Hardware Installation Guide for the Cisco 4000 Series Integrated Services Router
Initial Configuration
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Table of Contents

Initial Configuration

Performing the Initial Configuration on the Router

Using Cisco Setup Command Facility

Completing the Configuration

Using Cisco IOS XE CLI—Manual Configuration

Configuring the Router Hostname

Configuring the Enable and Enable Secret Passwords

Configuring the Console Idle Privileged EXEC Timeout

Gigabit Ethernet Management Interface Overview

Default Gigabit Ethernet Configuration

Gigabit Ethernet Port Numbering

Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces

Configuration Examples

Specifying a Default Route or Gateway of Last Resort

Configuring IP Routing and IP Protocols

Default Routes

Default Network

Gateway of Last Resort

Configuration Examples

Configuring Virtual Terminal Lines for Remote Console Access

Configuration Examples

Configuring the Auxiliary Line

Verifying Network Connectivity

Saving Your Router Configuration

Saving Backup Copies of Configuration and System Image

Configuration Examples

Verifying the Initial Configuration

Initial Configuration

This chapter describes how to perform the initial configuration on the router after you have installed and connected it. It contains the following sections:

Using Cisco Setup Command Facility

Using Cisco IOS XE CLI—Manual Configuration

Performing the Initial Configuration on the Router

You can perform initial configuration on the router with the help of the following tools:

Using Cisco Setup Command Facility

The setup command facility prompts you to enter the information that is needed to configure a router quickly. The facility steps you through a initial configuration, including LAN and WAN interfaces. For more general information about the setup command facility, see the following document:

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide , Release 12.4, Part 2: Cisco IOS User Interfaces: Using AutoInstall and Setup:
http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/ios-nx-os-software/ios-xe-3s/products-installation-and-configuration-guides-list.html

This section explains how to configure a hostname for the router, set passwords, and configure an interface to communicate with the management network.


Note The messages that are displayed will vary based on your router model, the installed interface modules, and the software image. The following example and the user entries (in bold) are shown as examples only.



Note If you make a mistake while using the setup command facility, you can exit and run the setup command facility again. Press Ctrl-C, and enter the setup command in privileged EXEC mode (Router#).



Step 1 From the Cisco IOS-XE CLI, enter the setup command in privileged EXEC mode:

Router> enable
Password: <password>
Router# setup
 
--- System Configuration Dialog ---
Continue with configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
 

You are now in the Setup Configuration Utility.

The prompts in the setup command facility vary; depending on your router model, on the installed interface modules, and on the software image. The following steps and the user entries (in bold) are shown as examples only.


Note This setup command facility is also entered automatically if there is no configuration on the router when it is booted into Cisco IOS-XE.



Note If you make a mistake while using the setup command facility, you can exit and run the setup command facility again. Press Ctrl-C, and enter the setup command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt (Router#). For more information on using the setup command facility, see The Setup Command chapter in Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference, Release 12.2T, at the following URL: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/12_2t/fun/command/reference/122tfr.html


Step 2 To proceed using the setup command facility, enter yes .

Continue with configuration dialog? [yes/no]:

At any point you may enter a question mark '?' for help.
 
Use ctrl-c to abort configuration dialog at any prompt.
Default settings are in square brackets '[]'.
 

Step 3 Basic management setup configures only enough connectivity

Would you like to enter basic management setup? [yes/no]: yes
 

Step 4 Enter a hostname for the router (this example uses myrouter):

Configuring global parameters:
Enter host name [Router]: myrouter
 

Step 5 Enter an enable secret password. This password is encrypted (for more security) and cannot be seen when viewing the configuration.

The enable secret is a password used to protect access to
privileged EXEC and configuration modes. This password, after
entered, becomes encrypted in the configuration.
Enter enable secret: cisco
 

Step 6 Enter an enable password that is different from the enable secret password. This password is not encrypted (and is less secure) and can be seen when viewing the configuration.

The enable password is used when you do not specify an
enable secret password, with some older software versions, and
some boot images.
Enter enable password: cisco123
 

Step 7 Enter the virtual terminal password, which prevents unauthenticated access to the router through ports other than the console port:

The virtual terminal password is used to protect
access to the router over a network interface.
Enter virtual terminal password: cisco
 

Step 8 Respond to the following prompts as appropriate for your network:

Configure SNMP Network Management? [no]: yes
Community string [public]:
 

A summary of the available interfaces is displayed.


