Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Hardware Installation Guide
Troubleshooting the Installation
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 698.0KB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 53.81MB) | Feedback

Table of Contents

Troubleshooting the Installation

Troubleshooting Overview

Troubleshooting Using a Subsystem Approach

Normal Router Startup Sequence

Identifying Startup Issues

Troubleshooting the Power Subsystem

Troubleshooting the AC Input Power Subsystem

Troubleshooting the DC Input Power Subsystem

Troubleshooting a DC Power Module

Additional Power Subsystem Troubleshooting Information

Hardware and Software Identification

Obtaining Temperature and Environmental Information

Troubleshooting the Power Distribution System

Troubleshooting the Route Processor Subsystem

Route Processor Overview

RSP and RP Front Panel Indicators

Compact Flash and Status LEDs

Ethernet Ports and Status LEDs

Auxiliary and Console Ports

Alphanumeric Message Displays

Flash Memory

Troubleshooting RSP and RP Cards

FC Card Front Panel Indicator

Troubleshooting Line Cards and Modular Port Adapters

Monitoring Critical, Major, and Minor Alarm Status

Troubleshooting the Cooling Subsystem

Fan Tray Operation

Power Module Fans

Overtemperature Conditions

Isolating Cooling Subsystem Problems

Troubleshooting the Installation

This chapter contains general troubleshooting information to help isolate the cause of any difficulties you might encounter during the installation and initial startup of the system.

Although an overtemperature condition is unlikely at initial startup, environmental monitoring functions are included in this chapter because they also monitor internal voltages.

Troubleshooting Overview

This section describes the methods used in troubleshooting the router. The troubleshooting methods are organized according to the major subsystems in the router.

If you are unable to solve a problem on your own, you can contact a Cisco customer service representative for assistance. Cisco customer service and technical support can be reached at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/support/tsd_cisco_worldwide_contacts.html

When you call, please have the following information ready:

  • Date you received the router and the chassis serial number (located on a label on the back of the chassis).
  • Installed line cards and Cisco software release number:

Use the show version command to determine which line cards are installed and the Cisco software release number, if possible.

  • Brief description of the symptoms and steps you have taken to isolate and solve the issue.
  • Maintenance agreement or warranty information.

Troubleshooting Using a Subsystem Approach

To solve a system problem, try to isolate the problem to a specific subsystem. Compare current router behavior with expected router behavior. Because a startup issue is usually attributable to one component, it is most efficient to examine each subsystem, rather than trying to troubleshoot each router component.

Table 4-1 describes the subsystems for the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers:

Table 4-1 Subsystem Descriptions for the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers

Type of Subsystem
Description

Power subsystem

  • Up to 8 AC input or DC input power supply modules can be installed in the Cisco ASR 9010 Router chassis.
  • Up to 4 AC input or DC input power supply modules installed in the Cisco ASR 9006 Router chassis.
  • Up to 6 AC input or DC input power supply modules installed in the Cisco ASR 9904 Router chassis.
  • Up to 16 AC input or DC input power supply modules installed in the Cisco ASR 9922 Router chassis.
  • Up to 12 AC input or DC input power supply modules installed in the Cisco ASR 9912 Router chassis.

Chassis backplane power distribution

The system transfers –54 VDC power from the power modules to the chassis backplane and distributes it to all the cards through the backplane connectors.

Processor subsystem

Cisco ASR 9010 Router Cisco ASR 9006 Router
Cisco ASR 9904 Router

Includes the active Route Switch Processor (RSP) card (and optional, redundant RSP card, if installed).

Up to eight line cards in the Cisco ASR 9010 Router, four line cards in the Cisco ASR 9006 Router, and two line cards in the Cisco ASR 9904 Router.


Note The RSP and line cards are equipped with onboard processors. The RSP downloads a copy of the Cisco software image to each line card processor. The system uses an alphanumeric display on the active RSP to display status and error messages, which can help in troubleshooting.


Processor subsystem

Cisco ASR 9922 Router Cisco ASR 9912 Router

Includes the active Route Processor (RP) card, standby redundant RP card.

Up to 20 line cards in the Cisco ASR 9922 Router or 10 line cards in the Cisco ASR 9912 Router.


Note The RP and line cards are equipped with onboard processors. The RP downloads a copy of the Cisco software image to each line card processor. The system uses an alphanumeric display on the active RP to display status and error messages, which can help in troubleshooting.


Cooling subsystem

Cisco ASR 9010 Router Cisco ASR 9006 Router Cisco ASR 9904 Router Cisco ASR 9912 Router

Consists of one or two fan trays, which circulate air through the card cage to cool the cards, and two fans in each of the power modules, which circulate cooling air through the power module.

Cooling subsystem

Cisco ASR 9922 Router

Consists of four fan trays, which circulate air through the top and bottom line card cages to cool the cards, and two fans in each of the power modules, which circulate cooling air through the power module.


Note There are two types of image files, -P PIE files, and x86-based -PX PIE files. -P PIE files are for use on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers with RSP route switch processors (RSP-4G and RSP-8G). -PX PIE files are for use on the routers with RSP-440 route switch processors and the Cisco ASR 9922 Router route processors.


Normal Router Startup Sequence

You can generally determine when and where the router failed during the startup sequence by checking the status LEDs on the power modules, and the alphanumeric displays on the RSP, RP, and line cards.

In a normal router startup sequence, the following sequence of events and conditions occur:

1. The fan in each power module receives power and begins drawing air through the power supply.

The power module input power and output power indicators are on.

2. The fans in the fan tray receive power and begin drawing air through the chassis.

The fan tray OK indicator is on.

3. As the power-on and boot process progresses for the RSP/RP, the status of the RSP/RP appears on the alphanumeric display on the front panel of the card.

