Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Overview and Reference Guide
Overview and Physical Description
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 5.34MB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 14.55MB) | Feedback

Table of Contents

Overview and Physical Description

Chassis Physical Overview

Cisco ASR 9010 Router

Cisco ASR 9006 Router

Cisco ASR 9904 Router

Cisco ASR 9922 Router

Cisco ASR 9912 Router

Field Replaceable Units

Rack-Mounting Specifications

Chassis Top-Down View Dimensions

Chassis Slots

Fiber and Interface Cable Management

Routing of DC Power Tray Source Cables

Slot ID Numbering

Cisco ASR 9010 Router

Cisco ASR 9006 Router

Cisco ASR 9904 Router

Cisco ASR 9922 Router

Cisco ASR 9912 Router

Route Switch Processor and Route Processor Cards

Overview

RSP Card Front Panel and Access Ports

RSP-440 and RSP-440 Lite Front Panel and Access Ports

RSP-880 Card Front Panel and Access Ports

RP Card and RP2 Card Front Panel and Access Ports

RSP and RP Front Panel Connectors

Management Ports

Auxiliary (AUX) Port and Console Port

Synchronization Ports

Alarm Connector

SFP/SFP+ Port

GPS Interface

Inter Chassis Synchronization Port

CMP Port

USB Port

Push Buttons

RSP and RP Front Panel Indicators

LED Matrix Display

LED Matrix Boot Stage and Runtime Display

LED Matrix CAN Bus Controller Error Display

RSP and RP Card Ejector Levers

Serviceability

Fabric Controller Card

FC Card Ejector Levers

Ethernet Line Cards

Line Card Serviceability

Line Card Ejector Levers

Power System

AC and DC Power Modules

Cisco ASR 9010 Router Power Modules

Cisco ASR 9904 Router Power Modules

Cisco ASR 9922 Router Power Modules

Cisco ASR 9912 Router Power Modules

Cooling System

Management and Configuration

Overview and Physical Description

This chapter provides an overview of the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers and description of the system components.

Chassis Physical Overview

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers are next-generation edge access routers optimized for service provider applications, designed to fulfill various roles in:

  • Layer 2 and Layer 3 Ethernet aggregation
  • Subscriber-aware broadband aggregation

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers meet carrier-class requirements for redundancy, availability, packaging, power, and other requirements traditional to the service provider.

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series consists of seven routers:

  • Cisco ASR 9001 Router
  • Cisco ASR 9001-S Router
  • Cisco ASR 9010 Router
  • Cisco ASR 9006 Router
  • Cisco ASR 9904 Router
  • Cisco ASR 9922 Router
  • Cisco ASR 9912 Router

This chapter briefly describes the chassis configuration and components of the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers. For information on the Cisco ASR 9001 and Cisco ASR 9001-S Routers, see:

C isco ASR 9001 and Cisco ASR 9001-S Routers Hardware Installation Guide

Cisco ASR 9010 Router

The Cisco ASR 9010 Router chassis is centered around a redundant pair of RSP cards, along with eight line cards. The 10-slot chassis size fits in Telco, EIA, and ETSI racks and cabinets.

The chassis has two power trays. The version 1 power system has AC or DC power modules (six total) in each tray (Figure 1-1). The version 2 and version 3 power system has four AC or DC power modules (eight total) in each tray (Figure 1-2).

Figure 1-1 Cisco ASR 9010 Router Chassis Components—Version 1 Power Trays

 

Figure 1-2 Cisco ASR 9010 Router Chassis Components—Version 2 and 3 Power Trays

 

Cisco ASR 9006 Router

The Cisco ASR 9006 Router chassis is centered around a redundant pair of RSP cards, along with four line cards. The 6-slot chassis size fits in Telco, EIA, and ETSI racks and cabinets.

The chassis has a single power tray for AC or DC power modules. The version 1 power system has three power modules in the single power tray. The version 2 power system has four power modules in the single power tray (Figure 1-3).

Figure 1-3 Cisco ASR 9006 Router Chassis Components—Version 2 Power Tray Shown

 

Cisco ASR 9904 Router

The Cisco ASR 9904 Router chassis is centered around a redundant pair of RSP cards, along with two line cards. The 4-slot chassis size fits in Telco, EIA, and ETSI racks and cabinets. The chassis has a single version 2 power tray for AC or DC power modules (Figure 1-4).

Figure 1-4 Cisco ASR 9904 Router Chassis Components—Version 2 Power System

 

Cisco ASR 9922 Router

The Cisco ASR 9922 Router chassis is centered around a redundant pair of RP cards, seven redundant FC cards, and twenty line cards. The 22-slot chassis size fits in Telco, EIA, and ETSI racks and cabinets. The chassis has two backplanes connected via up to seven fabric cards and two RP cards. The upper backplane connects to its one backplane identification (BPID) card, ten line cards, two fan trays, and four power trays. The lower backplane connects to its BPID card, ten line cards, and two fan trays.

The chassis has four power trays. The version 2 power system has four AC or DC power modules in each power tray (Figure 1-5). The version 3 power system has three AC power modules or four DC power modules in each power tray.

Figure 1-5 Cisco ASR 9922 Router Chassis Components—Version 2 Power Tray

 

 

Cisco ASR 9912 Router

The Cisco ASR 9912 Router chassis is centered around a redundant pair of RP cards, seven redundant FC cards, and ten line cards. The chassis fits in Telco, EIA, and ETSI racks and cabinets.

The chassis has three power trays. The version 2 power system has four AC or DC power modules in each power tray (Figure 1-6). The version 3 AC power system has three AC power modules in each power tray. The version 3 DC power system has four DC power modules in each power tray.

Figure 1-6 Cisco ASR 9912 Router Chassis Components—Version 2 Power Tray

 

Field Replaceable Units

In the Cisco ASR 9010 Router, Cisco ASR 9006 Router, and Cisco ASR 9904 Router, the following components are field replaceable units (FRUs):

  • All line cards
  • RSP cards
  • Power modules
  • Fan trays
  • Air filters
  • Line card and RSP blank fillers
  • Compact flash disk
  • Gigabit Ethernet small form-factor pluggable (SFP) transceiver modules
  • 10-Gigabit Ethernet small form-factor pluggable (SFP+) transceiver modules
  • 10-Gigabit Ethernet small form-factor pluggable (XFP) transceiver modules
  • Optional card cage doors (Cisco ASR 9010 Router only)

Note The backplane and BPID are not FRUs.