Note The interface summary includes interface numbering, which is dependent on the router model and the installed modules and interface cards.


Current interface summary
 
Interface IP-Address OK? Method Status Protocol
GigabitEthernet0/0/0 unassigned YES NVRAM administratively down down
GigabitEthernet0/1/0 10.10.10.12 YES DHCP up up
GigabitEthernet0/2/0 unassigned YES NVRAM administratively down down
SSLVPN-VIF0 unassigned NO unset up
 
Any interface listed with OK? value "NO" does not have a valid configuration
 
 

Step 9 Respond to the following prompts as appropriate for your network:

Configuring interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0:
Configure IP on this interface? [yes]: yes
IP address for this interface [10.10.10.12]:
Subnet mask for this interface [255.0.0.0] : 255.255.255.0
Class A network is 10.0.0.0, 24 subnet bits; mask is /24

 

The following configuration command script was created:

hostname myrouter
enable secret 5 $1$t/Dj$yAeGKviLLZNOBX0b9eifO0 enable password cisco123 line vty 0 4 password cisco snmp-server community public !
no ip routing
 
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
shutdown
no ip address
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0
no shutdown
ip address 10.10.10.12 255.255.255.0
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
shutdown
no ip address
!
end

 

 
 

Step 10 Respond to the following prompts. Select [2] to save the initial configuration:

[0] Go to the IOS command prompt without saving this config.
[1] Return back to the setup without saving this config.
[2] Save this configuration to nvram and exit.
 
Enter your selection [2]: 2
Building configuration...
Use the enabled mode 'configure' command to modify this configuration.
 
Press RETURN to get started! RETURN
 

The user prompt is displayed:

myrouter>

Completing the Configuration

When using the Cisco Setup, and after you have provided all the information requested by the facility, the final configuration appears. To complete your router configuration, follow these steps:


Step 1 The facility prompts you to save the configuration.

  • If you answer no, the configuration information you entered is not saved, and you return to the router enable prompt (Router#). Enter setup to return to the System Configuration Dialog.
  • If you answer yes, the configuration is saved, and you are returned to the user EXEC prompt (Router>).
Use this configuration? {yes/no} : yes
Building configuration...
Use the enabled mode 'configure' command to modify this configuration.
 
 
Press RETURN to get started!
 
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Ethernet0/0, changed state to up
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Ethernet0/1, changed state to up
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial0/0/0, changed state to up
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial0/0/1, changed state to down
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial0/2, changed state to down
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial1/0, changed state to up
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial1/1, changed state to down
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial1/2, changed state to down
 
<Additional messages omitted.>
 

Step 2 When the messages stop appearing on your screen, press Return to get the Router> prompt.

Step 3 The Router> prompt indicates that you are now at the command-line interface (CLI) and you have just completed a initial router configuration. Nevertheless, this is not a complete configuration. At this point, you have two choices:

  • Run the setup command facility again, and create another configuration.
Router> enable
Password: password
Router# setup
 
  • Modify the existing configuration or configure additional features by using the CLI:
Router> enable
Password: password
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)#

 


 

Using Cisco IOS XE CLI—Manual Configuration

This section shows you how to access the command-line interface (CLI) to perform the initial configuration on the router.

If the system configuration dialog message does not appear, a default configuration file was installed on the router prior to shipping. Follow these steps to configure the router.


Step 1 Enter the following answer when the system message appears on the router.

--- System Configuration Dialog ---
 
At any point you may enter a question mark '?' for help.
Use ctrl-c to abort configuration dialog at any prompt.
Default settings are in square brackets '[]'.
 
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: no
 

Step 2 Press Return to terminate autoinstall and continue with manual configuration:

Would you like to terminate autoinstall? [yes] Return
 

Several messages are displayed, ending with a line similar to the following:

...
Copyright (c) 1986-2012 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled <date> <time> by <person>
 

Step 3 Press Return to bring up the Router> prompt.

