabling the IP SLA Responder on the Destination Device" section.

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Echo Operation on the Source Device

You can enable a UDP echo operation without any optional parameters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type udp echo

4. destination address ipv4address

5. destination port port

6. frequency seconds

7. exit

8. ipsla schedule operation op-num

9. life {forever | seconds}

10. ageout seconds

11. recurring

12. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

13. end

or

commit

14. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

15. show ipsla statistics aggregated [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type udp echo

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type udp echo

Configures the operation as a UDP echo operation, and configures characteristics for the operation.

Step 4 

destination address ipv4address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# destination address 12.25.26.10

Specifies the IP address of the destination for the proper operation type.You can configure a permanent port on the IP SLA Responder side, or you can use an UDP echo server.

Step 5 

destination port port

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# destination port 11111

Specifies the destination port number, in the range from 1 to 65535.

Step 6 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# frequency 300

(Optional) Sets the rate at which a specified IP SLA operation is sent into the network.

(Optional) Use the seconds argument to specify the number of seconds between the IP SLA operations. Valid values are in the range from 1 to 12604800 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits IP SLA operation configuration mode and IP SLA configuration mode. Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 8 

ipsla schedule operation op-num

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 9 

life [forever | seconds]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# life 1

The forever keyword schedules the operation to run indefinitely. The seconds argument schedules the lifetime of the operation, in seconds. The default lifetime of an operation is 3600 seconds (one hour).

Step 10 

ageout seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# ageout 3600

(Optional) Specifies the number of seconds to keep the operation in memory when it is not actively collecting information. The default value of 0 seconds means that the operation never times out.

Step 11 

recurring

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# recurring

(Optional) Specifies that the operation starts automatically at the specified time and for the specified duration every day.

Step 12 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

(Optional) Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. This is the default value. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 13 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 14 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays the current statistics.

Step 15 

show ipsla statistics aggregated [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics aggregated 1

Displays the hourly statistical errors and the hourly statistics for all the IP SLA operations or specified operation.

Configuring and Scheduling a UDP Echo Operation with Optional Parameters on the Source Device

You can enable a UDP echo operation on the source device and configure some optional IP SLA parameters. The source device is the location at which the measurement statistics are stored.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type udp echo

4. vrf vrf-name

5. destination address ipv4address

6. destination port port

7. frequency seconds

8. datasize request size

9. tos number

10. timeout milliseconds

11. tag text

12. exit

13. ipsla schedule operation op-num

14. life {forever | seconds}

15. ageout seconds

16. recurring

17. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

18. end

or

commit

19. show ipsla statistics enhanced aggregated [operation-number] interval seconds

20. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type udp echo

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type udp echo

Configures the operation as a UDP echo operation, and configures characteristics for the operation.

Step 4 

vrf vrf-name

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# vrf VPN-A

(Optional) Enables the monitoring of a VPN (using a nondefault routing table) in a UDP echo operation. Maximum length is 32 alphanumeric characters.

Step 5 

destination address ipv4address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# destination address 12.25.26.10

Specifies the IP address of the destination for the proper operation type.

Step 6 

destination port port

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# destination port 11111

Specifies the destination port number, in the range from 1 to 65535.

Step 7 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# frequency 300

(Optional) Sets the rate at which a specified IP SLA operation is sent into the network.

(Optional) Use the seconds argument to specify the number of seconds between the IP SLA operations. Valid values are in the range from 1 to 12604800 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.

Step 8 

datasize request size

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# datasize request 512

(Optional) Sets the protocol data size in the payload of the IP SLA operation's request packet.

Use the size argument to specify the protocol data size in bytes. The range is from 0 to the maximum of the protocol. The default is 1 byte.

Step 9 

tos number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# tos 255

Defines a type of service (ToS) byte in the IP header of IP SLA operations.

Note The ToS byte is converted to a Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) value, but you cannot enter the DSCP value directly. To use a DSCP value, multiply it by 4 and enter the result as the value of the number argument.

Step 10 

timeout milliseconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# timeout 10000

Sets the time that the specified IP SLA operation waits for a response from its request packet.

Use the milliseconds argument to specify the number of milliseconds that the operation waits to receive a response.

Step 11 

tag text

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# type udp echo tag ipsla

(Optional) Creates a user-specified identifier for an IP SLA operation.

Step 12 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-udp-echo)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits IP SLA operation configuration mode and IPSLA configuration mode. Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 13 

ipsla schedule operation op-num

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule or schedule multiple operations using group scheduling.

Step 14 

life {forever | seconds}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# life 30

The forever keyword schedules the operation to run indefinitely. The seconds argument schedules the lifetime of the operation, in seconds. The default lifetime of an operation is 3600 seconds (one hour).

Step 15 

ageout seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# ageout 3600

(Optional) Specifies the number of seconds to keep the operation in memory when it is not actively collecting information. The default value of 0 seconds means that the operation never times out.

Step 16 

recurring

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# recurring

(Optional) Specifies that the operation starts automatically at the specified time and for the specified duration every day.

Step 17 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default value is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 18 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 19 

show ipsla statistics enhanced aggregated [operation-number] interval seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics enhanced aggregated 432

Displays the enhanced history statistics. You must configure the enhanced history statistics to display the sample output.

Step 20 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays the current statistics.

Configuring an ICMP Echo Operation

To monitor IP connections on a device, use the IP SLA ICMP echo operation. An ICMP echo operation measures end-to-end response times between a Cisco router and devices using IP. ICMP echo is used to troubleshoot network connectivity issues.


Note The ICMP echo operation does not require the IP SLA Responder to be enabled.


Depending on whether you want to configure and schedule a basic ICMP echo operation or configure and schedule an ICMP echo operation with optional parameters, perform one of the following procedures:

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic ICMP Echo Operation on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling an ICMP Echo Operation with Optional Parameters on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic ICMP Echo Operation on the Source Device

You can enable and schedule an ICMP echo operation without any optional parameters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type icmp echo

4. destination address ipv4address

5. frequency seconds

6. exit

7. ipsla schedule operation op-num

8. life {forever | seconds}

9. ageout seconds

10. recurring

11. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

12. end

or

commit

13. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type icmp echo

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type icmp echo

Defines an ICMP echo operation type.

Step 4 

destination address ipv4address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo)# destination address 12.25.26.10

Specifies the IP address of the destination for the proper operation type.

Step 5 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo) frequency 300

(Optional) Sets the rate at which a specified IP SLA operation is sent into the network.

(Optional) Use the seconds argument to specify the number of seconds between the IP SLA operations. Valid values are in the range from 1 to 12604800 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits IP SLA operation configuration mode and IP SLA configuration mode. Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 7 

ipsla schedule operation op-num

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 8 

life {forever | seconds}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# life 30

The forever keyword schedules the operation to run indefinitely. The seconds argument schedules the lifetime of the operation, in seconds. The default lifetime of an operation is 3600 seconds (one hour).

Step 9 

ageout seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# ageout 3600

(Optional) Specifies the number of seconds to keep the operation in memory when it is not actively collecting information. The default value of 0 seconds means that the operation never times out.

Step 10 

recurring

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# recurring

(Optional) Specifies that the operation starts automatically at the specified time and for the specified duration every day.

Step 11 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default value is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 12 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 13 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays the current statistics.

Configuring and Scheduling an ICMP Echo Operation with Optional Parameters on the Source Device

You can enable an ICMP echo operation on the source device and configure some optional IP SLA parameters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type icmp echo

4. vrf vrf-name

5. destination address ipv4address

6. frequency seconds

7. datasize request size

8. tos number

9. timeout milliseconds

10. tag text

11. exit

12. ipsla schedule operation op-num

13. life {forever | seconds}

14. ageout seconds

15. recurring

16. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

17. end

or

commit

18. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type icmp echo

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type icmp echo

Defines an ICMP echo operation type.