In the Cisco ASR 9922 Router and the Cisco ASR 9912 Router, the following components are FRUs:

  • All line cards
  • RP cards
  • FC cards
  • Power modules
  • Fan trays and covers
  • Air filters and foam media
  • Line card and RP blank fillers
  • Gigabit Ethernet small form-factor pluggable (SFP) transceiver modules
  • 10-Gigabit Ethernet small form-factor pluggable (SFP+) transceiver modules
  • 100-Gigabit Ethernet small form-factor pluggable (CFP) transceiver modules
  • Optional card cage doors

Note The backplanes and BPID cards are not FRUs.


Rack-Mounting Specifications

Table 1-1 list the rack-mounting specifications for the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers.

 

Table 1-1 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers Rack Mounting Specifications

Chassis Type
Rack Mounting Specifications

Cisco ASR 9010 Router

Chassis height is 36.75 inches (93.35 cm) or 21 RU (rack units), which includes a rack/tray mounting option. Two chassis fit into a commonly used 42 RU rack, and therefore will fit into an ETSI 45 RU rack with a height of 78.74 inches (200.00 cm).

Telco racks: Rail-to-rail dimension is 17.50 inches (44.54 cm)
EIA racks: 19 inches (48.26 cm) wide
Adaptable to 23 inches (58.42 cm) to fit into ETSI racks 23.62 inches (60.00 cm) wide

Cisco ASR 9006 Router

Chassis height is 17.50 inches (44.45 cm) or 10 RU (rack units), which includes a rack/tray mounting option. Four chassis fit into a commonly used 42 RU rack, and therefore will fit into an ETSI 45 RU rack with a height of 78.74 inches (200.00 cm).

Telco racks: Rail-to-rail dimension is 17.75 inches (45.09 cm)
EIA racks 19 inches (48.26 cm) wide
Adaptable to 23 inches (58.42 cm) to fit into ETSI racks 23.62 inches (60.00 cm) wide

Cisco ASR 9904 Router

Chassis height is 10.38 inches (26.36 cm) or 6 RU (rack units), which includes a rack/tray mounting option. Seven chassis fit into a commonly used 42 RU rack, and therefore will fit into an ETSI 45 RU rack with a height of 78.74 inches (200.00 cm).

Telco racks: Rail-to-rail dimension is17.75 inches (45.09 cm)
EIA racks: 19 inches (48.26 cm) wide
Adaptable to 23 inches (58.42 cm) to fit into ETSI racks 23.62 inches (60.00 cm) wide

Cisco ASR 9922 Router

Chassis height is 77.00 inches (195.58 cm) or 44 RU (rack units). The rail mounting option height is 1.00 inch. The Cisco ASR 9922 Router chassis will fit into an ETSI 45 RU rack with a height of 78.74 inches (200.00 cm).

Telco racks: Rail-to-rail dimension is17.75 inches (45.09 cm)
EIA racks: 19 inches (48.26 cm) wide
Adaptable to 23 inches (58.42 cm) to fit into ETSI racks 23.62 inches (60.00 cm) wide

Cisco ASR 9912 Router

Chassis height is 52.50 inches (133.35 cm) or 30 RU (rack units). The rail mounting option height is 1.00 inch. The Cisco ASR 9912 Router chassis will fit into an ETSI 45 RU rack with a height of 78.74 inches (200.00 cm).

Telco racks: Rail-to-rail dimension is17.75 inches (45.09 cm)
EIA racks: 19 inches (48.26 cm) wide
Adaptable to 23 inches (58.42 cm) to fit into ETSI racks 23.62 inches (60.00 cm) wide

The chassis depth for all Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers fits into a 31.50 inch (80.00 cm) deep EIA rack or an equivalent 80.00 cm deep ETSI rack. This space includes cable management space front and rear. The chassis has fixed rack mount rails that are set back 5.00 inches (12.7 cm), including front cable management space.


Note Racks and cabinets require adjustable front rails if the rack/cabinet doors must be able to close with the chassis installed.


Chassis Top-Down View Dimensions

  • Figure 1-7 shows the top-down view dimensions of the Cisco ASR 9010 Router.
  • Figure 1-8 shows the top-down view dimensions of the Cisco ASR 9006 Router.
  • Figure 1-9 shows the top-down view dimensions of the Cisco ASR 9904 Router.
  • Figure 1-10 shows the top-down view dimensions of the Cisco ASR 9922 Router.
  • Figure 1-11 shows the top-down view dimensions of the Cisco ASR 9912 Router.

Figure 1-7 Cisco ASR 9010 Router Chassis Footprint Dimensions—Top Down View

 

Figure 1-8 Cisco ASR 9006 Router Chassis Footprint Dimensions—Top Down View

 

Figure 1-9 Cisco ASR 9904 Router Chassis Footprint Dimensions—Top Down View

 

Figure 1-10 Cisco ASR 9922 Router Chassis Footprint Dimensions—Top Down View

 

Figure 1-11 Cisco ASR 9912 Router Chassis Footprint Dimensions—Top Down View

 

Chassis Slots

  • Cisco ASR 9010 Router: All line cards and RSP cards are front-facing and mounted vertically, with ejector levers and captive screws at the top and bottom of each card.
  • Cisco ASR 9006 Router and Cisco ASR 9904 Router: All chassis line cards and RSP cards are front-facing and mounted horizontally, with ejector levers and captive screws at the left and right ends of each card.
  • Cisco ASR 9922 Router: All RP, FCs, and LCs are front-facing and mounted vertically, with ejector levers and captive screws at the top and bottom of each card.
  • Cisco ASR 9912 Router: All RP, FCs, and LCs are front-facing and mounted vertically, with ejector levers and captive screws at the top and bottom of each card.

