Cisco ICS 7750 Installation and Configuration Guide, 2.6.0
Cisco ICS 7750 Sample Configurations
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Cisco ICS 7750 Sample Configurations

Table Of Contents

Cisco ICS 7750 Sample Configurations

Configuring Interfaces

Configuring Synchronous Serial WICs

Configuring ISDN BRI WICs

Configuring T1 and Fractional T1 WICs

Configuring VWIC Interfaces for Data

MGCP Sample Configuration

Sample MRP Configuration

Sample Cisco CallManager Configuration

Creating an MGCP Gateway

Configuring FXO Ports

Configuring FXS Ports

Testing the Phones for Local Connectivity

Configuring a Route Pattern

Testing Calls over the PSTN

Sample H.323 Call Routing Configurations

Configuring Dial Plans

Configuring Number Expansion

Configuring Analog Voice Ports

Configuring FXS Interfaces

Configuring FXO Interfaces

Configuring E&M Interfaces

Configuring ISDN Voice Interfaces

Configuring DID for ISDN

Configuring ISDN BRI VICs

Configuring ISDN PRI Interfaces

Configuring VoIP for Frame Relay

Configuring Quality of Service

Configuring RSVP

Configuring Multilink PPP with Interleaving

Configuring RTP Header Compression

Configuring TDM Clocking

T1 in Slot 0

Single T1 Port Providing Clocking

Single T1 Port Receiving Clocking from the Line

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line, with One in the Loop-Timed Mode

Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

T1 in Both Slot 0 and Slot 1

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line, with One in the Loop-Timed Mode

Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

T1 in Slot 0 and an Analog VIC in Slot 1

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line, with One in the Loop-Timed Mode

Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

T1 in Slot 0 and a WIC in Slot 1

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line, with One in the Loop-Timed Mode

Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

Verifying T1 Controller Configuration

Verifying the Configuration


Cisco ICS 7750 Sample Configurations


This chapter contains configuration examples using the Cisco IOS software command-line interface (CLI) and Cisco CallManager. It contains the following sections:

Configuring Interfaces

MGCP Sample Configuration

Sample H.323 Call Routing Configurations

Configuring TDM Clocking

Verifying the Configuration

Configuring Interfaces

This section presents examples that illustrate how to configure LAN and WAN interfaces on analog station interface (ASI) and multiservice route processor (MRP) cards (see the "Configuring WAN Interfaces" section on page 6-27) and contains the following sections:

Configuring Synchronous Serial WICs

Configuring ISDN BRI WICs

Configuring T1 and Fractional T1 WICs

Configuring VWIC Interfaces for Data

Configuring Synchronous Serial WICs

To configure the serial interfaces on your asynchronous/synchronous serial WIC (WIC-1T, WIC-2T, or WIC-2A/S), enter the following Cisco IOS commands at the ASI or MRP command prompt, in configuration mode (see the "Configuring WAN Interfaces" section on page 6-27):

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

MRP> enable

Password:password

MRP# 

Enters enable mode. You have entered enable mode when the prompt changes to MRP#.

Step 2 

MRP# configure terminal

MRP(config)#

Enters global configuration mode. You have entered global configuration mode when the prompt changes to MRP(config)#.

Step 3 

MRP# ip routing

Enables routing protocols as required for your global configuration. This example uses IP routing.

Step 4 

MRP(config)# interface serial 0

MRP(config-if)#

Enters the interface configuration mode. You have entered interface configuration mode when the prompt changes to MRP(config-if)#. In this example, serial interface 0 is being configured.

Step 5 

MRP(config-if)# physical-layer async

(Optional) All serial ports are initially configured as synchronous. Enter this command if you want to configure the port as asynchronous.

Step 6 

MRP(config-if)# async mode dedicated

MRP(config-if)# async default routing

(Optional) Assigns asynchronous parameters. Enter these parameters as needed for your configuration.

Step 7 

MRP(config-if)# line async#

(Optional) Configures the asynchronous line setting.

Step 8 

MRP(config-if)# half-duplex timer dcd-drop-delay 100

(Optional) Specifies the time that the interface waits in controlled carrier mode. See Table 6-8 for a list of half-duplex timer commands.

Step 9 

MRP(config-if)# clockrate 7200

(Optional) To use a port in DCE1 mode, connect a DCE cable, and set the internal TXC2 speed in bits per second. See Table 6-9 through Table 6-11 for clock rate settings for your interface. (For ports used in DTE3 mode, the MRP automatically uses the external timing signal.)

Step 10 

MRP(config-if)# dce-terminal-timing-enable

(Optional) When a port is operating in DCE mode, by default the DCE sends SCT4 and SCR5 clock signals to the DTE, and the DTE returns an SCTE6 signal to the DCE.

If the DTE does not return an SCTE signal, enter this command to configure the DCE port to use its own clock signal.

Step 11 

MRP(config-if)# invert-txc

(Optional) Interfaces that are connected with long cables might experience high error rates when operating at higher transmission speeds, because the clock and data signals can shift out of phase.

If a DCE port is reporting a high number of error packets, using this command to invert the clock can often correct the shift.

Step 12 

MRP(config-if)# exit

Exits to global configuration mode.

Note Repeat Step 4 through Step 12 if your MRP has more that one serial interface that you need to configure.

Step 13 

MRP(config)# Ctrl ^Z

MRP#

Exits to enable mode.

Step 14 

MRP# copy running-config startup-config

Saves the configuration changes to the startup-config file so that they are not lost during resets, power cycles, or power outages.

1 DCE = data communications equipment. Modems (analog) and CSU/DSUs (digital) are the most common DCE types.

2 TXC = transmit clock signal

3 DTE = data terminal equipment. Computers and terminals are the most common DTE types.

4 SCT = serial clock transmit

5 SCR = serial clock receive

6 SCTE = serial clock transmit external


Note Use ICSConfig to assign or modify the IP address of an ASI or MRP card, as necessary. Do not use the CLI.


Configuring ISDN BRI WICs

To configure the interfaces on your Basic Rate Interface (BRI) WIC (WIC-1B-S/T or WIC-1B-U), enter the following Cisco IOS commands at the ASI or MRP command prompt, in configuration mode (see the "Configuring ISDN BRI WICs" section on page 6-30):

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

MRP> enable

Password: password

MRP# 

Enters enable mode. You have entered enable mode when the prompt changes to MRP#.

Step 2 

MRP# configure terminal

MRP(config)#

Enters global configuration mode. You have entered global configuration mode when the prompt changes to MRP(config)#.

Step 3 

MRP(config)# isdn switch-type basic-5ess

Specifies an ISDN switch type. See Table 6-12 for a list of ISDN switch types.

Note Switch types that are configured in interface configuration mode override this setting for the configured interface.

Step 4 

MRP(config)# ip routing

Enables routing protocols as required for your global configuration. This example uses IP routing.

Step 5 

MRP(config)# interface bri 0/0

MRP(config-if)#

Enters interface configuration mode. You have entered interface configuration mode when the prompt changes to MRP(config-if)#. In this example, ISDN BRI is being configured on slot 0, interface 0.

Step 6 

MRP(config-if)# isdn switch-type basic-5ess

If you are configuring this interface for voice, enter the switch type instead of an IP address.

Step 7 

MRP(config-if)# exit

Exits to global configuration mode.

Note Repeat Step 5 through Step 7 if your card has more than one BRI interface that you need to configure.

Step 8 

MRP(config-if)# memory-size iomem 40

(Optional) By default, the card allocates 25 percent of dynamic RAM (DRAM) to shared memory (used for data transmitted or received by WICs). Enter this command if you wish to increase the amount of shared memory. This example increases shared memory from 25 percent to 40 percent.