Step 4 

vrf vrf-name

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo)# vrf VPN-A

(Optional) Enables the monitoring of a VPN (using a nondefault routing table) in an ICMP echo operation. Maximum length is 32 alphanumeric characters.

Step 5 

destination address ipv4address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo)# destination address 12.25.26.10

Specifies the IP address of the destination for the proper operation type.

Step 6 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo)# frequency 300

(Optional) Sets the rate at which a specified IP SLA operation is sent into the network.

(Optional) Use the seconds argument to specify the number of seconds between the IP SLA operations. Valid values are in the range from 1 to 12604800 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.

Step 7 

datasize request size

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo)# datasize request 512

(Optional) Sets the protocol data size in the payload of the request packet for the specified IP SLA operation.

Use the bytes argument to specify the protocol data size in bytes. The range is from 0 to 16384. The default is 36 bytes for ICMP echo operation.

Step 8 

tos number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo)# tos 1

Defines a type of service (ToS) byte in the IP header of IP SLA operations.

Note The ToS byte can be converted to a Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) value, but you cannot enter the DSCP value directly. To use a DSCP value, multiply it by 4 and enter the result as the value of the number argument.

Step 9 

timeout milliseconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo)# timeout 10000

Sets the time that the IP SLA operation waits for a response from its request packet.

Use the milliseconds argument to specify the number of milliseconds that the operation waits to receive a response.

Step 10 

tag text

Example:
Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo)# tag ipsla

(Optional) Creates a user-specified identifier for an IP SLA operation.

Step 11 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-echo)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits IP SLA operation configuration mode and IP SLA configuration mode. Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 12 

ipsla schedule operation op-num

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 13 

life {forever | seconds}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# life 30

The forever keyword schedules the operation to run indefinitely. The seconds argument schedules the lifetime of the operation, in seconds. The default lifetime of an operation is 3600 seconds (one hour).

Step 14 

ageout seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# ageout 3600

(Optional) Specifies the number of seconds to keep the operation in memory when it is not actively collecting information. The default value of 0 seconds means that the operation never times out.

Step 15 

recurring

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# recurring

(Optional) Specifies that the operation starts automatically at the specified time and for the specified duration every day.

Step 16 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default value is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 17 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 18 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays the current statistics.

Configuring the ICMP Path-echo Operation

The IP SLA ICMP path-echo operation records statistics for each hop along the path that the IP SLA operation takes to reach its destination. The ICMP path-echo operation determines the hop-by-hop response time between a Cisco router and any IP device on the network by discovering the path using the traceroute facility.

The source IP SLA device uses traceroute to discover the path to the destination IP device. A ping is then used to measure the response time between the source IP SLA device and each subsequent hop in the path to the destination IP device.


Note The ICMP path-echo operation does not require the IP SLA Responder to be enabled.


Depending on whether you want to configure and schedule a basic ICMP path-echo operation or configure and schedule an ICMP path-echo operation with optional parameters, perform one of the following procedures:

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic ICMP Echo Operation on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling an ICMP Echo Operation with Optional Parameters on the Source Device

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic ICMP Path-echo Operation on the Source Device

You can enable and schedule an ICMP path-echo operation without any optional parameters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type icmp path-echo

4. destination address ipv4address

5. frequency seconds

6. exit

7. ipsla schedule operation op-num

8. life {forever | seconds}

9. ageout seconds

10. recurring

11. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

12. end

or

commit

13. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type icmp path-echo

Example:
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type icmp 
path-echo

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) #

Defines an ICMP path-echo operation type.

Step 4 

destination address ipv4address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # destination address 12.25.26.10

Specifies the IP address of the destination for the proper operation type.

Step 5 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # frequency 300

(Optional) Sets the rate at which a specified IP SLA operation is sent into the network.

(Optional) Use the seconds argument to specify the number of seconds between the IP SLA operations. Valid values are in the range from 1 to 12604800 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits IP SLA operation configuration mode and IP SLA configuration mode. Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 7 

ipsla schedule operation op-num

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 8 

life {forever | seconds}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# life 30

The forever keyword schedules the operation to run indefinitely. The seconds argument schedules the lifetime of the operation, in seconds. The default lifetime of an operation is 3600 seconds (one hour).

Step 9 

ageout seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# ageout 3600

(Optional) Specifies the number of seconds to keep the operation in memory when it is not actively collecting information. The default value of 0 seconds means that the operation never times out.

Step 10 

recurring

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# recurring

(Optional) Specifies that the operation starts automatically at the specified time and for the specified duration every day.

Step 11 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default value is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 12 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 13 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays the current statistics.

Configuring and Scheduling an ICMP Path-echo Operation with Optional Parameters on the Source Device

You can enable an ICMP path-echo operation on the source device and configure some optional IP SLA parameters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type icmp path-echo

4. vrf vrf-name

5. lsr-path ip-address

6. destination address ipv4address

7. frequency seconds

8. datasize request size

9. tos number

10. timeout milliseconds

11. tag text

12. lsr-path ipaddress1 {ipaddress2 {... {ipaddress8}}}

13. exit

14. ipsla schedule operation op-num

15. life {forever | seconds}

16. ageout seconds

17. recurring

18. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

19. end

or

commit

20. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type icmp path-echo

Example:
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type icmp 
path-echo

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) #

Defines an ICMP path-echo operation type.

Step 4 

vrf vrf-name

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-imcp-path-echo) # vrf VPN-A

(Optional) Enables the monitoring of a VPN (using a nondefault routing table) in an ICMP path-echo operation. Maximum length is 32 alphanumeric characters.

Step 5 

lsr-path ip-address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-imcp-path-echo) # lsr-path 20.25.22.1

Specifies that a loose source routing path is to be used.

Step 6 

destination address ipv4address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # destination address 12.25.26.10

Specifies the IP address of the destination for the proper operation type.

Step 7 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # frequency 300

(Optional) Sets the rate at which a specified IP SLA operation is sent into the network.

(Optional) Use the seconds argument to specify the number of seconds between the IP SLA operations. Valid values are in the range from 1 to 12604800 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.

Step 8 

datasize request size

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # datasize request 512

(Optional) Sets the protocol data size in the payload of the request packet for the specified IP SLA operation.

Use the bytes argument to specify the protocol data size in bytes. The range is from 0 to 16384. The default is 36 bytes.

Step 9 

tos number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # tos 5

Defines a type of service (ToS) byte in the IP header of IP SLA operations.

Note The ToS byte can be converted to a Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) value, but you cannot enter the DSCP value directly. To use a DSCP value, multiply it by 4 and enter the result as the number argument.

Step 10 

timeout milliseconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # timeout 10000

Sets the time that the IP SLA operation waits for a response from its request packet.

Use the milliseconds argument to specify the number of milliseconds that the operation waits to receive a response.

Step 11 

tag text

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # tag ipsla

(Optional) Creates a user-specified identifier for an IP SLA operation.

Step 12 

lsr-path ipaddress1 {ipaddress2 {... {ipaddress8}}}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # lsr-path 20.25.22.1

Specifies the path in which to measure the ICMP echo response time.

(Optional) Use the ip address argument of the intermediate node or nodes in a path to the destination.

Step 13 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-echo) # exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits IP SLA operation configuration mode and IP SLA configuration mode. Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 14 

ipsla schedule operation op-num

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 15 

life {forever | seconds}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# life 1

The forever keyword schedules the operation to run indefinitely. The seconds argument schedules the lifetime of the operation, in seconds. The default lifetime of an operation is 3600 seconds (one hour).

Step 16 

ageout seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# ageout 3600

(Optional) Specifies the number of seconds to keep the operation in memory when it is not actively collecting information. The default value of 0 seconds means that the operation never times out.

Step 17 

recurring

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# recurring

(Optional) Specifies that the operation starts automatically at the specified time and for the specified duration every day.

Step 18 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default value is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 19 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 20 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays the current statistics.