The chassis components include:

  • Two RSP cards in the Cisco ASR 9010 Router, Cisco ASR 9006 Router, and Cisco ASR 9904 Router.
  • Two RP and seven FC cards in the Cisco ASR 9922 Router and Cisco ASR 9912 Router
  • Ethernet line cards

Cisco ASR 9010 Router—Up to eight

Cisco ASR 9006 Router—Up to four

Cisco ASR 9904 Router—Up to two

Cisco ASR 9922 Router—Up to twenty

Cisco ASR 9912 Router—Up to ten

  • Backplane(s)

Cisco ASR 9010 Router—One

Cisco ASR 9006 Router—One

Cisco ASR 9904 Router—One

Cisco ASR 9922 Router—Two

Cisco ASR 9912 Router—One

  • BPID card(s)

Cisco ASR 9010 Router—One

Cisco ASR 9006 Router—One

Cisco ASR 9904 Router—One

Cisco ASR 9922 Router—Two

Cisco ASR 9912 Router—One

  • Fan tray controllers

Cisco ASR 9010 Router—Two

Cisco ASR 9006 Router—Two

Cisco ASR 9904 Router—One

Cisco ASR 9922 Router—Four

Cisco ASR 9912 Router—Two

  • Power trays

Cisco ASR 9010 Router—Two AC power trays in AC-powered systems or two DC power trays in DC-powered systems

Cisco ASR 9006 Router—One AC power tray in AC-powered systems or one DC power tray in DC-powered systems

Cisco ASR 9904 Router—One AC power tray in AC-powered systems or one DC power tray in DC-powered systems

Cisco ASR 9922 Router—Four AC power trays in AC-powered systems or four DC power trays in DC-powered systems

Cisco ASR 9912 Router—Three AC power trays in AC-powered systems or three DC power trays in DC-powered systems


Note The line card slots are dedicated to only line cards; RSP/RP/FC cards cannot occupy these slots. The RSP/RP/FC slots are dedicated to only RSP/RP/FC cards; line cards cannot occupy these slots. A keying mechanism keeps line cards from entering RSP/RP/FC slots and RSP/RP/FC cards from entering line card slots; the keying mechanism pins engage before the card alignment pins engage.


Fiber and Interface Cable Management

Figure 1-12 shows how card interface cables are managed at the front of the Cisco ASR 9010 Router chassis using a cable management tray.

Figure 1-12 Cable Management Tray

 

The Cisco ASR 9922 Router and Cisco ASR 9912 Router have a cable management tray located above the card cage and a cable management tray below the bottom card cage that do not interfere with the insertion or removal of cards. A hinged cover at the top of the tray can be raised for ease of access for routing cables.

Line cards and RSP/RP cards share the same cable management tray. Cables to a card must be disconnected before its removal (this does not affect adjacent cards). Removal of a line card or RSP/RP card does not require removal or adjustment of cables other than those associated with the card itself.

A cable management bend radius of 1.5 inches (3.81 cm) is accommodated. Line card slots at the extreme ends of the cable management trays use space outside of the chassis width to accommodate the 1.5-inch (3.81-cm) radii due to limited space per slot.

Space for the fiber bend radii and strain relief is 3.75 inches (9.53 cm) in front of the faceplate.

Figure 1-13 shows how the fiber and cables are routed upward away from slot number labels. Therefore slot number labels, located at the lower part of the card cage, are not obscured by the cables.

Figure 1-13 Fiber/Cable Routing in the Cisco ASR 9010 Router

 

Routing of DC Power Tray Source Cables

Power cables are located in the rear. The A and B source feeds to the DC power supply modules are separated so the cables route to opposite sides of the chassis. A cable tie down point is provided.

Figure 1-14 shows the DC power cable routing on the power trays.

Figure 1-14 Routing of DC Power Tray Source Cables

 

Slot ID Numbering

All card slots are clearly numbered. Labels identifying slots are visible from the front of the chassis and are clearly numbered below each slot. As mentioned previously, fiber and cables are routed upward and do not obscure the slot ID labels.

Cisco ASR 9010 Router

Figure 1-15 shows slot ID numbering for the Cisco ASR 9010 Router with the DC power system. The numbering for the AC power system is the same but each power tray only holds three power modules.

 

Figure 1-15 Cisco ASR 9010 Router Slot ID Numbering

 

Cisco ASR 9006 Router

Figure 1-16 shows the slot ID numbering for the Cisco ASR 9006 Router with the DC power system. The numbering for the AC power system is the same but each tray only holds three power modules.

 

Figure 1-16 Cisco ASR 9006 Router Slot ID Numbering

 

Cisco ASR 9904 Router

Figure 1-17 shows the slot ID numbering for the Cisco ASR 9904 Router.

Figure 1-17 Cisco ASR 9904 Router Slot ID Numbering

 

Cisco ASR 9922 Router

Figure 1-18 shows slot numbering for the Cisco ASR 9922 Router with version 2 or version 3 DC power trays. The numbering for the AC power system is the same but each tray only holds three power modules.


Note For the Cisco ASR 9922 Router, line cards must be installed upside down in slots 10 through 19 of the bottom card cage, whereas in slots 0 though 9 of the top card cage, the line cards are installed right side up.


Figure 1-18 Cisco ASR 9922 Router Slot Numbering

 

 

Cisco ASR 9912 Router

Figure 1-19 shows slot numbering for the Cisco ASR 9912 Router with the DC power system. The numbering for the AC power system is the same but each tray only holds three power modules.

Figure 1-19 Cisco ASR 9912 Router Slot Numbering

 

 

Route Switch Processor and Route Processor Cards

This section describes the Route Switch Processor (RSP) card and Route Processor (RP) card for the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers and includes the following sections:

Overview

The Route Switch Processor (RSP) card is the main control and switch fabric element in the Cisco ASR 9010 Router, Cisco ASR 9006 Router, and Cisco ASR 9904 Router. To provide redundancy, there can be two RSP cards in each router, one as the active control RSP and the other as the standby RSP. The standby RSP takes over all control functions if the active RSP fails.

The Route Processor (RP) card is the main control element in the Cisco ASR 9922 Router and Cisco ASR 9912 Router. The RP card provides centralized chassis control, management, and data-plane switching. To provide redundancy, there are two RP cards in each router, one as the active control RP and the other as the standby RP. The standby RP takes over all control functions should the active RP fail.

System alarms reside on the RSP. Alarms consist of visual indicators with three levels: Critical (red), Major (red), and Minor (yellow for RSP, amber for RP). There is a console interface for remote viewing of alarms and fault information.


Note The generic term RSP card refers to the RSP-440, RSP-440 Lite, and RSP-880 cards, unless otherwise specified. The generic term RP card refers to the RP card and RP2 card, unless otherwise specified.