...
flashfs[4]: Initialization complete.
Router>
 

Step 4 Type enable to enter privileged EXEC mode:

Router> enable
Router#
 


 

Configuring the Router Hostname

The hostname is used in CLI prompts and default configuration filenames. If you do not configure the router hostname, the router uses the factory-assigned default hostname “Router.”

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. hostname name

4. Verify that the router prompt displays your new hostname.

5. end

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

configure terminal

 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3

hostname name

 

Router(config)# hostname myrouter

Specifies or modifies the hostname for the network server.

Step 4

Verify that the router prompt displays your new hostname.

 

myrouter(config)#

Step 5

end

 

myrouter# end

(Optional) Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Configuring the Enable and Enable Secret Passwords

To provide an additional layer of security, particularly for passwords that cross the network or are stored on a TFTP server, you can use either the enable password command or enable secret command. Both commands accomplish the same thing—they allow you to establish an encrypted password that users must enter to access privileged EXEC (enable) mode.

We recommend that you use the enable secret command because it uses an improved encryption algorithm. Use the enable password command only if you boot an older image of the Cisco IOS XE software.

For more information, see the “Configuring Passwords and Privileges” chapter in the Cisco IOS Security Configuration Guide . Also see the Cisco IOS Password Encryption Facts tech note and the Improving Security on Cisco Routers tech note.

Restrictions

If you configure the enable secret command, it takes precedence over the enable password command; the two commands cannot be in effect simultaneously.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. enable password password

4. enable secret password

5. end

6. enable

7. end

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

configure terminal

 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3

enable password password

 

Router(config)# enable password pswd2

(Optional) Sets a local password to control access to various privilege levels.

  • We recommend that you perform this step only if you boot an older image of the Cisco IOS-XE software or if you boot older boot ROMs that do not recognize the enable secret command.

Step 4

enable secret password

 

Router(config)# enable secret greentree

Specifies an additional layer of security over the enable password command.

  • Do not use the same password that you entered in Step 3.

Step 5

end

 

Router(config)# end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 6

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Verify that your new enable or enable secret password works.

Step 7

end

 

Router(config)# end

(Optional) Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Configuring the Console Idle Privileged EXEC Timeout

This section describes how to configure the console line’s idle privileged EXEC timeout. By default, the privileged EXEC command interpreter waits 10 minutes to detect user input before timing out.

When you configure the console line, you can also set communication parameters, specify autobaud connections, and configure terminal operating parameters for the terminal that you are using. For more information on configuring the console line, see the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals and Network Management Configuration Guide . In particular, see the “Configuring Operating Characteristics for Terminals” and “Troubleshooting and Fault Management” chapters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. line console 0

4. exec-timeout minutes [ seconds ]

5. end

6. show running-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

configure terminal

 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3

line console 0

 

Router(config)# line console 0

Configures the console line and starts the line configuration command collection mode.

Step 4

exec-timeout minutes [ seconds ]

 

Router(config-line)# exec-timeout 0 0

Sets the idle privileged EXEC timeout, which is the interval that the privileged EXEC command interpreter waits until user input is detected.

  • The example shows how to specify no timeout. Setting the exec-timeout value to 0 will cause the router to never log out once logged in. This could have security implications if you leave the console without manually logging out using the disable command.

Step 5

end

 

Router(config)# end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 6

show running-config

 

Router(config)# show running-config

Displays the running configuration file.

  • Verify that you properly configured the idle privileged EXEC timeout.

Examples

The following example shows how to set the console idle privileged EXEC timeout to 2 minutes 30 seconds:

line console
exec-timeout 2 30
 

The following example shows how to set the console idle privileged EXEC timeout to 30 seconds:

line console
exec-timeout 0 30

Gigabit Ethernet Management Interface Overview

The router provides an Ethernet management port, named GigabitEthernet0.

The purpose of this interface is to allow users to perform management tasks on the router; it is an interface that should not and often cannot forward network traffic but can be used to access the router via Telnet and SSH to perform management tasks on the router. The interface is most useful before a router has begun routing, or in troubleshooting scenarios when other forwarding interfaces are inactive.

The following aspects of the management ethernet interface should be noted:

  • The router has one management ethernet interface named GigabitEthernet0.
  • IPv4, IPv6, and ARP are the only routed protocols supported for the interface.
  • The interface provides a way to access to the router even if forwarding interfaces are not functional, or the IOS process is down.
  • The management ethernet interface is part of its own VRF. See the “Management Ethernet Interface VRF” section in the Software Configuration Guide for the Cisco 4400 and Cisco 4300 Series ISRs for more details.