Step 9 

MRP(config)# Ctrl ^Z

MRP#

Exits to enable mode.

Step 10 

MRP# copy running-config startup-config

Saves the configuration changes to the startup-config file so that they are not lost during resets, power cycles, or power outages.


Note Use ICSConfig to assign or modify the IP address of an ASI or MRP card, as necessary. Do not use the CLI.


Configuring T1 and Fractional T1 WICs

The Cisco IOS software provides the following default configuration for CSU/DSU- and T1-specific parameters:

service-module t1 clock source line
service-module t1 data-coding normal
service-module t1 timeslots all speed 64
service-module t1 framing esf
service-module t1 lbo none
service-module t1 linecode b8zs
no service-module t1 remote-alarm-enable
service-module t1 remote-loopback
no service-module t1 fdl

To configure a new T1 or fractional T1 interface or to change an existing interface configuration, enter the following Cisco IOS commands in configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

MRP> enable

Password: password

MRP# 

Enters enable mode. You have entered enable mode when the prompt changes to MRP#.

Step 2 

MRP# configure terminal

MRP(config)#

Enters global configuration mode. You have entered global configuration mode when the prompt changes to MRP(config)#.

Step 3 

MRP# ip routing

Enables routing protocols as required for your global configuration. This example uses IP routing.

Step 4 

MRP(config)# interface serial 0/0

MRP(config-if)#

Enters the interface configuration mode. You have entered interface configuration mode when the prompt changes to MRP(config-if)#.

Step 5 

MRP(config-if)# service-module t1 framing {esf | sf}

MRP(config-if)# service-module t1 linecode {b8zs | ami}

Specifies the framing type and line code type. In this example, the framing type is sf1 and the line code is ami2 .

Step 6 

MRP(config-if)# service-module t1 timeslots 1-20 speed 64

(Optional) If you are using fractional T1 service, enter the time slot range and speed. In this example, the time slot range is from 1 to 20, and the speed is 64 kbps.

Step 7 

MRP(config-if)# exit

Exits to global configuration mode.

Repeat Step 4 through Step 8 if your card has more than one interface that you need to configure.

Step 8 

MRP(config)# Ctrl ^Z

MRP#

Exits to enable mode.

Step 9 

MRP# copy running-config startup-config

Saves the configuration changes to the startup-config file so that they are not lost during resets, power cycles, or power outages.

1 SF = Super Frame

2 AMI = alternate mark inversion

Configuring VWIC Interfaces for Data

To configure a new T1 or E1 VWIC interface or to change the configuration of an existing interface, enter the following Cisco IOS commands (see the "Configuring VWICs for Data-Only Transmission" section on page 6-35):

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

MRP> enable

Password: password

MRP# 

Enters enable mode. You have entered enable mode when the prompt changes to MRP#.

Step 2 

MRP# configure terminal

MRP(config)#

Enters global configuration mode. You have entered global configuration mode when the prompt changes to MRP(config)#.

Step 3 

MRP(config)# ip routing

Enables routing protocols as required for your global configuration. This example uses IP routing.

Step 4 

MRP(config)# controller t1 1/0

Specifies the interface to configure. This example configures a T1 interface in slot 1 and port 0.

Step 5 

MRP(config-controller)# framing {esf | sf | crc4 | no-crc4} [australia]

Specifies the framing type. For T1, you can choose esf or sf (the default is esf). For E1, you can choose crc4, no-crc4, or (optionally) australia (the default is crc4).

Step 6 

MRP(config-controller)# linecode {b8zs | ami | hdb3}

Specifies the line code format. For T1, you can choose ami or b8zs (the default is b8zs). For E1, you can choose ami or hdb3 (the default is hdb3).

Step 7 

MRP(config-controller)# channel-group X timeslots 1-24

Specifies the channel group and time slots to be mapped. For data-only VWIC interfaces, only one channel group can be configured.

Step 8 

MRP(config-controller)# interface serial 1/0:0

Configures each channel group as a virtual serial interface. Specify the interface, port number, and channel group to modify.

Step 9 

MRP(config-if)# Ctrl ^Z

MRP#

Exits to enable mode.

Note Repeat Step 4 through Step 10 if your MRP has more than one T1 or E1 interface that you need to configure

Step 10 

MRP# copy running-config startup-config

Saves the configuration changes to the startup-config file so that they are not lost during resets, power cycles, or power outages.


Note Use ICSConfig to assign or modify the IP address of an ASI or MRP card, as necessary. Do not use the CLI.


MGCP Sample Configuration

This section guides you through a sample Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP) configuration. This section presents only the minimum commands required for building a working configuration for an MRP with two Foreign Exchange Office (FXO) ports and two Foreign Exchange Station (FXS) ports.

This section describes how to configure one FXO connection to the PSTN, as well as FXS connections to analog handsets and VoIP connectivity to Cisco 7960 IP Phones. After performing this sample configuration, you will be able to make calls to and from all the phones in this example, and you will be able to route calls over the PSTN from any phone in this example.

This section assumes that the reader is already familiar with the process of configuring Cisco IP Phones in CallManager. It also assumes that there is at least one IP Phone already active on the CallManager server.


Note Before performing this sample configuration, you need to have previously run the ICSConfig initial configuration program on the Cisco ICS 7750, you need to have configured IP routing on the MRP, and you need to have configured the voice ports on the MRP.


This section addresses the following topics:

Sample MRP Configuration

Sample Cisco CallManager Configuration

Sample MRP Configuration

The following procedure shows the minimum commands necessary for configuring an MRP or ASI for MGCP in the sample configuration.


Step 1 Configure the MRP or ASI to run MGCP as a signaling protocol.

MRP(config)#mgcp

Step 2 Configure the IP address (or DNS name) for the CallManager server.

MRP(config)#mgcp call-agent 172.16.1.252 

Step 3 Select the codec type and the DTMF relay function.

MRP(config)#mgcp dtmf-relay voip codec all mode out-of-band

Step 4 To enable support for Cisco CallManager within MGCP, enter the following command:

MRP(config)#ccm-manager mgcp 

Step 5 Bind the MGCP application to the voice ports.


Note Use the show voice port command to determine the type of ports the MRP has and in what order they are installed.


MRP(config)#dial-peer voice 1 pots
MRP(config)#application MGCPAPP
MRP(config)#port 0/0

/* FXO port */

MRP(config)#dial-peer voice 2 pots
MRP(config)#application MGCPAPP
MRP(config)#port 0/1

/* FXO port */

MRP(config)#dial-peer voice 3 pots
MRP(config)#application MGCPAPP
MRP(config)#port 1/0

/* FXS port */

MRP(config)#dial-peer voice 4 pots
MRP(config)#application MGCPAPP
MRP(config)#port 1/1

/* FXS port */

Step 6 Make certain that the voice ports are enabled.


Note The shutdown and no shutdown commands affect both ports on a VIC. It is necessary to enter the command on only one of the ports.


MRP(config)#voice-port 0/0
MRP(config-voiceport)#no shut
Both ports are in service

/* FXO port */

MRP(config)#voice-port 1/0
MRP(config-voiceport)#no shut
Both ports are in service

/* FXS port */s 


The MRP is now ready to communicate with the Cisco CallManager server. It will periodically send out messages to attempt to establish a connection. When the CallManager server configuration is complete, the connection should automatically establish itself. You should not have to make any further changes on the MRP.


