Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 Router Installation and Configuration Guide
Chapter 3 - Installing the Router
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Installing the Router

Table Of Contents

Installing the Router

Pre-Installation Considerations and Requirements

Required Tools and Equipment

Unpacking and Positioning the Router

Removing the Front Covers from Cisco 12016 Original Series Routers

Removing the Front Cover from Cisco 12016 Enhanced Series Routers

Rack-Mounting the Router Chassis

Verifying Rack Dimensions

Installing Center-Mount Brackets—Optional

Installing the Chassis Rack-Mounting Platform

Unpack and Position the Router

Installing the Chassis into the Rack

Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connections

Connecting to the Front Grounding Receptacle

Connecting to the Top Rear Receptacle

Attaching the Vertical Cable-Management Trough

Connecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

Connecting GRP Route Processor Cables

Connecting to the GRP Console Port

Connecting to the GRP Auxiliary Port

Connecting to the GRP Ethernet Port

RJ-45 Connection

MII Connection

Connecting PRP Route Processor Cables

Connecting to the PRP Console Port

Connecting to the PRP Auxiliary Port

Connecting to the PRP Ethernet Ports

Connecting an Alarm Card Cable

Connecting Power to the Power Shelf

Connecting Power to the AC-Input Power Shelf

Connecting Power to the DC-Input Power Shelf

Installing the Front Covers of Cisco 12016 Original Series Routers

Installing the Front Cover of Cisco 12010 Enhanced Series Routers


Installing the Router


This chapter contains the procedures to install the router in a rack. The installation is presented in the following sections:

Pre-Installation Considerations and Requirements

Rack-Mounting the Router Chassis

Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connections

Attaching the Vertical Cable-Management Trough

Connecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

Connecting GRP Route Processor Cables

Connecting PRP Route Processor Cables

Connecting an Alarm Card Cable

Connecting Power to the Power Shelf

Installing the Front Covers of Cisco 12016 Original Series Routers

Pre-Installation Considerations and Requirements

Before you perform any procedures in this chapter, review the following sections in Chapter 2, "Preparing for Installation":

Safety Guidelines, page 2-2

Site Requirement Guidelines, page 2-7

In particular, observe the guidelines for preventing electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage described in the Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage, page 2-4 and use Figure 2-1 on page 2-5 as a reference in locating and using the ESD sockets on the front of the router chassis.

A fully equipped router with an optional two-level AC-input power shelf can weigh as much as 440 pounds (200 kg). The router ships on a scissor-jack platform that enables two people to install a fully loaded router into a rack without removing any of the components from the chassis.


Warning This router is not designed to be installed as a shelf-mounted or a free-standing router. The router must be installed in a rack that is secured to the building structure. You must install the router in either a telco-style frame or a four-post equipment rack.


For additional safety and compliance information, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers publication that accompanied your router.

Required Tools and Equipment

Before you begin the rack-mount installation, you must read and understand the information in the "Rack-Mounting Guidelines" section on page 2-7 and have the following tools and equipment:

ESD-preventive wrist strap

Number 1 and number 2 Phillips screwdrivers

1/4-inch (6.35-mm) and 3/16-inch (4.5-mm) flat-blade screwdrivers

Tape measure

Level (optional)

3/8-inch (10-mm) nutdriver (for systems equipped with the DC-input power shelf)

9/16-inch (14-mm) wrench (for chassis hold-down bolts and pallet hold-down bracket bolts)

3/4-inch (19-mm) socket and ratchet wrench

Unpacking and Positioning the Router

Follow the unpacking instructions that came with the router and use a safety hand truck to move the router to the location where it is being installed in a rack.

Save the packaging materials in case the router has to be repackaged to be shipped again.

Removing the Front Covers from Cisco 12016 Original Series Routers

The chassis front covers for the power shelf and upper blower module, upper card cage, lower card cage, and lower blower module are fastened to the chassis by ball studs on the front of the chassis (Figure 3-1).


Note The power shelf and upper blower module front cover is packaged in the accessory kit to permit the foam shipping cap to fit securely on the top of the router, and to protect the router without damaging the front cover.


To remove a cover, grasp the outside edges of the cover and pull it straight out to detach it from the front of the chassis.

Figure 3-1 Router Chassis Front Covers

1

Ball stud

2

Ball stud clip


Removing the Front Cover from Cisco 12016 Enhanced Series Routers

The new cover on the Cisco enhanced series of routers has a two-piece front cover. The covers have release buttons on both sides that give you the flexibility to open it from either the left side or from the right side.