Default Gigabit Ethernet Configuration

By default, a forwarding VRF is configured for the interface with a special group named “Mgmt-intf.” This cannot be changed. This isolates the traffic on the management interface away from the forwarding plane. Basic configuration is like other interfaces, however, there are many forwarding features not supported on these interfaces. No forwarding features can be configured on GigabitEthernet0 interface as it is only used for management.

For example, the default configuration is as follows:
interface GigabitEthernet0
vrf forwarding Mgmt-intf
ip address 172.18.77.212 255.255.255.240
negotiation auto

Gigabit Ethernet Port Numbering

The Gigabit Ethernet Management port is always GigabitEthernet0.

The port can be accessed in configuration mode.

Router# config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet0
Router(config-if)#

Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces

This sections shows how to assign an IP address and interface description to an Ethernet interface on your router.

For comprehensive configuration information on Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, see the “Configuring LAN Interfaces” chapter of the Cisco IOS Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide , http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/12_2/interface/configuration/guide/icflanin.html

For information on interface numbering, see the software configuration guide for your router.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show ip interface brief

3. configure terminal

4. interface { fastethernet | gigabitethernet } 0/0/ port

5. description string

6. ip address ip-address mask

7. no shutdown

8. end

9. show ip interface brief

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

show ip interface brief

 

Router# show ip interface brief

Displays a brief status of the interfaces that are configured for IP.

  • Learn which type of Ethernet interface is on your router.

Step 3

configure terminal

 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 4

interface { fastethernet | gigabitethernet } 0/ port

 

Router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0/0

Specifies the Ethernet interface and enters interface configuration mode.

Note For information on interface numbering, see About Slot, Subslot (Bay), and Port Numbering.

Step 5

description string

 

Router(config-if)# description GE int to 2nd floor south wing

(Optional) Adds a description to an interface configuration.

  • The description helps you remember what is attached to this interface. The description can be useful for troubleshooting.

Step 6

ip address ip-address mask

 

Router(config-if)# ip address 172.16.74.3 255.255.255.0

Sets a primary IP address for an interface.

Step 7

no shutdown

 

Router(config-if)# no shutdown

Enables an interface.

Step 8

end

 

Router(config)# end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 9

show ip interface brief

 

Router# show ip interface brief

Displays a brief status of the interfaces that are configured for IP.

  • Verify that the Ethernet interfaces are up and configured correctly.

Configuration Examples

Configuring the GigabitEthernet Interface: Example

!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
description GE int to HR group
ip address 172.16.3.3 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
no shutdown
!

Sample Output for the show ip interface brief Command

 
Router#show ip interface brief
Interface IP-Address OK? Method Status Protocol
GigabitEthernet0/0/0 unassigned YES NVRAM administratively down down
GigabitEthernet0/0/1 unassigned YES NVRAM administratively down down
GigabitEthernet0/0/2 unassigned YES NVRAM administratively down down
GigabitEthernet0/0/3 unassigned YES NVRAM administratively down down
GigabitEthernet0 10.0.0.1 YES manual up up

Specifying a Default Route or Gateway of Last Resort

This section describes how to specify a default route with IP routing enabled. For alternative methods of specifying a default route, see the Configuring a Gateway of Last Resort Using IP Commands tech note.

The Cisco IOS-XE software uses the gateway (router) of last resort if it does not have a better route for a packet and if the destination is not a connected network. This section describes how to select a network as a default route (a candidate route for computing the gateway of last resort). The way in which routing protocols propagate the default route information varies for each protocol.

Configuring IP Routing and IP Protocols

For comprehensive configuration information about IP routing and IP routing protocols, see the Configuring IP Routing Protocol-Independent Feature on Cisco.com.

IP Routing

IP routing is automatically enabled in the Cisco ISO- XE software. When IP routing is configured, the system will use a configured or learned route to forward packets, including a configured default route.


Note This task section does not apply when IP routing is disabled. To specify a default route when IP routing is disabled, refer to the Configuring a Gateway of Last Resort Using IP Commands tech note on Cisco.com.


