Cisco ASR 9001 and Cisco ASR 9001-S Routers Hardware Installation Guide
Troubleshooting the Installation
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Table of Contents

Troubleshooting the Installation

Troubleshooting Overview

Troubleshooting Using a Subsystem Approach

Normal Router Startup Sequence

Identifying Startup Issues

Troubleshooting the Power Subsystem

Troubleshooting the AC-Input Power Subsystem

Troubleshooting the DC-Input Power Subsystem

Troubleshooting a DC Power Module

Additional Power Subsystem Troubleshooting Information

Hardware and Software Identification

Obtaining Temperature and Environmental Information

Troubleshooting the Power Distribution System

Troubleshooting the Route Processor Subsystem

Route Processor Overview

RP Front Panel Indicators

Ethernet Ports and Status LEDs

Auxiliary and Console Ports

Monitoring Critical, Major, and Minor Alarm Status

Troubleshooting the Line Card

Initial Boot Process

Status LEDs

Configuring and Troubleshooting Line Card Interfaces

Configuration Parameters

Line Card Interface Address

Using Configuration Commands

Basic Line Card Configuration

Verifying the Transceiver Modules

Advanced Line Card Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting the Cooling Subsystem

Fan Tray Operation

Power Module Fans

Over-temperature Conditions

Isolating Cooling Subsystem Problems

Troubleshooting the Installation

This chapter contains general troubleshooting information to help isolate the cause of any difficulties you might encounter during the installation and initial startup of the system.

Although an over-temperature condition is unlikely at initial startup, environmental monitoring functions are included in this chapter because these too monitor internal voltages.

Troubleshooting the installation is presented in these sections:

Troubleshooting Overview

This section describes the methods used in troubleshooting the router. The troubleshooting methods are organized according to the major subsystems in the router.

If you are unable to solve a problem on your own, you can contact a Cisco customer service representative for assistance. When you call, have this information ready:

  • Date you received the router and the chassis serial number (located on a label on the back of the chassis).
  • Installed line card and Cisco software release number:

Use the show version command to determine the Cisco software release number.

  • Brief description of the symptoms and steps you have taken to isolate and solve the issue.
  • Maintenance agreement or warranty information.

Troubleshooting Using a Subsystem Approach

To solve a system problem, try to isolate the problem to a specific subsystem. Compare the current router behavior with the expected router behavior. Because a startup issue is usually attributable to one component, it is most efficient to examine each subsystem, rather than trying to troubleshoot each router component.

For troubleshooting purposes in this chapter, the router consists of these subsystems:

  • Power subsystem—Router chassis is shipped with up to two AC-input or DC-input power supply modules installed in the Cisco ASR 9001 Router chassis.
  • Chassis backplane power distribution—System transfers +12 VDC power from the power modules to the chassis backplane and distributes it to all the cards through the backplane connectors. The fan tray receives power from the chassis backplane and communicate to the RP CAN Bus controller.
  • Processor subsystem—Includes the active Route Processor (RP) card with line card. The RP is equipped with onboard processors. The RP downloads a copy of the Cisco software image to the line card processor.
  • Cooling subsystem—Consists of one fan tray with 14 fans, which circulate cooling air through the chassis.

Normal Router Startup Sequence

You can generally determine when and where the router failed during the startup sequence by checking the status LEDs on the power modules and RP.

In a normal router startup sequence, this sequence of events and conditions occur:

1. The fan in each power module receives power and begins drawing air through the power supply.

The power module input power and output power indicators are on.

2. The fans in the fan tray receive power and begin drawing air through the chassis.

The fan tray OK indicator is on.

3. As the power-on and boot process progresses for the RP, the status of the RP appears on the front panel of the card.

Identifying Startup Issues

Table 4-1 shows the LED states on the power modules (AC or DC), RP, and the fan tray after a successful system startup.

 

Table 4-1 LEDs at System Startup

Component
Type of Indicator
Display Contents/LED Status and Meaning

Line Card

Status LED

Green: The line card is enabled and ready for use.

AC Power Modules

Power status LEDs

Green (ON): Input AC power OK.
Amber (OFF): No fault is present.
The correct power module voltages are present and no faults have been detected.