Configuring the ICMP Path-jitter Operation

The IP SLA ICMP path-jitter operation provides hop-by-hop jitter, packet loss, and delay measurement statistics in an IP network. The path-jitter operation functions differently than the standard UDP jitter operation, which provides total one-way data and total round-trip data.

The ICMP path-jitter operation can be used as a supplement to the standard UDP jitter operation. For example, results from the UDP jitter operation can indicate unexpected delays or high jitter values; the ICMP path-jitter operation can then be used to troubleshoot the network path and determine if traffic is bottlenecking in a particular segment along the transmission path.

The operation first discovers the hop-by-hop IP route from the source to the destination using a traceroute utility, and uses ICMP echoes to determine the response times, packet loss and approximate jitter values for each hop along the path. The jitter values obtained using the ICMP path-jitter operation are approximate because they do not account for delays at the target nodes.

The ICMP path-jitter operation functions by tracing the IP path from a source device to a specified destination device, then sending N number of Echo probes to each hop along the traced path, with a time interval of T milliseconds between each Echo probe. The operation as a whole is repeated at a frequency of once every F seconds. The attributes are user-configurable, as described in Table 6.

Table 6 ICMP Path-jitter Operation Parameters 

ICMP Path-jitter Operation Parameter
Default
Configured Using

Number of echo probes (N)

10 echoes

ipsla operation command with the operation-number argument

packet count command with the count argument

Time between Echo probes, in milliseconds (T)

20 ms

ipsla operation command with the operation-number argument

packet interval command with the interval argument

The frequency of how often the operation is repeated (F)

once every 60 seconds

ipsla operation command with the operation-number argument

frequency command with the seconds argument


Depending on whether you want to configure and schedule a basic ICMP path-jitter operation or configure and schedule an ICMP jitter operation with additional parameters, perform one of the following procedures:

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic ICMP Path-jitter Operation

Configuring and Scheduling an ICMP Path-jitter Operation with Additional Parameters

Configuring and Scheduling a Basic ICMP Path-jitter Operation

You can configure and schedule an ICMP path-jitter operation using the general default characteristics for the operation.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type icmp path-jitter

4. destination address ipv4address

5. packet count count

6. packet interval interval

7. frequency seconds

8. exit

9. ipsla schedule operation op-num

10. life {forever | seconds}

11. ageout seconds

12. recurring

13. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

14. end

or

commit

15. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type icmp path-jitter

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type icmp path-jitter

Defines an ICMP path-jitter operation type.

Step 4 

destination address ipv4address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jitter )# destination address 12.25.26.10

Specifies the IP address of the destination for the proper operation type.

Step 5 

packet count count

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jitter )# packet count 30

(Optional) Specifies the number of packets to be transmitted during a probe. For UDP jitter operation, the range is 1 to 60000. For ICMP path-jitter operation, the range is 1 to 100.

The default number of packets sent is 10.

Step 6 

packet interval interval

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jitter )# packet interval 30

(Optional) Specifies the time between packets. The default interval between packets is 20 milliseconds.

Step 7 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jitter )# frequency 300

(Optional) Sets the rate at which a specified IP SLA operation is sent into the network.

(Optional) Use the seconds argument to specify the number of seconds between the IP SLA operations. Valid values are in the range from 1 to 12604800 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.

Step 8 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jitter )# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits IP SLA operation configuration mode and IP SLA configuration mode. Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 9 

ipsla schedule operation op-num

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 10 

life {forever | seconds}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# life 30

The forever keyword schedules the operation to run indefinitely. The seconds argument schedules the lifetime of the operation, in seconds. The default lifetime of an operation is 3600 seconds (one hour).

Step 11 

ageout seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# ageout 3600

(Optional) Specifies the number of seconds to keep the operation in memory when it is not actively collecting information. The default value of 0 seconds means that the operation never times out.

Step 12 

recurring

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# recurring

(Optional) Specifies that the operation starts automatically at the specified time and for the specified duration every day.

Step 13 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

(Optional) Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default value is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 14 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 15 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays the current statistics.

Configuring and Scheduling an ICMP Path-jitter Operation with Additional Parameters

You can enable an ICMP path-echo operation on the source device and configure some optional IP SLA parameters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type icmp path-jitter

4. vrf vrf-name

5. lsr-path ip-address

6. destination address ipv4address

7. packet count count

8. packet interval interval

9. frequency seconds

10. datasize request size

11. tos number

12. timeout milliseconds

13. tag text

14. exit

15. ipsla schedule operation op-num

16. life {forever | seconds}

17. ageout seconds

18. recurring

19. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

20. end

or

commit

21. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type icmp path-jitter

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type icmp path-jitter

Defines an ICMP path-jitter operation type.

Step 4 

vrf vrf-name

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-imcp-path-jit ter)# vrf VPN-A

(Optional) Enables the monitoring of a VPN (using a nondefault routing table) in an ICMP path-jitter operation. Maximum length is 32 alphanumeric characters.

Step 5 

lsr-path ip-address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-imcp-path-jit ter)# lsr-path 20.25.22.1

Specifies that a loose source routing path is to be used.

Step 6 

destination address ipv4address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jit ter)# destination address 12.25.26.10

Specifies the IP address of the destination for the proper operation type.

Step 7 

packet count count

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jit ter)# packet count 30

(Optional) Specifies the number of packets to be transmitted during a probe. For UDP jitter operation, the range is 1 to 60000. For ICMP path-jitter operation, the range is 1 to 100.

The default number of packets sent is 10.

Step 8 

packet interval interval

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jit ter)# packet interval 30

(Optional) Specifies the time between packets. The default interval between packets is 20 milliseconds

Step 9 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jit ter)# frequency 300

(Optional) Sets the rate at which a specified IP SLA operation is sent into the network.

(Optional) Use the seconds argument to specify the number of seconds between the IP SLA operations. Valid values are in the range from 1 to 12604800 seconds. The default is 60 seconds.

Step 10 

datasize request size

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jit ter)# datasize request 512

(Optional) Sets the protocol data size in the payload of the request packet for the specified IP SLA operation.

Use the size argument to specify the protocol data size in bytes. The default for jitter is 36 bytes. The range is 0 to 16384 bytes.

Step 11 

tos number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jit ter)# tos 1

Defines a type of service (ToS) byte in the IP header of IP SLA operations.

Note The ToS byte can be converted to a Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) value, but you cannot enter the DSCP value directly. To use a DSCP value, multiply it by 4 and enter the result as the number argument.

Step 12 

timeout milliseconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jit ter)# timeout 10000

Sets the time that the IP SLA operation waits for a response from its request packet.

Use the milliseconds argument to specify the number of milliseconds that the operation waits to receive a response.

Step 13 

tag text

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jit ter)# tag ipsla

(Optional) Creates a user-specified identifier for an IP SLA operation.

Step 14 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-icmp-path-jit ter)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits IP SLA operation configuration mode and IP SLA configuration mode. Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 15 

ipsla schedule operation op-num

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 16 

life {forever | seconds}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# life 30

The forever keyword schedules the operation to run indefinitely. The seconds argument schedules the lifetime of the operation, in seconds. The default lifetime of an operation is 3600 seconds (one hour).

Step 17 

ageout seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# ageout 3600

(Optional) Specifies the number of seconds to keep the operation in memory when it is not actively collecting information. The default value of 0 seconds means that the operation never times out.

Step 18 

recurring

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# recurring

(Optional) Specifies that the operation starts automatically at the specified time and for the specified duration every day.

Step 19 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default value is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 20 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 21 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays the current statistics.

Configuring IP SLA MPLS LSP Ping and Trace Operations

The MPLS LSP ping and trace operations allow service providers to monitor label switched paths (LSPs) and quickly isolate MPLS forwarding problems. Use these IP SLA operations to troubleshoot network connectivity between a source router and a target router. To test LSPs, the MPLS LSP ping and trace operations send echo request packets and receive echo reply packets.

