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Installing the J1 Voice Interface Card

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Installing and Configuring the 1-Port Digital J1 Voice Interface Cards

Table Of Contents

Installing and Configuring the 1-Port Digital J1 Voice Interface Cards

Overview

Benefits

Restrictions

Related Documents

Hardware and Software Requirements

Hardware Requirements

Software Requirements

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Safety Recommendations

Safety Warnings

Safety with Electricity

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Required Tools and Equipment

Installing the Digital J1 Voice Interface Card

Inserting the Voice Interface Card into the Network Module

Connecting the 1-Port J1 Voice Interface Card to the Network

1-Port J1 Voice Interface Card LEDs

J1 DB-15 Connector Pinouts

Configuring J1 Voice Interfaces

Configuring the J1 Controller

Configuring Channel-Associated Signaling

Configuring the Clock Source

Configuring Loopback

Configuring Transparent Common Channel Signaling for a
Clear-Channel Codec

Verifying Configuration

To verify that J1 controller is configured correctly, enter the show running-config privileged EXEC command to display the command settings for the router, as shown in the"Configuration Examples" section.

Troubleshooting Tips

Diagnostics and Fault Isolation

Monitoring and Maintaining the J1 Controller

Configuration Examples

Controller (J1) Example

Channel-Associated Signaling Example

Loopback Example

Clock Source Example

Command Reference

clock source (controller j1)

controller (j1)

ds0-group (controller j1)

loopback (controller j1)

microcode reload controller (j1)

show controllers j1

Glossary

Obtaining Documentation

World Wide Web

Documentation CD-ROM

Ordering Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco.com

Technical Assistance Center

Contacting TAC by Using the Cisco TAC Website

Contacting TAC by Telephone


Installing and Configuring the 1-Port Digital J1 Voice Interface Cards


This document explains how to install and configure the 1-port digital J1 voice interface cards in Cisco 3600 series and Cisco 2600 series routers using Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T or higher. This document is intended for both data communications managers and telecommunications managers who are installing, configuring, or maintaining network modules and interface cards.

Use this document in conjunction with your router installation and configuration guide, the WAN Interface Card Hardware Installation Guide, the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document for your router, the Software Configuration Guide for Cisco 3600 series and Cisco 2600 series routers, and the Cisco IOS configuration guides and command references.

If you have questions or need help, see the "Obtaining Technical Assistance" section. If you want to order printed documents, see the "Obtaining Documentation" section

This document contains the following sections:

Overview

Hardware and Software Requirements

Safety Recommendations

Required Tools and Equipment

Installing the Digital J1 Voice Interface Card

Configuring J1 Voice Interfaces

Monitoring and Maintaining the J1 Controller

Configuration Examples

Command Reference

Glossary

Obtaining Documentation

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Before performing procedures described in this document, review the "Safety Recommendations" section.

Overview

The J1 voice interface card (VIC) provides the proper interface for directly connecting Cisco multiservice access routers to Private Branch Exchanges (PBXs) throughout Japan which use a J1 interface (2.048 Mbps TDM interface). This interface card supports 30 voice channels per port. The 1-port J1 multiflex line interface card provides an interface based on the Standards JJ-20.10-12. It supports voice applications only .

The J1 voice interface card provides the software and hardware features required to connect to over 80 percent of the PBXs within Japan that use digital interfaces. This J1 voice interface card provides a TTC JJ-20.11 compliant interface between high-density voice network modules (NM-HDV) and a Japanese PBX.

Figure 1 shows the earlier solution offered to customers in Japan. A J1/T1 adapter box installed between the PBX and router provides the translation between J1 using coded mark inversion (CMI) line coding at a bit rate of 2.048 Mbps and a T1 line using either alternate mark inversion (AMI) or B8ZS line coding at a bit rate of 1.544 Mbps. Note that with this solution, only 24 channels are supported, instead of the full 30 channels of the J1 interface.

Figure 1 Solution without J1 Interface Card

Figure 2 shows the solution using the J1 interface card. The interface is now between J1 and the VIC's time division multiplex access (TDMA) bus. Note that with this solution all 30 channels of the J1 interface are supported.

Figure 2 Solution with J1 Interface Card

Benefits

Support for Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP), H.248, H.323 (versions 1, 2, and 3), Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) and Cisco Call Manager (with Cisco IP phones) in association with VoIP, VoFR, and VoATM.

Provides Alarm Indication Signal (AIS) alarm signaling per TTC JJ-20.11

Delivers the same performance as existing 30 channel E1 NM-HDV.

Allows one to enable and disable individual DS0s or channels.

Restrictions

Voice only applications

Separate clock output not supported

Alarm relay output not supported

Per channel loopback not supported

Voice ports on the J1 interface cannot be configured using network management software. They can only be configured manually.

Related Documents

Cisco 2600 Series Hardware Installation Guide or Cisco 3600 Series Hardware Installation Guide

Interface Card Hardware Installation Guide

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco 2600 Series Routers or Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco 3600 Series Routers

Software Configuration Guide for Cisco 3600 Series and Cisco 2600 Series Routers

Cisco IOS Security Configuration Guide,  Release 12.2

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide,  Release 12.2

Cisco IOS Voice, Video, and Fax Configuration Guide,  Release 12.2

Cisco IOS Voice, Video, and Fax Command Reference,  Release 12.2

Hardware and Software Requirements

This section describes hardware and software requirements for the J1 voice interface card.

Hardware Requirements

A voice connection requires both a voice network module and a voice interface card. The voice network module is installed directly into the router. The voice interface card is installed in a slot on the voice network module. At least one other network module or WAN interface card must be installed in the router to provide the connection to the WAN. For Cisco 3620 and Cisco 3640 routers, an additional network module is required for connection to the IP LAN.