DC Power Modules

Power status LEDs

Green (ON): Input DC power OK.
Amber (OFF): No fault is present.
The correct power module voltages are present and no faults have been detected.

Fan Tray

Fan tray status LED

Green (ON): Fan Tray OK.

The fan tray fans are operating correctly.

Troubleshooting the Power Subsystem

This section contains information to troubleshoot the power subsystems:


NoteFor the RP card to communicate properly to a power module, input power to at least one of the two power modules should be present.


Troubleshooting the AC-Input Power Subsystem

AC-input power modules are monitored for internal temperature, voltage, and current load by the RP. If the router detects an extreme condition, it generates an alarm and logs the appropriate warning messages on the console.

Figure 4-1 shows the status indicators for the power module. The indicator definitions are provided after the figure.

Figure 4-1 Power Module Status Indicators

 

 

1

OK (Green) Power LED

ON when the power supply is ON and OK

BLINKING when the input AC power voltage is present

OFF when no input voltage is present

2

FAIL (Amber) LED

ON when power supply failure occurs (due to over voltage, over current, over temperature, and fan failure)

BLINKING when alarm condition or power supply warning events occur, where the power supply continues to operate (due to high temperature, high power, or slow fan)

OFF when no power supply failure has occurred

Use this procedure to troubleshoot the AC power module if it is not operating properly:


Step 1 Make sure the power module is seated properly by ejecting and reseating the power module. Verify that:

  • Latch on the ejector lever is locked securely.
  • Power switch on the front panel is set to the ON position.

Step 2 Make sure the router is powered on and that all power cords are connected properly. Verify that:

  • Power cables are securely attached to their power module terminal studs.
  • Power cords at the power source end are securely plugged into their own AC power outlets.
  • Source AC circuit breaker is switched on.

Step 3 Check the power supply status LED indicators:

  • OK (green) Power LED—Indicates that the input AC power is OK.

If the OK LED is blinking, AC power input is operating normally, and the source AC input voltage of 100 to 240 VAC is within the nominal operating range.

  • FAIL (amber) LED —Indicates the power supply failure, includes over voltage, over current, over temperature and fan failure conditions.

If the FAIL LED is blinking, it indicates alarm condition or power supply warning events, while the power supply continues to operate; this includes high temperature, high power, or slow fan conditions. Make sure that each power cord is connected to a dedicated AC power source. Verify that each AC power source is operating in the nominal range of 100 to 240 VAC and is supplying a minimum service of 15 A, North America (or 10 A, international).


 

Troubleshooting the DC-Input Power Subsystem

DC-input power supplies are monitored for internal temperature, voltage, and current load by the RP. If the router detects an extreme condition, it generates an alarm and logs the appropriate warning messages on the console.

Figure 4-1 shows the status indicators for the power module. The indicator definitions are provided after the figure.

Troubleshooting a DC Power Module

Use this procedure to troubleshoot a DC power module if it is not operating properly.


Step 1 Make sure the power module is seated properly by ejecting and reseating the power module. Verify that:

  • Latch on the ejector lever is locked securely.
  • Power switch on the front panel is set to the ON position.

Step 2 Make sure the router is powered on and that all power cords are connected properly. Verify that:

  • Power cables are securely attached to their power module terminal studs.
  • Power cables are securely attached at the DC source end.
  • Source DC circuit breaker is switched on.

Step 3 Check the power supply status LED indicators:

  • OK (green) Power LED—Indicates that the input DC power is OK.

If the OK LED is blinking, DC power input is operating normally, and the source DC input voltage of –40 to –72 VDC is within the nominal operating range.

  • FAIL (amber) LED —Indicates the power supply failure, includes over voltage, over current, over temperature and fan failure conditions.

If the FAIL LED is blinking, it indicates alarm condition or power supply warning events, while the power supply continues to operate; this includes high temperature, high power, or slow fan conditions. Make sure that each power cable is connected to a dedicated DC power source. Verify that each DC power source is operating in the nominal range of –40 to –72 VDC.


 

Additional Power Subsystem Troubleshooting Information

This section contains additional troubleshooting information to help you isolate the cause of a power problem.

Hardware and Software Identification

The power modules have software IDs that differ from the hardware ID labels on the chassis. Table 4-2 is a table for converting power module hardware IDs to software IDs.

