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Cisco 800 Series Routers

Installing and Configuring Cisco 802 IDSL and Cisco 804 IDSL Routers

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Installing and Configuring Cisco 802 IDSL and Cisco 804 IDSL Routers

Table Of Contents

Installing and Configuring Cisco 802 IDSL and Cisco 804 IDSL Routers

Overview

Before You Start

Safety

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Preventing Router Damage

Unpacking the Router

Connecting Cables to the Router

Connecting an Ethernet Device

Connecting a Hub

Connecting a Server, PC, or Workstation

Connecting an IDSL Line

Connecting the Power Supply

Verifying Router Connections

Configuring the IDSL Router

Basic IDSL Configuration

Example of Basic Configuration Output

IDSL Configuration with Frame Relay

Example of Frame Relay Configuration Output

Troubleshooting Using Debug Commands

Output 1 Example (show isdn status)

Output 2 Example (debug ppp negotiation and debug ppp authentication)

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco.com

Documentation DVD

Ordering Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Cisco Product Security Overview

Reporting Security Problems in Cisco Products

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco Technical Support Website

Submitting a Service Request

Definitions of Service Request Severity

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information


Installing and Configuring Cisco 802 IDSL and Cisco 804 IDSL Routers


Overview

Cisco 802 IDSL and Cisco 804 IDSL routers offer high-speed digital connections using an ISDN line and support line rates up to 144 kilobits per second (kbps). Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Digital Subscriber Line (IDSL) expands DSL connectivity for customers who are outside the Service Provider's range for DSL or for those who are unable to qualify for DSL connections.

This document describes the setup and configuration of your routers and contains the following sections:

Before You Start

Unpacking the Router

Connecting Cables to the Router

Configuring the IDSL Router

The following figure shows a typical setup of the Cisco 804 IDSL router.

Before You Start

Before you begin installing your Cisco IDSL router, read the following topics:

Safety

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Preventing Router Damage

Safety

Before installing the router, read the following warnings:

.


Warning Only trained and qualified personnel should be allowed to install, replace, or service this equipment. Statement 1030



Warning Read the installation instructions before connecting the system to the power source. Statement 1004



Warning Before working on a system that has a standby/off switch, turn off the power by pressing the power switch to standby and unplug the power cord. Statement 150



Warning Before working on equipment that is connected to power lines, remove jewelry (including rings, necklaces, and watches). Metal objects will heat up when connected to power and ground and can cause serious burns or weld the metal object to the terminals. Statement 43



Warning The IDSL connection is regarded as a source of voltage that should be inaccessible to user contact. Do not attempt to tamper with or open any public telephone operator (PTO)-provided equipment or connection hardware. Any hardwired connection (other than by a nonremovable, connect-one-time-only plug) must be made only by PTO staff or suitably trained engineers. Statement 23



Warning To avoid electric shock, do not connect safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits to telephone-network voltage (TNV) circuits. LAN ports contain SELV circuits, and WAN ports contain TNV circuits. Some LAN and WAN ports both use RJ-45 connectors. Use caution when connecting cables. Statement 1021



Warning Ultimate disposal of this product should be handled according to all national laws and regulations. Statement 1040



Warning If the symbol of suitability with an overlaid cross () appears above a port, you must not connect the port to a public network that follows the European Union standards. Connecting the port to this type of public network can cause severe personal injury or can damage the unit. Statement 1031


Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is a transfer of electrostatic charge between bodies of different electrostatic potentials, such as an operator and a piece of electrical equipment. It occurs when electronic components are improperly handled, and it can damage equipment and impair electrical circuitry. Electrostatic discharge is more likely to occur with the combination of synthetic fibers and dry atmosphere.


Step 1 Always use the following ESD-prevention procedures when removing and replacing components: Connect the chassis to earth ground with a wire that you provide.

Step 2 Wear an ESD-preventive wrist strap that you provide, ensuring that it makes good skin contact.

Connect the clip to an unpainted surface of the chassis frame to safely channel unwanted ESD voltages to ground. To properly guard against ESD damage and shocks, the wrist strap and cord must operate effectively. If no wrist strap is available, ground yourself by touching the metal part of the chassis. Always follow the guidelines in the preceding section, "Safety."