Caution All dial plan-related configuration elements are controlled by Cisco CallManager, and they should not be configured in the MGCP gateway for MGCP-managed endpoints (those with application mgcpapp command in their dial-peer statement). You should not configure any of the following functions:

Under Dial Peers

destination-pattern
session-target

Under Voice Ports

connection { plar | tie line | trunk }

Sample Cisco CallManager Configuration

This section shows how to configure Cisco CallManager for the sample configuration described in the previous section. It includes the following sample procedures:

Creating an MGCP Gateway

Configuring FXO Ports

Configuring FXS Ports

Testing the Phones for Local Connectivity

Configuring a Route Pattern

Testing Calls over the PSTN

This example uses the Default Device Pool. In addition, all Locations are set to < None >, all Calling Search Spaces are set to < None >, and all Partitions are set to < None >. If your configuration uses non-default Device Pools, Locations, Calling Search Spaces, or Partitions you must understand the implications of these features before proceeding. For more information about Cisco CallManager, refer to the Cisco CallManager Administration Guide.


Note This section assumes that you already have IP Phones configured on your CallManager server.


Creating an MGCP Gateway

This sample procedure shows how to create an MRP-based MGCP gateway in Cisco CallManager.


Step 1 Open Netscape Communicator or Microsoft Internet Explorer.

Step 2 In the Location or Address field, enter the following URL, replacing <ipaddress> with the IP address of the SPE running Cisco CallManager:

http://<ipaddress>/ccmadmin

You are prompted for a user ID and password.

Step 3 In the User Name field, enter the User ID of your Administrator account.

Step 4 In the Password field, enter your Administrator account password.

Step 5 Click OK.

The Cisco CallManager Administration page appears.

Step 6 From the menu bar at the top of the page, select Device > Gateway.

The Find and List Gateways page appears, as shown in Figure 7-1.

Figure 7-1 Find and List Gateways Page

Step 7 Click Add a New Gateway.

The Add a New Gateway page appears, as shown in Figure 7-2.

Figure 7-2 Add a New Gateway Page

Step 8 In the Gateway Type field, select Cisco ICS77XX-MRP2XX.


Note This example uses the gateway type Cisco ICS77XX-MRP2XX. The Cisco Integrated Communication System 7750 (Cisco ICS 7750) also supports gateway types Cisco ICS77XX-ASI160 and Cisco ICS77XX-ASI81, in case your configuration includes these ASI cards.


Step 9 Click Next.

The MGCP Configuration page appears, as shown in Figure 7-3.

Figure 7-3 MGCP Configuration Page

Step 10 In the MGCP Domain Name field, enter the actual host name you have assigned to the MRP—in this case, MRP_1.


Note The MGCP domain name is case sensitive.


Step 11 In the Description field, enter an optional description of this MGCP gateway.

Step 12 In the Cisco CallManager Group field, choose the Cisco CallManager group in which you want to create the MGCP gateway.

Step 13 In the Installed Voice Interface Cards fields, select the carrier modules installed in the MRP. VWIC-SLOT is the only option available for the MRP.

Step 14 Scroll down the page, and configure any other settings necessary to describe your configuration. In this example, the default settings were chosen.


Note For more information about the settings on this page, choose Help > For This Page from the main menu, or click the blue button labeled "i."


Step 15 Click Insert.


Configuring FXO Ports

This procedure continues the configuration example and shows how to configure the FXO ports. The FXO ports connect to the PSTN. In this procedure, the type of port is determined and the attendant Directory Number (DN) is assigned.


Step 1 After Insert is clicked in the last step of the "Creating an MGCP Gateway" procedure, the MGCP Configuration page changes to include fields for the installed voice interface card (VIC) modules, as shown in Figure 7-4.

Figure 7-4 VIC Module Fields

Identify the VIC modules installed in slot 0, positions 0 and 1. In this example, they are a VIC-2FXO module and a VIC-2FXS module, respectively.

Step 2 Click Update to activate the changes.

The FXO and FXS ports appear next to the VIC module fields, as shown in Figure 7-5. These ports are also referred to as endpoint identifiers.

Figure 7-5 Endpoint Identifiers

Step 3 Click the FXO port labeled 0/0.

The Gateway Configuration appears.

Step 4 In the Port Type field, select the type of FXO port. In this example, Loop Start is selected.


Note If you are not certain which option to use, you can experiment, without causing the system any harm. If you are not able to make or receive calls over the FXO port after you complete the MRP and CallManager configuration tasks, you can create a new MGCP Member, using the Ground Start option. You must first delete the original port configuration (MGCP Member). This step is required because it is not possible to change the port type of an MGCP Member after it is created.


The Gateway Configuration page shows all the configuration options for the type of FXO port selected. For this example, Figure 7-6 shows the FXO Loop Start options.

Figure 7-6 Gateway Configuration Page - FXO Loop Start Options

Step 5 Configure the parameters necessary for your FXO gateway. An asterisk after a field name indicates that you must enter information in the field.

In Figure 7-6, Default was chosen in the Device Pool field. For the Port Direction field, Bothways was selected, to indicate that calls can be both originated and received through this FXO gateway. In the Attendant DN field, 7010 was entered, to indicate that extension 7010 should initially receive all incoming calls. All other fields were left with their default options.


Note For more information about the settings on this page, choose Help > For This Page from the main menu, or click the blue button labeled "i."


Step 6 Click Insert.

Step 7 Click Back to MGCP Configuration.

You are returned to the MGCP Configuration page.


Note If you have additional FXO ports to configure, you can configure them by repeating Step 3 through Step 7 for each port. In this sample configuration, the second FXO port is not configured.



Configuring FXS Ports

This procedure continues the procedure, "Configuring FXO Ports," and shows how to configure FXS ports. The FXS ports connect to the analog telephony devices, handsets in this example. In this procedure, the type of port is determined and the DN is assigned. At the end of this procedure, the MGCP gateway is reset to activate the changes.


Step 1 In the MGCP Configuration page, click the Endpoint Identifier for the first FXS port, the link "1/0" in this example.

The Gateway Configuration page appears, showing the FXS options, as shown in Figure 7-7.

Figure 7-7 Gateway Configuration Page - FXS Options

Step 2 Configure the parameters necessary for your FXS gateway. An asterisk after a field name indicates that you must enter information in the field.

In the example above, Default was chosen in the Device Pool field. All other fields were left with their default options.


Note For more information about the settings on this page, choose Help > For This Page from the main menu.


Step 3 Click Insert.

Next to the icon in the top left corner of the Gateway Configuration page are icons that indicate the various FXS ports on this module. Next to the port just configured, which is 1/0 in this example, a link to Add DN appears on the page. This option lets you add a directory number (extension) for the FXS port that you just configured.

Step 4 Click Add DN.

The Directory Number Configuration page appears, as shown in Figure 7-8.

Figure 7-8 Directory Number Configuration Page

Step 5 Configure the parameters necessary for your directory number. An asterisk after a field name indicates that you must enter information in the field.

In the example shown in Figure 7-8, the directory number 7100 was entered in the Directory Number field, to assign extension 7100 to the phone connected to this port. All other fields were left with their default options.


Note For more information about the settings on this page, choose Help > For This Page from the main menu.


Step 6 Click Insert.

Step 7 A confirmation dialog box appears. Click OK.

Step 8 In the top left corner, click the icon for FXS port 1/1 to configure the second FXS port.

Step 9 Repeat Step 2 through Step 7 for the remaining FXS port. In this example, the directory number for FXS port 1/1 is 7101.


Note If you lose your place in the menu system, select Device > Gateway from the main CallManager menu at the top of the screen. Then select Find. All the configured gateways will be listed on the screen.


You have now configured the two FXS ports for the analog handsets. Next you must reset the gateway to activate the changes.