 

Table 4-2 Power Module Hardware and Software IDs

Hardware ID
Software ID

PS0 M0

PM0

PS0 M1

PM1

Obtaining Temperature and Environmental Information

If both the RP and the fan tray are operating, all internal correct DC voltages are present.

Enter the show environment command at the router admin prompt to display temperature and voltage information for each installed card, fan tray, and power module as shown in this example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(admin)#show environment
Sat Apr 15 04:57:35.185 UTC
 
Temperature Information
---------------------------------------------
 
R/S/I Modules Sensor (deg C)
0/RSP0/*
host Inlet0 31.1
host Inlet1 30.3
host Hotspot0 45.8
host Hotspot1 38.3
host Hotspot2 45.5
host Hotspot3 46.0
 
0/0/*
ep0 Inlet0 33.1
ep0 Hotspot0 38.5
ep1 Inlet0 33.6
ep1 Hotspot0 37.5
host Hotspot0 43.5
host Hotspot1 37.8
host Hotspot2 45.7
host Hotspot3 41.6
host Hotspot4 45.9
host Inlet0 36.0
 
Voltage Information
---------------------------------------------
 
R/S/I Modules Sensor (mV) Margin
0/RSP0/*
host 5.0V 5000 n/a
host VP3P3_CAN 3299 n/a
host 0.75V 750 n/a
host 3.3V_RSP 3299 n/a
host 2.5V_RSP 2499 n/a
host 1.8V_RSP 1799 n/a
host 1.5V_RSP 1500 n/a
host 1.2V_RSP 1199 n/a
host 1.9V_LDO_RSP 1900 n/a
host 1.2V_TIMEX 1199 n/a
host 1.0V_IMIO_CORE 1000 n/a
host 1.8V_USB 1799 n/a
host 12.0V 12004 n/a
host 7.0V_RSP 7000 n/a
host 3.3V_OCXO_RSP 3301 n/a
host 1.0V_RSP 1000 n/a
 
 
0/0/*
ep0 IBV 7960 n/a
ep0 VP3P3 3319 n/a
ep0 VP1P2 1200 n/a
ep0 VP1P2_PHY 1193 n/a
ep0 VP3P3_AUX 3276 n/a
ep1 VP2P5 2499 n/a
ep1 VP3P3 3300 n/a
ep1 VP1P2 1200 n/a
ep1 VP1P8 1799 n/a
ep1 VP5P0 5000 n/a
ep1 VP0P9_HEXP0 899 n/a
ep1 VP0P9_LDO 900 n/a
ep1 VP1P2_LDO 1199 n/a
host 5.0V 5000 n/a
host VP3P3_CAN 3299 n/a
host 2.5V 2500 n/a
host 0.75V 749 n/a
host 2.5V_DB 2499 n/a
host 1.8V_DB 1799 n/a
host 7.0V 6998 n/a
host VP1P0_SAC_CORE 1000 n/a
host VP1P0_SAC_VDDA 1000 n/a
host VP1P0_SAC_VDDD 1000 n/a
host VP1P2_SAC_VDDT 1199 n/a
host VP1P8_SAC_VDDR 1799 n/a
host VP1P0_SKT1_CORE 1000 n/a
host VP1P0_SKT2_CORE 1000 n/a
host VP1P0_CPU_CORE 999 n/a
host VP1P2 1199 n/a
host VP1P5 1500 n/a
host VP3P3_DB 3300 n/a
host VP1P5_DB 1499 n/a
host 1.2V_BLWDO 1200 n/a
host 1.0V_BLWDO 1000 n/a
host 1.8V_LC 1799 n/a
host 1.0V_FPGA_CORE_LC 999 n/a
host 1.2V_LC 1199 n/a
host 1.2V_PHY_LDO 1200 n/a
host 0.9V_PHY_LDO 900 n/a
host 0.9V_PHY_CORE 899 n/a
host 1.0V_LC_MB 999 n/a
host 3.3V_LC 3300 n/a
host 1.8V_ZAR_LDO 1799 n/a
host 3.3V_ZAR_LDO 3300 n/a
host 2.5V_SKT_SKM 2500 n/a
host 1.8V_LGTNG 1800 n/a
host 1.5V_NP4C_1 1500 n/a
host 1.5V_SKT 1500 n/a
host 1.05V_NP4C_CORE 1050 n/a
host 1.0V_SKT 1000 n/a
host 1.0V_SKM 999 n/a
host 1.0V_LGTNG_CORE 1000 n/a
host 0.9V_TCAM0_CORE 910 n/a
host 0.9V_TCAM1_CORE 909 n/a
host 3.3V_CLK_LDO 3299 n/a
host 2.5V_CLK_LDO 2499 n/a
host 1.2V_WL_LDO 1199 n/a
host 1.0V_WL_LDO 999 n/a
host 1.0V_PEX1 992 n/a
host 1.0V_PEX2 999 n/a
host 1.5V_NP4C2 1500 n/a
 