Default Routes

A router might not be able to determine the routes to all other networks. To provide complete routing capability, the common practice is to use some routers as smart routers and give the remaining routers default routes to the smart router. (Smart routers have routing table information for the entire internetwork.) These default routes can be passed along dynamically, or can be configured into the individual routers.

Most dynamic interior routing protocols include a mechanism for causing a smart router to generate dynamic default information that is then passed along to other routers.

Default Network

If a router has an interface that is directly connected to the specified default network, the dynamic routing protocols running on the router will generate or source a default route. In the case of RIP, the router will advertise the pseudonetwork 0.0.0.0. In the case of IGRP, the network itself is advertised and flagged as an exterior route.

A router that is generating the default for a network also may need a default of its own. One way a router can generate its own default is to specify a static route to the network 0.0.0.0 through the appropriate device.

Gateway of Last Resort

When default information is being passed along through a dynamic routing protocol, no further configuration is required. The system periodically scans its routing table to choose the optimal default network as its default route. In the case of RIP, there is only one choice, network 0.0.0.0. In the case of IGRP, there might be several networks that can be candidates for the system default. The Cisco IOS-XE software uses both administrative distance and metric information to determine the default route (gateway of last resort). The selected default route appears in the gateway of last resort display of the show ip route EXEC command.

If dynamic default information is not being passed to the software, candidates for the default route are specified with the ip default-network global configuration command. In this usage, the ip default-network command takes an unconnected network as an argument. If this network appears in the routing table from any source (dynamic or static), it is flagged as a candidate default route and is a possible choice as the default route.

If the router has no interface on the default network, but does have a route to it, it considers this network as a candidate default path. The route candidates are examined and the best one is chosen, based on administrative distance and metric. The gateway to the best default path becomes the gateway of last resort.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ip route dest-prefix mask next-hop-ip-address [ admin-distance ] [ permanent ]

4. ip default-network network-number
or
ip route dest-prefix mask next-hop-ip-address

5. end

6. show ip route

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

configure terminal

 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3

ip routing

 

Router(config)# ip routing

Enables IP routing.

Step 4

ip route dest-prefix mask next-hop-ip-address [ admin-distance ] [ permanent ]

 

Router(config)# ip route 192.168.24.0 255.255.255.0 172.28.99.2

Establishes a static route.

Step 5

ip default-network network-number

or

ip route dest-prefix mask next-hop-ip-address

 

Router(config)# ip default-network 192.168.24.0

 

Router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.28.99.1

Selects a network as a candidate route for computing the gateway of last resort.

Creates a static route to network 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 for computing the gateway of last resort.

Step 6

end

 

Router(config)# end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 7

show ip route

 

Router# show ip route

Displays the current routing table information.

  • Verify that the gateway of last resort is set.

Configuration Examples

Specifying a Default Route: Example

!
ip route 192.168.24.0 255.255.255.0 172.28.99.2
!
ip default-network 192.168.24.0
!

Sample Output for the show ip route Command

Router# show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2 i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2 ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default,
U - per-user static route o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP,
l - LISP a - application route + - replicated route, % - next hop override
 
Gateway of last resort is not set 40.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks C 40.0.0.0/24 is directly connected, Loopback1 L 40.0.0.1/32 is directly connected, Loopback1 Router#
 

Configuring Virtual Terminal Lines for Remote Console Access

Virtual terminal (vty) lines are used to allow remote access to the router. This section shows you how to configure the virtual terminal lines with a password, so that only authorized users can remotely access the router.

The router has five virtual terminal lines by default. However, you can create additional virtual terminal lines. See the Cisco IOS XE Dial Technologies Configuration Guide at http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/dial/configuration/guide/2_xe/dia_2_xe_book.html .

Line passwords and password encryption is described in the C isco IOS XE Security Configuration Guide: Secure Connectivity at the following URL: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/ios_xe/sec_secure_connectivity/configuration/guide/2_xe/sec_secure_connectivity_xe_book.html . See the Security with Passwords, Privilege Levels, and Login Usernames for CLI Sessions on Networking Devices section. If you want to secure the vty lines with an access list, see the Access Control Lists: Overview and Guidelines.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. line vty line-number [ ending-line-number ]

4. password password

5. login

6. end

7. show running-config

8. From another network device, attempt to open a Telnet session to the router.

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

configure terminal

 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3

line vty line-number [ ending-line-number ]

 

Router(config)# line vty 0 4

Starts the line configuration command collection mode for the virtual terminal lines (vty) for remote console access.