Step 10 Click Back to MGCP Configuration.

Step 11 Click Reset Gateway.

The Reset Gateway dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 7-9.

Figure 7-9 Reset Gateway Dialog Box

Step 12 Click Restart.

Restarting the gateway applies all your configuration changes to the configured gateway.


Testing the Phones for Local Connectivity

When you finish configuring the MRP, it will send MGCP messages to the CallManager server to attempt to establish an MGCP relationship. If the configuration was successful, the CallManager server and the MRP should be ready to route local calls between any IP phones registered to the CallManager and the analog phones connected to the FXS ports that were configured in the previous procedure, "Configuring FXS Ports."


Step 1 You should now have dial tone on the analog phones connected to the FXS ports. Try dialing from FXS 1/0 to 1/1 (in this case, directory number 7100 and directory number 7101, respectively). You should be able to make and receive calls between these ports.

Step 2 You should also be able to dial any IP Phones that you already had configured from the analog phones that you configured. You should also be able to call the analog phones from the IP Phones. Try making calls to and from all the phones in your configuration.

If some of your phones cannot place or receive calls, look at the Partition, Calling Search Space (CSS), Device Pool, and Location configurations. You may have a configuration that does not allow all local phones to call each other. If this is the case, temporarily place one IP Phone and one analog phone (FXS port) in the same Partition, Device Pool, Location, and Calling Search Space; then try the test again. When you have completed this task successfully, proceed to the next sample procedure, "Configuring a Route Pattern."


Configuring a Route Pattern

This sample procedure configures a simple route pattern to enable the phones to make calls via the PSTN. The standard North American Numbering Plan (NANP) pattern of "9.@" will be used.


Step 1 From the main Cisco CallManager menu, select Route Plan > Route Pattern.

The Find and List Route Patterns page appears.

Step 2 Click Add a New Route Pattern.

Step 3 The Route Pattern Configuration page appears, as shown in Figure 7-10.

Figure 7-10 Route Pattern Configuration Page

Step 4 In the Route Pattern field, enter 9.@ to indicate the standard route pattern for dial plans using the NANP. This route pattern is configured to provide dial tone (on by default).


Note The Route Pattern "9.!" is often used for installations outside the United States that cannot use the NANP.


Step 5 In the Gateway Router List field, choose the FXO gateway you configured previously.

Step 6 In the Discard Digits field, choose PreDot to indicate that the route pattern should drop everything up to and including the dot (.) in the route pattern.


Note This example leaves all other fields at their default values. For more information on these fields and on how you might configure them for your installation, choose Help > For This Page from the main menu.


Step 7 Click Insert.


Testing Calls over the PSTN

You should now be able to route calls over the PSTN from any phone on the system by dialing a 9 and the phone number after you hear the dial tone. Perform the following steps to test calling:


Step 1 Try making a call to the PSTN from an analog phone.

Step 2 Try making a call to the PSTN from an IP phone.


Sample H.323 Call Routing Configurations

This section contains examples for H.323 call routing configuration and contains the following sections:

Configuring Dial Plans

Configuring Analog Voice Ports

Configuring ISDN Voice Interfaces

Configuring VoIP for Frame Relay

Configuring Quality of Service

Configuring Dial Plans

This section explains how to map destination telephone numbers with the voice ports on the MRP or ASI card.

To configure a plain old telephone service (POTS) dial peer to associate a physical voice port with a local telephone device, use these key commands to configure the port and destination-pattern (see the "Configuring Dial Plans" section on page 6-40):

West(config)# dial-peer voice 401 pots
West(config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 14085553737
West(config-dial-peer)# port 0/0

To configure a VoIP dial peer to associates a telephone number with an IP address, use these key commands to configure the destination-pattern and session target (see the "Configuring Dial Plans" section on page 6-40):

West(config)# dial-peer voice 501 voip
West(config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 1919555....
West(config-dial-peer)# session target ipv4:192.168.11.3

Configuring Number Expansion

To define how to expand an extension number into a particular destination pattern, use the following global configuration command (see the "Create a Number Expansion Table" section on page 6-42):

East(config)# num-exp extension-number extension-string

Use the show num-exp command to verify that you have mapped the telephone numbers correctly.

East# show num-exp dialed-number

After you have configured dial peers and assigned destination patterns to them, use the show dialplan number command to see how a telephone number maps to a dial peer.

East# show dialplan number dialed-number

Note You must still configure each telephone number in full on a local dial peer so that the MRP can find the voice port to which the number belongs.


Configuring Analog Voice Ports

This section contains the following subsections:

Configuring FXS Interfaces

Configuring FXO Interfaces

Configuring E&M Interfaces

Configuring FXS Interfaces

This section explains how to configure ports on FXS VICs that connect directly to a standard telephone, fax machine, or similar device.

To configure the MRP with the dial-peer information in Table 6-17 on page 6-46, enter the following global configuration commands:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

West> enable

Password: password

West #

Enters enable mode. You have entered enable mode when the prompt changes to West #.

Step 2 

West> configure terminal

West(config)#

Enters global configuration mode. You have entered global configuration mode when the prompt changes to West(config)#.

Step 3 

West (config)# dial-peer voice 401 pots

Enters dial-peer configuration mode.

Step 4 

West (config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 14085553737

Specifies the destination telephone number to be associated with the POTS dial peer.

Step 5 

West (config-dial-peer)# port 0/0

Specifies the port and slot number associated with this POTS dial peer.

Step 6 

West (config) # dial-peer voice 402 pots

Enters dial-peer configuration mode.

Step 7 

West (config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 14085554141

Specifies the destination telephone number to be associated with the POTS dial peer.

Step 8 

West (config-dial-peer)# port 0/1

Enters the port and slot number associated with this POTS dial peer.

Step 9 

West (config-dial-peer)# exit

Returns to configuration mode.

To configure a VoIP dial peer on the West MRP for every telephone on the East MRP, all associated with the same IP address, enter the following information on the West MRP. See Table 6-20 on page 6-50.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

West (config)# dial-peer voice 501 voip

Enters dial-peer configuration mode.

Step 2 

West (config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 1919555....

Specifies the destination telephone number to be associated with the POTS dial peer.

Step 3 

West (config-dial-peer)# session target ipv4:192.168.11.3

Specifies a destination IP address for this dial peer.

Checking the Configuration

If you configured POTS dial peers on your MRP by following these examples, you can place calls between telephones connected to the same MRP. You can also use the show dial-peer voice command to verify that the data you configured is correct.


Note If the voice port is off line, use the interface configuration no shutdown command to enable it.


To configure number expansion, enter the following commands on the East MRP to create the dial-peer configuration given in Table 6-21 on page 6-52:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

East (config)# num-exp 5.... 1408555....

Expands a five-digit extension beginning with numeral 5 by prefixing 140855 to it.

Step 2 

East (config)# dial-peer voice 801 voip

Enters dial-peer configuration mode.

Step 3 

East (config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 1408555....

Defines the destination telephone number to be associated with the POTS dial peer.

Step 4 

East (config-dial-peer)# session target ipv4:192.168.19.27

Specifies a destination IP address for this dial peer.

If you configured VoIP dial peers on your MRP by following these examples, you can place calls from that MRP to telephones on the remote MRPs (using only the extension if you configured number expansion). If you have trouble placing calls, ping the remote MRP to make sure you have IP connectivity, or use the show dial-peer voice command to verify that the data you configured is correct.


Note See the "TDM Clocking Scenarios" section on page 6-70 if you need to improve the quality of voice connections.


Configuring FXO Interfaces

This section explains how to configure ports on FXO VICs.