The voice interface card can be installed in both the Cisco 3600 series and Cisco 2600 series routers in the high-density voice network module (Cisco part number NM-HDV).

Determining Platform Support Through Cisco Feature Navigator

Cisco IOS software is packaged in feature sets that support specific platforms. To get updated information regarding platform support for this feature, access Cisco Feature Navigator. Cisco Feature Navigator dynamically updates the list of supported platforms as new platform support is added for the feature.

Cisco Feature Navigator is a web-based tool that enables you to quickly determine which Cisco IOS software images support a specific set of features and which features are supported in a specific Cisco IOS image. You can search by feature or release. Under the release section, you can compare releases side by side to display both the features unique to each software release and the features in common.

To access Cisco Feature Navigator, you must have an account on Cisco.com. If you have forgotten or lost your account information, send a blank e-mail to cco-locksmith@cisco.com. An automatic check will verify that your e-mail address is registered with Cisco.com. If the check is successful, account details with a new random password will be e-mailed to you. Qualified users can establish an account on Cisco.com by following the directions at http://www.cisco.com/register.

Cisco Feature Navigator is updated regularly when major Cisco IOS software releases and technology releases occur. For the most current information, go to the Cisco Feature Navigator home page at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/fn

Software Requirements

The 1-port J1 voice interface cards require Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T or higher.

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Standards

General specification TTC JJ-20.10

TTC interface specification TTC JJ-20.11

TTC signaling specification TTC JJ-20.12 (E&M wink start, wink immediate, and DTMF only).

MIBs

None

To obtain lists of supported MIBs by platform and Cisco IOS release, and to download MIB modules, go to the Cisco MIB website on Cisco.com at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml

RFCs

None

Safety Recommendations

Follow these guidelines to ensure general safety:

Keep the chassis area clear and dust-free during and after installation.

Put the removed chassis cover in a safe place.

Keep tools away from walk areas where you or others could fall over them.

Do not wear loose clothing that could get caught in the chassis. Fasten your tie or scarf and roll up your sleeves.

Wear safety glasses when working under any conditions that might be hazardous to your eyes.

Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes equipment unsafe.

Safety Warnings

Safety warnings appear throughout this publication in procedures that, if performed incorrectly, may harm you. A warning symbol precedes each warning statement.

Warning This warning symbol means danger. You are in a situation that could cause bodily injury. Before you work on any equipment, be aware of the hazards involved with electrical circuitry and be familiar with standard practices for preventing accidents. To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.

Waarschuwing

Dit waarschuwingssymbool betekent gevaar. U verkeert in een situatie die lichamelijk letsel kan veroorzaken. Voordat u aan enige apparatuur gaat werken, dient u zich bewust te zijn van de bij elektrische schakelingen betrokken risico's en dient u op de hoogte te zijn van standaard maatregelen om ongelukken te voorkomen. Voor vertalingen van de waarschuwingen die in deze publicatie verschijnen, kunt u het document Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Informatie over naleving van veiligheids- en andere voorschriften) raadplegen dat bij dit toestel is ingesloten.

Varoitus

Tämä varoitusmerkki merkitsee vaaraa. Olet tilanteessa, joka voi johtaa ruumiinvammaan. Ennen kuin työskentelet minkään laitteiston parissa, ota selvää sähkökytkentöihin liittyvistä vaaroista ja tavanomaisista onnettomuuksien ehkäisykeinoista. Tässä julkaisussa esiintyvien varoitusten käännökset löydät laitteen mukana olevasta Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information -kirjasesta (määräysten noudattaminen ja tietoa turvallisuudesta).

Attention

Ce symbole d'avertissement indique un danger. Vous vous trouvez dans une situation pouvant causer des blessures ou des dommages corporels. Avant de travailler sur un équipement, soyez conscient des dangers posés par les circuits électriques et familiarisez-vous avec les procédures couramment utilisées pour éviter les accidents. Pour prendre connaissance des traductions d'avertissements figurant dans cette publication, consultez le document Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Conformité aux règlements et consignes de sécurité) qui accompagne cet appareil.

Warnung

Dieses Warnsymbol bedeutet Gefahr. Sie befinden sich in einer Situation, die zu einer Körperverletzung führen könnte. Bevor Sie mit der Arbeit an irgendeinem Gerät beginnen, seien Sie sich der mit elektrischen Stromkreisen verbundenen Gefahren und der Standardpraktiken zur Vermeidung von Unfällen bewußt. Übersetzungen der in dieser Veröffentlichung enthaltenen Warnhinweise finden Sie im Dokument Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Informationen zu behördlichen Vorschriften und Sicherheit), das zusammen mit diesem Gerät geliefert wurde.

Avvertenza

Questo simbolo di avvertenza indica un pericolo. La situazione potrebbe causare infortuni alle persone. Prima di lavorare su qualsiasi apparecchiatura, occorre conoscere i pericoli relativi ai circuiti elettrici ed essere al corrente delle pratiche standard per la prevenzione di incidenti. La traduzione delle avvertenze riportate in questa pubblicazione si trova nel documento Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Conformità alle norme e informazioni sulla sicurezza) che accompagna questo dispositivo.

Advarsel

Dette varselsymbolet betyr fare. Du befinner deg i en situasjon som kan føre til personskade. Før du utfører arbeid på utstyr, må du vare oppmerksom på de faremomentene som elektriske kretser innebærer, samt gjøre deg kjent med vanlig praksis når det gjelder å unngå ulykker. Hvis du vil se oversettelser av de advarslene som finnes i denne publikasjonen, kan du se i dokumentet Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Overholdelse av forskrifter og sikkerhetsinformasjon) som ble levert med denne enheten.

Aviso

Este símbolo de aviso indica perigo. Encontra-se numa situação que lhe poderá causar danos físicos. Antes de começar a trabalhar com qualquer equipamento, familiarize-se com os perigos relacionados com circuitos eléctricos, e com quaisquer práticas comuns que possam prevenir possíveis acidentes. Para ver as traduções dos avisos que constam desta publicação, consulte o documento Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Informação de Segurança e Disposições Reguladoras) que acompanha este dispositivo.