To configure and schedule an MPLS LSP ping or trace operation, perform one of the following tasks:

Configuring and Scheduling an MPLS LSP Ping Operation

Configuring and Scheduling an MPLS LSP Trace Operation

Configuring and Scheduling an MPLS LSP Ping Operation

An MPLS LSP ping operation tests connectivity between routers along an LSP path in an MPLS network by sending an echo request (User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packet) to the end of the LSP, and receiving an echo reply back that contains diagnostic data.

The MPLS echo request packet is sent to a target router through the use of the appropriate label stack associated with the LSP to be validated. Use of the label stack causes the packet to be forwarded over the LSP itself.

The destination IP address of the MPLS echo request packet is different from the address used to select the label stack. The destination IP address is defined as a 127.x.y.z/8 address. The 127.x.y.z/8 address prevents the IP packet from being IP switched to its destination if the LSP is broken.

An MPLS echo reply is sent in response to an MPLS echo request. The reply is sent as an IP packet and it is forwarded using IP, MPLS, or a combination of both types of switching. The source address of the MPLS echo reply packet is an address obtained from the router generating the echo reply. The destination address is the source address of the router that originated the MPLS echo request packet. The MPLS echo reply destination port is set to the echo request source port.

The MPLS LSP ping operation verifies LSP connectivity by using one of the supported Forwarding Equivalence Class (FEC) entities between the ping origin and egress node of each FEC. The following FEC types are supported for an MPLS LSP ping operation:

LDP IPv4 prefixes (configured with the target ipv4 command)

MPLS TE tunnels (configured with the target traffic-eng tunnel command)

Pseudowire (configured with the target pseudowire command)

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type mpls lsp ping

4. output interface type interface-path-id

5. target {ipv4 destination-address destination-mask | traffic-eng tunnel tunnel-interface | pseudowire destination-address circuit-id}

6. lsp selector ipv4 ip-address

7. force explicit-null

8. reply dscp dscp-bits

9. reply mode {control-channel | router-alert}

10. exp exp-bits

11. ttl time-to-live

12. exit

13. ipsla schedule operation operation-number

14. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

15. end

or

commit

16. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Configures an IP SLA operation and specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type mpls lsp ping

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type mpls lsp ping

Configures an MPLS LSP ping operation and enters IP SLA MPLS LSP Ping configuration mode.

Step 4 

output interface type interface-path-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# output interface pos 0/1/0/0

(Optional) Configures the echo request output interface to be used for LSP ping operations.

Note You cannot use the output interface command if pseudowire is specified as the target to be used in an MPLS LSP ping operation

Step 5 

target {ipv4 destination-address destination-mask | traffic-eng tunnel tunnel-interface |
pseudowire destination-address circuit-id}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# target ipv4 10.25.26.10 255.255.255.255

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# target ipv4 10.25.26.10/32

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# target traffic-eng tunnel 12

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# target pseudowire 192.168.1.4 4211

Specifies the target destination of the MPLS LSP ping operation as a LDP IPv4 address, MPLS traffic engineering tunnel, or pseudowire.

Step 6 

lsp selector ipv4 ip-address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# lsp selector ipv4 127.0.0.2

(Optional) Specifies the local host IPv4 address used to select the LSP in an MPLS LSP ping operation.

Step 7 

force explicit-null

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# force explicit-null

(Optional) Adds an explicit null label to the label stack of an LSP when an echo request is sent.

Step 8 

reply dscp dscp-bits

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# reply dscp 2

(Optional) Specifies the differentiated services codepoint (DSCP) value to be used in echo reply packets.Valid values are from 0 to 63.

Reserved keywords such as EF (expedited forwarding) and AF11 (assured forwarding class AF11) can be specified instead of numeric values.

Step 9 

reply mode {control-channel | router-alert}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# reply mode router-alert

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# reply mode control-channel

(Optional) Sets echo requests to send echo reply packets by way of a control channel in an MPLS LSP ping operation, or to reply as an IPv4 UDP packet with IP router alert. The router-alert reply mode forces an echo reply packet to be specially handled by the transit LSR router at each intermediate hop as it moves back to the destination.

Note The control-channel keyword can be used only if the target is set to pseudowire.

Step 10 

exp exp-bits

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# exp 5

(Optional) Specifies the MPLS experimental field (EXP) value to be used in the header of echo reply packets. Valid values are from 0 to 7.

Step 11 

ttl time-to-live

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# ttl 200

(Optional) Specifies the time-to-live (TTL) value used in the MPLS label of echo request packets. Valid values are from 1 to 255.

Step 12 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits IP SLA MPLS LSP Ping configuration mode and IP SLA configuration mode. Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 13 

ipsla schedule operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 14 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default value is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 15 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 16 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays IP SLA statistics for the current MPLS LSP ping operation.

Configuring and Scheduling an MPLS LSP Trace Operation

An MPLS LSP trace operation traces the hop-by-hop route of LSP paths to a target router in an MPLS network by sending echo requests (UDP packets) to the control plane of each transit label switching router (LSR). A transit LSR performs various checks to determine if it is a transit LSR for the LSP path. A trace operation allows you to troubleshoot network connectivity and localize faults hop-by-hop.

Echo request and reply packets validate the LSP. The success of an MPLS LSP trace operation depends on the transit router processing the MPLS echo request when it receives a labeled packet.

The transit router returns an MPLS echo reply containing information about the transit hop in response to any time-to-live (TTL)-expired MPLS packet or LSP breakage. The destination port of the MPLS echo reply is set to the echo request source port.

In an MPLS LSP trace operation, each transit LSR returns information related to the type of Forwarding Equivalence Class (FEC) entity that is being traced. This information allows the trace operation to check if the local forwarding information matches what the routing protocols determine as the LSP path.

An MPLS label is bound to a packet according to the type of FEC used for the LSP. The following FEC types are supported for an MPLS LSP trace operation:

LDP IPv4 prefixes (configured with the target ipv4 command)

MPLS TE tunnels (configured with the target traffic-eng tunnel command)

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla operation operation-number

3. type mpls lsp trace

4. output interface type interface-path-id

5. target {ipv4 destination-address destination-mask | traffic-eng tunnel tunnel-interface}

6. lsp selector ipv4 ip-address

7. force explicit-null

8. reply dscp dscp-bits

9. reply mode router-alert

10. exp exp-bits

11. ttl time-to-live

12. exit

13. ipsla schedule operation operation-number

14. start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

15. end

or

commit

16. show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla operation 432

Configures an IP SLA operation and specifies the operation number. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

type mpls lsp trace

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# type mpls lsp trace

Configures an MPLS LSP trace operation and enters IP SLA MPLS LSP Trace configuration mode.

Step 4 

output interface type interface-path-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-ping)# output interface pos 0/1/0/0

(Optional) Configures the echo request output interface to be used for LSP trace operations.

Step 5 

target ipv4 destination-address destination-mask

or

target traffic-eng tunnel tunnel-interface

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# target ipv4 10.25.26.10 255.255.255.255

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# target ipv4 10.25.26.10/32

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# target traffic-eng tunnel 12

Specifies the target destination of the MPLS LSP trace operation as an LDP IPv4 address or MPLS traffic engineering tunnel.

Step 6 

lsp selector ipv4 ip-address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# lsp selector ipv4 127.0.0.2

(Optional) Specifies the local host IPv4 address used to select the LSP in the MPLS LSP ping operation.

Step 7 

force explicit-null

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# force explicit-null

(Optional) Adds an explicit null label to the label stack of an LSP when an echo request is sent.

Step 8 

reply dscp dscp-bits

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# reply dscp 2

(Optional) Specifies the differentiated services codepoint (DSCP) value to be used in echo reply packets.Valid values are from 0 to 63.

Reserved keywords such as EF (expedited forwarding) and AF11 (assured forwarding class AF11) can be specified instead of numeric values.