Step 3 Do not touch any exposed contact pins or connector shells of interface ports that do not have a cable attached.

If cables are connected at one end only, do not touch the exposed pins at the unconnected end of the cable.



Note This device is intended for use in residential and commercial environments only.



Caution Periodically check the resistance value of the antistatic strap, which should be between 1 and 10 megohms (Mohms).

Preventing Router Damage

Use the following guidelines when connecting devices to your router:

Connect the color-coded cables supplied by Cisco to the color-coded ports on the back panel.

If the symbol of suitability () appears above a port, you can connect the port directly to a public network that follows the European Union standards.

Warning


If the symbol of suitability with an overlaid cross appears above a port, you must not connect the port to a public network that follows the European Union standards. Connecting the port to this type of public network can cause severe personal injury or can damage the unit. Statement 1031


Unpacking the Router

Your router package should include the following items:

Ethernet cable (yellow)

IDSL cable (red)

RJ-45 to RJ-11 adapter cable (for use with red IDSL cable)

Desktop power supply

Power cord (black)

Console cable (light blue)

DB-9 to RJ-45 adapter (for use with light blue console cable)

Product documentation


Connecting Cables to the Router

The following figures show the router ports. These ports and the cables are color-coded to help you connect the cables correctly.

For more information, see the following subsections:

Connecting an Ethernet Device

Connecting a Hub

Connecting a Server, PC, or Workstation

Connecting an IDSL Line

Connecting the Power Supply

Verifying Router Connections

Connecting an Ethernet Device

This section describes how to connect a hub, server, PC, or workstation with a 10- or 10/100-Mbps network interface card (NIC).

Before connecting an Ethernet device, you need to know the following:

Cisco provides one yellow cable to connect an Ethernet device. If you want to connect more than one device, you must provide additional straight-through cables. See the Cisco 800 Series Routers Hardware Installation Guide for straight-through cable specifications.

The TO HUB/TO PC button corresponds to the Ethernet port on Cisco 802 IDSL routers and to Ethernet port 1 on Cisco 804 IDSL routers.


Caution Always connect the yellow cable or Ethernet cable to the yellow ports on the router. Do not connect the cable to an IDSL port or to a Network Termination 1 (NT1) device. Accidently connecting the cable to the wrong port can damage your router.

Connecting a Hub


Step 1 Connect the yellow cable to one of the following ports:

The yellow Ethernet port on your Cisco 802 IDSL router.

Any of the yellow Ethernet ports on your Cisco 804 IDSL router.

Step 2 Connect the other end of the cable to the hub.

Step 3 Check the LED corresponding to the connected port after router power-up:

The LINK LED is on the Cisco 802 IDSL back panel.

ETHERNET 1, 2, 3, and 4 LEDs are on the Cisco 804 IDSL front panel.

Step 4 If the LED corresponding to the connected port is not on, do the following:

If the LINK or ETHERNET 1 LED is not on, try pressing the TO HUB/TO PC button.

If the ETHERNET 2, 3, or 4 LED is not on, press the equivalent of the router TO HUB/TO PC button on your hub.


Connecting a Server, PC, or Workstation

Connect the yellow cable to one of the following ports:

The yellow Ethernet port on your Cisco 802 IDSL router.

Any of the yellow Ethernet ports on your Cisco 804 IDSL router.


Step 1 Connect the other end of the cable to the server, PC, or workstation.

Step 2 Check the LED corresponding to the connected port after router power-up:

The LINK LED is on the Cisco 802 IDSL back panel.

ETHERNET 1, 2, 3, and 4 LEDs are on the Cisco 804 IDSL front panel.

Step 3 If the LINK or ETHERNET 1 LED is not on, try pressing the TO HUB/TO PC button.

Step 4 If the ETHERNET 2, 3, or 4 LED is not on, see the Cisco 800 Series Routers Hardware Installation Guide.


Connecting an IDSL Line


Caution Always connect the yellow cable or Ethernet cable to the yellow ports on the router. Do not connect the cable to an IDSL port or to a Network Termination 1 (NT1) device. Accidently connecting the cable to the wrong port can damage your router.


Step 1 Connect the red cable to the red IDSL port.