  • Make sure that you configure all vty lines on your router.

Note To verify the number of vty lines on your router, use the line vty ? command.

Step 4

password password

 

Router(config-line)# password guessagain

Specifies a password on a line.

Step 5

login

 

Router(config-line)# login

Enables password checking at login.

Step 6

end

 

Router(config-line)# end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 7

show running-config

 

Router# show running-config

Displays the running configuration file.

  • Verify that you properly configured the virtual terminal lines for remote access.

Step 8

From another network device, attempt to open a Telnet session to the router.

 

Router# 172.16.74.3

Password:

Verifies that you can remotely access the router and that the virtual terminal line password is correctly configured.

Configuration Examples

The following example shows how to configure virtual terminal lines with a password:

!
line vty 0 4
password guessagain
login
!

What to Do Next

After you configure the vty lines, follow these steps:

Configuring the Auxiliary Line

This section describes how to enter line configuration mode for the auxiliary line. How you configure the auxiliary line depends on your particular implementation of the auxiliary (AUX) port. See the following documents for information on configuring the auxiliary line:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. line aux 0

4. See the tech notes and sample configurations to configure the line for your particular implementation of the AUX port.

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

configure terminal

 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3

line aux 0

 

Router(config)# line aux 0

Starts the line configuration command collection mode for the auxiliary line.

Step 4

See the tech notes and sample configurations to configure the line for your particular implementation of the AUX port.

Verifying Network Connectivity

This section describes how to verify network connectivity for your router.

Prerequisites

  • Complete all previous configuration tasks in this document.
  • The router must be connected to a properly configured network host.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. ping [ ip-address | hostname ]

3. telnet { ip-address | hostname }

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

ping [ ip-address | hostname ]

 

Router# ping 172.16.74.5

Diagnoses initial network connectivity.

  • To verify connectivity, ping the next hop router or connected host for each configured interface to.

Step 3

telnet { ip-address | hostname }

 

Router# telnet 10.20.30.40

Logs in to a host that supports Telnet.

  • If you want to test the vty line password, perform this step from a different network device, and use your router’s IP address.

Examples

The following display shows sample output for the ping command when you ping the IP address 192.168.7.27:

Router# ping
 
Protocol [ip]:
Target IP address: 192.168.7.27
Repeat count [5]:
Datagram size [100]:
Timeout in seconds [2]:
Extended commands [n]:
Sweep range of sizes [n]:
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.7.27, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent, round-trip min/avg/max = 1/2/4 ms
 

The following display shows sample output for the ping command when you ping the IP hostname donald:

Router# ping donald
 
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.7.27, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent, round-trip min/avg/max = 1/3/4 ms

Saving Your Router Configuration

This section describes how to avoid losing your configuration at the next system reload or power cycle by saving the running configuration to the startup configuration in NVRAM. The NVRAM provides 256KB of storage on the router.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

copy running-config startup-config

 

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Saving Backup Copies of Configuration and System Image

To aid file recovery and minimize downtime in case of file corruption, we recommend that you save backup copies of the startup configuration file and the Cisco IOS-XE software system image file on a server.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. copy nvram:startup-config { ftp: | rcp: | tftp: }

3. show bootflash:

4. copy {bootflash}: { ftp: | rcp: | tftp: }

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

enable

 

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

copy nvram:startup-config { ftp: | rcp: | tftp: }

 

Router# copy nvram:startup-config ftp:

Copies the startup configuration file to a server.

  • The configuration file copy can serve as a backup copy.
  • Enter the destination URL when prompted.

Step 3

show {bootflash0|bootflash1}:

 

Router# show {bootflash0|bootflash1} :

Displays the layout and contents of a flash memory file system.

  • Learn the name of the system image file.

Step 4

copy {bootflash0|bootflash1}: { ftp: | rcp: | tftp: }

 

Router# copy {bootflash0|bootflash1}: ftp :

Copies a file from flash memory to a server.