Step 9 

reply mode router-alert

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# reply mode router-alert

(Optional) Sets echo requests to reply as an IPv4 UDP packet with IP router alert. The router-alert reply mode forces an echo reply packet to be specially handled by the transit LSR router at each intermediate hop as it moves back to the destination.

Step 10 

exp exp-bits

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# exp 5

(Optional) Specifies the MPLS experimental field (EXP) value to be used in the header of echo reply packets. Valid values are from 0 to 7.

Step 11 

ttl time-to-live

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# ttl 20

(Optional) Specifies the time-to-live (TTL) value used in the MPLS label of echo request packets. Valid values are from 1 to 255.

Step 12 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-lsp-trace)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-op)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# exit

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)#

Exits IP SLA MPLS LSP Trace configuration mode and IP SLA configuration mode. Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 13 

ipsla schedule operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla schedule operation 432

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)#

Schedules the start time of the operation. You can configure a basic schedule.

Step 14 

start-time [hh:mm:ss {day | month day} | now | pending | after hh:mm:ss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# start-time 01:00:00

Specifies a time for the operation to start. The following keywords are described:

(Optional) Use the pending keyword to configure the operation to remain in a pending (unstarted) state. The default value is inactive. If the start-time command is not specified, no information is collected until the start time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs an immediate start.

(Optional) Use the now keyword to indicate that the operation should start immediately.

(Optional) Use the after keyword and associated arguments to specify the time after which the operation starts collecting information.

Step 15 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-sched)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Step 16 

show ipsla statistics [operation-number]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show ipsla statistics 432

Displays the current IP SLA statistics for the trace operation.

Configuring IP SLA Reactions and Threshold Monitoring

If you want IP SLA to set some threshold and inform you of a threshold violation, the ipsla reaction operation command and the ipsla reaction trigger command are required. Perform the following procedures to configure IP SLA reactions and threshold monitoring:

Configuring Monitored Elements for IP SLA Reactions

Configuring Threshold Violation Types for IP SLA Reactions

Specifying Reaction Events

Configuring Monitored Elements for IP SLA Reactions

IP SLA reactions are configured to be triggered when a monitored value exceeds or falls below a specified level or a monitored event (for example, timeout or connection-loss) occurs. These monitored values and events are called monitored elements. You can configure the conditions for a reaction to occur in a particular operation.

The types of monitored elements that are available are presented in the following sections:

Configuring Triggers for Connection-Loss Violations

Configuring Triggers for Jitter Violations

Configuring Triggers for Packet Loss Violations

Configuring Triggers for Round-Trip Violations

Configuring Triggers for Timeout Violations

Configuring Triggers for Verify Error Violations

Configuring Triggers for Connection-Loss Violations

You can configure a reaction if there is a connection-loss for the monitored operation.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [connection-loss]

4. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [connection-loss]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react connection-loss

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies an element to be monitored for a reaction.

Use the connection-loss keyword to specify a reaction that occurs if there is a connection-loss for the monitored operation.

Step 4 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Configuring Triggers for Jitter Violations

Jitter values are computed as source-to-destination and destination-to-source values. Events, for example, traps, can be triggered when the jitter value in either direction or both directions rises above a specified threshold or falls below a specified threshold. You can configure jitter-average as a monitored element.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest}]

4. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest}]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react jitter-average

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies an element to be monitored for a reaction.

A reaction occurs if the average round-trip jitter value violates the upper threshold or lower threshold. The following options are listed for the jitter-average keyword:

dest-to-source—Specifies the jitter average destination to source (DS).

source-to-dest—Specifies the jitter average source to destination (SD).

Step 4 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Configuring Triggers for Packet Loss Violations

Packet-loss values are computed as source-to-destination and destination-to-source values. Events, for example, traps, can be triggered when the packet-loss values in either direction rise above a specified threshold or fall below a specified threshold. Perform this task to configure packet-loss as a monitored element.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest]]

4. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest]]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react packet-loss dest-to-source

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies an element to be monitored for a reaction.

The reaction on packet loss value violation is specified. The following options are listed for the packet-loss keyword:

dest-to-source—Specifies the packet loss destination to source (DS) violation.

source-to-dest—Specifies the packet loss source to destination (SD) violation.

Step 4 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Configuring Triggers for Round-Trip Violations

Round-trip time (RTT) is a monitored value of all IP SLA operations. Events, for example, traps, can be triggered when the rtt value rises above a specified threshold or falls below a specified threshold. You can configure rtt as a monitored element.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [rtt]

4. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [rtt]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react rtt

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies an element to be monitored for a reaction.

Use the rtt keyword to specify a reaction that occurs if the round-trip value violates the upper threshold or lower threshold.

Step 4 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Configuring Triggers for Timeout Violations

You can configure triggers for timeout violations.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [timeout]

4. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [timeout]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react timeout

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies an element to be monitored for a reaction.

Use the timeout keyword to specify a reaction that occurs if there is a timeout for the monitored operation.

Step 4 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Configuring Triggers for Verify Error Violations

You can specify a reaction if there is an error verification violation.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [verify-error]

4. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [verify-error]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react verify-error

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies an element to be monitored for a reaction.

Use the verify-error keyword to specify a reaction that occurs if there is an error verification violation.

Step 4 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Configuring Threshold Violation Types for IP SLA Reactions

For each monitored element, you can specify:

Condition to check for the threshold value.

Pattern of occurrences of the condition that can generate the reaction, such as a threshold type.

For example, you can specify that a reaction can occur for a particular element as soon as you observe the condition of interest by using the threshold type immediate command or when you observe the condition for three consecutive times by using the threshold type consecutive command.

The type of threshold defines the type of threshold violation (or combination of threshold violations) that triggers an event. Table 7 lists the threshold violation types.

Table 7 Threshold Violation Types for IP SLA Reactions 

Type of Threshold Violation
Description

consecutive

Triggers an event only after a violation occurs a number of times consecutively. For example, the consecutive violation type can be used to configure an action to occur after a timeout occurs five times in a row or when the round-trip time exceeds the upper threshold value five times in a row. For more information, see "Generating Events for Consecutive Violations".

immediate

Triggers an event immediately when the value for a reaction type (such as response time) exceeds the upper threshold value or falls below the lower threshold value or when a timeout, connection-loss, or verify-error event occurs. For more information, see "Generating Events for Each Violation".

X of Y

Triggers an event after some number (X) of violations within some other number (Y) of probe operations (X of Y). For more information, see "Generating Events for X of Y Violations".

averaged

Triggers an event when the averaged totals of a value for X number of probe operations exceeds the specified upper-threshold value or falls below the lower-threshold value. For more information, see "Generating Events for Averaged Violations".


Generating Events for Each Violation

You can generate a trap or trigger another operation each time a specified condition is met.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [connection-loss | jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest} | packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest] | rtt | timeout | verify-error]

4. threshold type immediate

5. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [connection-loss | jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest} | packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest] | rtt | timeout | verify-error]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react timeout

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies an element to be monitored for a reaction.

A reaction is specified if there is a timeout for the monitored operation.

Step 4 

threshold type immediate

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# threshold type immediate

Takes action immediately upon a threshold violation.

Step 5 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Generating Events for Consecutive Violations

You can generate a trap or trigger another operation after a certain number of consecutive violations.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [connection-loss | jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest} | packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest] | rtt | timeout | verify-error]

4. threshold type consecutive occurrences

5. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [connection-loss | jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest} | packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest] | rtt | timeout | verify-error]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react connection-loss

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies an element to be monitored for a reaction.

A reaction is specified if there is a connection-loss for the monitored operation.

Step 4 

threshold type consecutive occurrences

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# threshold type consecutive 8

Takes action after a number of consecutive violations. When the reaction condition is set for a consecutive number of occurrences, there is no default value. The number of occurrences is set when specifying the threshold type. The number of consecutive violations is from 1 to 16.