¡Advertencia!

Este símbolo de aviso significa peligro. Existe riesgo para su integridad física. Antes de manipular cualquier equipo, considerar los riesgos que entraña la corriente eléctrica y familiarizarse con los procedimientos estándar de prevención de accidentes. Para ver una traducción de las advertencias que aparecen en esta publicación, consultar el documento titulado Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Información sobre seguridad y conformidad con las disposiciones reglamentarias) que se acompaña con este dispositivo.

Varning!

Denna varningssymbol signalerar fara. Du befinner dig i en situation som kan leda till personskada. Innan du utför arbete på någon utrustning måste du vara medveten om farorna med elkretsar och känna till vanligt förfarande för att förebygga skador. Se förklaringar av de varningar som förkommer i denna publikation i dokumentet Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Efterrättelse av föreskrifter och säkerhetsinformation), vilket medföljer denna anordning.



Warning Read the installation instructions before you connect the system to its power source.To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.



Warning Only trained and qualified personnel should be allowed to install or replace this equipment.To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.



Warning Before working on a chassis or working near power supplies, unplug the power cord on AC units; disconnect the power at the circuit breaker on DC units.To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.



Warning Ultimate disposal of this product should be handled according to all national laws and regulations.To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.


Safety with Electricity


Warning Before working on equipment that is connected to power lines, remove jewelry (including rings, necklaces, and watches). Metal objects will heat up when connected to power and ground and can cause serious burns or weld the metal object to the terminals.



Warning Hazardous network voltages are present in WAN ports regardless of whether power to the router is OFF or ON. To avoid electric shock, use caution when working near WAN ports. When detaching cables, detach the end away from the router first.To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.


Follow these guidelines when working on equipment powered by electricity:

Locate the emergency power-off switch in the room in which you are working. Then, if an electrical accident occurs, you can quickly shut the power OFF.

Before working on the router, turn OFF the power and unplug the power cord.

Disconnect all power before doing the following:

Installing or removing a router chassis

Working near power supplies

Do not work alone if potentially hazardous conditions exist.


Warning Before opening the chassis, disconnect the telephone-network cables to avoid contact with telephone-network voltages.To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.


Never assume that power is disconnected from a circuit. Always check.


Warning Do not touch the power supply when the power cord is connected. For systems with a power switch, line voltages are present within the power supply even when the power switch is OFF and the power cord is connected. For systems without a power switch, line voltages are present within the power supply when the power cord is connected.To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.


Look carefully for possible hazards in your work area, such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

If an electrical accident occurs, proceed as follows:

Use caution; do not become a victim yourself.

Turn OFF power to the router.

If possible, send another person to get medical aid. Otherwise, determine the condition of the victim and then call for help.

Determine if the person needs rescue breathing or external cardiac compressions; then take appropriate action.

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage equipment and impair electrical circuitry. It occurs when electronic printed circuit cards are improperly handled and can result in complete or intermittent failures. Always follow ESD prevention procedures when removing and replacing cards. Ensure that the router chassis is electrically connected to earth ground. Wear an ESD-preventive wrist strap, ensuring that it makes good skin contact. Connect the clip to an unpainted surface of the chassis frame to safely channel unwanted ESD voltages to ground. To properly guard against ESD damage and shocks, the wrist strap and cord must operate effectively. If no wrist strap is available, ground yourself by touching the metal part of the chassis.


Caution For safety, periodically check the resistance value of the antistatic strap, which should be between 1 and 10 megohm (Mohm).

Required Tools and Equipment

You need the following tools and equipment to install a voice interface card in Cisco 3600 series and Cisco 2600 series routers:

J1 voice interface card

Network module

Number 2 Phillips screwdriver or small flat-blade screwdriver

ESD-preventive wrist strap

Tape (if using DC power)

Installing the Digital J1 Voice Interface Card

This section describes the 1-port J1 voice interface card (VIC-1J1).

The 1-port J1 voice interface cards provide voice access to PBXs with J1 interfaces. These cards provide single-port interfaces for basic voice service for J1 networks.

Figure 3 1-Port J1 Voice Interface Card (VIC-1J1)—Front Panel

Voice interface cards fit into a high-density voice network module (Cisco part number NM-HDV). The network module installs into the router chassis.

Inserting the Voice Interface Card into the Network Module


Caution Voice interface cards do not support online insertion and removal (hot swapping). Before inserting a voice interface card into a network module that is already installed in the router chassis, you must turn OFF electrical power and disconnect network cables. If you are using a Cisco 3660 router, the network module can be removed, the VIC inserted, and the network module can be reinserted without removing power. Refer to the Cisco 3600 Series Hardware Installation Guide for more information about hot-swapping Cisco 3660 components. See the "Obtaining Documentation" section.


Timesaver You can install voice interface cards either before or after mounting the router, whichever is more convenient. You can install the card in the network module either before or after installing the network module in the router chassis.


Follow this procedure to insert the voice interface card into the network module:


Step 1 If the network module has already been installed in the router chassis, turn OFF power to the router. However, to channel ESD voltages to ground, do not unplug the power cable. Remove all network interface cables, including telephone cables, from the rear panel.

The following warning applies to routers that use a DC power supply:


Warning Before performing any of the following procedures, ensure that power is removed from the DC circuit. To ensure that all power is OFF, locate the circuit breaker on the panel board that services the DC circuit, switch the circuit breaker to the OFF position, and tape the switch handle of the circuit breaker in the OFF position.


Step 2 Using either a number 2 Phillips screwdriver or a small flat-blade screwdriver, remove the blank filler panel from the network module slot where you plan to install the card. Save the blank panel for future use.