To configure 9 to reach an outside line (that is, the analog PSTN), as mentioned in the "FXO Gateway to PSTN" section on page 6-55, enter the following commands:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

West> enable

Password: password

West#

Enters enable mode. You have entered enable mode when the prompt changes to West #.

Step 2 

West> configure terminal

West(config)#

Enters global configuration mode. You have entered global configuration mode when the prompt changes to West(config)#.

Step 3 

West (config) # dial-peer voice 201 pots

Enters dial-peer configuration mode.

Step 4 

West (config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 9

Specifies the destination telephone number to be associated with the POTS dial peer.

Step 5 

West (config-dial-peer)# port 0/0

Specifies the port/slot number to be associated with this POTS dial peer.

To enable East MRP users to make calls over the West MRP local PSTN, enter the following commands:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

East (config)# dial-peer voice 701 voip

Enters dial-peer configuration mode.

Step 2 

East (config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 7

Specifies the destination telephone number to be associated with the POTS dial peer.

Step 3 

East (config-dial-peer)# session target ipv4:192.168.19.27

Specifies a destination IP address for this dial peer.

Step 4 

West (config) # dial-peer voice 601 pots

Enters dial-peer configuration mode.

Step 5 

West (config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 7

Defines the destination telephone number to be associated with the POTS dial peer.

Step 6 

West (config-dial-peer)# port 0/0

Specifies the port and slot number to be associated with this POTS dial peer.

Checking the Configuration

If you configured your FXO interface according to this example, you can place outgoing calls over the PSTN. If you have trouble placing calls, use the show voice port command to make sure that the VIC is installed correctly. Use the show dial-peer voice command to make sure that the data you configured is correct, and test the PSTN by connecting a handset directly to the PSTN outlet and placing a call.


Note See the "TDM Clocking Scenarios" section on page 6-70 if you need to improve the quality of voice connections.


Configuring E&M Interfaces

This section explains how to configure ports on E&M VICs.

To configure a local dial peer as if all the West telephones (represented by a wildcard destination pattern) are connected directly to this port, as referenced in the "Configuring E&M Interfaces" section on page 6-56, enter the following commands:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

West> enable

Password: password

West#

Enters enable mode. You have entered enable mode when the prompt changes to West #.

Step 2 

West> configure terminal

West(config)#

Enters global configuration mode. You have entered global configuration mode when the prompt changes to West(config) #.

Step 3 

West (config)# dial-peer voice 111 pots

Enters dial-peer configuration mode.

Step 4 

West (config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 1408555....

Specifies the destination telephone number to be associated with the POTS dial peer.

Step 5 

West (config-dial-peer)# port 0/0

Specifies the port and slot number to be associated with this POTS dial peer.

To configure VoIP dial peers for outgoing calls and to associate destination phone numbers on the East MRP with that MRP IP address, as shown in Figure 6-12 on page 6-58, enter the following commands:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

West (config)# dial-peer voice 121 voip

Enters dial-peer configuration mode.

Step 2 

West (config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 1919555....

Defines the destination telephone number to be associated with the VoIP dial peer.

Step 3 

West (config-dial-peer# session target ipv4:192.168.11.3

Specifies the port and slot number to be associated with this VoIP dial peer.

Step 4 

West (config-dial-peer)# exit

Exits to configuration mode.

Follow these steps to configure the E&M port on the West MRP, as shown in Figure 6-12 on page 6-58:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

West (config)# voice-port 0/0

Enters voice port configuration mode.

Step 2 

West (config-voice-port)# signal immediate

Specifies the signal type for this interface.

Step 3 

West (config-voice-port)# operation 4-wire

Specifies the appropriate cabling scheme for this voice port.

Step 4 

West (config-voice-port)# type 2

Specifies the appropriate E&M interface type.


Note For these commands to take effect, you have to cycle the port by using the shutdown and no shutdown commands.



Note Configure the PBX to pass all DTMF signals to the MRP.


Verifying the Configuration

If you configured the E&M interfaces correctly, you can place calls from a telephone served by one PBX to a telephone served by the other PBX (using only the extension, if you configured number expansion). If you have trouble placing calls, ping the remote MRP to make sure that you have IP connectivity.


Note See the "TDM Clocking Scenarios" section on page 6-70 if you need to improve the quality of voice connections.


Configuring ISDN Voice Interfaces

This section provides configuration instructions on the following topics:

Configuring DID for ISDN

Configuring ISDN BRI VICs

Configuring ISDN PRI Interfaces

Configuring DID for ISDN

To configure a POTS dial peer for DID, following these steps, beginning in global configuration mode (see Figure 6-9 on page 6-53):

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

MRP (config)# dial-peer voice number pots

Enters dial-peer configuration mode and defines a local dial peer that will connect to the POTS network.

The number is one or more digits identifying the dial peer. Valid entries are from 1 to 2147483647.

Step 2 

MRP (config-dial-peer)# direct-inward-dial

Specifies DID for this POTS dial peer.


Note DID is configured for inbound POTS dial peers only.


Configuring ISDN BRI VICs

The steps in this section include commands for configuring an NT interface and a TE interface.

To configure an ISDN BRI interface, follow these steps, beginning in global configuration mode (see the "Configuring ISDN Voice Interfaces" section on page 6-65):

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

MRP(config)# isdn switch-type basic-5ess

Specifies an ISDN switch type. See Table 6-12 for a list of ISDN switch types.

Note The only switch type currently supported for an NT interface is basic-net3.

Step 2 

MRP(config)# interface bri 0/0

MRP(config-if)#

Enters interface configuration mode for slot 0, port 0. You have entered interface configuration mode when the prompt changes to MRP(config-if)#.

Step 3 

MRP(config-if)# no ip address

Specifies that there is no IP address for this interface. For information about IP addressing, refer to the
Cisco IOS IP Configuration Guide.

Step 4 

MRP(config-if)# isdn overlap-receiving

(Optional) Activates overlap signaling to send to the destination PBX. In this mode, the interface waits for possible additional call-control information.

Step 5 

MRP(config-if)# isdn incoming-voice voice

Configures the port for incoming voice calls.

Step 6 

MRP(config-if)# shutdown

Turns off the port (prior to setting the port emulation).

Step 7 

MRP(config-if)# isdn layer1-emulate {user | network}

Configures the Layer 1 port mode emulation and clock settings.

The keywords are as follows:

user—Configures the port as TE and sets it to function as a clock slave. This is the default.

network—Configures the port as NT and sets it to function as a clock master.

Step 8 

MRP(config-if)# no shutdown

Turns on the port.

Step 9 

MRP(config-if)# network-clock-priority {low | high}

(Optional; TE only) Configures the priority of the network clock for this BRI voice port. If this port is configured as TE and you want it to be the first-priority BRI voice port for recovering the clock signal from the network NT device, enter high.

If this BRI voice port is configured as TE and you want it to be a low-priority BRI voice port for recovering the clock signal from the network NT device, enter low.

The default for the BRI VIC is high.

Do not use this command if this port is configured as NT with the command isdn layer1-emulate network.

Step 10 

MRP(config-if)# isdn protocol-emulate {user | network}

Configures the Layer 2 and Layer 3 port protocol emulation.

The keywords are as follows:

user—Configures the port as TE; the PBX is the master. This is the default.

network—Configures the port as NT; the PBX is the slave.

Step 11 

MRP(config-if)# isdn sending-complete

(Optional) Configures the voice port to include the "Sending Complete" information element in the outgoing call setup message. This command is used in some geographic locations, such as Hong Kong and Taiwan, where the "Sending Complete" information element is required in the outgoing call setup message.