To remove each front cover, grasp the sides of the cover and press both release buttons simultaneously to release the door from the chassis (Figure 3-2).

Figure 3-2 Removing the Front Covers

1

Release buttons


Rack-Mounting the Router Chassis

The router chassis can be installed in either a front-mounted position or a center-mounted position.

In a front-mounted position, the chassis rack-mounting flanges are secured directly to the rack posts.

In a center-mounted position, an optional set of center-mount brackets are secured to the rack posts and the chassis rack-mounting flanges are then secured to the center-mount brackets. The center-mounted position moves the center of gravity of the chassis closer to the vertical axis of the rack posts, which adds to the security and stability of the rack installation.


Warning The chassis should be mounted on a rack that is permanently affixed to the building


Verifying Rack Dimensions

Before you install the chassis, measure the space between the vertical mounting flanges (rails) on your equipment rack to verify that the rack conforms to the measurements shown in Figure 3-3.


Step 1 Mark and measure the distance between two holes on the left and right mounting rails.

The distance should measure 18.31 inches ± 0.06 inches (46.5 cm ± 0.15 cm).


Note Measure for pairs of holes near the bottom, middle and top of the equipment rack to ensure that the rack posts are parallel.


Step 2 Measure the space between the inner edges of the left front and right front mounting flanges on the equipment rack.

The space must be at least 17.7 inches (45 cm) to accommodate the chassis which is 17.25 inches (43.8 cm) wide and fits between the mounting posts on the rack.

Figure 3-3 Verifying Equipment Rack Dimensions

Installing Center-Mount Brackets—Optional

If you plan to install the router in the center-mount position, you must install the center-mount brackets to the rack rails first. If you do not plan to use the optional center-mount brackets, proceed directly to the "Installing the Chassis Rack-Mounting Platform" section.

The optional center-mount bracket installation kit ships in the accessories box included with the router and contains the following:

Two center-mount brackets.

10 (minimum) Phillips binderhead screws (usually provided with the bracket kit) to secure the brackets to the mounting flanges (also called rails) in the rack. Five screws should be installed on each bracket.

Contact a Cisco service representative for assistance if any parts are missing.


Note Make sure you have performed the measurements described in "Verifying Rack Dimensions" section before installing the center-mount brackets.


Use the following procedure to install the center-mount brackets to the rack rails.


Step 1 Determine the location in which you want to position the chassis in the rack, and mark holes at the same height on both the left and right rack rails.

Step 2 Identify the orientation of the left and right center-mount brackets (Figure 3-4).

Figure 3-4 Center-Mount Brackets

Step 3 Install the right center-mount bracket (Figure 3-5).

a. Align the bottom screw hole of the bracket with the marked screw hole at the bottom of the rack and finger tighten a screw in that hole.

b. Finger-tighten a second screw in the top hole of the bracket.

c. Finger-tighten three more screws in the middle of in the bracket.

d. Use a screwdriver to tighten all five screws securely.

Step 4 Repeat Step 3 for the left center-mount bracket.

Step 5 Use a level to verify that the tops of the two brackets are level, or use a measuring tape to verify that both brackets are the same distance from the top of the rack rails.

Figure 3-5 Installing a Center-Mount Rack-Mounting Bracket


Installing the Chassis Rack-Mounting Platform

The rack-mounting platform is installed at the bottom of an empty rack and acts as a permanent support platform for the chassis. It can be installed in either the front-mounted position or the center-mounted position, to match the installed position of the chassis.

The platform is adjustable from a minimum height of 5.25 inches (13.34 cm) to a maximum height of 8.00 inches (20.32 cm). For telco-style racks, the bottom edge of the platform can be raised to approximately 6.00 inches (15.24 cm) to clear the cross-members at the bottom of the rack.


Warning The chassis should be mounted on a rack that is permanently affixed to the building


Use the following procedure to install the rack-mounting platform.


Step 1 Remove the platform from the accessory box.

Step 2 Adjust the height of the platform to match the required rack-mounting height for the chassis:

a. Turn each of the adjustable feet to approximately the required platform height (Figure 3-6).

b. Place the platform in the rack making sure that it clears any rack cross-members.

c. Use a level to be sure the platform is level from side to side and front to back.

d. Adjust the feet until the platform clears any obstacles and is level at the required platform height.