Note The J1 VIC ships with an M3 metric female jackscrew. If the jackscrew is removed, the male side of the jackscrews are not metric and have a 4-40 thread.


Step 3 Align the card with the guides in the network module and slide it gently into the slot, as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4 Inserting the J1 VIC into the High Density Voice Network Module

Step 4 Push the card into place until you feel its edge connector mate securely with the connector in the network module.

Step 5 Fasten the card's captive mounting screws into the holes in the network module faceplate, using the Phillips or flat-blade screwdriver.

Step 6 If the router was previously running, reinstall the network interface cables and turn ON power to the router.

The following warnings apply to routers that use a DC power supply:


Warning After wiring the DC power supply, remove the tape from the circuit breaker switch handle and reinstate power by moving the handle of the circuit breaker to the ON position.



Warning This equipment is intended to be grounded. Ensure that the host is connected to earth ground during normal use.


Connecting the 1-Port J1 Voice Interface Card to the Network

For this connection, use twisted-pair cables with DB-15 connectors.


Step 1 Confirm that the router is still turned OFF.

Step 2 Connect one end of the cable to the J1 port on the card.

Step 3 Connect the other end to the J1 connector at the PBX at your site, as shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5 Connecting the 1-Port J1 Voice Interface Card to the J1 PBX

Step 4 Turn ON power to the router.

Step 5 Check that the CD LED is lit and the AL and LP LEDs are not lit.

1-Port J1 Voice Interface Card LEDs

The 1-port voice interface card has three LEDs, which are shown in Figure 3, and described in Table 1.

Table 1 J1 Voice Interface Card LEDs

LED
Description
Color

LP LED

On means that a loopback or line state is manually set by the user. This LED is off during normal operation.

Yellow

AL LED

On means that there is a local or remote alarm state. This LED is off during normal operation.

Yellow

CD LED

On means that a carrier has been detected. This LED is on during normal operation.

Only a Loss of Signal (LOS) condition should prevent the CD LED from being lit.

Green


J1 DB-15 Connector Pinouts

The pinouts for the J1 connector on the J1 voice interface card are shown in Table 2.

Table 2 J1 DB-15 Pinouts

Signal Name
Pinout

Ground

1

RX Tip

2

RX Ring

9

TX Tip

4

TX Ring

11

unconnected

3,5-8,10,12-15


Configuring J1 Voice Interfaces

To configure a voice interface, use configuration mode (manual configuration) in Cisco IOS software. In this mode, you enter Cisco IOS commands at the router prompt.


Note Voice ports for the J1 interface must be configured manually.



Note Before you begin, disconnect all WAN cables from the router to keep it from trying to run the AutoInstall process. The router tries to run AutoInstall whenever you power it on if there is a WAN connection on both ends and the router does not have a valid configuration file stored in NVRAM (for example, when you add a new interface). It can take several minutes for the router to determine that AutoInstall is not connected to a remote Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) host.


This section describes basic configuration, including enabling the interface and configuring voice ports. Depending on your own requirements and the protocols you plan to route, you might also need to enter other configuration commands.


Note The VIC-1J1 supports voice applications only. It does not support data applications.


See the following sections for configuration tasks for this feature. Each task in the list is identified as either required or optional:

Configuring the J1 Controller (required)

Configuring Channel-Associated Signaling (optional)

Configuring the Clock Source (optional)

Configuring Loopback (optional)

Configuring Transparent Common Channel Signaling for a Clear-Channel Codec (optional)

Verifying Configuration (optional)

Before you begin configuring the interfaces, make sure you:

Connect a console to the router.

Turn ON power to the router.

If you have questions or need help, see the "Obtaining Technical Assistance" section.

Configuring the J1 Controller

Use the following procedure to configure the J1 controller in manual configuration mode.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# controller j1 slot/port

Selects the J1 interface to configure.

slot/port—Backplane slot number and port number on the interface.

Configuring Channel-Associated Signaling

Configure the DS0 groups on the J1 controller for voice applicationsin manual configuration mode. The J1 controller supports the E&M wink start and E&M immediate channel associated signaling (CAS) protocols for the voice ports.

The following parameters have default values for the J1 interface:

The companding type is ulaw.

The CP tone is set to JP.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# controller j1 slot/port

Selects the J1 interface to configure and enters controller configuration mode.

Step 3 

Router(config-controller)# ds0-group ds0-group-no 
timeslots timeslot-list type signaling-type service 
service-type

Defines the J1 interface for use by compressed voice calls and the signaling method the router uses to connect to the PBX.

Note This step shows the basic syntax and signaling types available with the ds0-group command. For the complete syntax, see the Cisco IOS Voice, Video, and Fax Command Reference, Release 12.2.

The keywords and arguments are as follows:

ds0-group-noSpecifies the DS0 group number.

timeslots timeslot-listSpecifies the DS0 time slot range of values from 1 to 31 for J1 interfaces. Time slot 16 is reserved for signaling.

type signaling-type(optional) Specifies the signaling-type to be applied to the selected group.

The options are as follows:

e&m-delay-dial Specifies that the originating endpoint sends an off-hook signal and then and waits for an off-hook signal followed by an on-hook signal from the destination.

e&m-immediate-start—Specifies no specific off-hook and on-hook signaling.

e&m-wink-start—Specifies that the originating endpoint sends an off-hook signal and waits for a wink signal from the destination.

noneSpecifies null signaling for external call control.

Step 4 

Router(config-controller)# exit

Exits back to global configuration mode.

Return to Step 3 if your router has more than one J1 interface that you need to configure.

Configuring the Clock Source

Use the following procedure to configure the clock source for a J1 controller in manual configuration mode.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# controller j1 1/0

Selects the J1 interface to configure and enters controller configuration mode. This example configures a J1 interface in slot 1 and unit 0.