Step 2 Connect the other end of the cable to the IDSL wall jack. If your wall jack has an RJ-11 connector, attach the RJ-45-to-RJ-11 adapter cable to the red cable, and then connect the RJ-11 connector to the IDSL wall jack.


Connecting the Power Supply


Step 1 Make sure the router power is off. Press the power switch to standby ().

Step 2 Connect the power supply cable to the 8-pin connector on the router.

Step 3 Connect the power cord to the desktop power supply.

Step 4 Connect the other end of the power cord to an electrical outlet.

Step 5 Turn on the router. Press the power switch to on (|).


Verifying Router Connections

Verify the power connection and all other connections (links) by checking the LEDs in the table below. If the LEDs are not on, see the troubleshooting information in the Cisco 800 Series Routers Hardware Installation Guide.

Power/Link
LEDs To Check
Normal Patterns

Power

OK

On

To hub, server, PC, or workstation

Cisco 802 IDSL back panel: LINK LED

Cisco 804 IDSL front panel: ETHERNET 1, 2, 3, and 4 LEDs

On

To IDSL network using IDSL port

NT1, LINE, CH1, or CH2

On (CH1 or CH2 is on only when the router has an active data connection. With a 64 kbps connection, only CH1 is on. With a 128 or 144 kbps connection, both CH1 and CH2 are on).


Configuring the IDSL Router

You can configure your Cisco IDSL router using the Cisco IOS command-line interface or the Cisco 800 Fast Step application. For information about using Cisco 800 Fast Step, refer to the Cisco 800 DSL Connection Kit document in the product accessory kit or on Cisco Connection Online (CCO).

The following procedures are examples of how to configure the Cisco IDSL router using Cisco IOS commands. For more information about Cisco IOS commands, refer to the Cisco IOS documentation set on Cisco.com.

Basic IDSL Configuration

The following is an example of a typical IDSL configuration.


Step 1 In global configuration mode, specify a name for the router. For example:

router(config)# hostname 802

Step 2 Specify a username and password. The username is the destination router's hostname. The password must be the same for both the host and destination routers. For example:

router(config)# username isp password cisco

Step 3 Set the switch type. For example:

router(config)# isdn switch-type basic-5ess

Step 4 Set the BRI interface to use the ISDN physical connection as a leased-line service. The following example sets the line speed at 128 kbps:

router(config)# isdn leased-line bri0 128

Step 5 Configure DHCP relay pool name. For example:

router(config)# ip dhcp pool DHCPpoolLAN_0

Step 6 Set the DHCP pool of addresses. For example:

router(dhcp-config)# network 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0

Step 7 Set the IP addresses of the DNS servers. For example:

router(dhcp-config)# dns-server 172.29.20.41 172.29.20.51

Step 8 Set the NetBIOS servers. For example:

router(dhcp-config)# netbios-name-server 172.29.20.41 172.29.20.51

Step 9 Set the Ethernet 0 IP address as the default gateway. For example:

router(dhcp-config)# default-router 192.168.1.1

Step 10 Exit to global configuration mode.

router(dhcp-config)# exit
router(config)#

Step 11 Define the IP addresses of the DNS servers. For example:

router(config)# ip name-server 172.29.20.41
router(config)# ip name-server 172.29.20.51

Step 12 Change to interface command mode. For example:

router(config)# interface ethernet0
router(config-if)#

Step 13 Enter the IP address and subnet mask for the LAN. For example:

router(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0

Step 14 Enable Network Address Translation (NAT) on your LAN. The inside network address is not directly routed to the Internet but is subject to translation to a routable address outside the LAN.

router(config-if)# ip nat inside

Step 15 Set the BRI interface IP address. In the following example, IP addresses are dynamically assigned:

router(config-if)# interface bri0
router(config-if)# ip address negotiated

Step 16 Enable PPP.

router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp

Step 17 Configure CHAP authentication.

router(config-if)# ppp authentication chap

Step 18 Configure a valid Internet address to which the inside network address will be translated.

router(config-if)# ip nat outside

Step 19 Define the router hostname and password to authenticate. For example:

router(config-if)# ppp chap hostname 802
router(config-if)# ppp chap password cisco

Step 20 Exit to global configuration mode. Add default route and interface. For example:

router(config-if)# exit
router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 bri0