RSP Card Front Panel and Access Ports

The RSP has the following features:

  • Two dual-speed 100/1000 Mbit Ethernet Management ports
  • Two EIA/TIA-232 RJ232 serial RJ-45 ports—one each for Console and Auxiliary modem ports, with Manufacturing Test connections to the backplane
  • Two RJ-45 Sync timing ports with Link and Fault LEDs built into the RJ-45
  • Alarm Output DB9 port with three alarm outputs
  • One external Compact Flash type I/II
  • Alarm Cut Off (ACO) and Lamp Test momentary push buttons
  • Eight discrete Status LED indicators
  • One 4 character 5x7 LED dot matrix display and discrete status LEDs

Figure 1-20 shows the front panel and connectors of the RSP card.

Figure 1-20 RSP Card Front Panel Indicators and Connectors

 

 

1

Management LAN ports

5

Compact Flash type I/II

2

CONSOLE and AUX ports

6

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and LAMP TEST push buttons

3

SYNC (BITS/J.211) ports

7

Eight discrete LED indicators

4

Alarm Out DB9 connector

8

LED matrix display

RSP-440 and RSP-440 Lite Front Panel and Access Ports

The RSP-440 and RSP-440 Lite cards have the following features:

  • Two RJ-45 Sync timing ports with Link and Fault LEDs built into the RJ-45
  • Two 10-GE Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP/SFP+) virtualization cluster ports
  • IEEE1588 RJ-45 Timestamp port
  • Two Inter-Chassis Sync ports—ICS1 is shared with RS232/422 GPS TOD RJ-45 port
  • RS232/422 GPS TOD RJ-45 port for system timing input
  • 10 MHz and 1 PPS clock input SMB ports
  • Alarm Output DB9 port with three alarm outputs
  • External USB2, class-A port
  • Two dual-speed 100/1000 Mbit Ethernet Management ports
  • Two EIA/TIA-232 RJ232 serial RJ-45 ports—one each for Console and Auxiliary modem ports, with Manufacturing Test connections to the backplane
  • Alarm Cut Off (ACO) and Lamp Test momentary push buttons
  • Nine discrete Status LED indicators
  • One four-character 5x7 LED dot matrix display and discrete status LEDs

Figure 1-21 shows the front panel of the RSP-440 card. Figure 1-22 shows the front panel of the RSP-440 Lite card

Figure 1-21 RSP-440 Card Front Panel

 

1

SYNC (BITS/J.211) ports

7

External USB port

2

SFP/SFP+ ports

8

Management LAN ports

3

IEEE 1588 port

9

CONSOLE and AUX ports

4

ToD port

10

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and LAMP TEST push buttons

5

10 MHz and 1 PPS indicators

11

Nine discrete LED indicators

6

Alarm Out DB9 connector

12

LED matrix display

Figure 1-22 RSP-440 Lite Card Front Panel

 

 

1

SYNC (BITS/J.211) ports

7

External USB port

2

SFP ports

8

Management LAN ports

3

IEEE 1588 port

9

CONSOLE and AUX ports

4

ToD port

10

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and LAMP TEST push buttons

5

10MHz and 1PPS indicators

11

Nine discrete Status LED indicators

6

Alarm Out DB9 connector

12

LED matrix display

RSP-880 Card Front Panel and Access Ports

The RSP-880 has the following features:

  • Two RJ-45 Sync timing ports with Link and Fault LEDs built into the RJ-45
  • Four 10-GE Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP/SFP+) virtualization cluster ports
  • IEEE1588 RJ-45 Timestamp port
  • Two Inter-Chassis Sync ports—nVSync1 is shared with RS232/422 GPS TOD RJ-45 port
  • RS232/422 GPS TOD RJ-45 port for system timing input
  • 10 MHz and 1 PPS clock input SMB ports
  • Alarm Output DB9 port with three alarm outputs
  • External USB2, class-A port
  • Two dual-speed 100/1000 Mbit Ethernet Management ports
  • One Connectivity Management Processor (CMP) port
  • Two EIA/TIA-232 RJ232 serial RJ-45 ports—one each for Console and Auxiliary modem ports, with Manufacturing Test connections to the backplane
  • Alarm Cut Off (ACO) and Lamp Test momentary push buttons
  • Nine discrete Status LED indicators
  • One four-character 5x7 LED dot matrix display and discrete status LEDs

Figure 1-23 shows the front panel of the RSP-880 card.

Figure 1-23 RSP-880 Card Front Panel

 

1

SYNC (BITS/J.211) ports

8

Management LAN ports

2

SFP/SFP+ ports

9

CMP port

3

Service LAN port

10

Console and Auxiliary (AUX) ports

4

Inter Chassis Sync ports and ToD port

11

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and Lamp Test push buttons

5

10 MHz and 1 PPS indicators

12

Nine discrete LED indicators

6

Alarm Out DB9 connector

13

LED matrix display

7

External USB port

 

 

RP Card and RP2 Card Front Panel and Access Ports

The RP and RP2 front panel has the following information and alarm LEDs and connectors:

  • Two BITS RJ-45 Sync timing ports
  • Two 10 GE SFP/SFP+ ports
  • IEEE1588 RJ-45 Timestamp port
  • RS232/422 GPS TOD RJ-45 port for system timing input
  • 10 MHz and 1 PPS clock input SMB ports
  • Alarm Output DB9 port with three alarm outputs
  • External USB2, class-A port
  • Two RJ-45 100/1000 Mbit Ethernet Management ports
  • One Connectivity Management Processor (CMP) port (RP2 card only)
  • RJ-45 Console port
  • RJ-45 Auxiliary (AUX) port
  • Alarm Cut Off (ACO) and Lamp Test momentary push buttons
  • RP Discrete Status LEDs

SSD LED

FC Fault LED

GPS LED

Critical Alarm LED (red)

Major Alarm LED (red)

Minor Alarm LED (amber)

Power Fail LED

ACO LED (amber)

SYNC LED (green and amber)

  • One 4-character 5x7 LED dot-matrix display

Figure 1-24 shows the front panel of the RP card. Figure 1-25 shows the front panel of the RP2 card.