Step 3 

Router(config-controller)# clock source {line |internal}

Specifies the clock source, either line or internal.

line—The controller recovers external clock from the line and provides the recovered clock to the internal (system) clock generator. The line value is the default clock source.

internal—The controller synchronizes itself to the internal (system) clock.

Step 4 

Router(config-controller)# exit

Exits back to global configuration mode.

Return to Step 3 if your router has more than one J1 interface that you need to configure.

Configuring Loopback

Use the following procedure to configure the loopback for a J1 controller in manual configuration mode.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# controller j1 1/0

Selects the J1 interface to configure. This example configures a J1 interface in slot 1 and unit 0.

Step 3 

Router(config-controller)# loopback {local | line | 
isolation}

Sets the loopback method for testing the J1 interface.

local—Places the interface into local loopback mode.

line—Places the interface into external loopback mode at the line level

isolation—Both local and line loopback.

Step 4 

Router(config-controller)# exit

Exits back to global configuration mode.

Configuring Transparent Common Channel Signaling for a
Clear-Channel Codec

Use the following procedure to configure transparent common channel signaling in manual configuration mode.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# controller j1 slot/port

Selects the J1 interface to configure.

slot/port—Backplane slot number and port number on the interface.

Step 3 

Router(config-controller)# ds0-group ds0-group-no 
timeslots timeslot-list type ext-sig

This command defines the J1 interface for use by compressed voice calls and the signaling method the router uses to connect to the PBX.

Note This step shows the basic syntax and signaling types available with the ds0-group command. For the complete syntax, see the Cisco IOS Voice, Video, and Fax Command Reference, Release 12.2.

The keywords and arguments are as follows:

ds0-group-noSpecifies the DS0 group number.

timeslots timeslot-listSpecifies the DS0 time slot range of values from 1 to 31 for J1 interfaces. Time slot 16 is reserved for signaling.

type—Specifies the signaling-type to be applied to the selected group. The ext-sig signaling type specifies that the signaling traffic comes from an outside source.

Step 4 

Router(config-controller)# no shutdown

Activates the controller.

Step 5 

Router(config-controller)# exit

Exits controller configuration mode.

Step 6 

Router(config)# dial-peer voice number pots

Enters dial-peer configuration mode and defines a local dial peer that will connect to the plain old telephone service (POTS) network.

The value of number is one or more digits identifying the dial peer. Valid entries are from 1 to 2147483647.

The pots argument indicates a peer using a basic telephone service.

Step 7 

Router(config-dialpeer)# destination-pattern string [T]

Configure the dial peer's destination pattern so that the system can reconcile dialed digits with a telephone number.

The value of string is a series of digits that specify the E.164 or private dialing plan phone number. Valid entries are the digits 0 to 9 and the letters A through D. The plus symbol (+) is not valid. You can enter the following special characters:

The asterisk character (*) that appears on standard touch-tone dial pads can be in any dial string—but not as a leading character (for example, *650).

The period (.) acts as a wildcard character.

Use the comma (,) only in prefixes, the comma inserts a one-second pause.

When the timer (T) character is included at the end of the destination pattern, the system collects dialed digits as they are entered—until the interdigit timer expires (10 seconds, by default)—or the user dials the termination of end-of-dialing key (default is #).

Note The timer character must be a capital T.

Step 8 

Router(config-dialpeer)# port slot/port:ds0-group-no

This command associates the dial peer with a specific logical interface.

The value of slot is the router location where the voice module is installed. Valid entries are from 0 to 3.

The value of port indicates the voice interface card location. Valid entries are 0 or 1.

Each defined DS0 group number is represented on a separate voice port. This allows you to define individual DS0s.

Step 9 

Router(config-dialpeer)# exit

Exit dial-peer configuration mode to complete the POTS dial-peer configuration.

Step 10 

Router(config)# dial-peer voice number voip

Enter dial-peer configuration mode and defines a remote VoIP dial peer.

The value of number is one or more digits identifying the dial peer. Valid entries are 1 to 2147483647.

The voip argument indicates a VoIP peer using voice encapsulation on the IP network.

Step 11 

Router(config-dialpeer)# codec clear-channel 

The voice-card configuration codec complexity command sets the codec options that are available when you use this command.

Set codec complexity to clear-channel to use the clear channel codec.

Step 12 

Router(config-dialpeer)# vad

(optional) This setting is enabled by default. It activates voice activity detection (VAD) which allows the system to reduce unnecessary voice transmissions caused by unfiltered background noise.

Step 13 

Router(config-dialpeer)# destination-pattern 
string [T]

Configures the dial peer's destination pattern so that the system can reconcile dialed digits with a telephone number.

The value of string is a series of digits that specify the E.164 or private dialing plan phone number. Valid entries are the digits 0 to 9 and the letters A to D. The plus symbol (+) is not valid. You can enter the following special characters:

The star character (*) that appears on standard touch-tone dial pads can be in any dial string—but not as a leading character (for example, *650).

The period (.) acts as a wildcard character.

Use the comma (,) only in prefixes, the comma inserts a one-second pause.

When the timer (T) character is included at the end of the destination pattern, the system collects dialed digits as they are entered—until the interdigit timer expires (10 seconds, by default)—or the user dials the termination of end-of-dialing key (default is #).

Note The timer character must be a capital T.

Step 14 

Router(config-dialpeer)# session target 
{ipv4:destination-address | dns:[$s$. | $d$. | $e$. | $u$.] 
host-name}

Configures the IP session target for the dial peer.

The ipv4:destination-address parameter indicates IP address of the dial peer.

The dns:host-name parameter indicates that the domain name server will resolve the name of the IP address. Valid entries for this parameter are characters representing the name of the host device.

Wildcards are also available for defining domain names with keywords by using source, destination, and dialed information in the host name.