Step 3 Determine whether the platform is to be installed in the front-mounted position or in the center-mounted position, and adjust the positioning brackets on the platform:

a. Locate the hole on the side of the platform that corresponds with the front-mounted or center-mounted position of the table.

b. Align the side of the bracket with the round hole over the hole on the side of the platform, insert a screw, and use your fingers to loosely tighten it (see blow-out in Figure 3-6).

Repeat these steps to attach a bracket in the same position on the other side of the platform.

Step 4 Align the platform between the rack posts and set it in position so that the sides of the positioning brackets with the oblong holes are flush against the rack-mounting flanges.

Step 5 Secure the platform to the rack:

a. Locate an open screw hole through the oblong hole in the bracket, then insert a screw and use your fingers to loosely tighten it (see blow-out in Figure 3-6).

b. Repeat step a. for the other side of the platform.

c. Verify that the platform is level and seated squarely against the rack, then tighten all four screws.

Figure 3-6 The Chassis Rack-Mounting Platform


Unpack and Position the Router

Unpack the router following the instructions in the Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 Router Unpacking Instructions that came with the router. Use a safety hand truck to move the router to the location where it is being installed and position it in front of the rack so that the back panel of the chassis faces the rack opening (Figure 3-7).

Figure 3-7 Positioning the Router for Insertion into the Rack

Installing the Chassis into the Rack

Use the following procedure to install the chassis in the rack.


Step 1 Rotate the scissor-jack screw counterclockwise slowly and expand the scissor-jack platform to raise the chassis to the required installation height (Figure 3-8).


Warning A second person should be holding the chassis to prevent it from tipping while the platform is raised.


Figure 3-8 Raising the Chassis to the Installation Height

Step 2 Remove the four bolts and chassis anchor clips that secure the base of the chassis to the scissor-jack platform (Figure 3-9).

Figure 3-9 Removing the Chassis Anchor Clips

Step 3 Grasp the handle on the back panel of the chassis to carefully pull the chassis off of the scissor-jack platform and onto the rack-mounting platform while a second person pushes from the front of the chassis. (See Figure 3-10.)

Figure 3-10 Inserting the Router into the Rack


Warning Do not attempt to lift the chassis with the handles on the back and sides of the chassis. These handles are not designed to support the weight of the chassis, and should be used only to steady and guide the chassis while it is being inserted into or removed from an equipment rack. To reduce the risk of damage to the chassis and serious bodily injury, do not use these handles to lift or support the chassis.


Step 4 Insert the chassis into the rack until the chassis rack-mounting flanges are flush against the mounting flanges on the rack (or the optional center-mount brackets, if installed).

The weight of the chassis is now supported by the rack-mounting platform. Remove the scissor-jack platform and set it safely aside.


Note Save and reassemble all parts of the shipping package in case it becomes necessary to transport the router to another location or return it to Cisco. Do not discard or destroy any of the shipping materials.


Step 5 Secure the chassis to the rack beginning (Figure 3-11):

a. Identify one of the holes in group A that aligns with a mounting hole on the mounting flanges of the rack.

b. Hold the chassis in position against the mounting flanges on the rack and have a second person insert and loosely tighten one of the mounting screws provided.

c. Repeat step b. for the mounting hole on the other side of the chassis.

Step 6 Repeat Step 5 for each group of chassis mounting holes (groups b through e).

Step 7 Tighten all mounting screws (five on each side of the chassis) securely.

Figure 3-11 Chassis Rack-Mounting Hole Groups


Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connections

Before you connect power to the router, or power on the router for the first time, we recommend that you connect the central office ground system or new equipment building system (NEBS) to the supplemental bonding and grounding points on the router. For more information on supplemental bonding and grounding cable requirements, see the "Router Bonding and Grounding Receptacles—Top Rear" section on page 2-23.

There are two earth ground receptacles that you can use to connect a supplemental grounding cable to the chassis; one is on the front of the chassis behind the air filter door, and the other is located at the top rear of the chassis.

Use one of the following procedures to connect a grounding cable lug to the chassis:

Connecting to the Front Grounding Receptacle

Connecting to the Top Rear Receptacle

Connecting to the Front Grounding Receptacle

Use the following procedure to connect the supplemental grounding cable to front grounding receptacle.


Step 1 Loosen the two captive screws on each side of the air filter door and pivot the door open (Figure 3-12).