Step 12 

MRP(config-if)# isdn static-tei tei-number

(Optional) Configures a static ISDN Layer 2 terminal endpoint identifier (TEI).

The value of tei-number can be from 0 to 64.

Step 13 

MRP(config-if)# isdn point-to-point-setup

(Optional) Configures the ISDN port to send SETUP messages on the static TEI.

Note A static TEI must be configured in order for this command to be effective.

Step 14 

MRP(config-if)# end

Exits interface configuration mode.

Step 15 

MRP(config)# clear interface 0/0

(Optional) Resets the specified interface. The interface needs to be reset if the static TEI number has been configured in Step 15.

Step 16 

MRP(config)# Ctrl ^Z

MRP#

Exits to enable mode.

Step 17 

MRP# copy running-config startup-config

Saves the configuration changes to the startup-config file so that they are not lost during resets, power cycles, or power outages.

When you finish configuring one interface, you must repeat Step 1 through Step 17, for the other BRI VIC interface.


Note To complete voice configuration, you must set up your voice ports and dial peers. Refer to the "Configuring Voice Ports" chapter in the Cisco IOS Voice, Video, and Fax Configuration Guide.


Configuring ISDN PRI Interfaces

To configure basic ISDN PRI interface parameters, follow these steps, beginning in global configuration mode (see the "Configuring ISDN PRI Interfaces" section on page 6-66):

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

MRP(config)# isdn switch-type basic-5ess

Specifies an ISDN switch type. See Table 6-12 for a list of ISDN switch types.

Note The only switch types currently supported for an NT interface are basic-net3 and basic-qsig.

Step 2 

MRP(config)# controller t1 1/0

Specifies the T1/E1 interface to configure. This example configures a T1 interface in slot 1 and port 0.

Step 3 

MRP(config-controller)# framing {esf | sf | crc4 | no-crc4} [australia]

Specifies the framing type.

Step 4 

MRP(config-controller)# linecode {b8zs | ami | hdb3}

Specifies the line-encoding method to match that of your telephone company service provider.

Step 5 

MRP(config-controller)# pri-group timeslots range

Configures the ISDN PRI group.

The range argument specifies a range of time slots that make up the PRI group. The range is from 1 to 24 (for T1) or from 1 to 31 (for E1).

Step 6 

MRP(config-controller)# exit

Exits controller configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

Step 7 

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 1/0 both import T1 1/1 {internal | line}

Specifies which end of the circuit provides the clock to the time-division multiplexing (TDM) switch. If internal is selected, the onboard clock provides the clocking. If line is selected, the other end of the circuit (the PSTN) provides the clocking.

Note When configuring the interface payload type for T1 PRI, as shown in the command example, you should use the keyword both (for both voice and data) to ensure that sufficient processing power is available to carry in-band signaling.

Step 8 

MRP(config)# interface serial 1/0:0

Enters interface configuration mode and specifies the first ISDN line. (The ISDN serial interface is the D channel.) This example configures a T1 interface in slot 1, port 0, and channel 0.

Step 9 

MRP(config-if)# isdn incoming-voice modem

Enables incoming ISDN voice calls.

The modem keyword specifies that incoming voice calls will be handled as modems.

Note You must use the modem keyword to enable voice calls. The modem keyword represents bearer capabilities of speech.

Step 10 

MRP(config-if)# exit

Exits to global configuration mode.

Repeat Step 4 through Step 10 if your MRP has more than one T1 interface that you need to configure.

Step 11 

MRP(config-if)# Ctrl ^Z

MRP#

Exits to enable mode.

Step 12 

MRP# copy running-config startup-config

Saves the configuration changes to the startup-config file so that they are not lost during resets, power cycles, or power outages.

Verifying ISDN PRI Configuration

You can check the validity of your voice port configuration by performing the following tasks:

To verify that the data configured is correct, use the show voice port command.

If you have not configured your device to support DID, dial in to the router, and verify that you have a dial tone.

Enter a DTMF digit. If the dial tone stops, you have verified two-way voice connectivity with the router.

Configuring VoIP for Frame Relay

To configure a Frame Relay main interface and a subinterface so that voice and data traffic can be successfully transported, enter the following commands (see the "Configuring VoIP for Frame Relay" section on page 6-68):

interface Serial 0/0
mtu 300
no ip address
encapsulation frame-relay
no ip route-cache
no ip mroute-cache
fair-queue 64 256 1000
frame-relay ip rtp header-compression

In this configuration example, the main interface is configured as follows:

The maximum transmission unit (MTU) size is 300 bytes.

No IP address is associated with this serial interface. The IP address must be assigned for the subinterface.

The encapsulation method is Frame Relay.

Fair queuing is enabled.

IP Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) header compression is enabled.


interface Serial 0/0.1 point-to-point
mtu 300
ip address 40.0.0.7 255.0.0.0
ip rsvp bandwidth 48 48
no ip route-cache
no ip mroute-cache
bandwidth 64
traffic-shape rate 32000 4000 4000
frame-relay interface-dlci 16
frame-relay ip rtp header-compression

The subinterface is configured as follows:

The MTU size is inherited from the main interface.

The IP address for the subinterface is specified.

Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) is enabled to use the default value, which is 75 percent of the configured bandwidth.

Bandwidth is set to 64 kbps.

Generic traffic shaping is enabled with 32-kbps committed information rate (CIR) where committed burst (Bc) = 4000 bits, and excess burst (Be) = 4000 bits.

The Frame Relay data-link connection identifier (DLCI) number is specified.

IP RTP header compression is enabled.

Configuring Quality of Service

This section gives a few examples of how to configure quality of service (QoS) (see the "Configuring Quality of Service" section on page 6-78). For more detailed information about configuring QoS, see the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide, Release 12.2.

Configuring RSVP

To configure RSVP, you must first enable RSVP. To enable RSVP for IP on an interface, use the following interface configuration command (see the "Configuring RSVP for Voice" section on page 6-84):

MRP(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth [interface-kbps] [single-flow-kbps]

The following example enables RSVP and sets the maximum bandwidth to 100 kbps and the maximum bandwidth per single request to 32 kbps (the example assumes that both VoIP dial peers are configured):

MRP(config)# interface serial 0
MRP(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth 100 32
MRP(config-if)# fair-queue
MRP(config-if)# end

After enabling RSVP, you must also use the req-qos dial-peer configuration command to request an RSVP session on each VoIP dial peer. Otherwise, no bandwidth is reserved for voice traffic.

MRP(config)# dial-peer voice 211 voip
MRP(config-dial-peer)# req-qos controlled-load

MRP(config)# dial-peer voice 212 voip
MRP(config-dial-peer)# req-qos controlled-load

Note You can use the ip rtp reserve command instead of configuring RSVP. If you configure RSVP, this command is not required.


Configuring Multilink PPP with Interleaving

To configure multilink Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) and interleaving on a configured and operational interface or virtual interface template, follow these steps (see the "Configuring Multilink PPP with Interleaving" section on page 6-85):

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

ppp multilink 

Enables Multilink PPP.

Step 2 

ppp multilink interleave

Enables real-time packet interleaving.

Step 3 

ppp multilink fragment-delay 
milliseconds

Specifies a maximum fragment delay. If you choose to configure this, use a maximum fragment delay of 20 milliseconds.

Step 4 

ip rtp reserve 
lowest-UDP-port range-of-ports 
[maximum-bandwidth]

Reserves a special queue for real-time packet flows to specified destination UDP ports, allowing real-time traffic to have higher priority than other flows. This applies only if you have not configured RSVP.