For complete command syntax information, see Cisco IOS Voice, Video, and Fax Command Reference,  Release 12.2

Step 15 

Router(config-dialpeer)# exit

Exits dial peer configuration mode for the VoIP dial-peer configuration.

Verifying Configuration

To verify that J1 controller is configured correctly, enter the show running-config privileged EXEC command to display the command settings for the router, as shown in the"Configuration Examples" section.

Troubleshooting Tips

Diagnostics and Fault Isolation

The J1 Framer has three loopback modes which are initiated through software control; line loopback, local loopback, and isolation loopback. These modes are explained and illustrated in the sections that follow. Line loopback loops the received signal (R-D) from the PBX to the transmit going back to the PBX. Local loopback loops the transmitted signal (T-D) from the host to the received signal going back to the host. Isolation loopback routes PBX and TDM generated traffic back to their respective sources. (Tx=transmit interface; Rx=receive interface;
Tip / Ring leads carry audio between the signaling unit and the trunking circuit).

Line Loopback

To place the controller into line loopback, use the following command in controller configuration mode.

Command
Purpose

loopback line

Line loopback loops the receiver inputs to the transmitter outputs. The receive path is not affected by the activation of this loopback.


Figure 6 Line Loopback

Local Loopback

To place the controller into local loopback, use the following command in controller configuration mode. Use the no form of this command to turn off the loopback. The command should only be used for testing purposes.

Command
Purpose

loopback local

Local loopback loops the transmit line encoder outputs to the receive line encoder inputs. The transmit path is not affected by the activation of this loopback.


Figure 7 Local Loopback

Isolation Loopback

To place the controller into line loopback, use the following command in controller configuration mode. Use the no form of this command to turn off the loopback. The command should only be used for testing purposes.

Command
Purpose

loopback isolation

Both line and local loopback are turned on.


Figure 8 Isolation Loopback

Monitoring and Maintaining the J1 Controller

To monitor and maintain the J1 controller use the following privileged EXEC command.

Command
Purpose

Router# show controllers j1 slot/port

Displays statistics for the J1 link.


Configuration Examples

The following examples display the screen output using the show running-config command:

Controller (J1) Example

Channel-Associated Signaling Example

Clock Source Example

Loopback Example

Controller (J1) Example

The following example shows the Cisco IOS interface card in slot 4, port 0 of a Cisco 3660 configured as a J1 controller:

controller J1 4/0

Channel-Associated Signaling Example

The following example shows the DS0 groups on the J1 controller.

controller J1 4/0
 clock source line
 ds0-group 1 timeslots 1-15,17-31 type e&m-wink-start

Loopback Example

The following example shows the loopback method for testing the J1 interface is set at the line level.

controller J1 3/0
 clock source line
 loopback line

Clock Source Example

The following example shows the J1 controller clock source is configured to line, where the controller recovers external clock from the line and provides the recovered clock to the internal (system) clock generator.

controller J1 3/0
 clock source line

Command Reference

This section documents new and modified commands. All other commands used with this feature are documented in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2 command reference publications.

Modified Commands

clock source (controller j1)

controller (j1)

ds0-group (controller j1)

loopback (controller j1)

microcode reload controller (j1)

New Commands

show controllers j1

clock source (controller j1)

To configure the clock source for a J1 controller, use the clock source command in controller configuration mode. To restore the clock source to its default setting, use the no form of this command.

clock source {line | internal}

no clock source

Syntax Description

line

The controller recovers the external clock from the line and provides the recovered clock to the internal (system) clock generator. The line value is the default clock source.

internal

The controller synchronizes itself to the internal (system) clock.


Defaults

Clock source is line for the J1 controller.

Command Modes

Controller configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1T

This command was introduced.

12.2(8)T

The command was introduced as a J1 controller configuration for the Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series.


Usage Guidelines

If multiple network modules are present in the router, then each J1 controller will have to be given a separate priority. The controller having the highest priority will drive the internal clock.

Examples

The following example configures the clock source for line:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# controller j1 3/0

Router(config-controller)# clock source line

Related Commands

Command
Description

network-clock-select

Sets the selection priority for a clock source.


controller (j1)

To configure a J1 controller and enter controller configuration mode, use the controller command in global configuration mode.

controller {t1 | e1 | j1} slot/port

Syntax Description

t1

T1 controller.

e1

E1 controller.

j1

J1 controller.

slot/port

Backplane slot and port number on the interface.


Defaults

No J1 controller is configured.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.

10.3

The e1 keyword was added.

12.2(8)T

The j1 keyword was added on the Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series.


Examples

The following example configures the Cisco IOS interface card in slot 3, port 0 of a Cisco 3660 as a J1 controller:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# controller j1 3/0
Router(config-controller)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear controller

Resets the J1 controller.

clock source

Sets the J1 clock source.

show controllers j1

Displays information about the J1 link.


ds0-group (controller j1)

To configure channelized J1 time slots enter the ds0-group command in controller configuration mode. The no form of the command removes the group and signaling setting.

ds0-group ds0-group-no timeslots timeslot-list type signaling-type service service-type

no ds0-group ds0-group-no timeslots timeslot-list type signaling-type

Syntax Description

ds0-group-no

Specifies the DS0 group number.

timeslots timeslot-list

Specifies the DS0 time slot range of values from 1 to 31 for J1 interfaces. Time slot 16 is reserved. The default value configures 30 time slots with the channel associated signal called E&M (Ear and Mouth), which is the default signal type.

type signaling-type

(Optional) Specifies the signaling-type to be applied to the selected group.

