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Connecting DSL WAN Interface Cards

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Connecting DSL WAN Interface Cards

Table Of Contents

Connecting DSL WAN Interface Cards

ADSL WICs

Front Panel on ADSL WICs

ADSL High Speed WICs

Front Panel on ADSL HWICs

G.SHDSL WICs

Front Panel on G.SHDSL WICs

G.SHDSL High Speed WICs

Front Panel on G.SHDSL HWICs

Multimode VDSL2/ADSL2/2+ HWICs

Front Panel on Multimode VDSL2/ADSL2/2+ HWICs

G.SHDSL High Speed EHWICs

Front Panel on G.SHDSL EFM/ATM EHWICs

Cabling

Connecting DSL Interface Cards to a Network

Connecting the DSL Ports on WICs and HWICs

Connecting the ISDN Ports on HWICs

Connecting the SHDSL Port on the G.SHDSL HWICs and EHWICs

Using POTS Splitters and Microfilters with an ADSL-over-POTS WIC (WIC-1ADSL)

POTS Splitters

Microfilters

Telephone Company-Installed Splitter

Customer-Installed Splitter

Router and Telephone Using Separate Telephone Lines

Supported Platforms

Interface Card LEDs

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines


Connecting DSL WAN Interface Cards


Revised: November 2011, OL-12846-04

This document describes how to connect Cisco DSL WAN interface cards. For an overview of Cisco interface cards used for Cisco access routers, see Overview of Cisco Interface Cards for Cisco Access Routers. For descriptions of interface cards see "Related Documentation" section.

ADSL WICs

Asymmetric digital subscriber line WAN interface cards (ADSL WICs) are available in the following variations:

WIC-1ADSL-DG

WIC-1ADSL-I-DG

Front Panel on ADSL WICs

ADSL WICs have three LEDs, as shown in Figure 1, and described in Table 5.


Note Front panel labels may differ with model numbers.


Figure 1 ADSL and G.SHDSL WIC Front Panels

ADSL High Speed WICs

High speed ADSL WICs are available in the following variations:

ADSL over plain old telephone service (ADSLoPOTS) high-speed WAN interface cards (HWICs)

HWIC-ADSL—a 1-port ADSLoPOTS card

HWIC-ADSL-B/ST—a 2-port card with a port for ADSLoPOTS and a data-only backup port for an ISDN BRI S/T connection

ADSL over ISDN (ADSLoISDN) HWICs

HWIC-ADSLI—a 1-port ADSLoISDN card

HWIC-ADSLI-B/ST—a 2-port card with a port for ADSLoISDN and a data-only backup port for an ISDN BRI S/T connection


Note ADSL HWICs can be inserted only in those interface slots that are enabled to receive HWICs. To determine which slots in your router are enabled to receive HWICs, see Overview of Cisco Interface Cards for Cisco Access Routers.


ADSL HWICs are all packaged in the Cisco standard single-wide HWIC form factor.

Front Panel on ADSL HWICs

ADSL HWICs have three LEDs. Those ADSL HWICs with a backup ISDN port have three additional LEDs.

Figure 2 shows the front panels and LEDs for the ADSLoPOTS and ADSLoISDN HWICs. The LED descriptions are listed in Table 5.

Figure 2 ADSLoPOTS HWIC Front Panel

G.SHDSL WICs

G.SDSL WICs are available in the following variations:

WIC-1SHDSL

WIC-1SHDSL-V2 and WIC-1SHDSL-V3


Caution To comply with the Telcordia GR-1089 NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, connect the 1-port G.SHDSL interface card (WIC-1SHDSL-V2 and WIC-1SHDSL-V3) only to intra-building or non-exposed wiring or cabling. The intrabuilding cable must be shielded and the shield must be grounded at both ends.

Front Panel on G.SHDSL WICs

The ADSL and G.SHDSL WICs have three LEDs shown in Figure 3 and described in Table 5.


Note Front panel labels may differ with model numbers.