Figure 1-24 RP Card Front Panel

 

 

1

SYNC (BITS/J.211) ports

8

External USB port

2

SFP/SFP+ ports

9

Management LAN ports

3

IEEE 1588 port

10

CONSOLE and AUX ports

4

Inter-chassis nv Sync0

11

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and Lamp Test push buttons

5

Inter-chassis nv Sync1 GPS ToD

12

Nine discrete LED indicators

6

10 MHz and 1 PPS indicators

13

LED matrix display

7

Alarm Out DB9 connector

 

 

Figure 1-25 RP2 Card Front Panel

 

 

1

SYNC (BITS/J.211) ports

8

Management LAN ports

2

SFP/SFP+ ports

9

CMP Port

3

IEEE 1588 port

10

CONSOLE and AUX ports

4

Inter-chassis nv Sync0 and 1

11

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and Lamp Test push buttons

5

10 MHz and 1 PPS indicators

12

Nine discrete Status LED indicators

6

Alarm Out DB9 connector

13

LED matrix display

7

External USB port

 

 

RSP and RP Front Panel Connectors

Management Ports

Two dual-speed management LAN ports (MGT LAN 0, MGT LAN 1) are triple-speed RJ-45 connectors for use as out-of-band management ports. The speed of the management LAN is auto-negotiated.

Auxiliary (AUX) Port and Console Port

An RJ-45 Auxiliary (AUX) port and RJ-45 Console port are EIA/TIA-232 (also known as RS-232) asynchronous serial ports for connecting external devices to monitor and manage the system.

The console port provides a data circuit-terminating equipment (DCE) interface for connecting a console terminal. This port defaults to 9600 Baud, 8 data, no parity, 2 stop bits with flow control none.

The auxiliary port provides a data circuit-terminating equipment (DCE) interface that supports flow control. Use this port to connect a modem, a channel service unit (CSU), or other optional equipment for Telnet management. This port defaults to 9600 Baud, 8 data, no parity, 1 stop bit with software handshake.

Synchronization Ports

The RSP/RP card front panel also has a two synchronization (SYNC) timing ports that can be configured as BITS or J.211 ports. These ports provide connections for external timing and synchronization sources

The SYNC 0 and SYNC 1 ports are timing ports that can be configured as Building Integrated Timing System (BITS) ports. A BITS port provides a connection for an external synchronization source to establish precise frequency control at multiple network nodes, if required for your application. The RSP/RP card contains a Synchronous Equipment Timing Source (SETS) that can receive a frequency reference from an external BITS timing interface or from a clock signal recovered from any incoming interface, such as a Gigabit Ethernet, 10-Gigabit Ethernet, or SONET interface. The RSP/RP SETS circuit filters the received timing signal and uses it to drive an outgoing Ethernet interface or BITS output port.

The timing port(s) can also be configured as J.211 or DTI ports. A DOCSIS Timing Interface (DTI) port is used to connect to an external DTI server to synchronize timing and frequency across multiple routers. The timing function allows precise synchronization of real-time clocks in a network for measurements of network performance, for example, measuring delay across a VPN. The frequency reference acts like a BITS input.

Alarm Connector

Each RSP/RP card drives a set of three alarm output contacts. Alarm circuitry on the RSP/RP activates dry contact closures that are accessible through the nine-pin Alarm Out connector on the RSP/RP front panel. Each RSP/RP card drives a set of three alarm output contacts. Both normally-open and normally-closed contacts are available.

Only the active RSP/RP drives the alarm outputs. Should a switchover to the standby RSP/RP occur, the newly active RSP/RP drives the alarm outputs.

SFP/SFP+ Port

The RSP-440 and RSP-440 Lite support two 10-GE Small Form-Factor Pluggable Plus (SFP+) virtualization cluster ports. The RSP-880 supports four 10-GE SFP+ ports that are used for external server connectivity capability.

GPS Interface

The RSP-440, RSP-440 Lite, and RSP-880 have a Time of Day (ToD) port, 10-MHz connector, and 1-PPS connector that allow you to configure input or output clocking with a GPS device.

Inter Chassis Synchronization Port

The nV Sync 0 and nV Sync 1 ports on the RSP-440, RSP-440 Lite, and RSP-880 are the RJ-45 inter-chassis synchronization clock interfaces for synchronizing frequency and time.

CMP Port

The Connectivity Management Processor (CMP) on the RSP-880 card and RP2 card is a secondary, lightweight processor that provides a second network interface to the system. Each CMP contains its own RAM, bootflash, and front panel management Ethernet port.

The CMP port provides the following functions:

  • RSP-880 and RP2 ROMMON console access through the CMP port. This eliminates the need to use external terminal servers.
  • SSH/telnet into a designated CMP port.

USB Port

The RSP-440, RSP-440 Lite, RSP-880, and RP cards have a single external Universal Serial Bus (USB) port. A USB flash memory device can be inserted to load and transfer software images and files. This memory device can be used to turboboot the system or as the installation source for Package Information Envelopes (PIE) and Software Maintenance Upgrades (SMU). This memory device can also be used for users' data files, core files, and configuration backups.

Push Buttons

Two push buttons are provided on the RSP/RP card front panel.

  • Alarm Cutoff (ACO)—ACO activation suppresses alarm outputs. When the ACO button is pushed while critical alarms are active, the ACO LED turns on, and the corresponding alarm output contacts revert to the normally open (non-alarm) state, thus suppressing the alarm. If subsequent critical alarms are detected and activated after the ACO activation, the ACO function is deactivated to notify the user of the arrival of the new alarm(s). In this case, the ACO LED will turn off and any active alarms are again indicated by driving their alarm output contacts to the alarm state.
  • Lamp Test—When the Lamp Test button is pushed, the RSP/RP status LED, line card status and port LEDs, and Fan Tray LEDs light until the button is released. The LED matrix display is not affected.

RSP and RP Front Panel Indicators

The RSP card has eight discrete LED indicators and an LED dot-matrix display for system information. The RSP-440, RSP-440 Lite, and RSP-880 have nine discrete LED indicators, a LED dot-matrix display for system information, and three USB-specific LEDs.The RP has nine discrete LED indicators and a LED dot-matrix display for system information.

Table 1-2 lists the display definitions of the discrete LEDs on the various RSP front panels and the three USB LEDs on the RSP-440, RSP-440 Lite, and RSP-880.

 

Table 1-2 RSP, RSP-440, RSP-440 Lite, RSP-880 Discrete LED Display Definitions

Indicator (Label)
Color
Description

Power Fail (FAIL)

Red

Standby Power Fail LED. The LED is turned off by the CAN bus controller after it is up and running.

Off

Standby power is normal.

Critical Alarm (CRIT)

Red

Critical Alarm LED. A critical alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No critical alarm has occurred.

Major Alarm (MAJ)

Red

Major alarm LED. A major alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No major alarm has occurred.

Minor Alarm (MIN)

Amber

Minor alarm LED. A minor alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No minor alarm has occurred.