  • Copy the system image file to a server to serve as a backup copy.
  • Enter the filename and destination URL when prompted.

Configuration Examples

Copying the Startup Configuration to a TFTP Server: Example

The following example shows the startup configuration being copied to a TFTP server:

Router# copy nvram:startup-config tftp:
 
Remote host[]? 172.16.101.101
 
Name of configuration file to write [rtr2-confg]? <cr>
Write file rtr2-confg on host 172.16.101.101?[confirm] <cr>
![OK]

Copying from Flash Memory to a TFTP Server: Example

The following example shows the use of the show {flash0|flash1}: command in privileged EXEC to learn the name of the system image file and the use of the copy {flash0|flash1}: tftp: privileged EXEC command to copy the system image to a TFTP server. The router uses the default username and password.

 
Router#Directory of bootflash:
11 drwx 16384 Jun 12 2012 17:31:45 +00:00 lost+found 64897 drwx 634880 Sep 6 2012 14:33:26 +00:00 core 340705 drwx 4096 Oct 11 2012 19:28:27 +00:00 .prst_sync 81121 drwx 4096 Jun 12 2012 17:32:39 +00:00 .rollback_timer 12 -rw- 0 Jun 12 2012 17:32:50 +00:00 tracelogs.336 713857 drwx 1347584 Oct 11 2012 20:24:26 +00:00 tracelogs 162241 drwx 4096 Jun 12 2012 17:32:51 +00:00 .installer 48673 drwx 4096 Jul 2 2012 17:14:51 +00:00 vman_fdb 13 -rw- 420654048 Aug 28 2012 15:01:31 +00:00 crankshaft-universalk9.BLD_MCP_DEV_LATEST_20120826_083012.SSA.bin 14 -rw- 727035 Aug 29 2012 21:03:25 +00:00 uut2_2000_ikev1.cfg 15 -rw- 420944032 Aug 29 2012 19:40:28 +00:00 crankshaft-universalk9.BLD_MCP_DEV_LATEST_20120829_033026.SSA.bin 16 -rw- 1528 Aug 30 2012 14:24:38 +00:00 base.cfg 17 -rw- 360900 Aug 31 2012 19:10:02 +00:00 uut2_1000_ikev1.cfg 18 -rw- 421304160 Aug 31 2012 16:34:19 +00:00 crankshaft-universalk9.BLD_MCP_DEV_LATEST_20120821_193221.SSA.bin 19 -rw- 421072064 Aug 31 2012 18:31:57 +00:00 crankshaft-universalk9.BLD_MCP_DEV_LATEST_20120830_110615.SSA.bin 20 -rw- 453652 Sep 1 2012 01:48:15 +00:00 uut2_1000_ikev1_v2.cfg 21 -rw- 16452768 Sep 11 2012 20:36:20 +00:00 upgrade_stage_1_of_1.bin.2012-09-05-Delta 22 -rw- 417375456 Sep 12 2012 20:28:23 +00:00 crankshaft-universalk9.2012-09-12_00.45_cveerapa.SSA.bin 23 -rw- 360879 Oct 8 2012 19:43:36 +00:00 old-config.conf 24 -rw- 390804800 Oct 11 2012 15:34:08 +00:00 _1010t.bin 7451738112 bytes total (4525948928 bytes free)
 