Identifying Startup Issues

Table 4-2 shows the contents of the alphanumeric displays on the RSP/RP card, as well as the normal LED states on the power modules (AC or DC) and the fan tray after a successful system startup.


Note For the RSP/RP card to communicate properly to a power module in a power tray, the appropriate input power should be present.


 

Table 4-2 Alphanumeric Displays and LEDs at System Startup

Component
Type of Indicator
Display Contents/LED Status and Meaning

RSP card

Alphanumeric display

INIT—Card is inserted and microcontroller is initialized

BOOT—Board is powered on and CPU is booting

IMEM—Start initializing memory

IGEN—Start initializing the board

ICBC—Start initializing communication with the microcontroller

PDxy—Loading programmable devices
(x = FPGA, y = ROMMON)

PSTx—Power on self test x

RMN—All tests are finished and ROMMON is ready for commands

LOAD—Downloading Minimum Boot Image (MBI) image to CPU

MBI—Starting execution of MBI

IOXR—Cisco IOS XR software is starting execution

ACTV—RSP role is determined to be active RSP

STBY—RSP role is determined to be standby RSP

PREP—Preparing disk boot

Line Cards

Status LED

Green: The line card is enabled and ready for use.

RSP-440 card

Alphanumeric display

INIT—Card is inserted and microcontroller is initialized

BOOT—Board is powered on and CPU is booting

IMEM—Start initializing memory

IGEN—Start initializing the board

ICBC—Start initializing communication with the microcontroller

SCPI—Board is not plugged in properly

STID—CBC was unable to read slot ID pins correctly

PSEQ—CBC detected power sequencer failure

DBPO—CBC detected an issue during board power up

KPWR—CBC detected an issue during board power up

LGNP—CBC detected an issue during board power up

LGNI—CBC detected an issue during board power up

RMN—All tests are finished and ROMMON is ready for commands

LOAD—Downloading MBI image to CPU

RRST—ROMMON is performing a soft reset after 5 consecutive MBI validation requests timed out

MVB—ROMMON trying MBI validation boot

MBI—Starting execution of MBI

IOXR—Cisco IOS XR software is starting execution

LDG—The RSP is loading (MBI started and card preparing for activity)

INCP—The software or configuration is incompatible with the RSP

OOSM—The RSP is in Out of Service, Maintenance mode

ACTV—RSP role is determined to be active RSP

STBY—RSP role is determined to be standby RSP

PREP—Preparing disk boot

RP card

Alphanumeric display

INIT—Card is inserted and microcontroller is initialized

BOOT—Board is powered on and CPU is booting

IMEM—Start initializing memory

IGEN—Start initializing the board

ICBC—Start initializing communication with the microcontroller

SCPI—Board is not plugged in properly

STID—CBC was unable to read slot ID pins correctly

PSEQ—CBC detected power sequencer failure

DBPO—CBC detected an issue during board power up

KPWR—CBC detected an issue during board power up

LGNP—CBC detected an issue during board power up

LGNI—CBC detected an issue during board power up

RMN—All tests are finished and ROMMON is ready for commands

LOAD—Downloading MBI image to CPU

RRST—ROMMON is performing a soft reset after 5 consecutive MBI validation requests timed out

MVB—ROMMON trying MBI validation boot

MBI—Starting execution of MBI

IOXR—Cisco IOS XR software is starting execution

LDG—The RP is loading (MBI started and card preparing for activity)

INCP—The software or configuration is incompatible with the RP

OOSM—The RP is in Out of Service, Maintenance mode

ACTV—RP role is determined to be active RP

STBY—RP role is determined to be standby RP

PREP—Preparing disk boot

AC Power Modules

Power status LEDs

Input power indicator on (green): Input AC power OK.
Output power indicator on (green): Output DC power OK.
Fault LED off (red): No fault is present.

The correct power module voltages are present and no faults have been detected.

DC Power Modules

Power status LEDs

Input power indicator on (green): Input DC power OK.
On the DC power tray, the Power Input LED is lit solid green if both DC feeds are valid and blinks green if only a single DC feed is valid.
Output power indicator on (green): Output DC power OK.
Fault LED off (red): No fault is present.

The correct power module voltages are present and no faults have been detected.

Fan Trays

Fan tray status LED

Green LED on: Fan Tray OK.

The fan tray fans are operating correctly.

Troubleshooting the Power Subsystem

This section contains information to troubleshoot the power subsystems:


Note For the RSP/RP card to communicate properly to a power module in a power tray, input power to at least one of the three power modules in the power tray should be present.


Troubleshooting the AC Input Power Subsystem

AC input power modules are monitored for internal temperature, voltage, and current load by the RSP/RP. If the router detects an extreme condition, it generates an alarm and logs the appropriate warning messages on the console.

Figure 4-1 shows the status indicators for the version 1 power module, and Figure 4-2 shows the status indicators for the version 2 power module. The indicator definitions follow the two figures.

Figure 4-1 Version 1 Power Module Status Indicators

 

1

Input power LED

ON continuously when the input voltage is present and within the correct range

BLINKING when the input voltage is out of acceptable range
On the DC power tray, the Power Input LED is lit solid green if both DC feeds are valid and blinks green if only a single DC feed is valid.

OFF when no input voltage is present

2

Output power LED

ON when the power module output voltage is present

BLINKING when the power module is in a power limit or overcurrent condition

3

Fault LED

ON to indicate that a power module failure has occurred

Figure 4-2 Version 2 Power Module Status Indicators

 

 

1

Input power LED

ON continuously when the input voltage is present and within the correct range

BLINKING when the input voltage is out of acceptable range
On the DC power tray, the Power Input LED is lit solid green if both DC feeds are valid and blinks green if only a single DC feed is valid.