 
LED Information
---------------------------------------------
 
R/S/I Modules LED Status
0/RSP0/*
host Critical-Alarm Off
host Major-Alarm Off
host Minor-Alarm Off
host ACO Off
host Fail Off
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:ios#
 

Troubleshooting the Power Distribution System

The power distribution system consists of:

  • AC or DC power modules that supply +12 VDC to the backplane.
  • Chassis backplane that carries voltage to chassis components.
  • DC-to-DC converters that convert +12 VDC from the backplane to the correct voltages required by the line card.

Use this procedure to troubleshoot the power distribution system:


Step 1 Check each power module to make sure that:

  • Power module is fully inserted and properly secured by its latch.
  • Green LED is on.
  • Amber LED is off.

If the power modules meet the above criteria, then the correct source power is present and within tolerance, and output DC power is present. The power modules are functioning properly.

Step 2 Make sure the fan tray is operating:

  • If the fan tray is functioning, then the +12 VDC from the chassis backplane to the fan tray is functioning properly.
  • If the fan tray is still not operating, there could be a problem with either the fan tray or with the +12 VDC distribution through backplane.
  • Contact your Cisco representative if replacing the fan tray does not fix the problem.


 

Troubleshooting the Route Processor Subsystem

The router processor subsystem consists of the route processor located on the RP card. The RP and the line card each has the same onboard CPU serving as the main processor. The Controller Area Network (CAN) microcontroller processor monitors the environment and controls the onboard DC-to-DC converters.

This section contains information to troubleshoot the route processor subsystem, including:

Route Processor Overview

The CPU on the RP card provides chassis control and management, boot media functionality, telecom timing and precision clock synchronization, communication to the line card through the backplane Ethernet network, and power control through the CAN bus. In addition, the CPU on the RP card also runs the routing protocols.

Figure 4-2 identifies the slots, ports, and LEDs on the RP card front panel.

Figure 4-2 Cisco ASR 9001 Router Chassis Front Panel

 

 

1

Service LAN and ToD ports

6

External USB port

2

10MHz and 1PPS ports

7

Eight discrete LED indicators

3

SYNC (BITS/J.211) ports

8

CLUSTER ports

4

CONSOLE and AUX ports

9

Line Card SFP+ ports

5

Management LAN ports

 

 

RP Front Panel Indicators

The RP card has eight discrete LED indicators for display of system information.

Table 4-3 lists the display definitions of the eight discrete LEDs on the RP front panel as well as the normal LED states on the power modules (AC or DC) and the fan tray after a successful system startup.

 

Table 4-3 RP Discrete LED Display Definitions

Indicator (Label)
LED
Color
Description

RSP FAIL

Bi-color

Red

RSP in initializing or failed state.

Green

RSP is up and running.

Off

RSP is normal.

LC FAIL

Bi-color

Red

LC in initializing or failed state.

Green

LC is up and running.

Off

LC is normal.

Critical Alarm (CRIT)

Single color

Red

Critical Alarm LED. A critical alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No critical alarm has occurred.

Major Alarm (MAJ)

Single color

Red

Major alarm LED. A major alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No major alarm has occurred.

Minor Alarm (MIN)

Single color

Amber

Minor alarm LED. A minor alarm has occurred.

Off
(Default after reset)

No minor alarm has occurred.

External USB 2.0

(EUSB)

Single color

Green

External USB is busy/active. The LED is driven by the USB controller.

Off
(Default after reset)

External USB is not busy/active.