Synchronization (SYNC)

Green

System timing is synchronized to an external timing source.

Amber

System timing is free running.

Off

LED never turns off.

Alarm Cutoff (ACO)

Amber

Alarm Cutoff has been enabled. The ACO push button was pressed after at least one alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

Alarm Cutoff is not enabled.

Internal Hard Disk Drive (HDD)

[RSP only]

Green

Hard Disk Drive is busy/active. The LED is driven by the SAS controller.

Off
(Default after reset)

Hard Disk Drive is not busy/active

External Compact Flash (CF)

[RSP only]

Green

Compact Flash is busy/active.

Off
(Default after reset)

Compact Flash is not busy/active.

Internal Solid State Hard Disk Drive (SSD)

RSP-440/RSP-440 Lite RSP-880

Green

Internal Solid State Hard Disk Drive (SSD0) is busy/active. The LED is driven by the SSD/SAS controller.

Off
(Default after reset)

Internal Solid State Hard Disk Drive is not busy/active.

GPS

RSP-440/RSP-440 Lite
RSP-880

Green

GPS interface provisioned and ports are turned on. ToD, 1 PPS, 10 Mhz are all valid.

Off
(Default after reset)

Either the interface is not provisioned, or the ports are not turned on. ToD, 1 PPS, 10 Mhz are not valid.

External USB 2.0

RSP-440/RSP-440 Lite RSP-880

Green

External USB is busy/active.

Off
(Default after reset)

External USB is not busy/active.

Internal USB 2.0 A

RSP-440/RSP-440 Lite
RSP-880

Green

Internal USB is busy/active.

Off
(Default after reset)

Internal USB is not busy/active.

Internal USB 2.0 B

RSP-440/RSP-440 Lite
RSP-880

Green

Internal USB is busy/active.

Off
(Default after reset)

Internal USB is not busy/active.

Table 1-3 lists the display definitions of the nine discrete LEDs on the RP front panel.

 

Table 1-3 RP and RP2 Discrete LED Display Definitions

Indicator (Label)
Color
Description

Power Fail (FAIL)

Red
(Default after power on)

Standby Power Fail LED. The LED is turned off by the CAN bus controller after it is up and running.

Off

Standby power is normal.

Critical Alarm (CRIT)

Red

Critical Alarm LED. A critical alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No critical alarm has occurred.

Major Alarm (MAJ)

Red

Major alarm LED. A major alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No major alarm has occurred.

Minor Alarm (MIN)

Amber

Minor alarm LED. A minor alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No minor alarm has occurred.

Alarm Cutoff (ACO)

Amber

Alarm Cutoff has been enabled. The ACO push button was pressed after at least one alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

Alarm Cutoff is not enabled.

Synchronization (SYNC)

Green

System timing is synchronized to an external timing source including
IEEE 1588.

Amber

System timing is free running.

Off
(Default after reset)

LED never turns off.

Internal Solid State Hard Disk Drive (SSD)

Green

Internal Solid State Hard Disk Drive (SSD0) is busy/active. The LED is driven by the SSD controller.

Off
(Default after reset)

Internal Solid State Hard Disk Drive is not busy/active.

FC Fault

Amber

A fault has occurred on any or all of the FC cards installed. This LED will be on during the boot phase of the FC.

Off
(Default after reset)

FC cards are booted up and ready.

GPS

Green

GPS interface provisioned and ports are turned on. ToD, 1 PPS, 10 Mhz are all valid.

Off
(Default after reset)

Either the interface is not provisioned, or the ports are not turned on. ToD,
1 PPS, and 10 Mhz are not valid.

LED Matrix Display

The LED matrix displays one row of four characters. The matrix becomes active when the CPU powers on and displays the stages of the boot process, as well as displaying runtime information during normal operation. If there are CAN Bus Controller problems, error messages are displayed.

LED Matrix Boot Stage and Runtime Display

Table 1-4 and Table 1-5 describe the boot process and runtime display information for the RSP/RP cards.

Not all of these messages are seen during a successful boot up process because the screen is updated too quickly for the message to be visible. A failure detected during the boot up process results in the message remaining visible indicating the stage where the boot up process stopped. When possible, the RSP/RP card logs the failure information and reboots.

 

Table 1-4 RSP LED Matrix Boot Stage and Runtime Display

LED Matrix Display
Description

INIT

Card is inserted and microcontroller is initialized.

BOOT

Card is powered on and CPU is booting.

IMEM

Starting initialization of memory.

IGEN

Starting initialization of card.

ICBC

Initializing communication with the microcontroller.

PDxy

Loading programmable devices (x = FPGA, y = ROMMON).

PSTx

Power on self test x.

RMN

All tests finished and ROMMON is ready for commands.

LOAD

Downloading Minimum Boot Image (MBI) image to CPU.

MBI

Starting execution of MBI.

IOXR

Cisco IOS XR Software is starting execution.

ACTV

RSP role is determined to be active RSP.

STBY

RSP role is determined to be standby RSP.

PREP

Preparing disk boot.

 

Table 1-5 RSP-440, RSP-440 Lite, RSP-880, RP/RP2 LED Matrix Boot Stages and Runtime Displays

LED Matrix Display
Description

INIT

Card is inserted and microcontroller is initialized.

BOOT

Card is powered on and CPU is booting.

IMEM

Starting initialization of memory.

IGEN

Starting initialization of card.

ICBC

Initializing communication with the microcontroller.

SCPI

Board is not plugged in properly.

STID

CBC was unable to read slot ID pins correctly.

PSEQ

CBC detected power sequencer failure.

DBPO

CBC detected an issue during board power up.

KPWR

CBC detected an issue during board power up.

LGNP

CBC detected an issue during board power up.

LGNI

CBC detected an issue during board power up.

IPNP (RSP-880/RP2 only)

CBC detected an issue during board power up.

IPNI (RSP-880/RP2 only)

CBC detected an issue during board power up.

RMN

All tests finished and ROMMON is ready for commands.

LOAD

Downloading Minimum Boot Image (MBI) image to CPU.

RRST

ROMMON rebooting board after MBI validation timeout.

MVB

ROMMON trying MBI validation boot.

MBI

Starting execution of MBI.

IOXR

Cisco IOS XR Software is starting execution.

LDG

The RSP/RP is loading (MBI started and card preparing for activity).

INCP

The software or configuration is incompatible with the RSP/RP.