OFF when no input voltage is present

2

Output power LED

ON when the power module output voltage is present

BLINKING when the power module is in a power limit or overcurrent condition

3

Fault LED

ON to indicate that a power module failure has occurred

Follow these steps to troubleshoot the AC power module if it is not operating properly.


Step 1 Make sure the power module is seated properly by ejecting and reseating the power module. Check that:

  • Latch on the door/ejector lever is locked securely.
  • Power switch on the power tray is set to the ON (1) position.

Step 2 Make sure the router is powered on and that all power cords are connected properly. Check that the:

  • Power cords plugged into the power tray receptacles are secured in place with their retention clips.
  • Power cords at the power source end are securely plugged into their own AC power outlets.
  • Source AC circuit breaker is switched on.

Step 3 Check the power supply status LED indicators:

  • Input power LED (green)—Indicates that the AC power input is operating normally, and the source AC input voltage of 200 to 240 VAC is within the nominal operating range.

If the input power LED is blinking, the input voltage is out of acceptable range. Verify that each AC power source is operating in the nominal range of 200 to 240 VAC.


Note On the DC power tray, the Power Input LED is lit solid green if both DC feeds are valid and blinks green if only a single DC feed is valid.


  • Output power LED (green)—Indicates that the DC power output is operating normally and the –54 VDC output voltage to the backplane are within the nominal operating range. This indicator lights only when the power switch at the rear of the power tray is set to the ON (1) position.

If the Output power LED remains off after checking all the power sources, replace the power supply with a spare. If the spare power module does not work, troubleshoot the power tray in which the module is plugged.

If the output power LED is blinking, the power module is in a power limit or overcurrent condition. Make sure that each power cord is connected to a dedicated AC power source. Verify that each AC power source is operating in the nominal range of 200 to 240 VAC and is supplying a minimum service of 20 A, North America (or 13 A, international).

  • Fault LED (red)—Indicates that the system has detected a fault within the power supply. This indicator remains off during normal operation. If the fault LED is on:

If your system has more than one power tray (Cisco ASR 9010 Router, Cisco ASR 9922 Router, and Cisco ASR 9912 Router) with power modules installed for redundancy, you can toggle the power switch at the rear of the first power tray off and then on. If the fault LED remains on after several attempts to power it on, replace the power module with a spare.

If the spare power module also fails, the problem could be a faulty power tray backplane connector. Power off the router and contact a Cisco service representative for assistance.

Verify that the power module fans are operating properly.

Verify that the fan tray is operating properly.

If the power module fans and the fan trays are operating properly, replace the existing power module with a spare.


 


Caution Because the AC input power subsystems use redundant power modules, a problem with the DC output voltage to the backplane from only one power module should not affect router operation. When the router is equipped with two AC power supplies, it powers on and operates even if one power supply fails. However, complete router functionality may be affected depending on the system load.

Troubleshooting the DC Input Power Subsystem

DC input power supplies are monitored for internal temperature, voltage, and current load by the RSP/RP. If the router detects an extreme condition, it generates an alarm and logs the appropriate warning messages on the console.

Figure 4-1 shows the status indicators for the version 1 power module, and Figure 4-2 shows the status indicators for the version 2 power module. The indicator definitions follow the two figures.

Troubleshooting a DC Power Module

Follow these steps to troubleshoot a DC power module if it is not operating properly.


Step 1 Make sure the power module is seated properly by ejecting and reseating the power module. Check that:

  • Latch on the door/ejector lever is locked securely.
  • Power switch on the power tray is set to the ON (1) position.

Step 2 Make sure the router is powered on and that all power cords are connected properly. Check that the:

  • Power cables are securely attached to their power module terminal studs.
  • Power cables are securely attached at the DC source end.
  • Source DC circuit breaker is switched on.

Step 3 Check the power supply status LED indicators:

  • Input power LED (green)—Indicates that the DC power input is operating normally, and the source DC input voltage is within the nominal operating range of –40 to –72 VDC.

If the input power LED is blinking, input connections to the power module are loose or not connected, or the input voltage is below the minimum. Verify that DC power from the source is operating in the nominal range of –40 to –72 VDC.


Note On the DC power tray, the Power Input LED is lit solid green if both DC feeds are valid and blinks green if only a single DC feed is valid. Check the input connections to the power module.


If the indicator is still flashing after you perform the above checks, replace the power module.

  • Output power LED (green)—Indicates that the DC power output is operating normally, and the –54 VDC output voltage to the backplane is within the nominal operating range. This indicator lights only when the power switch at the rear of the power tray is set to the ON (1) position.

If the output power LED remains off after checking all the power sources, replace the power module with a spare. If the spare power module does not work, troubleshoot the power tray in which the module is plugged.

If the output power LED is blinking, the power module is in a power limit or overcurrent condition. Make sure that each power cable is connected to a dedicated DC power source. Verify that each DC power source is operating in the nominal range of –40 to –72 VDC.

  • Fault LED (red)—Indicates that the system has detected a fault within the power supply. This indicator remains off during normal operation. If the fault LED is on, check the following:

If your system has more than one power tray (Cisco ASR 9010 Router, Cisco ASR 9922 Router, and Cisco ASR 9912 Router) with power modules installed for redundancy, you can toggle the power switch at the rear of the first power tray off and then on. If the fault LED is still on, eject and reseat the power module. If the fault LED remains on after several attempts to power it on, replace the power module with a spare.

If the spare power module also fails, the problem could be a faulty power tray backplane connector. Power off the router and contact a Cisco service representative for assistance.

Verify that the power module fans are operating properly.

Verify that the fan tray is operating properly.

If the power module fans and the fan trays are operating properly, replace the faulty power module with a spare.