Alarm Cutoff (ACO)

Single color

Off

Alarm Cutoff is not enabled.

Note: ACO LED is not in use and will always be OFF.

Synchronization (SYNC)

Bi-color

Green

Sync - Time core is synchronized to an external source (either GPS or IEEE1588).

Amber

Not used.

Off
(Default after reset)

Time core clock synchronization is either disabled OR Time core is synchronized with external source excluding GPS and IEEE1588

Power Module
FAIL/OK
(Power Module)

Bi-color

Green

Refer Figure 4-1 for detailed description.

Amber

Refer Figure 4-1 for detailed description.

Fan Tray
STATUS
(Fan tray)

Bi-color

Amber

Fan tray power ON state.

Green

Fan tray fully functional.

Red

Fan failure condition.

Ethernet Ports and Status LEDs

The RP has two 8-pin media-dependent interface (MDI) RJ-45 Management LAN ports for 10 Mbps, 100 Mbps, and 1000Mbps Ethernet connections. These ports are labeled MGT LAN 0 and MGT LAN 1.

The transmission speed of the Ethernet port is not user-configurable. You set the speed through an auto-sensing scheme on the RP, the speed is determined by the network to which the Ethernet port is connected. However, even at an auto-sensed data transmission rate of 100 Mbps, the Ethernet port can only provide a usable bandwidth of substantially less than 100 Mbps. You can expect a maximum usable bandwidth of approximately 12 Mbps when using an Ethernet connection.

These LEDs on the front panel indicate traffic status and port selection (see Figure 4-3):

  • LINK—Indicates link activity.
  • ACT—Indicates which Ethernet port is selected (ETH 0 or ETH 1).

Note Because both ports are supported on the RP card, MGT LAN 0 is always on. MGT LAN 0 lights when it is selected.


Figure 4-3 Management LAN Port Activity LEDs

 

Auxiliary and Console Ports

The auxiliary and console ports on the RP are EIA/TIA-232 (also known as RS-232) asynchronous serial ports connect external devices to monitor and manage the system:

  • Auxiliary port—RJ45 interface that supports flow control and is often used to connect a modem, a channel service unit (CSU), or other optional equipment for Telnet management.
  • Console port—Receptacle (female) that provides a RJ45 interface for connecting a console terminal.

Monitoring Critical, Major, and Minor Alarm Status

Alarms warn of:

  • Overtemperature condition on a component in the card
  • Fan failure in the fan tray
  • Overcurrent condition in a power supply
  • Out-of-tolerance voltage on the card

The alarm LEDs are controlled by the CAN microcontoller software, which sets the threshold levels for triggering the different stages of alarms.

The RP card continuously polls the system for temperature, voltage, current, and fan speed values. If a threshold value is exceeded, the RP sets the appropriate alarm severity level on the alarm card, which lights the corresponding LED, and energizes the appropriate alarm display relays to activate any external audible or visual alarms wired to the alarm display. The RP also logs a message about the threshold violation on the system console.


NoteIf one or more of the alarm LEDs is on, check the system console for messages describing the alarm.


Troubleshooting the Line Card

Initial Boot Process

During a typical line card boot process, these events occur:

1. The line card receives power and begins executing initialization software.

2. The line card performs internal checks, and prepares to accept the Cisco IOS XR software from the RP.

3. The RP loads the line card with its Cisco IOS XR software.

To verify that the line card is working properly:


Step 1 Check that the LC FAIL LED is ON (green) to verify that the card is operating normally.

Step 2 Check that the RSP FAIL LED for the port of interest is ON (green or blinking) to verify that the port is active. If the RSP FAIL LED is not ON, verify that the associated interface is not shut down.

Step 3 If one of the conditions above is not met, see the “Advanced Line Card Troubleshooting” section to identify any possible problems.


 

Status LEDs

You can use the LC FAIL LED or the RSP FAIL LED on the RP card front panel to verify proper operation or troubleshoot a failure (see Table 4-4 ).

 

Table 4-4 RSP FAIL and LC FAIL LEDs

RSP FAIL LED

Green

Port state is up and a valid physical layer link is established.

Blinking

Line activity is occurring. The LED blinks green-amber-green.