Step 5 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Generating Events for X of Y Violations

You can generate a trap or trigger another operation after some number (X) of violations within some other number (Y) of probe operations (X of Y). The react command with the rtt keyword is used as an example.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [connection-loss | jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest} | packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest] | rtt | timeout | verify-error]

4. threshold type xofy X value Y value

5. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [connection-loss | jitter-average 
{dest-to-source | source-to-dest} | packet-loss 
[dest-to-source | source-to-dest] | rtt | timeout | 
verify-error]
Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react rtt

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies that a reaction occurs if the round-trip value violates the upper threshold or lower threshold.

Step 4 

threshold type xofy X value Y value
Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# threshold type xofy 7 7

When the reaction condition, such as threshold violations, are met for the monitored element after some x number of violations within some other y number of probe operations (for example, x of y), the action is performed as defined by the action command. The default is 5 for both x value and y value; for example, xofy 5 5. The valid range for each value is from 1 to 16.

Step 5 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Generating Events for Averaged Violations

You can generate a trap or trigger another operation when the averaged totals of X number of probe operations violate a falling threshold or rising threshold.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [connection-loss | jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest} | packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest] | rtt | timeout | verify-error]

4. threshold type average number-of-probes

5. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [connection-loss | jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest} | packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest] | rtt | timeout | verify-error]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react packet-loss dest-to-source

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies an element to be monitored for a reaction.

The reaction on packet loss value violation is specified. The following options are listed for the packet-loss keyword:

dest-to-source—Specifies the packet loss destination to source (DS) violation.

source-to-dest—Specifies the packet loss source to destination (SD) violation.

Step 4 

threshold type average number-of-probes

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# threshold type average 8

Takes action on average values to violate a threshold.

Step 5 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Specifying Reaction Events

When a reaction condition is detected, you can configure the type of action that occurs by using the action command. The following types of actions are configured:

logging—When the logging keyword is configured, a message is generated to the console to indicate that a reaction has occurred.

trigger—When the trigger keyword is configured, one or more other operations can be started. As a result, you can control which operations can be started with the ipsla reaction trigger op1 op2 command. This command indicates when op1 generates an action type trigger and operation op2 can be started.

You can specify reaction events. The react command with the connection-loss keyword is used as an example.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla reaction operation operation-number

3. react [connection-loss | jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest} | packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest] | rtt | timeout | verify-error]

4. action [logging | trigger]

5. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla reaction operation operation-number

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla reaction operation 432

Configures certain actions that are based on events under the control of the IP SLA agent. The operation-number argument is the number of the IP SLA operations for the reactions that are configured. The range is from 1 to 2048.

Step 3 

react [connection-loss | jitter-average {dest-to-source | source-to-dest} | packet-loss [dest-to-source | source-to-dest] | rtt | timeout | verify-error]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react)# react connection-loss

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)#

Specifies a reaction if there is a connection-loss for the monitored operation.

Step 4 

action [logging | trigger]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# action logging

Specifies what action or combination of actions the operation performs when you configure the react command or when threshold events occur. The following action types are described:

logging—Sends a logging message when the specified violation type occurs for the monitored element. The IP SLA agent generates a syslog and informs SNMP. Then, it is up to the SNMP agent to generate a trap or not.

trigger—Determines that the operational state of one or more operations makes the transition from pending to active when the violation conditions are met. The target operations to be triggered are specified using the ipsla reaction trigger command. A target operation continues until its life expires, as specified by lifetime value of the target operation. A triggered target operation must finish its life before it can be triggered again.

Step 5 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-react-cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them 
before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Configuring the MPLS LSP Monitoring Instance on a Source PE Router

Perform this task to configure the operation parameters for an MPLS LSP monitor (MPLSLM) instance. The IP SLA measurement statistics are stored on the source PE router.

To configure an MPLS LSP monitor ping or trace instance, perform one of the following tasks:

Configuring an MPLS LSP Monitoring Ping Instance

Configuring an MPLS LSP Monitoring Trace Instance

Configuring an MPLS LSP Monitoring Ping Instance

Restrictions

MPLS LSP monitoring is configured on a PE router.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla

3. mpls discovery vpn

4. interval minutes

5. exit

6. mpls lsp-monitor

7. monitor monitor-id

8. type mpls lsp ping

9. vrf vrf-name

10. scan interval scan-interval

11. scan delete-factor factor-value

12. timeout milliseconds

13. datasize request size

14. lsp selector ipv4 ip-address

15. force explicit-null

16. reply dscp dscp-bits

17. reply mode router-alert

18. ttl time-to-live

19. tag text

20. exp exp-bits

21. statistics hourly [buckets hours]

22. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla

Enters IP SLA configuration mode and configures IP service level agreements.

Step 3 

mpls discovery vpn

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# mpls discovery vpn

(Optional) Enters MPLS VPN BGP next-hop neighbor discovery configuration mode.

Step 4 

interval minutes

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-
discovery-vpn)# interval 120

(Optional) Specifies the time interval at which routing entries that are no longer valid are removed from the BGP next-hop neighbor discovery database of an MPLS VPN. The default time interval is 60 minutes.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-
discovery-vpn)# exit

Exits MPLS discovery VPN configuration mode.

Step 6 

mpls lsp-monitor

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# mpls lsp-monitor

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm)#

Enters MPLS LSP monitor mode. From this mode you can configure an LSP monitor instance, configure a reaction for an LSP monitor instance, or schedule an LSP monitor instance.

Step 7 

monitor monitor-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm)# monitor 1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-def)#

Configures an MPLS LSP monitor instance and enters IP SLA MPLS LSP monitor configuration mode.

Step 8 

type mpls lsp ping

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-def)# type mpls lsp ping

Automatically creates an MPLS LSP ping operation for each discovered BGP next-hop address and enters the corresponding configuration mode to configure the parameters.

Step 9 

vrf vrf-name

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# vrf SANJOSE

(Optional) Enables the monitoring of a specific Virtual Private Network (VPN) routing and forwarding (VRF) instance in the ping operation. If no VRF is specified, the MPLS LSP monitoring instance monitors all VRFs.

Step 10 

scan interval scan-interval

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# scan interval 300

(Optional) Specifies the time interval (in minutes) at which the MPLS LSP monitor instance checks the scan queue for BGP next-hop neighbor updates. The default time interval is 240 minutes.

At each interval, a new IP SLA operation is automatically created for each newly discovered BGP next-hop neighbor listed in the MPLS LSP monitor instance scan queue.

Step 11 

scan delete-factor factor-value

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# scan delete-factor 2

(Optional) Specifies the number of times the MPLS LSP monitor instance should check the scan queue before automatically deleting IP SLA operations for BGP next-hop neighbors that are no longer valid.

The default scan factor is 1. In other words, each time the MPLS LSP monitor instance checks the scan queue for updates, it deletes IP SLA operations for BGP next-hop neighbors that are no longer valid.

If the scan factor is set to 0, IP SLA operations are never deleted by the MPLS LSP monitor instance. We do not recommend this configuration.

Step 12 

timeout milliseconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# timeout 50000

(Optional) Specifies the amount of time that each MPLS LSP operation waits for a response from the LSP verification (LSPV) server. The default value is 5000 milliseconds.

Step 13 

datasize request size

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# datasize request 512

(Optional) Specifies the payload size of the MPLS LSP echo request packets. The default value is 100 bytes.

Note This command is available in MPLS LSP ping mode only.

Step 14 

lsp selector ipv4 ip-address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# lsp selector ipv4 127.10.10.1

(Optional) Specifies a local host IP address (127.x.x.x) that is used to select the label switched path (LSP) from among multiple LSPs. The default value is 127.0.0.1.

Step 15 

force explicit-null

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# force explicit-null

(Optional) Specifies whether an explicit null label is added to the label stack of MPLS LSP echo request packets. This is disabled by default.