Step 21 End configuration mode.

router(config)# end
router#

Step 22 In user mode, set global NAT commands. In the following example, all inside network addresses assigned to interface BRI0 are configured for translation, and the access list that contains the inside network addresses is defined.

router# ip nat inside source list 1 interface bri0 overload
router# access-list 1 permit 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255

Step 23 Save your configuration.

router# copy running-config startup-config

Example of Basic Configuration Output

Current configuration:
!
version 12.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug uptime
service timestamps log uptime
no service password-encryption
!
hostname cisco802
!
!
!
!
ip subnet-zero
!
isdn switch-type basic-5ess
isdn leased-line BRI0 128

ip dhcp pool DHCPoolLAN_0
   network 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0
   dns-server 172.29.20.41 172.29.20.51 
   netbios-name-server 172.29.20.41 172.29.20.51 
   default-router 192.168.1.1


 ip name-server 172.29.20.41
 ip name-server 172.29.20.51

!
!
interface Ethernet0
 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 ip nat inside
 !
interface BRI0
 ip unnumbered negotiated
 no ip directed-broadcast
 encapsulation ppp
 ppp authentication chap
 ip nat outside
 ppp chap hostname 802
 ppp chap password cisco

!
ip classless
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 bri 0
!

 ip nat inside source list 1 interface bri0 overload
 access-list 1 permit 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255


!
line con 0
 transport input none
 stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
end
cisco802#

IDSL Configuration with Frame Relay

The following procedure is an example of how to configure IDSL with Frame Relay.


Step 1 In global configuration mode, specify a name for the router. For example:

router(config)# hostname 802

Step 2 Specify a username and password. The username is the destination router's hostname. The password must be the same for both the host and destination routers. For example:

router(config)# username isp password cisco

Step 3 Set the switch type. For example:

router(config)# isdn switch-type basic-5ess

Step 4 Set the BRI interfaces to use the ISDN physical connection as a leased-line service. The following example sets the line speed at 144 kbps:

router(config)# isdn leased-line bri0 144
router(config)# isdn leased-line bri0.1 144

Step 5 Change to interface command mode. For example:

router(config)# interface ethernet0

Step 6 Enter an IP address. For example:

router(config-if)# ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0

Step 7 Enable Network Address Translation (NAT) on your LAN. The inside network address is not directly routed to the Internet but is subject to translation to a routable address outside the LAN.

router(config-if)# ip nat inside

Step 8 Change to BRI interface.

router(config-if)# interface bri0

Step 9 Configure interface with no IP address.

router(config-if)# no ip address

Step 10 Configure NAT so that the inside network address will be translated to a valid Internet address.

router(config-if)# ip nat outside

Step 11 Specify the encapsulation type. In the following example, IETF is used to connect to non-Cisco routers.

router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay ietf

Step 12 Specify the Local Management Interface (LMI) type used by the Frame Relay switch. For example:

router(config-if)# frame-relay lmi-type ansi

Step 13 Specify the subinterface point-to-point. For example:

router(config-if)# interface bri0:1 point-to-point

Step 14 Specify the IP address on the subinterface. For example:

router(config-if)# ip address 209.188.2.2 255.255.255.0

Step 15 Specify a DLCI number that is used to connect to the Internet service provider. For example:

router(config)# frame-relay interface dlci 16 ieft

Step 16 End configuration mode.

router(config)# end
router#

Step 17 In user mode, set global NAT commands. In the following example, all inside network addresses assigned to interface BRI0 are configured for translation, and the access list that contains the inside network addresses is defined.

router# ip nat inside source list 1 interface bri0 overload
router# access-list 1 permit 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255

Step 18 Save your configuration.

router# copy running-config startup-config

Example of Frame Relay Configuration Output

Current configuration:
 !
 !
 version 12.0
 service timestamps debug uptime
 service timestamps log uptime
 !
 hostname c802idsl

 username isp password 0 cisco
 !
 !
 ip subnet-zero
 !
 isdn switch-type basic-5ess
 isdn leased-line BRI0 144
 isdn leased-line BRI0.1 144
 !
 !
 interface Ethernet0
  ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
  ip nat inside
 !
 interface BRI0
  no ip address
  encapsulation frame-relay IETF
  frame-relay lmi-type ansi
 !
 interface BRI0.1 point-to-point
  ip address 209.188.2.2 255.255.255.0
  frame-relay interface-dlci 16 IETF  
  ip nat outside
 !

