Cisco 12012 Installation and Configuration Guide
Installing a Cisco 12012
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Installing a Cisco 12012

Table Of Contents

Installing a Cisco 12012

Installing the Brace Bar

Removing the Cisco 12012 Components before Installing the Frame

Removing the Blower Modules

Removing Cards from the Card Cage Assembly

Removing the Cards from the Upper Card Cage

Removing the Cards from the Lower Card Cage

Removing a DC-Input Power Supply

Removing an AC-Input Power Supply

Removing the Card Cage Assembly

Rack-Mounting the Frame

Reinstalling the Cisco 12012 Components after Installing the Frame

Reinstalling the Card Cage Assembly

Reinstalling the Blower Modules

Reinstalling the Cards in the Upper Card Cage

Reinstalling the Cards in the Lower Card Cage

Connecting Line Card Cables

Connecting Route Processor Cables

GRP Console and Auxiliary Port Connection Equipment

GRP Console Port Signals

GRP Auxiliary Port Signals

GRP Ethernet Connection Equipment

PRP Console and Auxiliary Port Connection Guidelines

PRP Console Port Signals

PRP Auxiliary Port Signals

PRP Ethernet Connection Equipment

PRP Ethernet Connections

Connecting Alarm Card Cables

Connecting System Grounding

Connecting Power

Reinstalling an AC-Input Power Supply

Reinstalling a DC-Input Power Supply


Installing a Cisco 12012


This chapter provides the procedures for installing the Cisco 12012 and contains the following sections:

Installing the Brace Bar

Removing the Cisco 12012 Components before Installing the Frame

Rack-Mounting the Frame

Reinstalling the Cisco 12012 Components after Installing the Frame

Connecting Line Card Cables

Connecting Route Processor Cables

Connecting Alarm Card Cables

Connecting Power


Note   You must install the Cisco 12012 in a rack; either a telco-style or a four-post unit. The Cisco 12012 is not designed to be installed as a shelf-mounted or a free-standing system.


Before you install your Cisco 12012, your installation site should already be prepared. Ensure that you have planned a compatible location for the Cisco 12012 and that you have considered the following:

The location does not block the cooling air intake (front of the system) and exhaust vents (rear of system). There must be at least 6 inches (15.8 cm) of clearance in the rack for the air intake and exhaust vents.

The location is a temperature-controlled, air-conditioned, dust-free area.

You have checked the power cables and power supplies for compatibility with your power service; check the labels on the equipment and ensure that the power service at your site is suitable for the Cisco 12012.

The proper source voltage (AC or DC) receptacles have been provided.

Maintain at least 24 inches (61 cm) of clearance in front of the frame for working with line cards, blower modules, power supplies, or attaching network interface cables or equipment.


Warning   

The Cisco 12012 must be installed in a rack that is secured to the building structure.



Caution   
To prevent system problems, do not mix power supply input types in the Cisco 12012 router. All power supplies installed in a router must be either AC-input or DC-input.

The Cisco 12012, fully configured, can weigh 380 lb (172.3 kg). The system installation process is structured to reduce the weight of the system by removing components from the card cage assembly and the frame, then installing the empty frame in the rack, and finally, reinstalling all of the components in the card cage assembly and the frame.

To make the installation process easier, reduce the weight of the system. The installation procedure requires you to remove all of the components from the card cage assembly and the frame, then install the empty frame in the rack, and finally reinstall all of the components in the card cage assembly and the frame.

Installing the Brace Bar

An optional brace bar is shipped with every Cisco 12012 as part of the accessory kit. You install the brace bar across the front of the rack to support the frame while you secure the frame is in the rack.


Caution   
The brace bar can only support the weight of an empty frame. It is not designed to support the full weight of the Cisco 12012.

This is an optional procedure; you can install the Cisco 12012 in the rack without a brace bar. If you choose not to use the brace bar, proceed to the next section "Removing the Cisco 12012 Components before Installing the Frame."

Perform the following steps to install the brace bar (see Figure 3-1):


Step 1 Determine the proper height to install the brace bar in the rack. We recommend that you install the brace bar not more than 12 inches (30.5 cm) above the floor to maintain a low center of gravity for the system.

Step 2 Position the brace bar between the front posts of a four-post rack or telco-style rack; make sure that the bar is level.

Step 3 Secure the brace bar to the rack using the two screws provided in the accessory kit.

Figure 3-1 Installing the Brace Bar

Removing the Cisco 12012 Components before Installing the Frame

To make the frame installation process easier, reduce the total weight of the system. The installation process requires you to remove all of the components from the card cage assembly and the frame, then install the empty frame in the rack, and finally reinstall all of the components in the card cage assembly and the frame.

Before you can remove the Cisco 12012 components, you must position the Cisco 12012, mounted on its shipping pallet (with the shipping container disassembled), as close to the installation site as possible.

A Cisco 12012 system configured for either source AC or source DC power is shipped with power supplies installed in the power supply bay. Redundant AC-input power supplies (third and fourth power supplies) are shipped in a large cardboard box on the front of the pallet.

Procedures in the following sections provide the steps for removing the Cisco 12012 components:

Removing the Blower Modules

Removing Cards from the Card Cage Assembly

Removing the Blower Modules

The Cisco 12012 has two blower modules, which provide cooling air to the card cage assembly. The blower modules slide on rails into and out of the top and bottom of the frame and attach to the frame with two captive screws each. A snap-on blower-module front cover is mounted over the faceplate of each blower module.