Step 16 

reply dscp dscp-bits

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# reply dscp 5

(Optional) Specifies the differentiated services codepoint (DSCP) value to be used in the IP header of MPLS LSP echo reply packets.

Step 17 

reply mode router-alert

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# reply mode router-alert

(Optional) Enables the use of the router alert option in MPLS LSP echo reply packets. This is disabled by default.

Step 18 

ttl time-to-live

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# ttl 200

(Optional) Specifies the maximum hop count for an echo request packet to be used for MPLS LSP operations. The default value is 255.

Step 19 

tag text

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# tag mplslm-tag

(Optional) Creates a user-specified identifier for MPLS LSP operations.

Step 20 

exp exp-bits

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# exp 7

(Optional) Specifes the experimental field value to be used in the MPLS header of MPLS LSP echo request packets. The default value is 0.

Step 21 

statistics hourly [buckets hours]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# statistics hourly buckets 2

(Optional) Specifies the statistics collection parameters for the operations in the MPLS LSP monitoring instance. The default number of hours is 2.

Step 22 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

What to Do Next

Configure the reaction conditions.

Schedule the MPLS LSP monitoring instance operations.

Configuring an MPLS LSP Monitoring Trace Instance

Restrictions

MPLS LSP monitoring is configured on a PE router.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla

3. mpls discovery vpn

4. interval minutes

5. exit

6. mpls lsp-monitor

7. monitor monitor-id

8. type mpls lsp trace

9. vrf vrf-name

10. scan interval scan-interval

11. scan delete-factor factor-value

12. timeout milliseconds

13. lsp selector ipv4 ip-address

14. force explicit-null

15. reply dscp dscp-bits

16. reply mode router-alert

17. ttl time-to-live

18. tag text

19. exp exp-bits

20. statistics hourly [buckets hours]

21. end

or

commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla

Enters IP SLA configuration mode and configures IP service level agreements.

Step 3 

mpls discovery vpn

Example:

v:router(config-ipsla)# mpls discovery vpn

(Optional) Enables MPLS VPN BGP next-hop neighbor discovery.

Step 4 

interval minutes

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-
discovery-vpn)# interval 120

(Optional) Specifies the time interval at which routing entries that are no longer valid are removed from the BGP next-hop neighbor discovery database of an MPLS VPN. The default time interval is 60 minutes.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mpls-
discovery-vpn)# exit

Exits MPLS discovery VPN configuration mode.

Step 6 

mpls lsp-monitor

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# mpls lsp-monitor

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm)#

Enters MPLS LSP monitor mode. From this mode you can configure an LSP monitor instance, configure a reaction for an LSP monitor instance, or schedule an LSP monitor instance.

Step 7 

monitor monitor-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm)# monitor 1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-def)#

Configures an MPLS LSP monitor instance and enters IP SLA MPLS LSP monitor configuration mode.

Step 8 

type mpls lsp trace

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplsm-def)# type mpls lsp trace

Automatically creates an MPLS LSP trace operation for each discovered BGP next-hop address and enters the corresponding configuration mode to configure the parameters.

Step 9 

vrf vrf-name

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# vrf SANJOSE

(Optional) Enables the monitoring of a specific Virtual Private Network (VPN) routing and forwarding (VRF) instance in the traceroute operation. If no VRF is specified, the MPLS LSP monitoring instance monitors all VRFs.

Step 10 

scan interval scan-interval

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# scan interval 300

(Optional) Specifies the time interval (in minutes) at which the MPLS LSP monitor instance checks the scan queue for BGP next-hop neighbor updates. The default time interval is 240 minutes.

At each interval, a new IP SLA operation is automatically created for each newly discovered BGP next-hop neighbor listed in the MPLS LSP monitor instance scan queue.

Step 11 

scan delete-factor factor-value

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# scan delete-factor 2

(Optional) Specifies the number of times the MPLS LSP monitor instance should check the scan queue before automatically deleting IP SLA operations for BGP next-hop neighbors that are no longer valid.

The default scan factor is 1. In other words, each time the MPLS LSP monitor instance checks the scan queue for updates, it deletes IP SLA operations for BGP next-hop neighbors that are no longer valid.

If the scan factor is set to 0, IP SLA operations are never deleted by the MPLS LSP monitor instance. We do not recommend this configuration.

Step 12 

timeout milliseconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# timeout 50000

(Optional) Specifies the amount of time that each MPLS LSP operation waits for a response from the LSP verification (LSPV) server. The default value is 5000 milliseconds.

Step 13 

lsp selector ipv4 ip-address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# lsp selector ipv4 127.10.10.1

(Optional) Specifies a local host IP address (127.x.x.x) that is used to select the label switched path (LSP) from among multiple LSPs. The default value is 127.0.0.1.

Step 14 

force explicit-null

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsl a-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# force explicit-null

(Optional) Specifies whether an explicit null label is added to the label stack of MPLS LSP echo request packets. This is disabled by default.

Step 15 

reply dscp dscp-bits

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# reply dscp 5

(Optional) Specifies the differentiated services codepoint (DSCP) value to be used in the IP header of MPLS LSP echo reply packets.

Step 16 

reply mode router-alert

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# reply mode router-alert

(Optional) Enables the use of the router alert option in MPLS LSP echo reply packets. This is disabled by default.

Step 17 

ttl time-to-live

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# ttl 40

(Optional) Specifies the maximum hop count for an echo request packet to be used for MPLS LSP operations. The default value is 30.

Step 18 

tag text

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# tag mplslm-tag

(Optional) Creates a user-specified identifier for MPLS LSP operations.

Step 19 

exp exp-bits

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# exp 7

(Optional) Specifies the experimental field value to be used in the MPLS header of MPLS LSP echo request packets. The default value is 0.

Step 20 

statistics hourly [buckets hours]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# statistics hourly buckets 2

(Optional) Specifies the statistics collection parameters for the operations in the MPLS LSP monitoring instance. The default number of hours is 2.

Step 21 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
trace)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

What to Do Next

Configure the reaction conditions.

Schedule the MPLS LSP monitoring instance operations.

Configuring the Reaction Conditions for an MPLS LSP Monitoring Instance on a Source PE Router

Perform this task to configure the reaction conditions for an MPLS LSP monitoring instance.

Prerequisites

The MPLS LSP monitoring instance should be defined before you configure the reaction conditions.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla

3. mpls lsp-monitor

4. reaction monitor monitor-id

5. react {connection-loss | timeout}

6. action logging

7. threshold type {consecutive occurrences | immediate}

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla

Enters IP SLA configuration mode and configures IP service level agreements.

Step 3 

mpls lsp-monitor

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# mpls lsp-monitor

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm)#

Enters MPLS LSP monitor mode. From this mode you can configure an LSP monitor instance, configure a reaction for an LSP monitor instance, or schedule an LSP monitor instance.

Step 4 

reaction monitor monitor-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm)# reaction monitor 2

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-react )#

Configures an MPLS LSP monitor instance reaction and enters IP SLA MPLS LSP monitor reaction configuration mode.

Step 5 

react {connection-loss | timeout}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-
react)# react connection-loss

Specifies that a reaction occurs if there is a one-way connection loss or timeout for the monitored operation. The reaction applies when the condition comes up for any of the automatically created operations.

Step 6 

action logging

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-react -cond)# action logging

Specifies that an event be logged as a result of the reaction condition and threshold.

Step 7 

threshold type {consecutive occurrences | immediate}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-react -cond)# threshold type consecutive

Specifies that the designated action is taken after the specified number of consecutive violations or immediately. The valid range of occurrences is 1 to 16.

Step 8 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-react -cond)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-react -cond)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

What to Do Next

Schedule the MPLS LSP monitoring instance operations.

Scheduling an MPLS LSP Monitoring Instance on a Source PE Router

Perform this task to schedule the operations in an MPLS LSP monitoring instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla

3. mpls lsp-monitor

4. schedule monitor monitor-id

5. frequency seconds

6. schedule period seconds

7. start-time hh:mm:ss [day | month day]

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla

Enters IP SLA configuration mode and configures IP service level agreements.