The options are as follows:

e&m-delay-dial Specifies that the originating endpoint sends an off-hook signal and then waits for an off-hook signal followed by an on-hook signal from the destination.

e&m-immediate-start—Specifies no specific off-hook and on-hook signaling.

e&m-wink -start—Specifies that the originating endpoint sends an off-hook signal and waits for a wink signal from the destination.

none—Specifies null signaling for external call control.

service service-type

(Optional—none type only) Specifies the type of service for the signaling type none. The valid service-type options are mgcp (Media Gateway Control Protocol service) or sgcp (Simple Gateway Control Protocol service).


Defaults

No DS0 group is defined.

Command Modes

Controller configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.2

This command was originally the cas-group command.

12.0(1)T

The cas-group command was introduced for the Cisco 3600 series.

12.0(5)XE

The command was renamed ds0-group on the Cisco AS5300 and on the Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series.

12.0(7)T

The command was integrated into the Cisco IOS Release 12.0(7)T.

12.2(8)T

The command was introduced as a J1 controller configuration for the Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series.


Usage Guidelines

The ds0-group command replaces the existing cas-group command. Making the command generic allows flexibility and scalability. It is not restricted to CAS signaling or channel bundling.

The ds0-group command automatically creates a logical voice port that is numbered as follows on Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series routers: slot/port:ds0-group-no. Although only one voice port is created for each group, applicable calls are routed to any channel in the group.

Examples

The following example is sample output from the show controllers j1 command on the Cisco 3660 series:

Router(config-controller)# ds0-group 1 timeslots 1-15,17-31 type e&m-wink-start 
Router(config-controller)#
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(1), cp
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(2), cp
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(3), cp
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(4), cp
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(5), cp
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(6), cp
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(7), cp
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(8), cp
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(9), cp
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(10), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(11), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(12), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(13), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(14), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(15), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(17), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(18), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(19), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(20), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(21), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(22), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(23), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.259: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(24), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.263: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(25), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.263: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(26), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.263: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(27), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.263: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(28), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.263: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(29), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.263: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(30), p
*Mar  1 03:12:26.263: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface recEive and transMit3/0:0(31), p

Related Commands

Command
Description

ds0 busyout

To busyout one or more signal level 0s (DS0s).


loopback (controller j1)

To set the loopback method for testing the J1 interface, enter the loopback command in controller configuration mode. Use the no form of this command to turn off loopback. The command should only be used for testing purposes.

loopback {local | line | isolation}

no loopback {local | line | isolation}

Syntax Description

local

Places the interface into local loopback mode.

line

Places the interface into external loopback mode at the line level.

isolation

Both local and line loopback.


Defaults

No loopback is configured.

Command Modes

Controller configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.3 MA

This command was introduced as a controller configuration command for the Cisco MC3810.

12.0(5)T and 12.0(7)XR

The command was introduced as an ATM interface configuration command for the Cisco  2600 and Cisco 3600 series.

12.0(5)XE

The command was introduced as an ATM interface configuration command for the Cisco 7200 and Cisco 7500 series.

12.1(1)T

The command was introduced as a controller configuration command for the Cisco 2600 series.

12.2(8)T

The command was introduced as a J1 controller configuration command for the Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series.


Examples

The following example establishes a loopback of the incoming J1 signal on controller j1 3/0:

Router# config terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# controller j1 3/0
Router(config-controller)# loopback line

microcode reload controller (j1)

To reload the firmware and FPGA without reloading the Cisco IOS image, use the microcode reload controller command in privileged EXEC mode.

microcode reload controller j1 slot/port

Syntax Description

j1

J1 controller.

slot/port

Backplane slot number and port number on the interface.


Defaults

No microcode reload activity is initiated.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1(2)XH

This command was introduced.

12.1(3)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.1(3)T.

12.2(8)T

The j1 keyword was added.


Usage Guidelines

Configurations such as loopbacks in the running configuration are restored after this command is entered. If the controller is in a looped state before this command is issued, the looped condition is dropped. You have to re-initiate the loopbacks from the remote end by doing no loop from the controller configuration.

The following example shows the microcode reload activity being initiated:

Router# microcode reload controller j1 3/0
TDM-connections and network traffic will be briefly disrupted.
Proceed with reload microcode?[confirm]
Router#
*Mar  3 209.165.200.225: clk_src_link_up_down: Status of this CLK does not matter

*Mar  3 209.165.200.226: clk_src_link_up_down: Status of this CLK does not matter

*Mar  3 209.165.200.227: %CONTROLLER-5-UPDOWN: Controller J1 3/0, changed state to)
*Mar  3 209.165.200.227: clk_src_link_up_down: Status of this CLK does not matter

*Mar  3 209.165.200.228: clk_src_link_up_down: Status of this CLK does not matter

*Mar  3 209.165.200.229: %CONTROLLER-5-UPDOWN: Controller J1 3/0, changed state top
*Mar  3 209.165.200.229: clk_src_link_up_down: Status of this CLK does not matter

*Mar  3 209.165.200.229: clk_src_link_up_down: Status of this CLK does not matter

show controllers j1

To display statistics about the J1 link use the show controllers j1 command in privileged EXEC mode.

show controllers j1 slot/port

Syntax Description

slot/port

Backplane slot and port number on the interface.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(8)T

The command was introduced on the J1 controller for the Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series.


Examples

The following example is sample output from the show controllers j1 command on the Cisco 3660:

Router# show controllers j1 3/0
J1 3/0 is up.
  Applique type is Channelized J1 - TTC2M
  No alarms detected.
Version info Firmware: 20010530, FPGA: 1
  Framing is J1-TTC2M MF, Line Code is CMI, Clock Source is Line.
  Data in current interval (344 seconds elapsed):
     0 Slip Secs, 0 Fr Loss Secs, 0 Line Err Secs, 0 Degraded Mins
     0 Errored Secs, 0 Bursty Err Secs, 0 Severely Err Secs, 0 Unavail Secs
  Total Data (last 24 hours)
     0 Slip Secs, 0 Fr Loss Secs, 0 Line Err Secs, 0 Degraded Mins,
     0 Errored Secs, 0 Bursty Err Secs, 0 Severely Err Secs, 0 Unavail Secs

Table 3 show controllers j1 Field Descriptions  

Field
Description

j1 3/0 is up.