 


Caution Because there are redundant power modules, a problem with the DC output voltage to the backplane from only one power module should not affect router operation. When the router is equipped with two DC power supplies, it powers on even if one power supply fails. However, complete router functionality may be affected depending on the system load.

Additional Power Subsystem Troubleshooting Information

This section contains additional troubleshooting information to help you isolate the cause of a power problem.

Hardware and Software Identification

The power modules have software IDs that differ from the hardware ID labels on the chassis. Table 4-3 shows how to convert power module hardware IDs to software IDs.

 

Table 4-3 Power Module Hardware and Software IDs

Hardware ID
Software ID

PS0 M0

PM0

PS0 M1

PM1

PS0 M2

PM2

PS0 M3

PM3

PS1 M0

PM4

PS1 M1

PM5

PS1 M2

PM6

PS1 M3

PM7

PS2 M0

PM8

PS2 M1

PM9

PS2 M2

PM10

PS2 M3

PM11

PS3 M0

PM12

PS3 M1

PM13

PS3 M2

PM14

PS3 M3

PM15

Obtaining Temperature and Environmental Information

If both the RSP/RP and fan trays are operating, all internal correct DC voltages are present.

Enter the show environment command at the router admin prompt to display temperature and voltage information for each installed card, fan tray, and power module as shown in this example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(admin) #show environment
 
Temperature Information
---------------------------------------------
 
R/S/I Modules Inlet Hotspot
Temperature Temperature
(deg C) (deg C)
 
0/RSP0/*
host 25.3 41.6
 
0/0/*
host 29.2 30.0
0/1/*
host 35.0 46.6
 
0/FT0/*
host 21.2 20.8
0/FT1/*
host 22.0 21.5
 
 
Voltage Information
---------------------------------------------
 
R/S/I Modules Sensor (mV) Margin
0/RSP0/*
host 0.75VTT 749 n/a
host 0.9VTT_A 909 n/a
host 0.9VTT_B 900 n/a
host IBV 10484 n/a
host 5.0V 4998 n/a
host VP3P3_CAN 3283 n/a
host 3.3V 3297 n/a
host 2.5V 2496 n/a
host 1.8VB 1798 n/a
host 1.2VA 1204 n/a
host 1.2VB 1204 n/a
host 1.05V 1051 n/a
host 1.2VD 1206 n/a
host 1.8VA 1812 n/a
host 1.5V 1495 n/a
host 1.9V 1883 n/a
 
0/0/*
host IBV 10552 n/a
host 5.0V 4939 n/a
host VP3P3_CAN 3275 n/a
host 3.3V 3303 n/a
host 2.5V 2515 n/a
host 1.8VB 1803 n/a
host 1.2VB 1203 n/a
host 1.8VA 1795 n/a
host 0.9VB 881 n/a
host 1.2V_LDO_BRG0 1195 n/a
host 1.2V_LDO_BRG1 1196 n/a
host 1.8VC 1806 n/a
host 1.5VB 1504 n/a
host 1.5VA 1499 n/a
host 1.1V(1.05V_CPU) 1051 n/a
host 0.75VA 749 n/a
host 0.75VB_0.75VC 754 n/a
host 1.1VB 1101 n/a
host 1.2V_TCAM0 1203 n/a
host 1.2V_TCAM1 1202 n/a
host 1.0V_Bridge_LDO 995 n/a
host 1.0VB 1046 n/a
host 0.75VD_and_0.75VE 755 n/a
host 1.2V_TCAM2 1208 n/a
host 1.2V_TCAM3 1203 n/a
host 1.5VC 1507 n/a
host 1.8VD 1793 n/a
host 1.1VC 1105 n/a
host ZARLINK_3.3V 3284 n/a
host ZARLINK_1.8V 1810 n/a
host 1.2V_DB 1200 n/a
host 3.3V_DB 3320 n/a
host 2.5V_DB 2498 n/a
host 1.5V_DB 1493 n/a
host 1.8V_DB 1827 n/a
host 5.0V_XFP_DB 5034 n/a
host 1.2VB_DB 1226 n/a
 
0/1/*
host IBV 10460 n/a
host 5.0V 4920 n/a
host VP3P3_CAN 3283 n/a
host 3.3V 3294 n/a
host 2.5V 2510 n/a
host 1.8VB 1804 n/a
host 1.2VB 1203 n/a
host 1.8VA 1794 n/a
host 0.9VB 882 n/a
host 1.2V_LDO_BRG0 1191 n/a
host 1.2V_LDO_BRG1 1194 n/a
host 1.8VC 1816 n/a
host 1.5VB 1508 n/a
host 1.5VA 1497 n/a
host 1.1V(1.05V_CPU) 1054 n/a
host 0.75VA 749 n/a
host 0.75VB_0.75VC 755 n/a
host 1.1VB 1104 n/a
host 1.2V_TCAM0 1205 n/a
host 1.2V_TCAM1 1207 n/a
host 1.0V_Bridge_LDO 995 n/a
host 1.0VB 1047 n/a
host 0.75VD_and_0.75VE 753 n/a
host 1.2V_TCAM2 1207 n/a
host 1.2V_TCAM3 1199 n/a
host 1.5VC 1503 n/a
host 1.8VD 1805 n/a
host 1.1VC 1102 n/a
host ZARLINK_3.3V 3272 n/a
host ZARLINK_1.8V 1811 n/a
host 1.2V_DB 1197 n/a
host 3.3V_DB 3318 n/a
host 2.5V_DB 2540 n/a
host 1.5V_DB 1511 n/a
 
 
LED Information
---------------------------------------------
 
R/S/I Modules LED Status
0/RSP0/*
host Critical-Alarm Off
host Major-Alarm Off
host Minor-Alarm Off
host ACO Off
 