 ip nat inside source list 1 interface bri0:1 overload
 access-list 1 permit 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255


 ip classless
 ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 209.188.2.1
 !
 !
 line con 0
  exec-timeout 0 0
  transport input none
  stopbits 1
 line vty 0 4
 !
 end

Troubleshooting Using Debug Commands

In general, Cisco recommends that you use these commands with the direction of your technical support representative. Using the debug commands can disrupt operation of the router when your internetwork is experiencing a high-load condition.

When you finish using a debug command, remember to disable it with the specific no debug command or with the no debug all command.

To minimize the impact of using debug commands, use the following procedure:


Step 1 Enter the following command from global configuration mode:

router (config)# no logging console

This command disables all logging to the terminal or PC that you are troubleshooting the software from. (To reenable logging, enter the global configuration mode logging console enable command.)

Step 2 To use the debug commands, do the following:

a. Access any router port remotely using Telnet, and enter the following command while in user EXEC mode:

router> enable

b. To show debug command output and error messages, enter the following command:

router> terminal monitor

c. To disable logging on the virtual terminal, enter the following command:

router> terminal no monitor

d. Enter the desired debug commands.


Performing this procedure minimizes the load created because the console port no longer needs to generate character-by-character processor interrupts.

The following table describes debug commands, problems your router might be experiencing, and solutions to the problems. An output example from each command appears after the table.

Command
Possible Problem
Solution

show isdn status
(user EXEC mode).

See output 1 example following this table.

Improperly connected cable.

Refer to troubleshooting information in Cisco 800 Series Routers Hardware Installation Guide.

 

Damaged IDSL cable.

Order a new red IDSL cable from your Cisco reseller.

 

Problem with IDSL line.

Contact your telephone service provider to report a problem.

   

If the problem continues after these steps, call your Cisco reseller.

 

Software configuration error for router connected to Cisco 802 IDSL or Cisco 804 IDSL router.

Check your router configuration. See the documentation that shipped with your router for more information.

debug ppp negotiation, debug ppp authentication
(privileged EXEC mode)

See output 2 example following this table.

PAP or CHAP authentication failed.

For PAP, check the settings of the PAP hostname and password for correct spelling and use of uppercase and lowercase letters. If settings are incorrect, reconfigure them.

For CHAP, clear the existing hostname and password. Reconfigure the hostname and password.


Output 1 Example (show isdn status)


The current ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni1
ISDN BRI0 interface
Layer 1 Status:
DEACTIVATED
Layer 2 Status:
Layer 2 NOT Activated
Layer 3 Status:
No Active Layer 3 Call(s)
Activated dsl 0 CCBs = 0
Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0
isdn#

ISDN BR0:TX ->  RRp sapi = 0  tei = 80 nr = 1 
ISDN BR0:RX <-  RRf sapi = 0  tei = 80  nr = 1    
isdn#
ISDN BR0:TX ->  RRp sapi = 0  tei = 81 nr = 1 
ISDN BR0:RX <-  RRf sapi = 0  tei = 81  nr = 1
ISDN BR0:TX ->  RRp sapi = 0  tei = 80 nr = 1 
ISDN BR0:RX <-  RRf sapi = 0  tei = 80  nr = 1
isdn#und all
isdn#show isdn st
The current ISDN Switchtype = basic-dms100
ISDN BRI0 interface
    Layer 1 Status:
        ACTIVE
    Layer 2 Status:
        TEI = 80, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED
        TEI = 81, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED
    Layer 3 Status:
        No Active Layer 3 Call(s)
    Activated dsl 0 CCBs = 0