Figure 3-12 Opening the Air Filter Door

Step 2 Attach the grounding cable to the chassis (Figure 3-13):

a. Insert two M6 bolts through the grounding holes in the chassis.

b. Place the cable lug over the bolts and secure with the locking washers and nuts.

Figure 3-13 Router Front Bonding and Grounding Receptacles

Step 3 Prepare the other end of the grounding wire and connect it to the appropriate grounding point at your site to ensure an adequate earth ground.


Connecting to the Top Rear Receptacle

Use the following procedure to connect the supplemental grounding cable to top rear grounding receptacle.


Step 1 Attach the grounding cable to the chassis (Figure 3-14):

a. Insert two M6 bolts through the grounding holes in the chassis.

b. Place the cable lug over the bolts and secure with the locking washers and nuts.

Figure 3-14 Router Top Bonding and Grounding Receptacles

Step 2 Prepare the other end of the grounding wire and connect it to the appropriate grounding point at your site to ensure an adequate earth ground.


Attaching the Vertical Cable-Management Trough

Refer to Figure 3-15 and use the following procedure to attach the vertical cable-management trough.


Step 1 Position the trough so that the access gate opens toward the front of the chassis.

Step 2 Align the top screw holes on the inside panel of the trough with the chassis standoffs.

Step 3 Hand tighten two screws into the holes to hold the trough in place.

Step 4 Repeat Step 2 and Step 3 for the middle two standoffs and the bottom two standoffs.

Step 5 Tighten all six screws with a Phillips screwdriver to secure the trough to the chassis.


Figure 3-15 Attaching the Vertical Cable-Management Troughs

Connecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

This section describes how to route the network interface cables through the
router cable-management system and attach the network interface cables to the line card ports.

This procedure uses an 8-port fiber-optic Fast Ethernet card as an example to describe how to attach a network interface cable to a line card port and route the cable through the cable-management system. Depending on which line cards are installed in your system, your cable connection procedure might differ slightly from this example. For cable connection information for your specific line card, refer to the installation and configuration note for that line card.


Note You can access the most current Cisco line card documentation on the World Wide Web at: http://www.cisco.com.


Use the following procedure as an example to route the network interface cables through the cable-management system and connect them to the line card.


Step 1 Route an interface cable across the horizontal cable-management tray, through the cable tray opening to connect it to the line card:

For legacy fiber-optic line cards, go to Step 2.

For current fiber-optic line cards, go to Step 6.

Step 2 Install a plastic bend-radius clip on the strain-relief ferrule on the connector (see blow-out in Figure 3-16).


Note The bag of bend-radius clips (Part Number 800-06119-01) in the accessories box that shipped with your router contains two sizes of bend-radius clips. The clip size is determined by the diameter of the strain-relief ferrule on the cable connectors. Use the size that provides the most secure fit on the strain-relief ferrule on the cable connectors in use at your site.


Step 3 Insert the cable connector into its assigned port.

Step 4 Route the cable up the cable-management bracket and carefully press the cable into the channel so it is held in place by the cable clips (Figure 3-16b).

Step 5 Repeat Steps 3 through 5 for each additional cable connection to that line card.

Figure 3-16 Connecting a Network Interface Cable to a Legacy Line Card

Step 6 Insert all cables into their assigned ports.

Step 7 Place several evenly spaced velcro straps through slots on the cable-management bracket (Figure 3-17a).

Step 8 Route the cables alongside the cable-management bracket and secure them with the velcro straps as appropriate (Figure 3-17b).


Caution Make sure the interface cables do not have any kinks or sharp bends which can destroy or degrade the ability of the optical fiber to propagate the signal-encoded beam of light accurately from one end of the cable to the other. Always allow adequate strain relief in the interface cable.

Figure 3-17 Current Style Cable Management Bracket


Connecting GRP Route Processor Cables

This section describes how to connect cables to the console, auxiliary, and Ethernet ports on the GRP. The console and auxiliary ports are both asynchronous serial ports; any devices connected to these ports must be capable of asynchronous transmission. For example, most modems are asynchronous devices.

Figure 3-18 shows an example of a data terminal and modem connections.

Figure 3-18 GRP Console and Auxiliary Port Connections


Caution The ports labeled Ethernet, 10BASE-T, Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits.


Note RP cables are not available from Cisco, but are available from any commercial cable vendor.