Fan Information
---------------------------------------------
 
Fan speed (rpm):
FAN0 FAN1 FAN2 FAN3 FAN4 FAN5
 
0/FT0/*
7080 7020 6990 7020 6960 6900
0/FT1/*
6900 6900 7110 6960 6900 7020
Power Supply Information
---------------------------------------------
 
R/S/I Modules Sensor Watts Status
 
0/PM0/*
host PM 3000 Ok
 
 
Power Shelves Type: AC
 
Total Power Capacity: 3000W
Usable Power Capacity: 3000W
Supply Failure Protected Capacity: 0W
Worst Case Power Used: 1910W
 
Slot Max Watts
---- ---------
0/RSP0/CPU0 250
0/RSP1/CPU0 250 (default)
0/0/CPU0 375
0/1/CPU0 375
0/FT0/SP 330 (default)
0/FT1/SP 330 (default)
 
Worst Case Power Available: 1090W
Supply Protected Capacity Available: Not Protected
 

Troubleshooting the Power Distribution System

The power distribution system consists of:

  • AC or DC power modules, which supply –54 VDC to the backplane.
  • Chassis backplane, which carries voltage to chassis components.
  • DC-to-DC converters, which convert –54 VDC from the backplane to the correct voltages required by the line cards.

Follow these steps to troubleshoot the power distribution system:


Step 1 Check each power module to make sure that:

  • Power module door is fully closed and properly secured by its latch.
  • Green Input Power LED is on.
  • Green Output Power LED is on.
  • Red Fault LED is off.

If the power modules meet the above criteria, then the correct source power is present and within tolerance and output DC power is present. The power modules are functioning properly.

Step 2 Make sure the fan trays are operating:

  • If the fan trays are functioning, then the –54 VDC from the chassis backplane and the cables from the backplane to the fan trays are functioning properly.
  • If one or both fan trays are not functioning, there may be a problem with either the fan trays themselves, or the –54 VDC power supplied to the fan trays. Eject and reseat the fan trays.
  • If a fan tray is still not operating, there could be a problem with the fan tray controller card or cable. Replace the fan tray.
  • Contact your Cisco representative if replacing a fan tray or both fan trays does not fix the problem.


 

Troubleshooting the Route Processor Subsystem

The router processor subsystem consists of the route processor located on the RSP card. The RSP and the line cards each have the same onboard CPU serving as the main processor. The Controller Area Network (CAN) microcontroller processor monitors the environment and controls the onboard DC-to-DC converters.


Note A minimally configured router must have an RSP/RP installed in RSP slot 0 or RP slot 0 of the card cage to operate. If the router is equipped with a redundant RSP/RP, the redundant RSP/RP must be installed in RSP slot 1 or RP slot 1 of the card cage.


This section contains information to troubleshoot the route processor subsystem, including:

Route Processor Overview

The CPU on the RSP/RP card provides chassis control and management, boot media functionality, telecom timing and precision clock synchronization, communication to the line cards through the backplane Ethernet network, and power control through the CAN bus. In addition, the CPU on the RSP/RP card also runs the routing protocols.

Figure 4-3 identifies the ports and LEDs on the RSP card front panel.

Figure 4-4 identifies the ports and LEDs on the RSP-440 card front panel.

Figure 4-5 identifies the ports and LEDs on the RP card front panel.

Figure 4-3 RSP Card Front Panel

 

 

1

Management LAN ports

5

Compact Flash type I/II

2

Console and Auxiliary (AUX) ports

6

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and Lamp Test push buttons

3

Sync (BITS and J.211) ports

7

Eight discrete LED indicators

4

Alarm Out DB9 Connector

8

LED matrix display

Figure 4-4 RSP-440 Card Front Panel

 

1

SYNC (BITS/J.211) ports

7

External USB port

2

SFP/SFP+ ports

8

Management LAN ports

3

Service LAN port

9

Console and Auxiliary (AUX) ports

4

ToD port

10

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and Lamp Test push buttons

5

10 MHz and 1 PPS connectors

11

Eight discrete LED indicators

6

Alarm Out DB9 connector

12

LED matrix display

Figure 4-5 RP Card Front Panel

 

1

SYNC (BITS/J.211) ports

8

External USB port

2

SFP/SFP+ ports

9

Management LAN ports

3

IEEE 1588 port

10

CONSOLE and AUX ports

4

Inter-chassis nv Sync0

11

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and Lamp Test push buttons

5

Inter-chassis nv Sync1 GPS ToD

12

Nine discrete LED indicators

6

10 MHz and 1 PPS connectors

13

LED matrix display

7

Alarm Out DB9 connector

 

 

RSP and RP Front Panel Indicators

The RSP card has eight discrete LED indicators and an LED dot-matrix display for system information. The RSP-440 adds three USB-specific LEDs. The RP has nine discrete LED indicators and an LED dot-matrix display for system information.

Table 4-4 lists the display definitions of the eight discrete LEDs on the RSP and RSP-440 front panels and the three RSP-440 specific USB LEDs.

 

Table 4-4 RSP and RSP-440 Discrete LED Display Definitions

Indicator (Label)
Color
Description

Power Fail (FAIL)

Red

Standby Power Fail LED. The LED is turned off by the CAN bus controller after it is up and running.

Off

Standby power is normal.

Critical Alarm (CRIT)

Red

Critical Alarm LED. A critical alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No critical alarm has occurred.

Major Alarm (MAJ)

Red

Major alarm LED. A major alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No major alarm has occurred.

Minor Alarm (MIN)

Amber

Minor alarm LED. A minor alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No minor alarm has occurred.

Synchronization (SYNC)

Green

System timing is synchronized to an external timing source.

Amber

System timing is free running.

Off

LED never turns off.

Internal Hard Disk Drive (HDD)

Green

Hard Disk Drive is busy/active. The LED is driven by the SAS controller.