Red

Port state is up, but there is a link loss or SFP/XFP failure.

Off

Port is administratively shut down.

LC FAIL LED

Green

Line card has booted properly, and is ready to pass or is passing traffic.

Red

Line card has encountered a hardware error, and is not passing traffic.

Off

Line card is powered off. The LED might turn off momentarily when switching between the states described above, although the line card has not powered off.

Configuring and Troubleshooting Line Card Interfaces

After the person who installed the hardware verifies that the line card is working properly by examining the LEDs, the network administrator can configure the new interface. These sections provide information on configuring and troubleshooting the line card:

Configuration Parameters

Table 4-5 lists the default interface configuration parameters that are present when an interface is enabled on a 10-Gigabit Ethernet line card. See Cisco IOS XR software documentation for complete information about these parameters.

 

Table 4-5 Line Card Configuration Default Values

Parameter
Configuration File Entry
Default Value

Flow control

flow-control

egress on
ingress off

MTU

mtu

1514 bytes for normal frames

1518 bytes for IEEE 802.1Q tagged frames

1522 bytes for Q-in-Q frames

MAC address

mac address

Hardware burned-in address (BIA)

Line Card Interface Address

A Cisco ASR 9001 Router identifies an interface address by its rack number, line card slot number, instance number, and port number, in the format rack/ slot /instance/ port . The rack parameter is reserved for multirack systems; so, the rack parameter is always 0 (zero) for the Cisco ASR 9001 Router.

The line card slot is numbered 0 with three subslots. The subslots on the line card are numbered 0, 1, and 2. 0 and 1 are reserved for EP ports and 2 is for native ports on the line card. Even if the line card contains only one port, you must use the rack/ slot /instance/ port notation.

Using Configuration Commands

The command line interface (CLI) for Cisco IOS XR software is divided into different command modes. To configure a line card, you enter the correct mode and then enter the commands you need.

When you first log in, you are automatically in EXEC mode. Next, enter the configure command to access configuration mode. Then, enter the interface command to enter interface configuration mode and specify the interface. You are now in the command mode where you can configure the new interface. Be prepared with the information you will need, such as the interface IP address.

Basic Line Card Configuration

This procedure is for creating a basic configuration—enabling an interface and specifying IP routing. You might also need to enter other configuration subcommands, depending on the requirements for your system configuration.

This example shows one way to configure the basic parameters of a line card:


Step 1 Enter EXEC mode:

Username: username
Password: password
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router#
 

Step 2 Check the status of each port by entering the show interface command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show interface
 

Step 3 Enter global configuration mode and specify that the console terminal will be the source of the configuration commands:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure terminal
 

Step 4 At the prompt, specify the new interface to configure by entering the interface command, followed by the type (for example, gigabitethernet or tengige) and rack/ slot /instance/ port (line card rack, slot number, subslot number, port number). Remember that Cisco ASR 9001 Router rack and subslot values are always 0 (zero). For example, to configure port 4 on bay 0 of the line card:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# interface tengige 0/0/0/3
 

You are now in interface configuration mode.

Step 5 Assign an IP address and subnet mask to the interface with the ipv4 address configuration subcommand, as in the following example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.2.3 255.255.255.0
 

Step 6 Use the no shutdown command to enable the interface:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown
 

The no shutdown command passes an enable command to the line card. It also causes the line card to configure itself based on the most recent configuration commands received by the line card.

Step 7 If you want to disable the Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP), which is not required, use this command:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no cdp
 

Step 8 Add any other configuration subcommands required to enable routing protocols and adjust the interface characteristics. Examples of such subcommands are:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# flow-control ingress
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# mtu 1448
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# mac-address 0001.2468.ABCD
 

Step 9 When you have included all the configuration subcommands to complete the configuration, enter the commit command to commit all changes you made to the running configuration.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit
 

Step 10 Enter Ctrl-Z to exit configuration mode. If you did not enter the commit command, you will be prompted to do so:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? [cancel]:
 

Answer yes to commit, no to exit without a commit, or cancel to cancel the exit (default).

Step 11 Write the new configuration to memory:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# copy run disk0:/config/running/alternate_cfg:/router.cfg
Destination file name (control-c to abort): [/router.cfg]?
The destination file already exists. Do you want to overwrite? [no]: yes
Building configuration.
223 lines built in 1 second
[OK]
 

The system displays an OK message when the configuration has been stored.