Router#show bootflash: -#- --length-- ---------date/time--------- path 1 4096 Oct 11 2012 20:22:19 +00:00 /bootflash/ 2 16384 Jun 12 2012 17:31:45 +00:00 /bootflash/lost+found 3 634880 Sep 06 2012 14:33:26 +00:00 /bootflash/core 4 1028176 Sep 06 2012 14:31:17 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_17360.core.gz 5 1023738 Sep 06 2012 14:31:24 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_23385.core.gz 6 1023942 Sep 06 2012 14:31:30 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_24973.core.gz 7 1023757 Sep 06 2012 14:31:37 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_26241.core.gz 8 1023726 Sep 06 2012 14:31:43 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_27507.core.gz 9 1023979 Sep 06 2012 14:31:50 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_28774.core.gz 10 1023680 Sep 06 2012 14:31:56 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_30045.core.gz 11 1023950 Sep 06 2012 14:32:02 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_31332.core.gz 12 1023722 Sep 06 2012 14:32:09 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_5528.core.gz 13 1023852 Sep 06 2012 14:32:15 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_7950.core.gz 14 1023916 Sep 06 2012 14:32:22 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_9217.core.gz 15 1023875 Sep 06 2012 14:32:28 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_10484.core.gz 16 1023907 Sep 06 2012 14:32:35 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_11766.core.gz 17 1023707 Sep 06 2012 14:32:41 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_13052.core.gz 18 1023963 Sep 06 2012 14:32:48 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_14351.core.gz 19 1023915 Sep 06 2012 14:32:54 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_15644.core.gz 20 1023866 Sep 06 2012 14:33:00 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_17171.core.gz 21 1023518 Sep 06 2012 14:33:07 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_18454.core.gz 22 1023938 Sep 06 2012 14:33:13 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_19741.core.gz 23 1024017 Sep 06 2012 14:33:20 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_21039.core.gz 24 1023701 Sep 06 2012 14:33:26 +00:00 /bootflash/core/UUT2_RP_0_iomd_22323.core.gz 25 4096 Oct 11 2012 19:28:27 +00:00 /bootflash/.prst_sync 26 4096 Jun 12 2012 17:32:39 +00:00 /bootflash/.rollback_timer 27 0 Jun 12 2012 17:32:50 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs.336 28 1347584 Oct 11 2012 20:24:26 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs 29 392 Oct 11 2012 20:22:19 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.gz 30 308 Oct 11 2012 18:39:43 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011183943.gz 31 308 Oct 11 2012 18:49:44 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011184944.gz 32 42853 Oct 04 2012 07:35:39 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/hman_R0-0.log.0498.20121004073539.gz 33 307 Oct 11 2012 18:59:45 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011185945.gz 34 308 Oct 11 2012 19:19:47 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011191947.gz 35 307 Oct 11 2012 19:37:14 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011193714.gz 36 308 Oct 11 2012 19:47:15 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011194715.gz 37 308 Oct 11 2012 19:57:16 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011195716.gz 38 308 Oct 11 2012 20:07:17 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011200717.gz 39 307 Oct 11 2012 20:12:18 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011201218.gz 40 306 Oct 11 2012 20:17:18 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011201718.gz 41 44220 Oct 10 2012 11:47:42 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/hman_R0-0.log.32016.20121010114742.gz 42 64241 Oct 09 2012 20:47:59 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/fman-fp_F0-0.log.12268.20121009204757.gz 43 177 Oct 11 2012 19:27:03 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_compmatrix_R0-0.log.gz 44 307 Oct 11 2012 18:24:41 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011182441.gz 45 309 Oct 11 2012 18:29:42 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011182942.gz 46 43748 Oct 06 2012 13:49:19 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/hman_R0-0.log.0498.20121006134919.gz 47 309 Oct 11 2012 18:44:43 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011184443.gz 48 309 Oct 11 2012 19:04:46 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/inst_cleanup_R0-0.log.0000.20121011190446.gz 49 2729 Oct 09 2012 21:21:49 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/IOSRP_R0-0.log.20011.20121009212149 50 116 Oct 08 2012 21:06:44 +00:00 /bootflash/tracelogs/binos_log_R0-0.log.20013.20121008210644

Note To avoid losing work you have completed, be sure to save your configuration occasionally as you proceed. Use the copy running-config startup-config command to save the configuration to NVRAM.


Verifying the Initial Configuration

Enter the following commands in the Cisco IOS-XE to verify the initial configuration on the router:

  • show version —Displays the system hardware version; the installed software version; the names and sources of configuration files; the boot images; and the amount of installed DRAM, NVRAM, and flash memory.
  • show diag —Lists and displays diagnostic information about the installed controllers, interface processors, and port adapters.
  • show interfaces — Shows interfaces are operating correctly and that the interfaces and line protocol are in the correct state—up or down
  • show ip interface brief— Displays a summary status of the interfaces configured for IP protocol.
  • show configuration— Verify that you have configured the correct hostname and password.
  • show platform— Displays the software/rommon version, and so on.

When you have completed and verified the initial configuration, the specific features and functions are ready to be configured. See the Software Configuration Guide for the Cisco 4400 and Cisco 4300 Series ISRs.