Note To comply with Telcordia GR-1089 NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, connect all console, auxiliary, and Ethernet interfaces only to intrabuilding or nonexposed wiring or cabling. The intrabuilding cable must be shielded and the shield must be grounded at both ends.


Connecting to the GRP Console Port

The system console port on the GRP is an EIA/TIA-232 DCE DB-25 receptacle for connecting a data terminal to perform the initial configuration of the router. The console port requires a straight-through RJ-45 cable.

See "GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections" section on page 2-26 for additional information about the GRP console port.

Use the following procedure to connect a data terminal to the GRP console port.


Step 1 Set your terminal to these operational values: 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (9600 8N2).

Step 2 Power off the data terminal.

Step 3 Attach the terminal end of the cable to the interface port on the data terminal.

Step 4 Attach the other end of the cable to the GRP console port.

Step 5 Power on the data terminal.


Connecting to the GRP Auxiliary Port

The auxiliary port on the GRP is an EIA/TIA-232 DTE DB-25 plug for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU) or another router) to this router.

See the "GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections" section on page 2-26 for more information.

Use the following procedure to connect an asynchronous serial device to the GRP auxiliary port.


Step 1 Power off the asynchronous serial device.

Step 2 Attach the device end of the cable to the interface port on the asynchronous serial device.

Step 3 Attach the other end of the cable to the GRP auxiliary port.

Step 4 Power on the asynchronous serial device.


Connecting to the GRP Ethernet Port

The Ethernet port on the GRP supports two types of Ethernet ports as shown in (Figure 3-19):

A media-independent interface (MII), 40-pin, D-type receptacle.

A media-dependent interface (MDI) RJ-45 receptacle.

The RJ-45 and MII receptacles on the GRP represent two physical connection options for only one Ethernet interface; therefore, you can use either the RJ-45 connection or the MII connection, but not both simultaneously.


Caution The GRP can support only one Ethernet connection at a time. To prevent router and network problems, do not connect both RJ-45 and MII cables to the Ethernet receptacles at the same time, and use cables that comply with EIA/TIA-568 standards.

LEDs on the front panel indicate which Ethernet receptacle is active when the GRP is operating.

See "GRP Ethernet Port Connections" section on page 2-29 for additional information about GRP Ethernet ports.


Caution Ethernet ports are primarily used as a Telnet port into the Cisco 12000 series router, and for booting or accessing Cisco IOS software images over a network to which an Ethernet port is directly connected. Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions are switched off by default for security reasons. We strongly caution you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on these ports.

Figure 3-19 GRP RJ-45 and MII Ethernet Connections

RJ-45 Connection

Use the following procedure to connect an Ethernet cable to the RJ-45 receptacle.


Step 1 Plug the cable directly into the RJ-45 receptacle.

Step 2 Connect the network end of your RJ-45 cable to your transceiver, switch, hub, repeater, DTE, or other external equipment.


Note The Ethernet interfaces on the GRP are endstation devices only, not repeaters.



MII Connection

The MII receptacle requires an external transceiver that permits connection to multimode fiber for 100BASE-FX or 100BASE-T4 physical media. Depending on the type of media you use between the MII receptacle and your switch or hub, the network side of your 100-Mbps transceiver should be appropriately equipped with ST-type connectors (for fiber-optic cables), BNC connectors, and so forth.

Use the following procedure to connect a cable to the MII Ethernet receptacle on the GRP.


Step 1 Connect the cable directly to the MII receptacle, or attach a 100BASE-T transceiver (with the media appropriate to your application) to the MII receptacle.

Step 2 Connect the network end of your MII cable to your transceiver, switch, hub, repeater, DTE, or other external equipment.


Note The Ethernet interfaces on the GRP are endstation devices only, not repeaters.



Connecting PRP Route Processor Cables

This section describes how to connect cables to the console, auxiliary, and Ethernet ports on the PRP. The console and auxiliary ports are both asynchronous serial ports; any devices connected to these ports must be capable of asynchronous transmission. For example, most modems are asynchronous devices.

Figure 3-20 shows an example of a data terminal and modem connections.

Figure 3-20 PRP Console and Auxiliary Port Connections

1

Modem

4

Auxiliary port

2

Console terminal

5

Console port

3

RJ-45 Ethernet cables

 



Caution The ports labeled Ethernet, 10BASE-T, Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits.


Note RP cables are not available from Cisco, but are available from any commercial cable vendor.