 

Verifying the Transceiver Modules

Use the show inventory all command to display SFP or XFP module information for all transceiver modules currently installed in the router. To display SFP or XFP module information for a particular module, you can use the show inventory location <slot ID> command.

The output of these commands lists such information as the slot ID, transceiver type, description, product ID, version, and serial number.

For example, to list module information for all modules in the router:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show inventory all
Mon Mar 26 13:08:28.805 UTC
NAME: "module 0/RSP0/CPU0", DESCR: "ASR9001CHASSIS"
PID: ASR-9001, VID: V00, SN: FOC154682GG
 
NAME: "module 0/0/CPU0", DESCR: "ASR9001CHASSIS"
PID: ASR-9001, VID: V00, SN: FOC1547809S
 
NAME: "module 0/0/0", DESCR: "ASR 9000 4-port 10GE Modular Port Adapter"
PID: A9K-MA-4X10GE, VID: V01, SN: FOC1539862S
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/0/0", DESCR: "XFP"
PID: XFP-10G-MM-SR , VID: V02 , SN: ONT1535101F
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/0/1", DESCR: "XFP"
PID: XFP-10G-MM-SR , VID: V01 , SN: ONT15011038
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/0/2", DESCR: "XFP"
PID: XFP-10G-MM-SR , VID: V02 , SN: ONT1535103K
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/0/3", DESCR: "XFP"
PID: XFP-10G-MM-SR , VID: V01 , SN: ONT150111N5
 
NAME: "module 0/0/1", DESCR: "ASR 9000 20-port 1GE Modular Port Adapter"
PID: A9K-MPA-20X1GE, VID: V01, SN: FOC155181Q7
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/0", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501BQS
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/1", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: AGM1501P2VN
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/2", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501BDQ
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/3", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501YHS
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/4", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501YJA
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/5", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501AJD
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/6", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501SPE
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/7", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501AHA
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/8", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501AGX
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/9", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501AKF
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/10", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501BDT
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/11", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501BET
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/12", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501AKX
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/13", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501AJ5
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/14", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501AK4
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/15", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS155009QS
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/16", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501AJX
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/17", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS155009TE
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/18", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS155009TR
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/1/19", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-GE-S , VID: V01 , SN: FNS15501AJQ
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/2/0", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-10G-SR , VID: V03 , SN: SPC1503050L
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/2/1", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-10G-SR , VID: V03 , SN: FNS15210Q2K
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/2/2", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-10G-SR , VID: V03 , SN: SPC150305MD
 
NAME: "module mau 0/0/2/3", DESCR: "SFP"
PID: SFP-10G-LR , VID: V02 , SN: ECL150200Y9
 

Advanced Line Card Troubleshooting

This section briefly describes advanced troubleshooting commands that can be used if a line card fails.


NoteThis section assumes that you possess basic proficiency in the use of Cisco IOS XR software commands.


By using the commands listed in this section, you should be able to determine the nature of the problems you are having with your line card. The first step is to identify the cause of the line card failure or console errors that you are seeing.

To discover which card may be at fault, it is essential to collect the output from these commands:

  • show logging
  • show diag slot
  • show context location slot

Along with these show commands, you should also gather the following information:

  • Console Logs and Syslog Information—This information is crucial if multiple symptoms are occurring. If the router is configured to send logs to a Syslog server, you may see some information on what has occurred. For console logs, it is best to be directly connected to the router on the console port with logging enabled.
  • Additional Data—The show tech-support command is a compilation of many different commands, including show version, show running-config, show tech ethernet , show tech pfi , and show stacks. This information is required when working on issues with the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (Cisco TAC).

For examples of how to use these commands and the resulting output, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Troubleshooting Guide.


NoteIt is important to collect the show tech-support command data before doing a reload or power cycle. Failure to do so can cause all information about the problem to be lost. Output from these commands varies slightly depending on which line card you are using, but the basic information is the same.


Troubleshooting the Cooling Subsystem

You may need to troubleshoot the cooling subsystem if an over-temperature condition occurs. The cooling subsystem of the router consists of a fan tray in the chassis and a fan in each of the power supplies. The fan tray and the power supply fans circulate air to maintain acceptable operating temperatures within the router.