Output 2 Example (debug ppp negotiation and debug ppp authentication)


pico#ping 192.9.198.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.9.198.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0: B-Channel 1, changed state to up
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface BRI0: B-Channel 1, changed state to up
ppp: sending CONFREQ, type = 3 (CI_AUTHTYPE), value = C223/5
ppp: sending CONFREQ, type = 5 (CI_MAGICNUMBER), value = 28CEEF99
ppp: received config for type = 3 (AUTHTYPE) value = C223 value = 5 
acked
ppp: received config for type = 5 (MAGICNUMBER) value = 1E23F5C acked
PPP BRI0: B-Channel 1: state = ACKSENT fsm_rconfack(C021): rcvd id E4
ppp: config ACK received, type. = 3 (CI_AUTHTYPE), value = C223
ppp: config ACK received, type = 5 (CI_MAGICNUMBER), value = 28CEEF99
BRI0: B-Channel 1: PPP AUTH CHAP input code = 1 id = 82 len = 16
BRI0: B-Channel 1: PPP AUTH CHAP input code = 2 id = 95 len = 28
BRI0: B-Channel 1: PPP AUTH CHAP input code = 4 id = 82 len = 21
BRI0: B-Channel 1: Failed CHAP authentication with remote.
Remote message is: MD compare failed
ppp: sending CONFREQ, type = 3 (CI_AUTHTYPE), value = C223/5
ppp: sending CONFREQ, type = 5 (CI_MAGICNUMBER), value = 28CEEFDB
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0: B-Channel 1, changed state to down
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface BRI0: B-Channel 1, changed state to down
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0: B-Channel 1, changed state to up
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface BRI0: B-Channel 1, changed state to up
ppp: sending CONFREQ, type = 3 (CI_AUTHTYPE), value = C223/5
ppp: sending CONFREQ, type = 5 (CI_MAGICNUMBER), value = 28CEF76C
ppp: received config for type = 3 (AUTHTYPE) value = C223 value = 5 
acked
ppp: received conf.ig for type = 5 (MAGICNUMBER) value = 1E24718 acked
PPP BRI0: B-Channel 1: state = ACKSENT fsm_rconfack(C021): rcvd id E6
ppp: config ACK received, type = 3 (CI_AUTHTYPE), value = C223
ppp: config ACK received, type = 5 (CI_MAGICNUMBER), value = 28CEF76C
BRI0: B-Channel 1: PPP AUTH CHAP input code = 1 id = 83 len = 16
BRI0: B-Channel 1: PPP AUTH CHAP input code = 2 id = 96 len = 28
BRI0: B-Channel 1: PPP AUTH CHAP input code = 4 id = 83 len = 21
BRI0: B-Channel 1: Failed CHAP authentication with remote.
Remote message is: MD compare failed

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available on Cisco.com. Cisco also provides several ways to obtain technical assistance and other technical resources. These sections explain how to obtain technical information from Cisco Systems.

Cisco.com

You can access the most current Cisco documentation at this URL:

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Documentation DVD

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a Documentation DVD package, which may have shipped with your product. The Documentation DVD is updated regularly and may be more current than printed documentation. The Documentation DVD package is available as a single unit.

Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order a Cisco Documentation DVD (product number DOC-DOCDVD=) from the Ordering tool or Cisco Marketplace.

Cisco Ordering tool:

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Ordering Documentation

You can find instructions for ordering documentation at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/es_inpck/pdi.htm

You can order Cisco documentation in these ways:

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Attn: Customer Document Ordering
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883

We appreciate your comments.

Cisco Product Security Overview

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http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_security_vulnerability_policy.html

From this site, you can perform these tasks:

Report security vulnerabilities in Cisco products.

Obtain assistance with security incidents that involve Cisco products.

Register to receive security information from Cisco.

A current list of security advisories and notices for Cisco products is available at this URL:

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If you prefer to see advisories and notices as they are updated in real time, you can access a Product Security Incident Response Team Really Simple Syndication (PSIRT RSS) feed from this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_psirt_rss_feed.html

Reporting Security Problems in Cisco Products

Cisco is committed to delivering secure products. We test our products internally before we release them, and we strive to correct all vulnerabilities quickly. If you think that you might have identified a vulnerability in a Cisco product, contact PSIRT:

Emergencies — security-alert@cisco.com

Nonemergencies — psirt@cisco.com


Tip We encourage you to use Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) or a compatible product to encrypt any sensitive information that you send to Cisco. PSIRT can work from encrypted information that is compatible with PGP versions 2.x through 8.x.