Figure 3 G.SHDSL WIC Front Panels

G.SHDSL High Speed WICs

High speed WICs are available in the following variations:

G.SHDSL HWICs

HWIC-2SHDSL

HWIC-4SHDSL

G.SHDSL EFM

HWIC-4SHDSL-E


Note Inverse multiplexing over ATM (IMA) lines and ATM segmentation and reassembly (SAR) lines are not supported on the G.SHDSL EFM HWIC.



Note The HWIC-4SHDSL-E provides four DSL pairs of connectivity through one RJ-45 connector.



Note The Cisco HWIC-2SHDSL and the Cisco HWIC-4SHDSL-E provide support for the Dying Gasp feature; however, the Cisco HWIC-4SHDSL does not provide support for this feature. The term dying gasp refers to power status as defined in ITU-T standard G.991.2, section 7.1.2.5.3.


Front Panel on G.SHDSL HWICs

The G.SHDSL HWICS have three or five LEDs as shown in Figure 4 and Figure 5 and described in Table 5.


Note Front panel labels may differ with model numbers.


Figure 4 HWIC-2SHDSL Front Pane

Figure 5 HWIC-4SHDSL-E Front Panel

Multimode VDSL2/ADSL2/2+ HWICs

Multimode VDSL2/ADSL2/2+ HWICs are available in the following variations:

ADSL/VDSL over POTS

EHWIC-VA-DSL-A, Annex A

EHWIC-VA-DSL-M, Annex M

ADSL/VDSL over ISDN

EHWIC-VA-DSL-B, Annex B


Note Multimode VDSL2/ADSL2/2+ HWICs can be inserted only in those interface slots that are enabled to receive EHWICs. To determine which slots in your router are enabled to receive HWICs, see the Interface Card Slot Locations and Numbering on Cisco Access Routers section of Overview of Cisco Interface Cards for Cisco Access Routers.


Front Panel on Multimode VDSL2/ADSL2/2+ HWICs

The Multimode VDSL2/ADSL2/2+ HWICs have three LEDS as shown in Figure 6 and described in Table 5.


Note Front panel labels may differ with model numbers.


Figure 6 Multimode VDSL2/ADSL2/2+ HWIC Front Panels

G.SHDSL High Speed EHWICs

A multimode VDSL2/ADSL2/2+ EHWIC is available, the Cisco EHWIC-4SHDSL-EA (EFM/ATM).

Front Panel on G.SHDSL EFM/ATM EHWICs

The G.SHDSL EFM/ATM HWICs have LEDs that indicate DSL functionality. Figure 7 shows the front panel and LEDs for the EHWIC-4SHDSL-EA. The LED functions are described in Table 5.

Figure 7 Cisco EHWIC-4SHDSL-EA EFM/ATM Faceplate


Note The Cisco EHWIC-4SHDSL-EA provides support for the Dying Gasp feature. The term "dying gasp" refers to power status as defined in ITU-T standard G.991.2, section 7.1.2.5.3.



Note G.SHDSL EFM/ATM EHWICs can be inserted only in interface slots that are enabled to receive EHWICs. To determine which slots in your router are enabled to receive HWICs, see the Interface Card Slot Locations and Numbering on Cisco Access Routers section of Overview of Cisco Interface Cards for Cisco Access Routers.


Cabling

The twisted-pair straight-through cable for customer premises equipment (CPE) applications is supplied. The RJ-45-to-RJ-45 BRI cable to connect the ISDN BRI ports on ADSL over ISDN HWICs is not supplied. The two-line Y-cable for central office (CO) and four-wire patch panel applications is not supplied. See Overview of Cisco Interface Cards for Cisco Access Routers.


Note The Y-cable must have the wires for pins 3 and 4 twisted together; wires for pins 2 and 5 must also be twisted together. Each pair goes to its own connector at the patch panel end.


Connecting DSL Interface Cards to a Network

Connecting the DSL Ports on WICs and HWICs

Use a straight-through RJ-11 cable for this connection.

Table 1 shows the ADSL and VDSL WIC and HWIC pinouts.

Table 1 VDSL2/ADSL2/2+ WIC and HWIC Pinouts

Pin
Signal

3

Tip

4

Ring



Note If you are connecting an ADSL interface card to an RJ-11 wall jack that has the DSL pair wired for pins 2 and 5, you must use an RJ-11 crossover cable (lavender with blue stripe). The RJ-11 crossover cable is orderable separately as a spare.