Note To comply with Telcordia GR-1089 NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, connect all console, auxiliary, Ethernet, and BITS (PRP2) interfaces only to intrabuilding or nonexposed wiring or cabling. The intrabuilding cable must be shielded and the shield must be grounded at both ends.


Connecting to the PRP Console Port

The system console port on the PRP is a DCE RJ-45 receptacle for connecting a data terminal to perform the initial configuration of the router. The console port requires an RJ-45 rollover cable.

See the "PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connection Guidelines" section on page 2-36 for additional information about the console port.

Refer to Figure 3-20 and use the following procedure to connect a data terminal to the PRP console port.


Step 1 Set your terminal to these operational values: 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (9600 8N2).

Step 2 Power off the data terminal.

Step 3 Attach the terminal end of the cable to the interface port on the data terminal.

Step 4 Attach the other end of the cable to the GRP console port.

Step 5 Power on the data terminal.


Connecting to the PRP Auxiliary Port

The auxiliary port on the PRP is a DTE, RJ-45 receptacle for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the router. The asynchronous auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and modem control.

See the "PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connection Guidelines" section on page 2-36 for additional information about the auxiliary port.

Refer to Figure 3-20 and use the following procedure to connect an asynchronous serial device to the PRP auxiliary port.


Step 1 Power off the asynchronous serial device.

Step 2 Attach the device end of the cable to the interface port on the asynchronous serial device.

Step 3 Attach the other end of the cable to the PRP auxiliary port.

Step 4 Power on the asynchronous serial device.


Connecting to the PRP Ethernet Ports

Two RJ-45 Ethernet interface receptacles on the PRP provide media-dependent interface (MDI) Ethernet ports. These connections support IEEE 802.3 and IEEE 802.3u interfaces compliant with 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX standards. The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is autosensing by default and is user-configurable.

The RJ-45 receptacles on the PRP provide two physical connection options for Ethernet interfaces. To connect cables to the PRP Ethernet interfaces (ports labeled ETH0 and ETH1), attach the Category 5 UTP cable directly to a RJ-45 receptacle on the PRP.

See the "PRP Ethernet Connections" section on page 2-40 for additional information.


Note RJ-45 cables are not available from Cisco Systems; they are available from outside commercial cable vendors. Use cables that comply with EIA/TIA-568 standards.



Caution Ethernet ports are primarily used as a Telnet port into the Cisco 12000 series router, and for booting or accessing Cisco IOS software images over a network to which an Ethernet port is directly connected. Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions are switched off by default for security reasons. We strongly caution you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on these ports.

Use the following procedure to connect an Ethernet cable to the PRP RJ-45 Ethernet receptacle.


Step 1 Plug the cable directly into the RJ-45 receptacle.

Step 2 Connect the network end of your RJ-45 cable to a switch, hub, repeater, DTE, or other external equipment.


Note The Ethernet interfaces on the PRP are endstation devices only, not repeaters.



Connecting an Alarm Card Cable

Each router alarm card has one 25-pin Dsub connector, labeled Alarm (Figure 3-21).

Figure 3-21 Alarm Card Cable Connection

Alarm subconnectors can be used to connect the router to an external site alarm maintenance system. Any critical, major, and minor alarms generated by the router also energize alarm relays on the alarm card and activate the external site alarm. The alarm relay contacts on the alarm card consist of standard common, normally open, and normally closed relay contacts that are wired to the alarm connector pins.

Table 2-13 lists the pin-to-signal correspondence between the connector pins and the alarm card relay contacts. Because alarm contact cables are entirely dependent on installation site circumstances, alarm connector cables are not available from Cisco. For information about alarm connector wiring requirements and the pinouts for the alarm connector interface, see the "Alarm Card Connection Guidelines" section on page 2-45.


Caution Only safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits can be connected to the alarm connector. Maximum rating for the alarm circuit is 2 A, 50 VA.


Note To comply with Telcordia GR-1089 NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, you must use a shielded cable when connecting to the external alarm ports on the alarm card. The shielded cable is terminated by shielded connectors on both ends, with the cable shield material tied to both connectors.


Connecting Power to the Power Shelf

Use the one of the following procedures to connect power to your router.

Connecting Power to the AC-Input Power Shelf

Connecting Power to the DC-Input Power Shelf


Caution A router must be operated with all its power modules installed at all times for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC).

Connecting Power to the AC-Input Power Shelf

Use the following procedure to connect the AC power cords to the power shelf.