The following example defines a virtual interface template that enables multilink PPP with interleaving and a maximum real-time traffic delay of 20 milliseconds and then applies that virtual template to the multilink PPP bundle:

MRP(config)# interface virtual-template 1
MRP(config-if)# ppp multilink
MRP(config-if)# encapsulated ppp
MRP(config-if)# ppp multilink interleave
MRP(config-if)# ppp multilink fragment-delay 20
MRP(config-if)# ip rtp reserve 16384 100 64

MRP(config)# multilink virtual-template 1

Configuring RTP Header Compression

You must enable compression on both ends of a serial connection. To enable RTP header compression, use the following interface configuration command (see the "Configuring RTP Header Compression" section on page 6-86:

MRP(config-if)# ip rtp header-compression [passive] 

If you include the passive keyword, the software compresses outgoing RTP packets only if incoming RTP packets on the same interface are compressed. If you use the command without the passive keyword, the software compresses all RTP traffic.

By default, the software supports a total of 16 RTP header compression connections on an interface. To specify a different number of RTP header compression connections, use the following interface configuration command:

MRP(config-if)# ip rtp compression connections number

The following example enables RTP header compression for a serial 
interface:
MRP(config)# interface serial0
MRP(config-if)# ip rtp header-compression
MRP(config-if)# encapsulation ppp
MRP(config-if)# ip rtp compression-connections 25


Note When you enter the show running-config command, the format of the ip rtp header-compression command will change to ip rtp header-compression iphc-format.


Configuring TDM Clocking

This section describes the timing scenarios that can occur when different combinations of WICs and VICs are used on the two slots of an MRP (see the "TDM Clocking Scenarios" section on page 6-70).

T1 in Slot 0

Each of the topologies described in Table 6-23 on page 6-71 is illustrated in the examples that follow.

Single T1 Port Providing Clocking

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-11, the digital T1 port 0/0 is the clock source for the connected device. The phase locked loop (PLL) chip generates the clock internally and drives the clocking on the T1 line.

Figure 7-11 Single T1 Port Providing Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice import onboard


Note Generally, this method is useful only when connecting to a PBX, key system, or channel bank. A Cisco VoIP gateway rarely provides clocking to the central office (CO), because CO clocking provides a higher Stratum level.


Single T1 Port Receiving Clocking from the Line

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-12, the digital T1 port 0/0 receives clocking from the connected device (CO). The clocking of the PLL chip is driven by the clock reference on the receive (Rx) side of the T1 connection.

Figure 7-12 Single T1 Receiving Clocking from Line

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-13, there are two reference clocks. Both T1 port 0/0 and T1 port 0/1 receive clocking from the CO.

Figure 7-13 Dual T1 Ports Receiving Line Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice export line

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line, with One in the Loop-Timed Mode

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-14, T1 port 0/0 receives clocking for the PLL chip from the CO and puts the T1 port 0/1 connected to the CO into looped-time mode. This is usually the best method because the CO provides an excellent clock source.

Figure 7-14 Dual T1 Ports Receiving Line Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice import t1 0/0 line

Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-15, the digital T1 port 0/0 receives clocking for the PLL chip from the CO and uses this clock as a reference to clock T1 port 0/1. If T1 port 0/0 fails, the PLL chip internally generates the clock reference to drive T1 port 0/1.

Figure 7-15 Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice import t1 0/0 internal

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-16, an MRP generates the clock for the PLL chip and provides clocking to both T1 port 0/0, which is connected to a CO, and to T1 port 0/1, which is connected to a PBX.

Figure 7-16 Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice import onboard internal
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice import onboard internal

T1 in Both Slot 0 and Slot 1

Each of the topologies described in Table 6-24 on page 6-73 is illustrated in the examples that follow.

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-17, there are two reference clocks. Both T1 port 0/0 and T1 port 1/0 receive clocking from the CO.

Figure 7-17 Dual T1 Ports Receiving Line Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 1/0 voice export line

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line, with One in the Loop-Timed Mode

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-18, T1 port 0/0 receives clocking for the PLL chip from the CO and puts the T1 port 1/0, which is connected to the CO, into looped-time mode. This is usually the best method because the CO provides an excellent clock source.

Figure 7-18 Dual T1 Ports Receiving Line Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 1/0 voice import t1 0/0 line

Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-19, the digital T1 port 0/0 receives clocking for the PLL chip from the CO and uses this clock as a reference to clock T1 port 1/0. If T1 port 0/0 fails, the PLL chip internally generates the clock reference to drive T1 port 1/0.

Figure 7-19 Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 1/0 voice import t1 0/0 internal

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-20, an MRP generates the clock for the PLL chip and provides clocking both to T1 port 0/0, which is connected to a CO, and to T1 port 1/0, which is connected to a PBX.

Figure 7-20 Dual T1 Ports, Both Clocks from an MRP

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice import onboard 
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 1/0 voice import onboard 

T1 in Slot 0 and an Analog VIC in Slot 1

Each of the topologies described in Table 6-25 on page 6-74 is illustrated in the examples that follow.

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-21, there are two reference clocks. Both T1 port 0/0 and T1 port 0/1 receive clocking from the CO.

Figure 7-21 Dual T1 Ports Receiving Line Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice export line

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line, with One in the Loop-Timed Mode

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-22, T1 port 0/0 receives clocking for the PLL chip from the CO and puts the T1 port 0/1, which is connected to the CO, into looped-time mode. This is usually the best method because the CO provides an excellent clock source.

Figure 7-22 Dual T1 Ports Receiving Line Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice import t1 0/0 line

Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-23, the digital T1 port 0/0 receives clocking for the PLL chip from the CO and uses this clock as a reference to clock T1 port 0/1. If T1 port 0/0 fails, the PLL chip internally generates the clock reference to drive T1 port 0/1.

Figure 7-23 Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice import t1 0/0 internal

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-24, an MRP generates the clock for the PLL chip and provides clocking both to T1 port 0/0, which is connected to a CO, and to T1 port 0/1, which is connected to a PBX.

Figure 7-24 Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice import onboard internal
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice import onboard internal

T1 in Slot 0 and a WIC in Slot 1

Each of the topologies listed in Table 6-26 on page 6-75 shows the timing that can result when slot 0 is a T1 interface and slot 1 is a WIC interface.

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-25, there are two reference clocks. Both T1 port 0/0 and T1 port 0/1 receive clocking from the CO.

Figure 7-25 Dual T1 Ports Receiving Line Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice export line

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from the Line, with One in the Loop-Timed Mode

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-26, T1 port 0/0 receives clocking for the PLL chip from the CO and puts the T1 port 0/1, which is connected to the CO, into looped-time mode. This is usually the best method because the CO provides an excellent clock source.

Figure 7-26 Dual T1 Ports Receiving Line Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice import t1 0/0 line

Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-27, the digital T1 port 0/0 receives clocking for the PLL chip from the CO and uses this clock as a reference to clock T1 port 0/1. If T1 port 0/0 fails, the PLL chip internally generates the clock reference to drive T1 port 0/1.

Figure 7-27 Dual T1 Ports, One Receiving Clocking and One Providing Clocking

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice export line
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice import t1 0/0 internal

Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

In this topology, shown in Figure 7-28, an MRP generates the clocking for the PLL chip and provides clocking both to T1 port 0/0, which is connected to a CO, and to T1 port 0/1, which is connected to a PBX.

Figure 7-28 Dual T1 Ports, Both Receiving Clocking from an MRP

The following configuration sets up this clocking method:

MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/0 voice import onboard internal
MRP(config)# tdm clock T1 0/1 voice import onboard internal

Verifying T1 Controller Configuration

To verify that the controller is up and running and that no alarms have been reported, enter the show controller t1 command and specify the port number.