OOSM

The RSP/RP is in Out of Service, Maintenance mode.

ACT

The RSP/RP is active (IOS-XR completely up and ready for traffic)

STBY

The RSP/RP is standby (IOS-XR completely up and ready)

AUTH

The RSP-880 card or RP2 card failed anti-counterfeiting authentication and rebooted. If authentication continues to fail, the card will be in a continuous reboot loop.

LED Matrix CAN Bus Controller Error Display

Table 1-6 shows the error messages the LED matrix displays if the RSP card fails one of the power on self tests.

 

Table 1-6 RSP LED Matrix CAN Bus Controller Status Display

LED Matrix Display
Description

PST1

Failed DDR RAM memory test

PST2

Failed FPGA image cyclic redundancy checking (CRC) check

PST3

Failed card type and slot ID verification

RSP and RP Card Ejector Levers

Ejector levers are provided for inserting and removing the RSP/RP cards. The insertion and removal force of the card ejector levers is about 16 lbs (7.27 kg). Longer ejector levers are provided for the RSP/RP cards than for the line cards due to the higher pin count of the RSP/RP card.

Serviceability

RSP/RP cards can be inserted or removed when adjacent (cabled) RSP/RP or line cards are installed. Compact Flash is serviceable without the need to remove the RSP card. Servicing the hard drive requires removal of the RSP/RP card.

Fabric Controller Card

On the Cisco ASR 9922 Router and Cisco ASR 9912 Router, the switch fabric resides on the FC cards.

The switch fabric is configured as a single stage of switching with multiple parallel planes. The switch fabric is responsible for transporting packets from one line card to another but has no packet processing capabilities. Each fabric plane is a single-stage, non-blocking, packet-based, store-and-forward switch. To manage fabric congestion, the RP provides centralized Virtual Output Queue (VOQ) arbitration.

When five FC cards are installed in the chassis, the switch fabric is 4+1 redundant. When all seven FC cards are installed in the chassis, the switch fabric is 6+1 redundant. The switch fabric is fully redundant, with one copy of the fabric on each FC, and each FC carries enough switching capacity to meet the chassis throughput specifications.

Figure 1-26 shows the FC card. The FC2 card is similar.

Figure 1-26 FC Card

 

Figure 1-27 shows the front panel of the FC card. The front panel has a status LED, ejector levers, ejector lever release buttons, and mounting screws. The FC2 card is similar.

Figure 1-27 FC Card Front Panel

 

FC Card Ejector Levers

Ejector levers are provided for inserting and removing the FC cards from the backplane connectors. The insertion and removal force of the card ejector levers is about 16 lbs (7.27 kg). To release the ejector levers, push in the ejector lever release buttons.


Note Once any ejector lever release button is pushed in, the FC card must by physically removed and reinserted (OIR) to restart the FC card.


Ethernet Line Cards

For line card installation information, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers Ethernet Line Card Installation Guide.

In addition, a SPA Interface Processor (SIP) and Shared Port Adapters (SPA) are supported on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers. For information about these components, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Aggregation Services Router SIP and SPA Hardware Installation Guide.

Line Card Serviceability

Line cards can be inserted or removed when adjacent (cabled) RSP or line cards are installed.

Line Card Ejector Levers

Ejector levers are provided for inserting and removing line cards from the backplane connectors. Insertion and removal force of the card ejector levers is about 16 lbs (7.27 kg).

Power System

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers can be powered with an AC or DC source power. The power system provides power for the cards and fan trays. Depending on the router, version 1, version 2, and version 3 power systems are supported.

The power system is based on a distributed power architecture centered around a –54 VDC printed circuit power bus on the system backplane.

The –54 VDC system backplane power bus can be sourced from one of two options:

  • AC systems—AC/DC bulk power supply tray connected to the user 200 to 240 VAC +/- 10 percent (180 to 264 VAC) source
  • DC systems—DC/DC bulk power supply tray connected to the user Central Office DC battery source –48 VDC/–60 VDC (–54 VDC nominal)

DC output power from each power tray is connected to the router by two power blades that mate to the power bus on the backplane. The system backplane distributes DC power through connectors on the backplane to each card and the fan trays. Each card has on-board DC–DC converters to convert the –54 VDC from the distribution bus voltage to the voltages required by each particular card.

AC and DC Power Modules

Each AC or DC power tray houses up to four power modules.The power trays drive a single output bus that delivers –54 V to all cards and fan trays that are plugged into the backplane.

Cisco ASR 9010 Router Power Modules

Figure 1-28 shows a front view of six version 1 power modules in the Cisco ASR 9010 Router. Figure 1-29 shows a front view of eight version 2 power modules in the Cisco ASR 9010 Router.The front view of eight version 3 DC power modules in the Cisco ASR 9010 Router is similar.

The AC power trays in the Cisco ASR 9010 Router provide N+N redundancy. The DC power trays provide N+1 redundancy.

Figure 1-28 Front System View of Power Trays—Cisco ASR 9010 Router with Version 1 Power Trays

 

Figure 1-29 Front System View of Power Trays—Cisco ASR 9010 Router with Version 2 Power Trays

 

Cisco ASR 9904 Router Power Modules

The AC and DC power trays in the Cisco ASR 9006 Router and Cisco ASR 9904 Router provide N+1 redundancy.

The Cisco ASR 9006 Router supports one power tray with up to three version 1 power modules or four version 2 power modules. The Cisco ASR 9904 Router supports one power tray with up to four version 2 power modules (Figure 1-30).

Figure 1-30 Front System View of Power Tray—Cisco ASR 9904 Router with Version 2 Power Tray

 

Cisco ASR 9922 Router Power Modules

The AC power trays in the Cisco ASR 9922 Router provide N+N redundancy. The DC power trays provide N+1 redundancy.

  • To operate the Cisco ASR 9922 Router on AC power:

Four AC power trays should be installed, each with up to four version 2 power modules or up to three version 3 power modules.

Each version 2 power module is fed by a single-phase 220-V 20-A circuit. Each version 3 power module is fed by two single-phase 220-V 20-A circuits.

Eight version 2 or six version 3 power modules are enough to power a fully-populated chassis.

Sixteen version 2 or twelve version 3 power modules are required for N+N redundancy. Fewer power modules can be used if the chassis is populated with fewer line cards.

Figure 1-31 shows an example of version 2 power modules installed in the Cisco ASR 9922 Router.