The J1 controller 3 in slot 0 is operating. The controller's state can be up, down, or administratively down.

Applique type

The applique type is shown and is always channelized.

No alarms detected

Any alarms detected by the controller are displayed here. Possible alarms are as follows:

Transmitter is sending remote alarm.

Transmitter is sending AIS.

Receiver has loss of signal.

Receiver is getting AIS.

Receiver has loss of frame.

Receiver has remote alarm.

Receiver has no alarms.

Version

Indicates date of compilation.

Framing is

Shows the current framing type which is always
J1-TTC2M MF.

Linecode is

Shows the current linecode type which is always CMI.

Clock Source

Shows the current clock source type.

Data in current interval (344 seconds elapsed)

Shows the current accumulation period, which rolls into the 24 hour accumulation every 15 minutes. Accumulation period is from 1 to 900 seconds. The oldest 15-minute period falls off the back of the 24-hour accumulation buffer.

Slip Secs

Indicates the replication or deletion of the payload bits of a DS1 frame. A slip might be performed when there is a difference between the timing of a synchronous receiving terminal and the received signal.

Fr Loss Secs

Indicates the number of seconds an Out of Frame (OOF) error is detected.

Line Err Secs

Line errored seconds (LES) is a second in which one or more line code violation errors are detected.

Degraded Mins

A degraded minute is one in which the estimated error rate exceeds 1E-6 but does not exceed 1E-3.

Errored Secs

An errored second is a second in which one of the following are detected:

One or more path code violations.

One or more out of frame defects.

One or more controlled slip events.

A detected AIS defect.

Bursty Err Secs

A second with fewer than 320 and more than 1 path coding violation error, no severely errored frame defects, and no detected incoming AIS defects. Controlled slips are not included in this parameter.

Severely Err Secs

A severely err sec is a second with one of the following errors: 320 or more path code violation errors; one or more out of frame defects; a detected AIS defect.

Unavail Secs

A count of the total number of seconds where the controller did not get a clock.


Table 1 describes the fields shown in the display.

Glossary

AIS—Alarm Indication Signal. An all-ones signal transmitted in lieu of the normal signal to maintain transmission continuity and to indicate to the receiving terminal that there is a transmission fault that is located either at, or upstream from, the transmitting terminal.

AMI—alternate mark inversion. Line-code type used on T1 and E1 circuits.

CAS—channel associated signaling. The transmission of signaling information within the voice channel. CAS signaling often is referred to as robbed-bit signaling because user bandwidth is being robbed by the network for other purposes.

CCS—common channel signaling. Signaling system used in telephone networks that separates signaling information from user data. A specified channel is exclusively designated to carry signaling information for all other channels in the system.

CMI—coded mark inversion. ITU-T line coding technique specified for STS-3c transmissions.

E&M—recEive and transMit (or ear and mouth). Trunking arrangement generally used for two-way switch-to-switch or switch-to-network connections. Cisco's analog E&M interface is an RJ-48 connector that allows connections to PBX trunk lines (tie lines). E&M is also available on E1 and T1 digital interfaces.

FPGA—field programmable gate array.

J1 framer—A functional block within the VIC FPGA which works in tandem with the LIUs to perform the J1 framing, monitoring and loopback functions.

LIU—line interface unit.

MGCP—Media Gateway Control Protocol. A merging of the IPDC and SGCP protocols.

OOF—Out Of Frame. A designation for a condition defined as either the network or the DTE equipment sensing an error in framing bits.

NM-HDV—High-Density Voice network modules.

SIP—Session Initiation Protocol. Protocol developed by the IETF MMUSIC Working Group as an alternative to H.323. SIP features are compliant with IETF RFC 2543, published in March 1999. SIP equips platforms to signal the setup of voice and multimedia calls over IP networks.

TDM—time division multiplex. Technique in which information from multiple channels can be allocated bandwidth on a single wire based on preassigned time slots. Bandwidth is allocated to each channel regardless of whether the station has data to transmit.

TDMA—time division multiplex access. Type of multiplexing where two or more channels of information are transmitted over the same link by allocating a different time interval ("slot" or "slice") for the transmission of each channel, that is, the channels take turns to use the link. Some kind of periodic synchronizing signal or distinguishing identifier usually is required so that the receiver can tell which channel is which.

VIC—voice interface card. Connects the system to either the PSTN or to a PBX.

VoATM—Voice over ATM. Voice over ATM enables a router to carry voice traffic (for example, telephone calls and faxes) over an ATM network. When sending voice traffic over ATM, the voice traffic is encapsulated using a special AAL5 encapsulation for multiplexed voice.

VoFRVoice over Frame Relay. Voice over Frame Relay enables a router to carry voice traffic (for example, telephone calls and faxes) over a Frame Relay network. When sending voice traffic over Frame Relay, the voice traffic is segmented and encapsulated for transit across the Frame Relay network using FRF.12 encapsulation.

VoIP—Voice over IP. The ability to carry normal telephony-style voice over an IP-based internet with POTS-like functionality, reliability, and voice quality.

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Contacting TAC by Using the Cisco TAC Website

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http://www.cisco.com/tac/caseopen

Contacting TAC by Telephone

If you have a priority level 1(P1) or priority level 2 (P2) problem, contact TAC by telephone and immediately open a case. To obtain a directory of toll-free numbers for your country, go to the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/687/Directory/DirTAC.shtml

P1 and P2 level problems are defined as follows:

P1—Your production network is down, causing a critical impact to business operations if service is not restored quickly. No workaround is available.

P2—Your production network is severely degraded, affecting significant aspects of your business operations. No workaround is available.