MRP# show controller t1 0/0
 T1 0/0 is up.
   No alarms detected.
   Version info of slot 0:  HW: 2, Firmware: 16, PLD Rev: 0
 
 Manufacture Cookie Info:
  EEPROM Type 0x0001, EEPROM Version 0x01, Board ID 0x42,
  Board Hardware Version 1.0, Item Number 73-2217-4,
  Board Revision A0, Serial Number 06467665,
  PLD/ISP Version 0.0, Manufacture Date 14-Nov-1999.
 
   Framing is ESF, Line Code is B8ZS, Clock Source is Internal.
   Data in current interval (269 seconds elapsed):
    0 Line Code Violations, 0 Path Code Violations
      0 Slip Secs, 0 Fr Loss Secs, 0 Line Err Secs, 0 Degraded Mins
      0 Errored Secs, 0 Bursty Err Secs, 0 Severely Err Secs, 0 
Unavail Secs

Note the following:

The controller must report being up.

No errors should be reported.

Make sure the show controller t1 output is not reporting alarms or violations.

Verifying the Configuration

After configuring the new interface, you can perform the following tests to verify that the new interface is operating correctly:

Use the show version command to display MRP or ASI hardware configuration. Verify that the list includes the new interface.

MRP_Slot1#show version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) ICS7700 Software (ICS7700-SV3Y-M), Version 12.2(4)XL1, 
EARLY DEPLOYMENT
 RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
TAC Support: http://www.cisco.com/tac
Copyright (c) 1986-2001 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Thu 22-Nov-01 01:05 by ealyon
Image text-base: 0x80008124, data-base: 0x80D73708

ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 12.0(20000705:170114) 
[mtluong-ics7750-MRP200-ROM
 102], DEVELOPMENT SOFTWARE
ROM: ICS7700 Software (ICS7700-SV3Y-M), Version 12.2(4)XL1, EARLY 
DEPLOYMENT REL
EASE SOFTWARE (fc1)

MRP-000196664ab8 uptime is 2 weeks, 5 days, 19 hours, 9 minutes
System returned to ROM by power-on
Running default software

cisco ICS7750-MRP200 (MPC860T) processor (revision 0x602) with 
65536K/16384K byt
es of memory.
Processor board ID JAD04460DNM (2391758321), with hardware 
revision 0000
MPC860T processor: part number 0, mask 32
Bridging software.
X.25 software, Version 3.0.0.
1 FastEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
2 Serial(sync/async) network interface(s)
2 Voice FXO interface(s)
32K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.

Configuration register is 0x101

Use the show controller command to display all T1 network modules and their interfaces.

MRP_Slot1#show controller t1 0/0
T1 0/0 is up.
  Applique type is Channelized T1
  Cablelength is long gain36 0db
  No alarms detected.
  Version info Firmware:19990616, FPGA:6
  Framing is ESF, Line Code is B8ZS, Clock Source is Line.
  Data in current interval (21 seconds elapsed):
     0 Line Code Violations, 0 Path Code Violations
     0 Slip Secs, 0 Fr Loss Secs, 0 Line Err Secs, 0 Degraded Mins
     0 Errored Secs, 0 Bursty Err Secs, 0 Severely Err Secs, 0 
Unavail Secs

Use the show protocols command to display the protocols configured for the entire MRP or ASI and for individual interfaces. If necessary, return to configuration mode to add or remove protocol routing on the MRP, ASI, or its interfaces.

MRP_Slot1#show protocols        
Global values:
  Internet Protocol routing is enabled
FastEthernet0 is up, line protocol is up
  Internet address is 1.16.164.201/16
Serial0 is down, line protocol is down
  Internet address is 199.1.1.1/24

Use the show interfaces command to specify an interface and verify that the interface and line protocol are in the correct state, up or down.

MRP_Slot1#show interfaces       
FastEthernet0 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is PQUICC_FEC, address is 0050.73ff.727f (bia 
0050.73ff.727f)
  Internet address is 1.16.164.201/16
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, 
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  Full-duplex, 100Mb/s, 100BaseTX/FX
  ARP type:ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
  Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:09, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:07
  Queuing strategy:fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  5 minute input rate 4000 bits/sec, 4 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     42 packets input, 5003 bytes
     Received 42 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 watchdog, 0 multicast
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
Serial0 is down, line protocol is down 
  Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial
  Internet address is 199.1.1.1/24
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, 
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation FRAME-RELAY, loopback not set
  Keepalive not set
  FR SVC disabled, LAPF state down
  Broadcast queue 0/64, broadcasts sent/dropped 0/0, interface 
broadcasts 0
  Last input 05:34:50, output 05:34:57, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:09
  Input queue:0/75/0 (size/max/drops); Total output drops:0
  Queueing strategy:weighted fair
  Output queue:0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) 
     Conversations  0/1/256 (active/max active/max total)
     Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated)
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
     0 carrier transitions
DCD=up  DSR=up  DTR=down  RTS=down  CTS=up

Use the show running-config command to display the running configuration.

MRP_Slot1#show running-config
Building configuration...

Current configuration : 1772 bytes
!
version 12.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec localtime show-timezone
service timestamps log datetime msec localtime show-timezone
service password-encryption
!
hostname MRP_Slot1
!
no logging monitor
enable password 7 070C294D400E1C0812
!
memory-size iomem 20
voice-card 0
!
voice-card 1
!
ip subnet-zero
!
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
isdn switch-type primary-ni
!
voice rtp send-recv
!
!
controller T1 0/0
 shutdown
 framing esf
 linecode b8zs
!
controller T1 0/1
 framing esf
 linecode b8zs
 pri-group timeslots 1-24
!
!
interface FastEthernet0/0
 ip address 10.1.1.5 255.255.255.0
 speed auto
!
interface Serial0/1:23
 no ip address
 no logging event link-status
 isdn switch-type primary-ni
 isdn protocol-emulate network
isdn incoming-voice voice
 no isdn T309-enable
 isdn T310 10000
 no cdp enable
!
router eigrp 100
 network 10.1.1.0
 no auto-summary
 no eigrp log-neighbor-changes
!
ip classless
no ip http server
ip pim bidir-enable
!
logging 10.1.1.1
!
snmp-server community public RO
snmp-server community changeme RW
snmp-server host 10.1.1.5 public
call rsvp-sync
!
voice-port 1/0
!
voice-port 1/1
!
voice-port 0/1:23
!
!
mgcp profile default
!
dial-peer cor custom
!
!
dial-peer voice 5 voip
 destination-pattern 5...
 session target ipv4:10.1.1.3
 ip qos dscp cs5 media
 ip qos dscp cs3 signaling
!
dial-peer voice 4 pots
 destination-pattern 4...
 direct-inward-dial
 port 0/1:23
 forward-digits all
!
dial-peer voice 4003 pots
 destination-pattern 4003
 direct-inward-dial
 port 0/1:23
 forward-digits all
!
!
line con 0
 exec-timeout 0 0
password 7 0605072042490C1400
 login
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 password 7 0822444F071E001A17
 login
line vty 5 15
 password 7 0822444F071E001A17
 login
!
no exception crashinfo
!end

Use the ping command to send an echo request to a specified IP address. Each returned signal is displayed as an exclamation point (!) on the console; each signal that is not returned before the timeout, is displayed as a period (.). A series of exclamation points (!!!!!) indicates a good connection; a series of periods (.....) or the message "timed out" or "failed" indicates that the connection failed.


Note If an interface is down and you configured it as up, or if the displays indicate that the hardware is not functioning properly, make sure that the new interface is properly connected and configured.