Figure 1-31 Front System View of Power Trays —Cisco ASR 9922 Router with Version 2 Power Trays

 

To operate the Cisco ASR 9922 Router on DC power:

  • Four DC power trays should be installed, each with up to four version 2 or version 3 power modules.
  • Each version 2 power module is fed by a single-phase 220-V 20-A circuit. Each version 3 power module is fed by two single-phase 220-V 20-A circuits.
  • Fifteen power modules are enough to power a fully-populated chassis.
  • Sixteen power modules are required for N+1 redundancy. Fewer power modules can be used if the chassis is populated with fewer line cards.

Cisco ASR 9912 Router Power Modules

The AC power trays in the Cisco ASR 9922 Router provide N+N redundancy. The DC power trays provide N+1 redundancy.

To operate the Cisco ASR 9912 Router on AC power:

  • Three AC power trays must be installed, each with up to four version 2 power modules or up to three version 3 power modules.
  • Each version 2 power module is fed by a single-phase 220-V 20-A circuit. Each version 3 power module is fed by two single-phase 220-V 20-A circuits.
  • Six power modules are enough to power a fully-populated chassis.
  • Twelve version 2 or nine version 3 power modules s are required for N+N redundancy. Fewer power modules can be used if the chassis is populated with fewer line cards.

To operate the Cisco ASR 9912 Router on DC power:

  • Three DC power trays must be installed, each with up to four version 2 or version 3 power modules
  • Eleven power modules are enough to power a fully-populated chassis.
  • Twelve power modules are required for N+1 redundancy. Fewer power modules can be used if the chassis is populated with fewer line cards.

Cooling System

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series chassis is cooled by removable fan trays. The fan trays provide full redundancy and maintain required cooling if a single fan failure should occur.

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers are configured in such a way that a fan failure or its subsequent replacement does not cause a significant outage. During either a fan replacement or a fan failure, the airflow is maintained and no outage occurs. Also, the fan trays are hot swappable so that no outage occurs during replacement.


Note Due to air leakage, the chassis should not be operated with any of the fan trays completely missing.The system shuts itself off if all fan trays are removed and the system crosses the Shutdown Temperature Threshold (STT. Replace any missing fan tray within five minutes. Any fan tray replacement should be performed when the chassis is back to room temperature.


Table 1-7 shows the fan tray locations and cooling redundancy information for the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers.

Table 1-7 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers Fan Tray Locations and Redundancy Information

 

Router
Fan Tray Locations

Cisco ASR 9010 Router

The chassis contains two fan trays for redundancy (Figure 2-32). The fan trays are located one above the other below the card cage and are equipped with handles for easy removal. The chassis has a front-to-rear cooling path (Figure 2-27). The inlet is at the bottom front of the chassis, and the exhaust is at the upper rear.

Each fan tray has 12 fans arranged in three groups of four fans each. Two fans of each group share a fan controller. The power supplied to the fan controller is 1:3 protected. A single fan failure has no impact on air flow because the other 11 fans will compensate for it. If the fan controller fails, there is a possibility of up to two fans failing; however, the design always has two fans operating in a row (three rows of fans) to compensate for the air speed.

Cisco ASR 9006 Router

The chassis contains two fan trays for redundancy (Figure 2-33). The fan trays are located at the top left of the chassis They are covered by a fan tray door hinged at the bottom, which must be opened before removing the fan trays. The chassis has a side-to- top-to-rear cooling path (Figure 2-28). The inlet is at the right side of the chassis, and the exhaust is at the upper rear.

Each fan tray has six fans arranged in three groups of two fans each. The two fans in a group share a fan controller. The power supplied to the fan controller is 1:3 protected. A single fan failure has no impact on air flow because the other five fans will compensate for it. If the fan controller fails, there is a possibility of up to two fans failing; however, the design always has two fans operating to compensate for the air speed.

Cisco ASR 9904 Router

The chassis contains a single fan tray. The fan tray is located at the left side of the chassis and is accessible from the rear (Figure 2-34). The chassis has a side-to-side cooling path (Figure 2-29). The inlet is at the right side of the chassis, and the exhaust is at the left side.

The fan tray has 12 fans. Every two fans share a fan controller. The power supplied to the fan controller is 1:1 protected. A single fan failure has no impact on air flow because the other eleven fans will compensate for it. I.

If the router is installed in a 2-post 23-inch rack, air flow is circulated front-to-back. An optional air baffle accessory kit (ASR-9904-BAFFLE=) is available for mounting the router chassis in this configuration. For air baffle installation information, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Hardware Installation Guide.

Cisco ASR 9912 Router

The chassis contains two fan trays for redundancy (Figure 2-35). The fan trays are located above the line card cage. The chassis has a front-to-rear cooling path (Figure 2-31). The inlet is at the front of the RP/FC card cage, and the exhaust is at the upper rear.

Each fan tray holds 12 axial fans and includes a controller that reduces the speed of the fans when the chassis temperature is within limits, thereby reducing the generation of acoustic noise. The fan controller also senses and reports individual fan failures.

The power supplied to the fan controller is 1:3 protected. A single fan failure has no impact on air flow because the other 11 fans will compensate for it. If the fan controller fails, there is a possibility of up to two fans failing; however, the design always has two fans operating in a row (three rows of fans) to compensate for the air speed.

Cisco ASR 9922 Router

The chassis contains four fan trays (Figure 2-35).Two top fan trays are located between the top and middle cages, whereas the two bottom fan trays are located between the middle and bottom cages. The two bottom fan trays are inserted upside down compared to the two top fan trays. The cages of the chassis have a front-to-rear cooling path (Figure 2-30). The inlet is at the front of the middle cage, and the exhaust is at the upper and lower rear.

The fan tray has an LED indicator to indicate fan tray status. If a fan fails, it is possible to swap a single fan tray assembly while the system is operational. Fan tray removal does not require removal of any cables

Management and Configuration

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers run IOS XR software and use the system manageability architecture of that operating system. The system management interfaces consist of the following three protocols running on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers:

  • CLI—Command-line interface
  • XML—Extensible Markup Language
  • SNMP—Simple Network Management Protocol

By default, only CLI on the console is enabled.

Craft Works Interface (CWI), a graphical craft tool for performance monitoring, is embedded with the Cisco IOS XR software and can be downloaded through the HTTP protocol. You can use CWI to edit the router configuration file, open Telnet/SSH application windows, and create user-defined applications.