Off
(Default after reset)

Hard Disk Drive is not busy/active

External Compact Flash (CF)

Green

Compact Flash is busy/active.

Off
(Default after reset)

Compact Flash is not busy/active.

Alarm Cutoff (ACO)

Amber

Alarm Cutoff has been enabled. The ACO push button was pressed after at least one alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

Alarm Cutoff is not enabled.

External USB 2.0

[RSP-440]

Green

External USB is busy/active.

Off
(Default after reset)

External USB is not busy/active.

Internal USB 2.0 A

[RSP-440]

Green

Internal USB is busy/active.

Off
(Default after reset)

Internal USB is not busy/active.

Internal USB 2.0 B

[RSP-440]

Green

Internal USB is busy/active.

Off
(Default after reset)

Internal USB is not busy/active.

Table 4-5 lists the display definitions of the nine discrete LEDs on the RP front panel.

 

Table 4-5 RP Discrete LED Display Definitions

Indicator (Label)
Color
Description

Power Fail (FAIL)

Red
(Default after power on)

Standby Power Fail LED. The LED is turned off by the CAN bus controller after it is up and running.

Off

Standby power is normal.

Critical Alarm (CRIT)

Red

Critical Alarm LED. A critical alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No critical alarm has occurred.

Major Alarm (MAJ)

Red

Major alarm LED. A major alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No major alarm has occurred.

Minor Alarm (MIN)

Amber

Minor alarm LED. A minor alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No minor alarm has occurred.

Alarm Cutoff (ACO)

Amber

Alarm Cutoff has been enabled. The ACO push button was pressed after at least one alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

Alarm Cutoff is not enabled.

Synchronization (SYNC)

Green

System timing is synchronized to an external timing source including
IEEE 1588.

Amber

System timing is free running.

Off
(Default after reset)

LED never turns off.

Internal Solid State Hard Disk Drive (SSD)

Green

Internal Solid State Hard Disk Drive (SSD0) is busy/active. The LED is driven by the SSD/SAS controller.

Off
(Default after reset)

Internal Solid State Hard Disk Drive is not busy/active.

FC Fault

Amber

A fault has occurred on any or all of the FC cards installed. This LED will be on during the boot phase of the FC. This LED will be turned off by the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus controller after it is up and running.

Off
(Default after reset)

All FC cards are booted up and ready.

GPS

Green

GPS interface provisioned and ports are turned on. ToD, 1 PPS, 10 Mhz are all valid.

Off
(Default after reset)

Either the interface is not provisioned, or the ports are not turned on. ToD, 1 PPS, 10 Mhz are not valid.

Compact Flash and Status LEDs

One compact flash slot provides the RSP with additional flash memory capacity. All combinations of different flash devices are supported by the RSP. You can use ATA flash disks, Type 1 or Type 2 linear flash memory cards, or a combination of the two.


Note The RSP only supports +5.2 VDC flash memory devices. It does not support +3.3 VDC PCMCIA devices.



Note The RSP-440 and RP do not have a compact flash slot.


The slot has an eject button (located behind the cover) to remove a flash card from the slot.

Ethernet Ports and Status LEDs

The RSP/RP has two 8-pin media-dependent interface (MDI) RJ-45 Management LAN ports for 100 Mbps and 1000Mbps Ethernet connections. These ports are labeled MGT LAN 0 and MGT LAN 1.

The transmission speed of the Ethernet port is not user-configurable. You set the speed through an autosensing scheme on the RSP/RP, which determines the speed by the network that the Ethernet port is connected to. However, even at an autosensed data transmission rate of 100 Mbps, the Ethernet port can only provide a usable bandwidth of substantially less than 100 Mbps. You can expect a maximum usable bandwidth of approximately 12 Mbps when using an Ethernet connection.

The following LEDs on the front panel indicate traffic status and port selection (see Figure 4-6):

  • LINK—Indicates link activity.
  • ACT—Indicates which Ethernet port is selected (ETH 0 or ETH 1).

Note Because both ports are supported on the RSP/RP card, MGT LAN 0 is always on. MGT LAN 0 lights when it is selected.


Figure 4-6 Management LAN Port Activity LEDs

 

Auxiliary and Console Ports

The auxiliary and console ports on the RSP/RP are EIA/TIA-232 (also known as RS-232) asynchronous serial ports connect external devices to monitor and manage the system:

  • Auxiliary port—RJ-45 interface that supports flow control and is often used to connect a modem, a channel service unit (CSU), or other optional equipment for Telnet management.
  • Console port—Receptacle (female) that provides a RJ-45 interface for connecting a console terminal.

Alphanumeric Message Displays

The alphanumeric message displays are organized in one row of four LED characters (see callout 8 in Figure 4-3 for the RSP, callout 12 in Figure 4-4 for the RSP-440, and callout 13 in Figure 4-5 for the RP).

The alphanumeric message displays show router status messages during the boot process and after the boot process is complete:

  • During the boot process, the message displays are controlled directly by the CAN microcontroller.
  • After the boot process, the message displays are controlled by Cisco IOS XR software (through the CAN bus).

The alphanumeric message displays also provide information about different levels of system operation, including the status of the RSP/RP, router error messages, and user-defined status and error messages.


Note A list of all system and error messages appears in the Cisco IOS XR System Error Messages publication.


Flash Memory

You can use the flash memory on the RSP card to store multiple Cisco IOS XR software and microcode images that you can use to operate the router. You can download new images to flash memory over the network (or from a local server) to replace an existing image or to add it as an additional image. The router can be booted (manually or automatically) from any of the stored images in flash memory.

Flash memory also functions as a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server to allow other servers to boot remotely from the stored images, or to copy them into their own flash memory.