Table 2 shows the WIC-1SHDSL pinouts.

Table 2 WIC-1SHDSL Pinouts

Pin
Signal
3

Tip

4

Ring


Table 3 shows the RJ-14C pinouts on the WIC-1SHDSL-V2 and WIC-1SHDSL-V3 interface cards.

Table 3 WIC-1SHDSL-V2 RJ-14C Pinouts

Pins
Signal
Line

3 and 4

3 = Tip, 4 = Ring

0

2 and 5

2 = Tip, 5 = Ring

1


To connect a DSL interface card to the WAN, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Confirm that the router is turned off.


Warning To comply with the standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, connect the HWIC-ADSLI-B/ST, HWIC-2SHDSL, HWIC-4SHDSL, and HWIC-4SHDSL-E interface cards only to intra-building or unexposed wiring or cable. The intra-building port(s) of the equipment or subassembly must not be metallically connected to interfaces that connect to the OSP or its wiring. These interfaces are designed for use as intra-building interfaces only (Type 2 or Type 4 ports as described in GR-1089-CORE, Issue 4) and require isolation from the exposed OSP cabling. The addition of Primary Protectors is not sufficient protection in order to connect these interfaces metallically to OSP wiring.

Step 2 Connect one end of the cable to the ADSL or G.SHDSL port on the card.

Step 3 Connect the other end to the wall jack (RJ-11) at your site, as shown in Figure 8.

Figure 8 Connecting an ADSL Card to the Wall Jack

Alternatively, when connecting a G.SHDSL card to a 4-wire patch panel, use a Y-cable as shown in Figure 9.

Figure 9 Connecting a G.SHDSL Card to a Patch Panel With a Y-Cable

Figure 10 Connecting a G.SHDSL EFM Card to a Patch Panel With a Y-Cable

Step 4 Turn on power to the router.

Step 5 To connect the card to the network, you must configure the DSL interface card in the router to the no shutdown state. Enter the no shut command in the router configuration. Verify that the CD LED comes on, indicating that the interface card is connected to the network.


Note This step does not apply to the WIC-1SHDSL-V2, WIC-1SHDSL-V3, and HWIC-4SHDSL-E.



Connecting the ISDN Ports on HWICs

Use an RJ-45-to-RJ-45 BRI cable (not included) to connect the ISDN BRI port to an ISDN NT1 device. See the online document Cisco Modular Access Router Cable Specifications for pinouts.

To connect an ISDN BRI S/T port to the WAN, follow these steps:


Step 1 Confirm that the router is turned off.


Warning To comply with the Telcordia GR-1089 NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, connect the HWIC-ADSL-B/ST or HWIC-ADSLI-B/ST ISDN BRI S/T port only to intra-building or unexposed wiring or cable. The intra-building port(s) of the equipment or subassembly must not be metallically connected to interfaces that connect to the OSP or its wiring. These interfaces are designed for use as intra-building interfaces only (Type 2 or Type 4 ports as described in GR-1089-CORE, Issue 4) and require isolation from the exposed OSP cabling. The addition of Primary Protectors is not sufficient protection in order to connect these interfaces metallically to OSP wiring.

Step 2 Connect one end of a straight-through RJ-45-to-RJ-45 cable to the S/T interface.

Step 3 Connect the other end of the cable to the NT1 device, as shown in Figure 11.

Figure 11 Connecting the BRI S/T Port

Step 4 Connect the NT1 device to the ISDN wall jack according to the documentation that came with the NT1 device.

Step 5 Turn on power to the router.


Connecting the SHDSL Port on the G.SHDSL HWICs and EHWICs

Connect Cisco G.SHDSL HWICs as described next:

Cisco HWIC-2SHDSL—Use a standard RJ-11 straight-through cable to establish connection between the HWIC and a network device.

Cisco HWIC-4SHDSL, HWIC-4SHDSL EFM, and EHWIC-4SHDSL-EA—Use a standard RJ-45 straight-through cable to establish connection between the HWIC or EHWIC and a network device.