Note Connect each AC power supply to a dedicated power source (branch circuit). Each AC-input power supply operates between 200 and 240 VAC and requires at least a 20 A service for North American use, or a 13 A service for international use. For more information on AC power cords, see the "Power Connection Guidelines" section on page 2-17.



Step 1 Connect each AC power cord to the back panel of the power shelf and secure them in place with their retention clips (Figure 3-22).

Figure 3-22 Connecting AC Power Cords

Step 2 Plug each power supply cable into its AC outlet.


Connecting Power to the DC-Input Power Shelf

This section contains the procedures to connect the DC source power cables to a DC-powered router.

The color coding of source DC power cable leads depends on the color coding of the site DC power source.

Because there is no color code standard for source DC wiring, you must be sure that power source cables are connected to the power shelf with the proper positive (+) and negative (-) polarity:

In some cases, the source DC cable leads might have a positive (+) or a negative (-) label. This is a relatively safe indication of the polarity, but you must verify the polarity by measuring the voltage between the DC cable leads. Be sure that the positive (+) and negative (-) cable leads match the positive (+) and negative (-) labels on the power shelf when making the measurement.

A green (or green and yellow) cable typically indicate that it is a ground cable.


Caution DC PEMs contain circuitry to trip the breaker on the PEM if the PEM detects a reverse polarity condition. No damage should occur from reverse polarity, but you should correct a reverse polarity condition immediately.


Note The length of the cables depends on the location of your router in relation to the source of DC power. These cables and the cable lugs used to attach the cables to the router chassis are not available from Cisco Systems. They are available from any commercial cable vendor. For more information on site power and source DC cable requirements, see the "Power Connection Guidelines" section on page 2-17.



Warning To ensure that power remains off while you are performing this procedure, tape the DC circuit breaker switch in the off (0) position.


Use the following procedure to connect DC power cables to the power shelf.


Step 1 Remove the cover over the cable terminal studs on the back panel of the power shelf (Figure 3-23):

a. Loosen (but do not remove) the screw that secures the cover.

b. Slide the cover down then pull the cover over the screw head and away from the PEM shelf.

Figure 3-23 DC-Input Terminal Connections on the DC-Input Power Shelf

Step 2 Connect the ground and each pair of power cables to the DC-input terminal studs as follows (Figure 3-24):


Warning When reconnecting source DC power cables, always connect the ground cable first.


a. Connect the ground cable to the ground terminal studs.

Beginning with terminal studs B2:

b. Connect the positive cable to the positive (+) terminal studs. For example: B2+.

c. Connect the negative cable to the negative (-) terminal studs. For example: B2-.

Repeat steps b and c for the remaining pairs of terminal studs.

Figure 3-24 Reconnecting the Source DC Power Cables to the Power Shelf

Step 3 Reinstall the power cable cover (Figure 3-25).

Figure 3-25 Reinstalling the Source DC Power Cable Cover

Installing the Front Covers of Cisco 12016 Original Series Routers

The chassis front covers for the power shelf and upper blower module, upper card cage, lower card cage, and lower blower module are fastened to the chassis by ball studs on the front of the chassis (Figure 3-26).


Note The front cover for power shelf and upper blower module is packaged in the accessory kit to permit the foam shipping cap to fit securely on the top of the router and protect the router without damaging the front cover.



Step 1 Hold the front cover by its outside edges and align the ball studs with the ball stud clips on the front of the chassis.

Step 2 Push the front cover into the ball stud clips and the front cover is flush with the front of the chassis.

Step 3 Repeat Step 1 and Step 2 for the remaining front covers.

Figure 3-26 Router Chassis Front Covers

1

Ball stud

2

Ball stud clip



Installing the Front Cover of Cisco 12010 Enhanced Series Routers

Refer to Figure 3-27 and use the following procedure to install the front cover for the Cisco 12010 enhanced series routers.


Step 1 Align the hinges on each side of the cover with the hinge connectors on each side of the chassis (see blowout in Figure 3-27).

Step 2 Push the front cover until the hinges snap into place.

Step 3 Repeat Step 1 and Step 2 for the remaining front cover.


Figure 3-27 Attaching the Front Covers

1

Release buttons


This completes the hardware installation procedures for Cisco 12016, Cisco 12416, and Cisco 12816 routers. Proceed to the next chapter to perform the initial router startup and basic configuration.