The system uses two types of flash memory:

  • Onboard flash memory ( bootflash)— Contains the Cisco IOS XR boot image
  • Compact flash memory disks (or cards)—Contains the Cisco IOS XR software images

Note The RSP-440 and RP do not have a compact flash slot.


Table 4-6 lists supported compact flash disk sizes and Cisco part numbers.

 

Table 4-6 Supported Compact Flash Disk Sizes

Compact Flash Disk Size
Part Number

1 GB

16-3204-01

Troubleshooting RSP and RP Cards

When the router is powered on, the alphanumeric display on the RSP indicates the following sequence:

INIT—Card is inserted and microcontroller is initialized.

BOOT—Board is powered on and CPU is booting.

IMEM—Start initializing memory.

IGEN—Start initializing the board.

ICBC—Start initializing communication with the microcontroller.

PDxy—Loading programmable devices (x = FPGA, y = ROMMON).

PSTx—Power on self test x.

RMN—All tests are finished and ROMMON is ready for commands.

LOAD—Downloading Minimum Boot Image (MBI) image to CPU.

MBI—Starting execution of MBI.

IOXR—Cisco IOS-XR software is starting execution.

ACTV—RSP role is determined to be active RSP.

STBY—RSP role is determined to be standby RSP.

PREP—Preparing disk boot.

When the router is powered on, the alphanumeric display on the RSP-440 and RP indicates the following sequence:

INIT—Card is inserted and microcontroller is initialized

BOOT—Board is powered on and CPU is booting

IMEM—Start initializing memory

IGEN—Start initializing the board

ICBC—Start initializing communication with the microcontroller

SCPI—Board is not plugged in properly

STID—CBC was unable to read slot ID pins correctly

PSEQ—CBC detected power sequencer failure

DBPO—CBC detected an issue during board power up

KPWR—CBC detected an issue during board power up

LGNP—CBC detected an issue during board power up

LGNI—CBC detected an issue during board power up

UPWR—User requested power off

TEMP—Over temperature

CPU—CPU communication failure

RMN—All tests are finished and ROMMON is ready for commands

LOAD—Downloading MBI image to CPU

RRST—ROMMON is performing a soft reset after 5 consecutive MBI validation requests timed out

MVB—ROMMON trying MBI validation boot

MBI—Starting execution of MBI

IOXR—Cisco IOS XR software is starting execution

LDG—The RSP/RP is loading (MBI started and card preparing for activity)

INCP—The software or configuration is incompatible with the RSP/RP

OOSM—The RSP/RP is in Out of Service, Maintenance mode

ACTV—RSP/RP role is determined to be active RSP/RP

STBY—RSP/RP role is determined to be standby RSP/RP

PREP—Preparing disk boot

You can use the alphanumeric display to isolate a problem with the RSP:

  • Alphanumeric display is powered directly from the CAN microcontroller on the RSP card through the chassis backplane:

If the alphanumeric display is not operating, the CAN microcontroller may be malfunctioning.

If the CAN microcontroller is operating, the alphanumeric display could be on even if the RSP failed to power on.

  • If the alphanumeric display is not operating, but the power modules and the fan trays are operational, the RSP may not be installed properly, or the +5 VDC output from the chassis backplane may be faulty:

Make sure that the system is powered on.

Initialize the RSP card by ejecting it from the chassis backplane and then reseating it.

  • If the alphanumeric display is operating, check the meaning of the messages (see Table 4-7 for the RSP).

When the DC-to-DC converters are powered on by the CAN microcontroller, the begins the RSP boot process and displays various status messages. Some messages appear briefly; while others appear for several seconds. If the messages appear to stop at a particular point, the boot process may be halted:

Make a note of the message.

Turn off power to the router, then turn on the power again to reset the router and start the boot process. If the router halts again, replace the RSP (see the “Removing and Replacing Cards from the Chassis” section).

 

Table 4-7 Troubleshooting Using the RSP Alphanumeric Display Messages

Message
Description

PST1

Failed DDR RAM memory test

PST2

Failed FPGA image CRC check

PST3

Failed board type and slot ID verification

FC Card Front Panel Indicator

The front panel of the FC card has one tri-color LED indicator for system information.

Table 4-8 lists the display definitions of the discrete LED on the FC card front panel.

 

Table 4-8 FC Card LED Display Definitions

Indicator (Label)
Color
Description

Power Fail (FAIL)

Green

FC card powered on and FPGA is programmed.

Note Fabric Data Link failure is not detected so LED remains green. Monitor CLI messages for status.

Red

Fault or malfunction in FC card power up or FPGA programming.

Note Once any ejector lever release button is pushed in, the FC card must be physically removed and reinserted (OIR) to restart the FC card. During this time before the FC card is restarted, the LED is red.

Amber

FC card powered on but fabric not active.

Off
(Default after reset)

FC card powered off via CLI.

Troubleshooting Line Cards and Modular Port Adapters

See the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Ethernet Line Card Installation Guide for information about troubleshooting line cards and modular port adapters (MPA).

Monitoring Critical, Major, and Minor Alarm Status

The alarms can warn of:

  • Overtemperature condition on a component in the card cage
  • Fan failure in a fan tray
  • Overcurrent condition in a power supply
  • Out-of-tolerance voltage on one of the cards
  • Insertion count for an RSP, RP, FC, or line card has reached a specified threshold. For more information on OIR insertion counts, see the “OIR Monitoring” section.

The alarm LEDs are controlled by the CAN microcontroller software, which sets the threshold levels for triggering the different stages of alarms.

The RSP/RP card continuously polls the system for temperature, voltage, current, and fan speed values. If a threshold value is exceeded, the RSP/RP sets the appropriate alarm severity level on the alarm card, which lights the corresponding LED, and energizes the appropriate alarm display relays to activate any external audible or visual alarms wired to the alarm display. The RSP/RP also logs a message about the threshold violation on the system console.