This section contains information to troubleshooting the cooling subsystem and includes:

Fan Tray Operation

The fan tray maintains acceptable operating temperatures for the internal components by drawing cooling air into the system chassis. The fan tray receives power from the chassis backplane.

The fan tray contains 14 fans, a controller card, and one front panel STATUS LED indicator:

  • Green—Fan tray is functioning properly.
  • Red—There is a fault detected in the fan tray.

If the air temperature inside the chassis rises, blower speed increases to provide additional cooling air to the internal components. If the internal air temperature continues to rise beyond the specified threshold, the system environmental monitor shuts down all internal power to prevent equipment damage because of excessive heat.

If the system detects that one or more of the fans in the fan tray has failed, it displays a warning message on the system console. In addition, the remaining fans go to full speed to compensate for the loss of the failed fan.

Power Module Fans

Each AC or DC power module is equipped with one fan that draws cooling air in through the front of the power module and force warm air out through the air exhaust of the chassis:

  • If the power source is within the required voltage range, the power supply fan remains on.
  • If a fan fails:

Power module detects an internal over-temperature condition.

Fault and Temp indicators light.

Power module sends an over-temperature warning to the system and then power supply switchover to the redundant power module.

For additional power supply troubleshooting information, see the “Troubleshooting the Power Subsystem” section.


NoteFor the RSP to communicate properly to a power module, input power to at least one of the two power modules should be present.


Over-temperature Conditions

This console error message indicates that the system has detected an over-temperature condition or out-of-tolerance power value inside the system:

Queued messages:
%ENVM-1-SHUTDOWN: Environmental Monitor initiated shutdown
 

The preceding message could also indicate a faulty component or temperature sensor. Enter the show environment command or the show environment all command at the user EXEC prompt to display information about the internal system environment. The information generated by these commands includes:

  • Voltage measurements on each card from the DC-to-DC converter
  • The +5 VDC for the I2C module
  • Operating voltage for the fan tray
  • Temperature measurements received by all sensors of RP and LC module as well as temperature measurements from sensors located in each power module

If an environmental shutdown results from an over-temperature or out-of-tolerance condition, the Fault indicator on the power supply lights before the system shuts down.

Although an over-temperature condition is unlikely at initial system startup, make sure that:

  • Heated exhaust air from other equipment in the immediate environment is not entering the chassis card cage vents.
  • You allow sufficient air flow by maintaining a minimum of 6 inches (15.24 cm) of clearance at both the inlet and exhaust openings on the chassis and the power modules to allow cool air to enter freely and hot air to be expelled from the chassis.

Isolating Cooling Subsystem Problems

Use this procedure to isolate a problem with the chassis cooling system if you have an over-temperature condition:


Step 1 Make sure the fan tray is operating properly when you power on the system. To determine if the fan tray is operating, check the LED indicator on the fan tray front panel:

  • OK (green)—Fan tray is functioning properly and receiving +12 VDC power, indicating that the cables from the chassis backplane to the fan tray are good.
  • Fail (red)—Fault is detected in the fan tray. Replace the fan tray.
  • If neither indicator is on and the blower is not operating, there may be a problem with either the fan tray or the +12 VDC power supplied to the fan tray. Go to Step 2.

Step 2 Eject and reseat the fan tray making sure the captive screws are securely tightened to a torque of 10 +/–1 in-lb.

If the fan tray still does not function, go to Step 3.

Step 3 Check for +12 VDC power by looking at the LED indicators on each power module:

  • If the Pwr OK indicator is on and the Fault indicator is off on each power module, it indicates that the fan tray is receiving +12 VDC:

If the fan tray is still not functioning, there could be a problem with the fan tray controller card or an undetected problem in the fan tray cable. Replace the fan tray.

If the new fan tray does not function, contact a Cisco customer service representative for assistance.

  • If the Fault indicator is on, the power supply is faulty. Replace the power supply.
  • If the Temp and Fault indicators are on, an over-temperature condition exists:

Verify that the power supply fan is operating properly.

If the fan is not operating, replace the power supply.

Contact your Cisco representative if replacing the power supply does not fix the problem.