Warning To comply with the Telcordia GR-1089 NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, connect the HWIC-2SHDSL, HWIC-4SHDSL, HWIC-4SHDSL-E interface cards only to intra-building or unexposed wiring or cable. The intra-building port(s) of the equipment or subassembly must not be metallically connected to interfaces that connect to the OSP or its wiring. These interfaces are designed for use as intra-building interfaces only (Type 2 or Type 4 ports as described in GR-1089-CORE, Issue 4) and require isolation from the exposed OSP cabling. The addition of Primary Protectors is not sufficient protection in order to connect these interfaces metallically to OSP wiring.

Figure 12 shows the RJ-45 pin assignment. Table 4 identifies the RJ-45 signal assignment by pin.


Caution Inserting an RJ-11 connector into an RJ-45 port may deform pins 1 and 8, which may prevent solid contact between the connector and the plug in subsequent connections. If solid contact is prevented, line -1 tip and line -3 ring does not work properly.

Figure 12 RJ-45 Pin Assignment

Table 4 RJ-45 Signal Assignment by Pin

Pin
Signal

1

Line 1 tip

2

Line 1 ring

3

Line 2 tip

4

Line 0 tip

5

Line 0 ring

6

Line 2 ring

7

Line 3 tip

8

Line 3 ring


To connect the Cisco HWIC-4SHDSL or Cisco HWIC-4SHDSL-E with a DSLAM that supports two or four RJ-11 connections, modify the standard RJ-45 cable, using one of the following diagrams as applicable:

Figure 13 shows how to modify the cable and connect the Cisco HWIC-4SHDSL, HWIC-4SHDSL-E, and EHWIC-4SHDSL-EA with a DSLAM that supports four RJ-11 cable connections.
Figure 14 shows how to modify the cable and connect the Cisco HWIC-4SHDSL, HWIC-4SHDSL-E, and EHWIC-4SHDSL-EA with a DSLAM that supports two RJ-11 cable connections.

Figure 13 Standard RJ-45 Connector to Four Standard RJ-11 Connectors

Figure 14 Standard RJ-45 Connector to Two Standard RJ-11 Connectors

Using POTS Splitters and Microfilters with an ADSL-over-POTS WIC (WIC-1ADSL)

POTS splitters and microfilters apply to the ADSL-over-POTS WIC only. They are used on telephone lines to ensure voice- and data-call quality. POTS splitters result in the best data and voice performance when the router and the telephone are used on the same telephone line.

POTS Splitters

A POTS splitter is installed on a telephone line connected to both data and voice devices. The splitter routes the data and voice signals on the telephone line to the correct device. Signals intended for the router can disrupt voice calls; signals intended for voice calls can affect router operation.

Most splitters must be installed by the telephone company; however, some splitters can be installed by the customer. If you are not sure what type of splitter to use, contact your service provider.

Figure 15 is an example of a type of POTS splitter that is installed at the customer premises by the customer.

Figure 15 POTS Splitters

Microfilters

Microfilters are installed on telephones to improve voice-call quality when voice and data equipment are using the same telephone line (twisted pair). You should use microfilters only when the documentation requires their use.

Figure 16 shows one type of microfilter.

Figure 16 Microfilte

Telephone Company-Installed Splitter

The scenario below describes Figure 17.

The telephone company has provisioned a single copper pair to be used by both the telephone (POTS) service and the router with a DSL interface card, so a POTS splitter must be installed.

The splitter is installed by the telephone company on the customer premises. This type of splitter is also referred to as a network interface device (NID).

The router and telephone are on separate lines (twisted pair) to the splitter.

The router and telephone share the same telephone line (twisted pair) to the telephone company.

Figure 17 Telephone Company-Installed Splitter

Customer-Installed Splitter

The scenario below describes Figure 18.

The telephone company has provisioned a single copper pair used by the telephone (POTS) service and the router with a DSL interface card, so a POTS splitter must be installed.

The splitter is installed by the customer on the customer premises.

The router and telephone are directly connected to the splitter connected to the telephone line.

The router and telephone share the same telephone line (twisted pair) to the telephone company.

For optional telephones connected through the splitter, microfilters are optional. They should be installed only if they improve telephone call quality.

For telephones connected directly to the telephone line, microfilters are required.

Figure 18 Customer-Installed Splitter

Router and Telephone Using Separate Telephone Lines

The scenario below describes Figure 19.

The telephone company has provisioned a single copper pair to be used exclusively by the router with a DSL interface card and a separate copper pair to be used exclusively by the telephone (POTS) service; therefore, neither a POTS splitter nor a microfilter is needed.

The microfilter is optional; it should be installed only if it improves telephone call quality.

Figure 19 No Splitter, Optional Microfilter

Supported Platforms

For a list of the platforms supported by a Cisco interface card, see Platform Support for Cisco Interface Cards.

Finding Support Information for Platforms and Cisco IOS Software Images

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS software image support. Access Cisco Feature Navigator at http://www.cisco.com/go/fn. You must have an account on Cisco.com. If you do not have an account or have forgotten your username or password, click Cancel at the login dialog box and follow the instructions that appear.

Interface Card LEDs

Table 5 DSL Interface Card LEDs 

LED
Color
Description

CD LED

Green

Lit when the unit is connected to the network and operating normally. On ADSL interface cards only, this LED blinks while training with DSLAMs. Does not apply to the WIC-1SHDSL-V2 or WIC-1SHDSL-V3 interface cards.

LP LED

Yellow

DSL interface is in loopback mode.

Off

Normal operation.

OK LED

Green

Enabled when the card is detected by the router.

LINK (CD) LED

Green and Yellow

Green when cells or frames are passing between the host and the DSLAM. Yellow when the T1E1 framer detects an alarm. Applies only to the WIC-1SHDSL-V2 and WIC-1SHDSL-V3 interface cards.

EN

Green

Operating system is running.

Amber

Interface card is resetting.

Blinking

System is initializing.

L0, L1, L2, L3, L4, L5, L6, L7

 

Status of link:

On—Link is active.

Off—Link is inactive (disabled).

Blinking—Link is training / Link alarm.

Amber and green blinking simultaneously—Loopback mode. EN/LP is also amber (HWIC-4SHDSL-E and EHWIC-2SHDSL-EA).

EN/LP

Green

Operating system is running.

Amber

Loopback mode.

EFM

Green

EFM mode.

ATM

Green

ATM mode.

OK (ADSL)

Green

Enabled when the card is detected by the router. This LED blinks while downloading firmware.

B1

Green

ISDN port. Blinks with active connection on the first B channel.

B2

Green

ISDN port. Blinks with active connection on the second B channel.

OK (ISDN)

Green

ISDN port has established a connection with the central office switch
(D channel).


Related Documentation

Related documentation is available on Cisco.com. For more information, see the "Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines" section.

Interface Card General Information

Cisco Router—Guide For teleworkers, small offices, small to medium-sized businesses and enterprise branch and head offices

Overview of Cisco Interface Cards for Cisco Access Routers

Feature Modules

Configuring Cisco Multimode G.SHDSL EFM/ATM in Cisco ISR G2

Configuring Cisco G.SHDSL EFM HWICs in Cisco Access Routers

Configuring Cisco G.SHDSL HWICs in Cisco Access Routers

1-Port ADSL WAN Interface Card for Cisco 2600 Series and Cisco 3600 Series Routers, Cisco IOS Release 12.2(4)T

1-Port ADSL WAN Interface Card, Cisco IOS Releases 12.1(3)XJ and 12.2(2)T

1-Port ADSL WAN Interface Card, Cisco IOS Release 12.1(5)YB

ATM Mode for Two-Wire or Four-Wire SHDSL, Cisco IOS Release 12.3(7)T

T1/E1 Mode for SHDSL, Cisco IOS Release 12.3(7)T

Enhanced Voice and QoS for ADSL and G.SHDSL, Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T

Sample Configurations

Configuring PPP over Ethernet with NAT

Configuring PPP over ATM with NAT

Configuring a LAN with DHCP and VLANs

Configuring a VPN Using Easy VPN and an IPSec Tunnel

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

For information on obtaining documentation, obtaining support, providing documentation feedback, security guidelines, and also recommended aliases and general Cisco documents, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html