Step 3 

mpls lsp-monitor

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# mpls lsp-monitor

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm)#

Enters MPLS LSP monitor mode. From this mode you can configure an LSP monitor instance, configure a reaction for an LSP monitor instance, or schedule an LSP monitor instance.

Step 4 

schedule monitor monitor-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm)# schedule monitor 2

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-
sched)#

Enters IP SLA MPLS LSP monitor schedule configuration mode to schedule the MPLS LSP monitor instance.

Step 5 

frequency seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-
sched)# frequency 600

(Optional) Specifies the frequency at which the schedule period is run. The default value is same as schedule period. The schedule period is specified using the schedule period command. You must specify this value before scheduling an MPLS LSP monitor instance start time.

Step 6 

schedule period seconds

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-sched )# schedule period 300

Specifies the amount of time, in seconds, during which all of the operations are scheduled to run. All operations are scheduled equally spaced throughout the schedule period.

Use the frequency command to specify how often the entire set of operations is performed. The frequency value must be greater than or equal to the schedule period.

You must specify this value before scheduling an MPLS LSP monitor instance start time.

Step 7 

start-time hh:mm:ss [day | month day]

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-sched )# start-time 11:45:00 July 4

Specifies the time when the MPLS LSP monitor instance starts collecting information. You must specify the scheduled time; otherwise, no information is collected.

Step 8 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-sched )# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-sched )# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

LSP Path Discovery

Perform this task to configure the LSP Path Discovery (LPD) and its required parameters, including echo interval, path, and scan.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. ipsla

3. mpls lsp-monitor

4. monitor monitor-id

5. type mpls lsp ping

6. path discover

7. echo interval time

8. echo maximum lsp selector ipv4 host address

9. echo multipath bitmap-size size

10. echo retry count

11. echo timeout value

12. path retry range

13. path secondary frequency {both | connection-loss | timeout} value}

14. scan period value

15. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipsla

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipsla

Enters IP SLA configuration mode and configures IP service level agreements.

Step 3 

mpls lsp-monitor

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla)# mpls lsp-monitor

Enters MPLS LSP monitor mode. From this mode you can configure an LSP monitor instance, configure a reaction for an LSP monitor instance, or schedule an LSP monitor instance.

Step 4 

monitor monitor-id

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm)# monitor 2

Configures an MPLS LSP monitor instance.

Step 5 

type mpls lsp ping

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-def)# type mpls lsp ping

Verifies the end-to-end connectivity of a label switched path (LSP) and the integrity of an MPLS network.

Step 6 

path discover

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
ping)# path discover

Enables LSP path discovery.

Step 7 

echo interval time

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
lpd)# echo interval 777

Configures the interval (in milliseconds) between MPLS LSP echo requests sent during path discovery. Range is 0 to 3600000. Default is 0.

Step 8 

echo maximum lsp selector ipv4 host address

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
lpd)# echo maximum lsp selector ipv4 host_one 127.100.100.100

Configures a local host IP address (127.x.x.x) that is the maximum selector value to be used during path discovery. Default is 127.255.255.255.

Step 9 

echo multipath bitmap-size size

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
lpd)# echo multipath bitmap-size 50

Configures the maximum number of selectors sent in the downstream mapping of an MPLS LSP echo request during path discovery. Range is 1 to 256. Default is 32.

Step 10 

echo retry count

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
lpd)# echo retry 3

Configures the number of timeout retry attempts for MPLS LSP echo requests sent during path discovery. Range is 0 to 10. Default is 3.

Step 11 

echo timeout value

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
lpd)# echo timeout 300

Configures the timeout value for echo requests during path discovery. Range is 0 to 3600 in milliseconds. Default is 5.

Step 12 

path retry range

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
lpd)# path retry 12

Configures MPLS LSP path retry range. Range is 1 to 16. Default is 1.

Step 13 

path secondary frequency {both | connection-loss | timeout} value}

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
lpd)# path secondary frequency both 600

Enables secondary frequency for:

Both timeout and connection loss

Only connection loss

Only timeout

Note There is no default value.

Step 14 

scan period value

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
lpd)# scan period 60

Configures MPLS LSP scan time period value. Range is 0 to 7200 minutes. Default is 5.

Step 15 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
lpd)# end

or

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-ipsla-mplslm-lsp-
lpd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:
 
        

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session

Configuration Examples for Implementing IP Service Level Agreements

Configuring IP Service Level Agreements: Example

Configuring IP SLA Reactions and Threshold Monitoring: Example

Configuring IP SLA MPLS LSP Monitoring: Example

Configuring LSP Path Discovery: Example

Configuring IP Service Level Agreements: Example

The following example shows how to configure and schedule a UDP echo operation:

configure
ipsla operation 432
  type udp echo 
    destination address 12.25.26.10
    destination port 11111
    frequency 300
 exit
exit
ipsla schedule operation 432
  life 30
  ageout 3600
  recurring
  start-time after 01:00:00
end
 
   
show ipsla statistics 432

Configuring IP SLA Reactions and Threshold Monitoring: Example

The following examples show how to configure IP SLA reactions and threshold monitoring. You can:

Configure a reaction for attributes that activate a true or false condition, for example, 1, 5, or 6.

Configure a reaction for attributes that accept a threshold value.

Configure additional threshold type options.

Configure either the logging or triggering of action types.

configure
ipsla operation 1
  type icmp echo
    timeout 5000
    destination address 223.255.254.254
    frequency 10
    statistics interval 30
    buckets 3
end
 
   
configure
ipsla operation 2
  type icmp path-echo
    destination address 223.255.254.254
    frequency 5
end
 
   
configure
ipsla reaction operation 1
  react timeout
   action trigger
   threshold type immediate
 exit
exit
  react rtt
   action logging
   threshold lower-limit 4 upper-limit 5
end
 
   

Operation 1 checks for timeout occurrence. If applicable, operation 1 generates a trigger event. If the rtt keyword exceeds 5, an error is logged.

If operation 1 generates a trigger event, operation 2 is started. The following example shows how to configure a reaction trigger operation by using the ipsla reaction trigger command:

configure
ipsla reaction trigger 1 2
end

Configuring IP SLA MPLS LSP Monitoring: Example

The following example illustrates how to configure IP SLA MPLS LSP monitoring:

ipsla
 mpls lsp-monitor
  monitor 1
   type mpls lsp ping
    vrf SANJOSE
    scan interval 300
    scan delete-factor 2
    timeout 10000
    datasize request 256
    lsp selector ipv4 127.0.0.10
    force explicit-null
    reply dscp af
    reply mode router-alert
    ttl 30
    exp 1
    statistics hourly
     buckets 1
    !
   !
  !
  reaction monitor 1
   react timeout
    action logging
    threshold type immediate
   !
   react connection-loss
    action logging
    threshold type immediate
   !
  !
  schedule monitor 1
   frequency 300
   schedule period 120
   start-time 11:45:00 July 4
  !
 !
 mpls discovery vpn 
  interval 600
 !
!

Configuring LSP Path Discovery: Example

The following example illustrates how to configure LSP Path Discovery:

configure
ipsla
 mpls lsp-monitor
  monitor 1
   type mpls lsp ping
    path discover
     path retry 12
     path secondary frequency both 12

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to IP Service Level Agreements.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

IP Service Level Agreement commands

IP Service Level Agreement Commands on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router module in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router System Monitoring Command Reference

Information about user groups and task IDs

Configuring AAA Services on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router module in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router System Security Configuration Guide


Standards

Standards
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.


MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link

To locate and download MIBs using Cisco IOS XR software, use the Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL and choose a platform under the Cisco Access Products menu: http://cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml


RFCs

RFCs
Title

No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature, and support for existing RFCs has not been modified by this feature.


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Technical Support website contains thousands of pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport