Cisco ICS 7750 Installation and Configuration Guide, 2.6.0
Completing the Cisco ICS 7750 Installation
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Completing the Cisco ICS 7750 Installation

Table Of Contents

Completing the Cisco ICS 7750 Installation

Running the Initial Configuration Program

Before You Start

Collecting Required Information for the Initial Configuration Program

Verifying Your PC Requirements

Configuring Your PC IP Address for Initial Configuration

Configuring Your Web Browser for System Manager

Installing Microsoft Terminal Services Client

Connecting Your PC to the SSP Card

Verifying That Your PC Can Communicate with the Cisco ICS 7750

Troubleshooting the Connection

Launching the Configuration Program

User Consent to Availability Monitoring Page

Configuring Your System

Reconfiguring the PC

Changing the Host Name of the SPE310 Running System Manager

Guidelines for Host Names

Assigning a New Host Name

Installing Cisco CallManager Software

Connecting to the LAN

Gigabit Cascaded Configuration

Star-Wired 100-Mbps Configuration

Connecting IP Phones and Other Network Devices

Connecting a Modem

Determining the Modem Initialization String

Checking Other Modem Settings

Initializing a Modem for an SAP

Initializing a Modem for a Dial-Up Connection to an MRP or ASI

Testing the Dial-Up Connection


Completing the Cisco ICS 7750 Installation


This chapter tells how to use the Cisco ICS System Manager initial configuration program (also referred to as ICSConfig) to complete the initial software configuration on the Cisco Integrated Communications System 7750 (Cisco ICS 7750) and how to complete the hardware installation. The chapter is organized as follows:

Running the Initial Configuration Program

Reconfiguring the PC

Changing the Host Name of the SPE310 Running System Manager

Installing Cisco CallManager Software

Connecting to the LAN

Connecting IP Phones and Other Network Devices

Connecting a Modem

Running the Initial Configuration Program

To configure the system for use, you run ICSConfig, a web-browser-based program that prompts you to enter IP address and other network information. The Cisco ICS 7750 uses this information to send data and voice information over the local network, over the WAN, and to the public switched telephone network (PSTN). When the initial configuration program is complete, you can use the System Manager software to configure and manage the system or to access additional applications such as Cisco CallManager or Cisco Unity Voice Mail.


Caution To enable the initial configuration program to run correctly, the Cisco ICS 7750 must not be connected to the Ethernet network. Do not remove the sticker covering the Ethernet ports on the SSP card until you are directed to do so.You will connect the Ethernet 10/100 ports on the SSP to the Ethernet 10/100 ports on the external Catalyst 3524-PWR XL switches after you run the initial configuration program.


Note Tasks that can be completed using the ICSConfig application or the System Manager should be done using those applications, not the Cisco IOS command-line interface (CLI). For more information about when to use ICSConfig or System Manager and when to use the CLI, see the section "Best Practices for Using the Cisco IOS CLI" section.


Before You Start

Perform the following tasks before you launch the initial configuration program (ICSConfig):

Collect required information that the initial configuration program will prompt you to enter.

Verify your PC requirements.

Configure your PC IP address.

Configure your web browser for System Manager.

Install Microsoft Terminal Services Client.

Connect your PC to the SSP card.

Verify that your PC can communicate with the Cisco ICS 7750.

Collecting Required Information for the Initial Configuration Program

Collect the information to complete Table 4-1 before you run the initial configuration program. The initial configuration program prompts you to enter this information during the setup process.

Table 4-1 Required Information for Running the Initial Configuration Program 

Required Information
Enter the Information Here

IP address range for system cards.

This range of IP addresses is recommended to be a range of at least 10 contiguous IP addresses but must be a range of at least 7 IP addresses.

Addresses must be on the same subnet.

The range must not overlap address ranges used for IP phones or other IP devices.

Entering this range of addresses enables new cards to be dynamically addressed when they are installed in the system.

Start IP address range:
 _____._____._____._____

End IP address range: 
 _____._____._____._____

Subnet mask:
 _____._____._____._____

IP address range and other DHCP configuration information for IP phones and other IP devices.

These IP address ranges are required only if configuring DHCP services for IP phones or other IP devices.

This range cannot overlap the range of IP addresses used for system cards.

These IP addresses must be on the same subnet as the system cards.

IP address of TFTP server (optional):
 _____._____._____._____

Start IP address range for IP phones (optional):
 _____._____._____._____

End IP address range for IP phones (optional):
 _____._____._____._____

DHCP lease time (in days, hours, minutes, and seconds) for IP phone IP addresses (optional):

 __________

Start IP address range for other IP devices (optional):
 _____._____._____._____

End IP address range for other IP devices (optional):
 _____._____._____._____

 

DHCP lease time (in days, hours, minutes, and seconds) for other IP device IP addresses (optional):

 __________

Primary WINS server host name or IP address (optional):
 _______________________

Secondary WINS server host name or IP address (optional):
 _______________________

IP addresses for DNS network components and default gateway.

Primary DNS server IP address:
 _____._____._____._____

Secondary DNS server IP address (optional):
 _____._____._____._____

Default gateway IP address:
 _____._____._____._____

Passwords for Cisco IOS-based system cards (system switch process [SSP], multiservice route processors [MRPs], and analog station interfaces [ASIs]) and system alarm processor [SAP]).

Passwords can contain up to 80 characters.

Passwords can consist of any alphanumeric characters, with the exception of spaces and the ?, tab (\t), new line (\n), and return (\r) characters.

Passwords are case sensitive.

If a password is composed entirely of digits, the number cannot be evaluated to less than 10.

Login password:
 _______________________

Enable password:
 _______________________

SNMP community strings.

SNMP community strings can contain up to 32 alphanumeric characters—excluding spaces and the ?, tab (\t), new line (\n), and return (\r) characters—and are case sensitive.

SNMP read-only community string:
 ________________________

SNMP read/write community string:
 ________________________

Default Windows 2000 administrator password for all Cisco System Processor Engine 310s (SPE310s).

Default SPE310 administrator password:
 _______________________

Password for ICS Super Admin user—The user ID that has complete access to the ICS System Manager.

ICS Super Admin password:
 _______________________

Default settings for event notification through e-mail. Required entries when consenting to system event monitoring.

SMTP server.

Cisco ICS 7750 device name.

Cisco ICS 7750 e-mail address.

Administrator e-mail address.

Default phone number for event notification with paging.

Event Manager default settings for syslog message forwarding—Supply a host name or an IP address of an external syslog server, or select None.

SMTP server used to send e-mail about system events:
 _______________________

Device name shown as the sender in e-mail sent about system events:
 _______________________

E-mail address shown as the sender in e-mail sent about system events:
 _______________________

E-mail address to which you will send e-mail about system events:
 _______________________

Phone number to page regarding system events (optional):
 _______________________

Host name of syslog server to forward system events (optional):
 _______________________

IP address of syslog server to forward system events (optional):
 _____._____._____._____


Verifying Your PC Requirements

Make sure that the PC that you use to run the initial configuration program and System Manager meets the requirements listed in the "PC Requirements" section.

Configuring Your PC IP Address for Initial Configuration

Before connecting your PC to the Cisco ICS 7750, your PC must have an IP address in the same IP subnet as the Cisco ICS 7750. Complete the following steps to change the IP address on your PC.


Note You will need to return your PC to its original configuration after the Cisco ICS 7750 has been configured. We recommend that you write down your PC IP address settings before changing them.



Step 1 On the PC Desktop, right-click Network Neighborhood (Windows NT) or My Network Places (Windows 2000).

Step 2 Choose Properties.

Step 3 Click the Protocols tab (Windows NT), or right-click Local Area Connection and choose Properties (Windows 2000).

Step 4 Choose TCP/IP Protocol (Windows NT) or Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) (Windows 2000).

Step 5 Click Properties.

Step 6 Click the Specify an IP address radio button (Windows NT) or the Use the following IP address radio button (Windows 2000).

Step 7 In the IP Address field, enter a unique (unused) IP address, such as 10.0.0.250. (By default, system cards are assigned IP addresses in the range beginning with 10.0.0.1 and ending with 10.0.0.127.)

This IP address must meet the following requirements:

It must be in the same subnet as the cards in the Cisco ICS 7750.

It must not fall within the range of contiguous IP addresses that you have reserved for the Cisco ICS 7750 cards.

Step 8 In the Subnet Mask field, enter 255.255.255.0.

Step 9 Click OK.

Step 10 If a message appears which indicates that your PC must be rebooted to apply the changes, click Yes.


Configuring Your Web Browser for System Manager

To use the web-browser-based configuration program (ICSConfig), configure your web browser as follows.


Note To access the ICS System Manager, your browser must be configured as described. If you reconfigure your browser for a different application, you must configure the browser as described in "Netscape Communicator 4.7" or "Internet Explorer 5.01" before you can use the System Manager. Netscape Communicator version 4.7 and Internet Explorer version 5.01 are the only supported browsers.


Netscape Communicator 4.7

If you are using Netscape Communicator 4.7 on your PC, follow these steps to configure it to work with System Manager:


Step 1 Open Netscape Communicator.

Step 2 Choose Edit > Preferences.

Step 3 In the Preferences window, click Advanced.

Step 4 Check the Enable Java, Enable JavaScript, and Enable Style Sheets check boxes.

Step 5 From the Advanced drop-down list, choose Cache.

Step 6 Under Document in Cache Is Compared to Document on Network, choose Every time.

Step 7 Click OK.


Internet Explorer 5.01

If you are using Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.01 on your PC, follow these steps to configure it to work with System Manager.


Note During the installation of this browser, check the Install Minimal or Customize Your Browser check box. In the Component Options window in the Internet Explorer 5 section, check the Microsoft Virtual Machine check box to display applets written in Java.



Step 1 Open Internet Explorer.

Step 2 Choose Tools > Internet Options.

Step 3 In the Internet Options window, click the Advanced tab.

a. Under Microsoft VM, check the Java logging enabled and JIT compiler for virtual machine enabled check boxes.

If you do not see this section, you need to reinstall the browser and follow the instructions in the note at the beginning of this section.

b. Click Apply.

Step 4 In the Internet Options window, click the General tab.

a. In the Temporary Internet Files section, click Settings.

b. In the Settings window, choose Every visit to the page, and click OK.

Step 5 In the Internet Options window, click the Security tab.

a. Click the Trusted Sites icon, and click Sites.

b. Uncheck the Require server verification check box.

c. Click OK.

Step 6 While still in the Security tab of the Internet Options window, click Custom Level.

a. In the Security Settings window, scroll to the Microsoft VM > Java permissions section.

If you do not see this section, you need to reinstall the browser and follow the instructions in the note at the beginning of this section.

b. Choose Custom to enable Java Custom Settings.

c. Click Java Custom Settings.

Step 7 In the Trusted Sites window, click the Edit Permissions tab.

a. Under Run Unsigned Content, choose Enable.

b. Click OK.

Step 8 In the Security Settings window, click OK.

Step 9 In the Internet Options window, click the Content tab.

a. In the Personal Information section, click AutoComplete.

b. In the Use AutoComplete For section, uncheck the User Names and Passwords on Forms check box.

c. Click OK.

Step 10 In the Internet Options window, click OK.


Installing Microsoft Terminal Services Client

If Microsoft Terminal Services Client is not installed on your PC, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Open Netscape Communicator or Microsoft Internet Explorer.

Step 2 In the Location or Address field, enter the following URL:

http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/downloads/recommended/TSAC/tsmsi.asp

Step 3 Follow the instructions to download and install Microsoft Terminal Services Client.


Connecting Your PC to the SSP Card

Peel back the sticker from one of the Ethernet 10/100 ports (labeled 1x and 2x) on the SSP card, and use a straight-through Ethernet cable (yellow) to connect the SSP 1x or 2x port to your PC Ethernet NIC.

Verifying That Your PC Can Communicate with the Cisco ICS 7750


Step 1 On your PC, choose Start > Run.

Step 2 Enter the following command to verify communication with the SPE310:

ping 10.0.0.1 

If ping is successful (a connection is established), you will see output similar to the following:

Reply from 10.0.0.1 bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=113

The following messages mean that you have no connection:

[timed out]
[failed]


Troubleshooting the Connection

If you are not able to make a connection with the SPE310, verify the following:

PC IP address configuration—Ensure that the PC has an IP address that is on the same subnet as the Cisco ICS 7750, but that is not in the default range of 10.0.0.1 - 10.0.0.127.

Cable integrity—Ensure that the cables connecting the PC to the Cisco ICS 7750 are not damaged.

Cable connections—Ensure that the cables between the PC and the Cisco ICS 7750 are properly connected.

Cisco ICS 7750 status—Ensure that the Cisco ICS 7750 is receiving power and that the SSP card STATUS LED is on.

Repeat the steps in the "Verifying That Your PC Can Communicate with the Cisco ICS 7750" section. If ping is still unsuccessful, you do not have a connection with the Cisco ICS 7750. Contact your technical support representative for assistance.

Launching the Configuration Program

To begin configuring the system, follow these steps:


Step 1 Open Netscape Communicator or Microsoft Internet Explorer.

Step 2 In the Location or Address field, enter the following URL:

http://10.0.0.1/icsconfig

You are prompted for a user ID and password.

Step 3 In the User ID field, enter administrator.

Step 4 In the Password field, enter changeme.

Step 5 Click OK.

The browser displays the software license agreement.


Note If you are using a version of Internet Explorer later than version 5.01 or a version of Netscape Communicator later than version 4.7, you will receive a warning. Click Continue to run Cisco ICS 7700 System Manager to bypass this screen and view the license agreement.


Step 6 Read and accept the license agreement that appears on your screen.

The User Consent to Availability Monitoring page appears, as described in the "User Consent to Availability Monitoring Page" section.


User Consent to Availability Monitoring Page

For Cisco to improve the hardware and software performance of the Cisco ICS 7750, the System Manager software can be configured to anonymously send e-mail information to Cisco about certain availability and reliability system events. The User Consent to Availability Monitoring page is shown in Figure 4-1.

Figure 4-1 User Consent to Availability Monitoring Page

This page describes availability monitoring, which you can enable or disable. After you read the feature description, select whether or not to accept the automatic monitoring, and click Continue>> to begin the initial configuration process. (If you do not enable availability monitoring now, you can enable it later by using the Event Manager component of System Manager.)


Note After you click Continue>>, the configuration program begins a discovery process to determine which system cards are present in your Cisco ICS 7750. This might take several minutes.


Configuring Your System

Use the configuration wizard to configure the default settings of your system. Enter the information you collected in Table 4-1 in the "Collecting Required Information for the Initial Configuration Program" section. The configuration wizard takes you through the following tasks:

Addressing the System Cards

Addressing IP Phones and Other IP Devices

Setting Up the Network DNS and Default Gateway Configuration

Configuring Security for Cisco IOS-Based Cards

Configuring Security for SNMP

Configuring SPE310 Card Security

Configuring ICS System Manager Security

Configuring Event Manager Default Settings

Viewing the Summary Page

Completing the Configuration

Addressing the System Cards

The Network Configuration—System Cards page, shown in Figure 4-2, collects IP address information for the system cards installed in your Cisco ICS 7750. Table 4-2 describes the Network Configuration—System Cards page fields.

Figure 4-2 Network ConfigurationSystem Cards Page

Table 4-2 Network ConfigurationSystem Cards Page Fields

Field
Description

IP Address Pool for System Cards

A pool of IP addresses used to address system cards. You must define a continuous range of at least seven IP addresses. (It is recommended that you use a range of at least ten IP addresses to accommodate possible replacements in the future.)

Start IP

The starting IP address of the IP address pool for system cards.

End IP

The ending IP address of the IP address pool.

Subnet Mask

The subnet mask associated with the pool of IP addresses.


In addition to the fields listed in Table 4-2, the Network Configuration—System Cards page displays a list of all the system cards installed in your Cisco ICS 7750. This table is initially populated with the IP addresses discovered for the system cards. You can change the start and end ranges, but the table values must remain consistent. Each card IP address must be unique and must fall within the range between the start and end IP addresses.

Addressing IP Phones and Other IP Devices

The Network Configuration—IP Device Addresses page, shown in Figure 4-3, collects IP address and directory information for your IP phones. The page also collects IP address information for the other IP devices on your network. Table 4-3 describes the Network Configuration—IP Device Addresses page fields.


Note ICSConfig cannot be configured to assign IP addresses to IP phones or other IP devices that do not reside on the same VLAN as the system cards (VLAN 1). To configure DHCP to assign IP addresses to IP phones or other IP devices that are on VLANs other than VLAN 1, you must use the Cisco IOS CLI on the MRP or router configured to route between VLANs. For information about configuring DHCP using the Cisco IOS CLI, see the "Configuring DHCP" section in the Cisco IOS IP Configuration Guide, Release 12.2. For more information about configuring VLANs on the Cisco ICS 7750, see the "Configuring VLANs" section.


Figure 4-3 Network ConfigurationIP Device Addresses Page

Table 4-3 Network ConfigurationIP Device Addresses Page
Fields 

Field
Description

IP Address Pool for System Cards

These read-only values represent the IP range and subnet mask for the system cards. The IP address ranges for IP phones and other IP devices cannot overlap the IP address range for system cards.

IP Address Pool for IP Phones

A pool of IP addresses used to address IP phones. This pool of IP addresses cannot overlap the range of IP addresses used for system cards or other IP devices. This IP address pool must be on the same subnet as the IP addresses used for the system cards.

Enable DHCP for IP Phones

Click this check box to enable IP provisioning through DHCP for IP phones. It will be automatically enabled if you enter an IP address pool for IP phones.

Phone TFTP IP

The IP address of the TFTP server used to deliver startup information to the IP phones. This is usually the IP address of the SPE310 running the Cisco CallManager publisher.

Phone Start IP

The starting IP address of the IP address pool for IP phones.

Phone End IP

The ending IP address of the IP address pool for IP phones.

Lease Time

The number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds that will elapse by default before expiration of an IP address that has been assigned to an IP phone.

IP Address Pool for Other IP Devices

A pool of IP addresses used to address other IP devices. This pool of IP addresses cannot overlap the range of IP addresses used for system cards or IP phones. This IP address pool must be on the same subnet as the IP addresses used for the system cards.

Enable DHCP for Other IP Devices

Click this check box to enable IP provisioning through DHCP for other IP devices. It will be automatically enabled if you enter an IP address pool for other IP devices.

Device Start IP

The starting IP address of the IP address pool for other IP devices.

Device End IP

The ending IP address of the IP address pool for other IP devices.

Lease Time

The number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds that will elapse by default before expiration of an IP address that has been assigned to an IP device.

Primary WINS Server (optional)

The IP address of an external, primary WINS server that this pool of IP devices will use for WINS resolution.

Secondary WINS Server (optional)

The IP address of an external, secondary WINS server available to this pool of IP devices.


Setting Up the Network DNS and Default Gateway Configuration

The Network Configuration—DNS and Gateway page, shown in Figure 4-4, collects DNS and default gateway information that you enter for your network. Table 4-4 describes the Network Configuration page fields.

Figure 4-4 Network ConfigurationDNS and Gateway Page

Table 4-4 Network ConfigurationDNS and Gateway Page Fields 

Field
Description

Primary DNS IP

The IP address of your primary DNS server external to the chassis.

Secondary DNS IP (optional)

The IP address of your secondary DNS server.

Default Gateway IP

The IP address of your default gateway. This is the address of an MRP or ASI (or external router), and must be in the same subnet as all the IP addresses entered on the previous page.

The default gateway is the connection or interchange point that connects separate IP networks. It is used to forward traffic to destinations beyond the local subnet. For example, a local area network (LAN) may need a gateway to connect it to a wide area network (WAN) or to the Internet.

...

Click this button to select the IP address of an MRP or ASI for the default gateway IP.


Configuring Security for Cisco IOS-Based Cards

The Security Setup for IOS-Based Cards page, shown in Figure 4-5, collects password information that you enter for access to Cisco IOS-based cards (the SSP, MRPs, and ASIs) and to the SAP card.

See the "Password Rules" section for password guidelines and descriptions.

Figure 4-5 Security Setup for IOS-Based Cards Page

Password Rules

Assign the enable and read-only passwords according to the following rules:

Passwords can contain up to 80 characters.

Passwords can consist of any alphanumeric characters, except for the following:

Spaces.

The ?, tab (\t), new line (\n), and return (\r) characters.

Passwords are case sensitive.

If a password consists of all digits, the number cannot be evaluated to less than 10.

Fields on the Security Setup for IOS-based Cards page are described as follows:

Login Password

Enter and reenter a new password to change the login password from the default password, which is changeme.

The login password is used to log in to any Cisco IOS-based card. You cannot use this password to change the configuration of an Cisco IOS-based card. It is used as the console and vty password for Cisco IOS-based cards.

Enable Password

Enter and reenter a new password to change the enable password from the default password, which is changeme.

The enable password is used to change the configuration of an Cisco IOS-based card or the SAP. This password cannot be the keyword level.


Caution If you forget your passwords, you cannot recover them. We recommend that you write your passwords on the provided worksheet (see the "Collecting Required Information for the Initial Configuration Program" section) and then store this document in a safe place.

Configuring Security for SNMP

The Security Setup for SNMP page, shown in Figure 4-6, collects the community strings that you enter and reenter. Community strings make possible SNMP access to system cards (MRPs, ASIs, SSP, and SPE310).

SNMP community strings can contain as many as 32 alphanumeric characters, excluding spaces and the ?, tab (\t), new line (\n), and return (\r) characters. SNMP community strings are case sensitive.

It is highly recommended that you change the default SNMP community strings even if you do not use SNMP. The Cisco ICS 7750 uses SNMP internally; therefore, leaving the SNMP community strings at their default values creates a security risk on the system.

Figure 4-6 Security Setup for SNMP Page

Configuring SPE310 Card Security

You use the SPE310 administrator password for administrator-level access to the Windows 2000 operating system running on the SPE310. With administrator access, you can change operating system settings or you can upgrade or modify the operating system as needed. The user ID for the SPE310 administrator is set to Administrator. This user ID cannot be changed.

The Security Setup for SPE Cards page, shown in Figure 4-7, collects the new password that you enter to use for access to the SPE310 cards.


Note Do not configure the Windows 2000 administrator password through the Windows 2000 user interface. Using ICSConfig to configure the administrator password ensures that all SPE310s have the same password, for easier management.


Figure 4-7 Security Setup for SPE Cards Page

Fields on the Security Setup for SPE Cards page are described as follows:

New Password

Enter a new password to change the SPE310 administrator password from the default password, which is changeme.

Confirm Password

Reenter the password entered in the first field.

Configuring ICS System Manager Security

The Security Setup for ICS 7700 System page, shown in Figure 4-8, collects the new password that you enter for access to System Manager. This password is used to gain access to all areas of the ICS system manager software. By default, the user ID for the ICS Super Admin user ID is set to admin. This user ID cannot be changed.

Figure 4-8 Security Setup for ICS 7700 System Page

Fields on the Security Setup for ICS 7700 System page are described as follows:

Change Password

Enter a new password to change the ICS Super Admin password from the default of admin. Note that this password is case sensitive.

Confirm Password

Reenter the password entered in the first field.

Configuring Event Manager Default Settings

The ICS Event Manager Preferences page, shown in Figure 4-9, collects information that you enter if you choose to enable e-mail, paging, and forwarding related to system events. Table 4-5 describes the fields in the ICS Event Manager Preferences page.


Note If you need to modify these settings later, use the Event Manager Preferences page in the System Manager.


The Event Manager monitors system messages. The Event Manager can be configured to forward messages to other syslog servers, to send e-mail, or to page an administrator when it receives specified system messages.

If you consent to having System Manager automatically send event messages to Cisco Systems, then you must complete all the E-mail Setting fields.The Event Forwarding Setting and Page Setting fields are optional.

If you do not consent to monitoring availability, then all the fields are optional.

Figure 4-9 ICS Event Manager Preferences Page

Table 4-5 ICS Event Manager Preferences Page Fields 

Field
Description

SMTP Server (outgoing)

The default Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) e-mail server used to send e-mail about system events. Enter the host name of an accessible e-mail server in the format servername.maildomain.suffix.

Device Name

The default name shown as the sender in e-mail sent about system events. This name should be descriptive and should uniquely identify each Cisco ICS 7750.

From E-mail Address

The default e-mail address shown as the sender in e-mail sent about system events. This e-mail address should be descriptive and should uniquely identify each Cisco ICS 7750, such as 7750_XXX@my_domain_name.com, where XXX is the last three digits of the IP address of the SPE310 running System Manager.

To E-mail Address

The default e-mail address to which the system should send e-mails about system events. This is usually the e-mail address of a system administrator.

Page Number (optional)

Enter the default pager number of the user (system administrator) receiving page notifications (numeric pages only; alphanumeric pages are supported only via e-mail). This page number field is valid only when used in conjunction with a user-defined Event Manager rule with a Page action. For more information about Event Manager rules, see the Cisco ICS System Manager - Event Manager help.

If a pager PIN number is required, it must be appended to the pager phone number. For example, if the pager number is 555-1212 and the PIN number is 1234, enter the following in the Page Number field:

555-1212,,,,,1234

The commas each signify a 1-second delay. There must be a delay between automatically dialing the pager number and sending the PIN. For more information see Cisco ICS System Manager - Event Manager help.

Syslog Server for Event Forwarding (optional)

Enter a secondary syslog server in order to forward event notifications (in the form of syslog messages) to another syslog server (outside the ICS7750 such as CiscoWorks 2000). This optional field is valid only when used in conjunction with a user-defined Event Manager rule with a Forward action. For more information about Event Manager rules, see the Cisco ICS System Manager - Event Manager help.

You can specify the syslog server by its IP address or host name:

None - (Default)—Select this radio button if you do not want to forward messages to another syslog server.

Host Name—To set a server as the default for forwarded system messages, select this radio button, and enter the host name of the syslog server.

IP Address—To set the server as the default for forwarded system messages, select this radio button and enter the IP address of the syslog server.

Host Name

Click this radio button, and enter the host name of a syslog server to be used as the default server for forwarded system messages. Enter the host name in the format servername.domain.suffix, such as server_name.my_domain_name.com.

IP Address

Click this radio button, and enter the IP address of a syslog server to be used as the default server for forwarded system messages.

None

Click this radio button to have no event messages sent to another syslog server.


Viewing the Summary Page

When you have configured all the settings, the Summary page, shown in Figure 4-10, is displayed.

Figure 4-10 Summary Page

The Summary page displays a list of all the configuration pages and the data entered in each field. All the page names listed on the Summary page are links to the configuration pages, where you can change any of the information that you entered.

To change any of your settings, click the associated hyperlinked page.

By clicking the Save As button, you can save a report of your configuration settings to a file on your local PC hard disk. This is useful for later reviewing of your configuration.

Completing the Configuration

The Ready to Submit page, shown in Figure 4-11, provides instructions on what to do after you submit the changes to your Cisco ICS 7750. Submitting and processing these changes can take up to 20 minutes to complete.


Caution Do not reboot your Cisco ICS 7750 or perform any configuration tasks during this process.

Figure 4-11 Ready to Submit Page

When the changes are complete, the Setup Complete page appears, as shown in Figure 4-12. At this time, the connection to the server is lost (because of the IP address change), and you must readdress the client PC to continue.

Figure 4-12 Setup Complete Page

Reconfiguring the PC

After you run the initial configuration program, you must return your PC to its original IP address setting and connect it to your local network.

After your PC is rebooted, it is safe to connect the Cisco ICS 7750 to your network. (See the "Connecting to the LAN" section.)

Changing the Host Name of the SPE310 Running System Manager

This section describes how to change the computer name (also known as the host name) of the SPE310 running System Manager from the factory default to a host name of your choosing, should you desire to do so.


Note These instructions assume that no other applications, such as Cisco CallManager, have been installed on the SPE310 running System Manager since you received it from the factory. If any other applications have been installed, refer to the application documentation for information about any restrictions or procedures related to changing the hostname.



Note For reimaging instructions and for information about changing the host name of other SPE310s, see the Cisco ICS 7750 Troubleshooting Guide.


To change the host name of an SPE310 running System Manager, follow the practices and procedures in this section.

Guidelines for Host Names

Assigning a New Host Name

Guidelines for Host Names

The following principles govern the use of host names on SPE310s and other devices on the same network as the Cisco ICS 7750:

Access privileges—You must be logged on as an administrator on the SPE310 in order to change the SPE310 host name.

Naming conventions:

Host names should be no more than 15 characters long.

Host names should contain only the numbers 0 through 9, the letters A through Z, the letters a through z, and hyphens (-). Using other characters might prevent other users from finding your device on the network.

Assigning a New Host Name

Follow these steps to assign a new host name to the SPE310 running System Manager:


Step 1 Connect a monitor, mouse, and keyboard to the SPE310. See the "Accessing the SPE310 Windows Interface Through Directly Connected Peripherals" section.


Note When you perform this procedure, access the SPE310 only through directly connected peripherals. Do not attempt to perform this procedure by accessing the SPE310 through Terminal Services Client.


Step 2 Log in as an administrator (User ID administrator), and enter your password (the default is changeme).

Step 3 Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel > System.

Step 4 Click the Network Identification tab.

Step 5 Click the Properties button.

Step 6 In the Computer name field, enter the new host name.

Step 7 Click OK.

Step 8 Click Yes when prompted to reboot the SPE310.


Note If an error message appears which suggests that the SQL database has been tampered with, ignore it.



Installing Cisco CallManager Software

Once you have completed the initial configuration and, optionally, changed the SPE310 host name, you can install Cisco CallManager. For instructions on installing Cisco CallManager, see Installing Cisco CallManager.


Note System software release 2.6.0 requires Cisco CallManager version 3.3.2 or later. Earlier versions of Cisco CallManager will not run with system software release 2.6.0.



Note Before you begin configuring Cisco CallManager, be sure to read the "Configuring Cisco CallManager" section.


Connecting to the LAN

This section provides information about the following types of connections to Catalyst switches:

Gigabit Cascaded Configuration

Star-Wired 100-Mbps Configuration


Note You can use any combination of Ethernet switches with the Cisco ICS 7750. If you intend to provide inline power to Cisco IP phones, you can use Catalyst 3524-PWR Series XL switches, Catalyst 4000 Series switches, or Catalyst 6000 Series switches.



Note Use the supplied crossover Ethernet cables (yellow with a black stripe) to connect both 10/100 Ethernet ports on the SSP to the Catalyst switch 10/100 Ethernet ports. If you are using more than one Catalyst switch in your system, connect each SSP Ethernet port to a separate Catalyst switch to ensure redundancy between the Cisco ICS 7750 and the Catalyst switches.


Gigabit Cascaded Configuration

In the gigabit cascaded configuration, shown in Figure 4-13, the Catalyst 3524-PWR XL switches have 1000BaseX GBIC modules and GigaStack Gigabit Interface Converter (GBIC) modules installed.

Figure 4-13 Gigabit Cascaded Configuration

Each switch is connected to the one above it and the one below it through the GigaStack GBIC module ports, by using the 50-cm cable supplied with the GigaStack GBIC module. Two crossover Ethernet cables (yellow with black stripe) are included in the hardware accessory kit for connecting the two SSP ports to two different switches in the switch stack for redundant connectivity. The GigaStack GBIC module ports are available for high-speed connections to network resources.

In a gigabit cascaded configuration, you can use any 10/100 ports that are not connected to the SSP for connecting local Cisco IP phones, printers, servers, and workstations. You can use this configuration to connect up to nine switches, supporting as many as 214 connections.


Note Refer to the installation guide that came with your switch for instructions on making the necessary connections.


Star-Wired 100-Mbps Configuration

In the star-wired 100-Mbps configuration, shown in Figure 4-14, the Catalyst switches are connected by using the 10/100 switch ports. You can use this configuration for switches that do not have1000BaseX or GigaStack GBIC modules installed. Two crossover Ethernet cables (yellow with black stripe) are included in the hardware accessory kit for connecting the two SSP ports to the switch stack. You must provide any additional crossover cables required to interconnect the 10/100 switch ports.

Figure 4-14 Star-Wired 100-Mbps Configuration

In this configuration, the Catalyst switch on the top functions as an aggregator and is star-wired to the SSP and the other switches in the stack, ensuring optimal performance. The four bottom switches are cascaded to provide a redundant path if the aggregator switch fails.

This type of configuration reduces the number of switch ports available for connecting to local Cisco IP Phones, printers, servers, and workstations. You can use this configuration to connect up to nine switches.

Connecting IP Phones and Other Network Devices

Any data network equipment—including desktop PCs, servers, and Cisco IP Phones—that you intend to use on the same LAN as the Cisco ICS 7750 should be connected to the system through the ports on the Catalyst switches.

The Catalyst 3524-PWR XL 10/100 ports can supply inline power to a Cisco IP Phone across the Ethernet cable that connects the Cisco IP Phone to the Catalyst switch.


Caution Before connecting Cisco IP Phones to the Catalyst 3524-PWR XL switches, refer to the Catalyst 3500 Series XL Hardware Installation Guide and the documentation that came with the Cisco IP Phone.

Connecting a Modem

This section tells how to make a direct modem connection with an SAP and a remote dial-in connection (via the connected modem) with an MRP or ASI. A modem must be configured appropriately to establish these connections. For the SAP, you must manually configure the modem before attaching it to the system console port.

The following sections explain how to configure the modem:

Determining the Modem Initialization String

Checking Other Modem Settings

Initializing a Modem for an SAP

Initializing a Modem for a Dial-Up Connection to an MRP or ASI


Note To connect and configure a modem for remote System Manager dial-up access, refer to the Cisco ICS 7750 Administration and Troubleshooting Guide.


Determining the Modem Initialization String

You have to provide the modem with an initialization string and other settings that tell it how to function with the system. The initialization string is a series of parameter settings that configure the modem to interact with the system. This section describes how to determine the correct initialization string for your modem.

Modem command sets vary widely. Although most modems use the Hayes command set (prefixing commands with AT), Hayes-compatible modems do not use identical AT command sets.

Refer to your modem manufacturer's documentation to learn how to examine the current and stored configuration of the modem you are using. Generally, you enter AT commands such as &v, i4, or *o to view, inspect, or observe the settings.

The following is an example of a modem initialization string for a U.S. Robotics 56K Fax Modem. This example is for a modem attached to the system console port on the SAP.

&a1&b0&c1&h0&i0&k1&m4&n6&r1s0=1  


Timesaver Initialization strings for other modems are listed in the "Configuring and Troubleshooting Modems" appendix in the Dial Services Command Reference publication.



Note Ensure that automatic baud rate detection is turned off so that the modem speed is not changed.


A modem initialization string configures the following functions:

Locking the port speed. This function locks in the modem to the speed of the system's serial port. Modems differ in how locking of the port speed is done. Refer to your modem documentation to see how your modem locks the port speed (check the &b, \j, &q, \n and s-register settings).


Note For the SAP, the modem must be set to 9600 baud.


Other terms that vendors might use to refer to locking of the port speed are port-rate adjust, speed conversion, or buffered mode. Enabling error correction often puts the modem in the buffered mode (see the "Checking Other Modem Settings" section).

Setting the hardware flow control. Request To Send (RTS) and Clear To Send (CTS) signals are used between the modem and the system to control the flow of data. Incorrectly configuring flow control can result in hung sessions and loss of data. Refer to your modem documentation to see how to do this (check the &e, &k, &h, &r, and s-register settings).


Note For the SAP, set the modem for no flow control.


Setting the correct data carrier detect (DCD). The modem uses DCD to indicate to the system when a session has been established with a remote modem. Most modems use the setting &c1. Refer to your modem documentation for the DCD settings used with your modem.

Setting the correct data terminal ready (DTR). The modem interprets a toggle of the DTR signal as a command to drop any active call and return to the stored settings. Most modems use the setting &d2 or &d3. Refer to your modem documentation for the DTR setting used with your modem.

Setting to answer calls on the first ring. If a modem services incoming calls, it must be configured to answer a call after a specific number of rings. Most modems use the setting s0=1 to answer the call after one ring. Refer to your modem documentation for the settings used with your modem.

Checking Other Modem Settings

The following are other settings that might be necessary or desirable, depending on your modem:

Setting error correction. This function can be negotiated between two modems to ensure a reliable data link. Error correction standards include the Link Access Procedure for Modems (LAPM) and Microcom Networking Protocol Class 4 (MNP4). V.42 error correction allows either LAPM or MNP4 error correction to be negotiated. Modems differ in how they enable error correction. Refer to your modem documentation for the error correction methods used with your modem.

Setting data compression. This function can be negotiated between two modems to allow for greater data throughput. Data compression standards include V.42 bis and MNP5. Modems differ in how they enable data compression. Refer to your modem documentation for the data compression settings used with your modem.

Initializing a Modem for an SAP

This section describes how to initialize a modem for an SAP. You must initialize the modem and save its configuration externally before attaching it to the console port of the SAP.


Note You cannot use the SAP to configure a modem. You must configure it externally.



Note The US Robotics 56K Fax Modem is the recommended modem to connect to the SAP. However, any modem that can save and restore its settings when the modem is powered on, as long as modem settings equivalent to those specified in Table 4-6 are set, can be used.


Table 4-6 Required Modem Settings for Connection to SAP

Modem Setting
Description

B0

V32 Mode/CCITT Answer Seq

E0

No Command Echo

F1

No Online Echo

M1

Speaker ON Until CD

Q0

Result Codes Sent

V1

Verbal Responses

X1

Extended Result Codes

Y0

Next Reset to &W0 settings

Z0

Y setting determines reset

&A1

Enable /ARQ Result Codes

&B1

Fixed DTE Speed

&C1

Modem Controls CD

&D0

Ignore DTR

&G0

No Guard Tone

&H0

Disable TX Flow Control

&I0

Disable RX Flow Control

&K1

Auto Data Compression

&M4

ARQ/Normal Mode

&N6

9600 bps

&P0

N. American Pulse Dial

&R2

RX to DTE/RTS High

&S0

DSR Always ON

&T5

Deny Remote DLB

&U0

Variable link rate floor

&Y1

Destructive/Expedited


Follow these steps to initialize a U.S. Robotics 56K Fax Modem for an SAP:


Step 1 Set the DIP switches on the back of the modem. Table 4-7 shows the DIP switch settings for the US Robotics 56K Fax Modem:

Table 4-7 US Robotics 56K Fax Modem DIP Switch Settings

DIP Switch
Up/Down
Meaning

1

down

DTR normal override

2

up

result codes verbal

3

down

display result codes

4

down

offline commands - no echo

5

up

auto answer on, answer 1st ring

6

up

Carrier Detect (CD) normal

7

up

Load defaults from VRAM

8

down

Smart mode



Note Some modems need to be strapped so that they start up with saved settings when they are powered on, rather than starting up using default settings. Make sure that your modem is strapped accordingly (see DIP Switch 8 in Table 4-7 for a US Robotics 56K Fax Modem).


Step 2 Connect the modem to a serial port on your PC using a serial modem cable (also known as a Data Communications Equipment, or DCE, cable).

Step 3 On your PC, open HyperTerminal and connect to the modem. On PCs running Windows 2000, a typical HyperTerminal path is Start > Programs > Accessories > Communications > HyperTerminal.

Step 4 Configure the modem by entering the initialization strings below. The following example is for a US Robotics 56K Fax Modem:

ATB0E0F1M1Q0V1X1Y0
AT&A1&B1&C1&D0&G0&H0&I0&K1&M4&N6&P0&R2&S0&T5&U0&Y1


Note For a description of the example modem initialization string, refer to Table 4-6


Step 5 Save the configuration settings on the modem (enter AT&W0 (Store Configuration 0) for a US Robotics 56K Fax Modem).

Step 6 Test the modem on the SAP:

a. Connect the modem to the SAP console port using the serial modem cable.

b. Connect a telephone line to the modem.

c. Dial up the modem and establish a remote connection with the SAP or send a test page from ICSSM Event Manager Preferences. For information on sending a test page, see the ICS System Manager Event Manager online help.


Initializing a Modem for a Dial-Up Connection to an MRP or ASI

This section explains how to initialize a modem attached to your PC for a dial-up connection to an MRP or ASI.


Note You must first create a direct Telnet or connection session to the modem before you can send an initialization string. You can use AT&F as a basic modem initialization string in most cases.


Follow these steps to initialize a U.S. Robotics 56K Fax Modem on line 1 (decimal number 2000 + line number 1 = 2001):


Step 1 Map a host name to a decimal port. The port number is 200x, plus the number of the TTY line. The following example maps port 2001 to the IP address (172.16.1.10) of the Ethernet 0 interface on one of the MRPs or ASIs in the system:

C7750(config)# ip host modem1 2001 172.16.1.10
C7750(config)# exit 
C7750# 

Step 2 Establish a direct Telnet session to the modem:

C7750# telnet modem1 
Trying modem1 (172.16.1.10, 2001)... Open 

Step 3 (Optional) Set the modem to its factory defaults:

at&f
OK

Step 4 Configure the modem with an initialization string. The following example is a string for a U.S. Robotics 56K Fax Modem:

at&b1&h1&r2&c1&d3&m4&k1s0=1
OK

Step 5 Store the modem settings in NVRAM on the modem:

at&w
OK


Note Some modems need to be strapped so that they start up with saved settings when they are powered on, rather than starting up using default settings. Make sure that your modem is strapped accordingly.


Step 6 Suspend and disconnect your Telnet session:

- suspend keystroke -        
C7750# disconnect
Closing connection to modem1 [confirm] y
C7750#  


Testing the Dial-Up Connection

Test your modem connectivity to make sure that dial-up access is properly configured. The following is an example of a successful connection from a PC using a U.S. Robotics 56K Fax Modem to dial in to an MRP or ASI:

at&f&c1&d3&h1&r2&b1&m4&k1&w
OK
atdt9,5551234
CONNECT 28800/ARQ/V32/LAPM/V42BIS
User Access Verification
Username: janedoe 
Password:
C7750> 


Note The same configuration issues exist between the client data terminal equipment (DTE) and the client modem. Make sure that you have the correct EIA/TIA-232 cabling and the correct modem initialization string for your client modem.