Note If one or more of the alarm LEDs is on, check the system console for messages describing the alarm.


Troubleshooting the Cooling Subsystem

You may need to troubleshoot the cooling subsystem if an overtemperature condition occurs. The cooling subsystem of the router consists of a fan tray in the chassis and a fan in each of the power supplies. The fan tray and the power supply fans circulate air to maintain acceptable operating temperatures within the router.


Caution When troubleshooting the fan trays, never unplug all the fan trays at the same time.

This section contains information to troubleshooting the cooling subsystem and includes:

Fan Tray Operation

The fan trays maintain acceptable operating temperatures for the internal components by drawing cooling air through a replaceable air filter into the switch fabric and alarm card cage and then through the line card and RSP card cage (see Figure 1-12 for the Cisco ASR 9010 Router cooling path, Figure 1-13 for the Cisco ASR 9006 Router cooling path, and Figure 1-14 for the Cisco ASR 9904 Router cooling path.

In the Cisco ASR 9922 Router, the fan trays draw cooling air from the front of the chassis into the middle card cage and then through each of the two line card cages top and bottom (see Figure 1-15). The fan tray receives power from the chassis backplane through a wiring harness.

In the Cisco ASR 9912 Router, the rear-insertion fan trays draw cooling air from the front of the chassis into the card cage and then up through the chassis to exit out the rear (see Figure 1-16).

The fan tray contains 12 fans (Cisco ASR 9010 Router, Cisco ASR 9904 Router, Cisco ASR 9922 Router, and Cisco ASR 9912 Router) or six fans (Cisco ASR 9006 Router), a controller card, and one front panel status LED indicator:

  • Green—Fan tray is functioning properly.
  • Red—There is a fault detected in the fan tray.

If the air temperature inside the chassis rises, blower speed increases to provide additional cooling air to the internal components. If the internal air temperature continues to rise beyond the specified threshold, the system environmental monitor shuts down all internal power to prevent equipment damage because of excessive heat.

If the system detects that one or more of the fans in the fan tray has failed, it displays a warning message on the system console. In addition, the remaining fans go to full speed to compensate for the loss of the failed fan.


Note Due to air leakage, the chassis should not be operated with any of the fan trays completely missing. Replace any missing fan tray within five minutes. Any fan tray replacement should be performed when the chassis is back to room temperature.


Power Module Fans

Each AC or DC power module is equipped with two fans that draw cooling air in through the front of the power module and force warm air out the back of the power tray:

  • If the power source is within the required range, the power supply fan remains on.
  • If a fan fails:

Power module detects an internal overtemperature condition.

Fault and Temp indicators light.

Power module sends an overtemperature warning to the system and then shuts down the system.

For additional power supply troubleshooting information, see the “Troubleshooting the Power Subsystem” section.


Note For the RSP/RP to communicate properly to a power module in a power tray, input power to at least one of the three power modules in the power tray should be present.


Overtemperature Conditions

The following console error message indicates that the system has detected an overtemperature condition or out-of-tolerance power value inside the system:

Queued messages:
%ENVM-1-SHUTDOWN: Environmental Monitor initiated shutdown

The preceding message could also indicate a faulty component or temperature sensor. Enter the show environment command or the show environment all command at the user EXEC prompt to display information about the internal system environment. The information generated by these commands includes:

  • Voltage measurements on each card from the DC-to-DC converter
  • The +5 VDC for the I2C module
  • Operating voltage for the fan trays
  • Temperature measurements received by two sensors on each card (one for inlet air temperature and one for the card’s hot-spot temperature) as well as temperature measurements from sensors located in each power module

If an environmental shutdown results from an overtemperature or out-of-tolerance condition, the Fault indicator on the power supply lights before the system shuts down.

Although an overtemperature condition is unlikely at initial system startup, make sure that:

  • Heated exhaust air from other equipment in the immediate environment is not entering the chassis card cage vents.
  • You allow sufficient air flow by maintaining a minimum of 6 inches (15.24 cm) of clearance at both the inlet and exhaust openings on the chassis and the power modules to allow cool air to enter freely and hot air to be expelled from the chassis.

Isolating Cooling Subsystem Problems

Follow these steps to isolate a problem with the chassis cooling system if you have an overtemperature condition:


Step 1 Make sure the fan trays are operating properly when you power on the system. To determine if a fan tray is operating, check the LED indicator on each fan tray front panel:

  • OK (green)—Fan tray is functioning properly and receiving –48 VDC power, indicating that the cables from the chassis backplane to the fan tray are good.
  • Fail (red)—Fault is detected in the fan tray. Replace the fan tray.
  • If neither indicator is on and the blower is not operating, there may be a problem with either the fan tray or the –48 VDC power supplied to the fan tray. Go to Step 2.

Caution Never unplug all the fan trays at the same time.

Step 2 Eject and reseat the fan tray making sure the captive screws are securely tightened to a torque of 10 +/–1 in-lb.

If the fan tray still does not function, go to Step 3.

Step 3 Check for –48 VDC power by looking at the LED indicators on each power module:

  • If the Pwr OK indicator is on and the Fault indicator is off on each power module, it indicates that the fan trays are receiving –48 VDC:

If a fan tray is still not functioning, there could be a problem with the fan tray controller card or an undetected problem in the fan tray cable. Replace the fan tray.

If the new fan tray does not function, contact a Cisco customer service representative for assistance.

  • If the Fault indicator is on, the power supply is faulty. Replace the power supply.
  • If the Temp and Fault indicators are on, an overtemperature condition exists:

Verify that the power supply fan is operating properly.

If the fan is not operating, replace the power supply.

Contact your Cisco representative if replacing the power supply does not fix the problem.