Never use a revoked or an expired encryption key. The correct public key to use in your correspondence with PSIRT is the one that has the most recent creation date in this public key server list:

http://pgp.mit.edu:11371/pks/lookup?search=psirt%40cisco.com&op=index&exact=on


In an emergency, you can also reach PSIRT by telephone:

1 877 228-7302

1 408 525-6532

Obtaining Technical Assistance

For all customers, partners, resellers, and distributors who hold valid Cisco service contracts, Cisco Technical Support provides 24-hour-a-day, award-winning technical assistance. The Cisco Technical Support Website on Cisco.com features extensive online support resources. In addition, Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) engineers provide telephone support. If you do not hold a valid Cisco service contract, contact your reseller.

Cisco Technical Support Website

The Cisco Technical Support Website provides online documents and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. The website is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport

Access to all tools on the Cisco Technical Support Website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a user ID or password, you can register at this URL:

http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do


Note Use the Cisco Product Identification (CPI) tool to locate your product serial number before submitting a web or phone request for service. You can access the CPI tool from the Cisco Technical Support Website by clicking the Tools & Resources link under Documentation & Tools. Choose Cisco Product Identification Tool from the Alphabetical Index drop-down list, or click the Cisco Product Identification Tool link under Alerts & RMAs. The CPI tool offers three search options: by product ID or model name; by tree view; or for certain products, by copying and pasting show command output. Search results show an illustration of your product with the serial number label location highlighted. Locate the serial number label on your product and record the information before placing a service call.


Submitting a Service Request

Using the online TAC Service Request Tool is the fastest way to open S3 and S4 service requests. (S3 and S4 service requests are those in which your network is minimally impaired or for which you require product information.) After you describe your situation, the TAC Service Request Tool provides recommended solutions. If your issue is not resolved using the recommended resources, your service request is assigned to a Cisco TAC engineer. The TAC Service Request Tool is located at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/servicerequest

For S1 or S2 service requests or if you do not have Internet access, contact the Cisco TAC by telephone. (S1 or S2 service requests are those in which your production network is down or severely degraded.) Cisco TAC engineers are assigned immediately to S1 and S2 service requests to help keep your business operations running smoothly.

To open a service request by telephone, use one of the following numbers:

Asia-Pacific: +61 2 8446 7411 (Australia: 1 800 805 227)
EMEA: +32 2 704 55 55
USA: 1 800 553-2447

For a complete list of Cisco TAC contacts, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/contacts

Definitions of Service Request Severity

To ensure that all service requests are reported in a standard format, Cisco has established severity definitions.

Severity 1 (S1)—Your network is "down," or there is a critical impact to your business operations. You and Cisco will commit all necessary resources around the clock to resolve the situation.

Severity 2 (S2)—Operation of an existing network is severely degraded, or significant aspects of your business operation are negatively affected by inadequate performance of Cisco products. You and Cisco will commit full-time resources during normal business hours to resolve the situation.

Severity 3 (S3)—Operational performance of your network is impaired, but most business operations remain functional. You and Cisco will commit resources during normal business hours to restore service to satisfactory levels.

Severity 4 (S4)—You require information or assistance with Cisco product capabilities, installation, or configuration. There is little or no effect on your business operations.

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Information about Cisco products, technologies, and network solutions is available from various online and printed sources.

Cisco Marketplace provides a variety of Cisco books, reference guides, and logo merchandise. Visit Cisco Marketplace, the company store, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/

Cisco Press publishes a wide range of general networking, training and certification titles. Both new and experienced users will benefit from these publications. For current Cisco Press titles and other information, go to Cisco Press at this URL:

http://www.ciscopress.com

Packet magazine is the Cisco Systems technical user magazine for maximizing Internet and networking investments. Each quarter, Packet delivers coverage of the latest industry trends, technology breakthroughs, and Cisco products and solutions, as well as network deployment and troubleshooting tips, configuration examples, customer case studies, certification and training information, and links to scores of in-depth online resources. You can access Packet magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/packet

Internet Protocol Journal is a quarterly journal published by Cisco Systems for engineering professionals involved in designing, developing, and operating public and private internets and intranets. You can access the Internet Protocol Journal at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/ipj

World-class networking training is available from Cisco. You can view current offerings at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/learning/index.html