Perform the following steps to remove a blower module:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Grasp both edges of the blower module front cover and pull it straight out to detach the front cover from the blower module faceplate. (See .) Set the front cover aside.

Figure 3-2 Removing the Blower Module Front Cover

Step 3 Loosen the two captive screws on the blower module faceplate. (See .)

Figure 3-3 Removing the Blower Module


Caution   
The blower module weighs 22 lb (10 kg). Use two hands when handling a blower module.

Step 4 Grasp the blower module handle and pull it straight out to disconnect the blower module from the connector at the back of the frame. Slide the blower module halfway out of the frame.

Step 5 Place your free hand underneath the blower module for support and slide the blower module completely out of the frame. Set the blower module aside.

Repeat Step 2 through Step 5 for the second blower module.

Removing Cards from the Card Cage Assembly

Before you can remove the card cage assembly, you must remove the cards installed in it. This section contains procedures for removing cards from the upper and lower card cages. The card cage assembly is a single assembly that includes the upper card cage, the lower card cage, and the power supply bay. (See .) The card cage assembly slides on rails into and out of the front of the frame and attaches to the frame with six captive screws.

Figure 3-4 Cisco 12012 Card Cage Assembly

Removing the Cards from the Upper Card Cage

The upper card cage has 12 user-configurable slots (numbered 0 through 11, from left to right) that can support a combination of line cards and an RP. The upper card cage also has a non-configurable slot (rightmost slot, labeled Alarm card) for an alarm card.

To reduce the weight of the card cage assembly, you need to remove the cards from slots 0 through 11.


Note   You do not need to remove any card blanks or the alarm card from the upper card cage.



Note   Each line card has a vertical cable-management bracket attached to it that manages the distribution and routing of the network interface cables from the line card to the external network. Leave the vertical cable-management bracket attached to the line card when you remove the line cards. The RP and alarm card do not have vertical cable-management brackets.


Perform the following steps to remove a card from the upper card cage:


Step 1 Attach an ESD wrist strap to your wrist and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Proceeding from left to right, identify each card and note its slot number on a piece of paper. (This step will make reinstallation easier and will ensure that you reinstall cards in their proper slots.)


Note   Line cards and an RP are installed in slots 0 through 11 in the upper card cage.


Step 3 Starting from slot 0 (left side of the upper card cage), select a card and loosen the two captive screws located at the top and bottom of the card. (See a.)

Step 4 Pivot the two card ejector levers out, away from the card to unseat the card from the backplane connector. (See b.)

Step 5 Grasp the card carrier edge with one hand and place your other hand under the carrier to support it. (See c.) Slide the card out of the slot and place it immediately on the antistatic mat.

Figure 3-5 Removing a Card from the Upper Card Cage (GRP Shown)

Repeat Step 3 through Step 5 for the rest of the cards in the upper card cage.

Removing the Cards from the Lower Card Cage

The lower card cage is located below the upper card cage, behind the air filter tray on the front of the card cage assembly. Mounted in the lower card cage is an air deflector, which directs airflow in the card cage assembly. The lower card cage has five keyed, color-coded, horizontal card slots for the clock and scheduler cards and switch fabric cards.

Clock and scheduler cards (light blue) are installed in the upper two card slots (slot 0 and slot 1); switch fabric cards (magenta) are installed in the lower three slots (slot 2, slot 3, and slot 4). When you want to remove or install either type of card, you must first open the air filter tray and pivot the air deflector up, out of the way to gain access to the lower card cage.

Perform the following steps to access the lower card cage and remove the clock and scheduler cards and switch fabric cards:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 To gain access to the lower card cage, loosen the two captive screws at the top of the air filter tray and pivot the tray down, away from the lower card cage. (See .)

Figure 3-6 Opening the Air Filter Tray


Caution   
To prevent damage, do not place any tools on the air filter tray or inside the lower card cage. Damaging the honeycomb screen on the air filter tray or in the lower card cage could restrict the air flow causing an overtemperature condition in the Cisco 12012.

Step 3 To access the cards in the lower card cage, you must first move the air deflector up, out of the way. Lift the air deflector up and secure it to the top of the lower card cage by turning the air deflector latch knob counterclockwise. (See .)

Figure 3-7 Latching the Lower Card Cage Air Deflector

Step 4 Select one of the cards in the lower card cage. Grasp the two card ejector levers and simultaneously pivot both ejector levers 90 degrees away from the sides of the card cage to unseat the card from the backplane connector. (See .)

Figure 3-8 Removing Cards from the Lower Card Cage

Step 5 Touching only the metal card carrier, slide the card out of the slot and place it immediately on an antistatic mat.

Repeat Step 4 and Step 5 for the rest of the cards in the lower card cage, then proceed to Step 6.

Step 6 Release the air deflector latch (turn the latch clockwise) and lower the air deflector down to its stops.

Step 7 Pivot the air filter tray up so that it is flush with the front of the lower card cage and tighten the two captive screws.

Removing a DC-Input Power Supply

If you ordered a Cisco 12012 configured for source DC power, the system is shipped with one or two DC-input power supplies installed in the power supply bays.

Perform the following steps to remove a DC-input power supply from the power supply bay:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Turn the power supply power switch to OFF (O).


Note   Turning the power supply switch to OFF (O) releases a latch that secures the power supply in the power supply bay.


Step 3 Using a flat-blade screwdriver or 10-mm nutdriver, turn the jackscrew on the power supply faceplate counterclockwise (eject) to unseat the power supply from the backplane connector.

Step 4 Grasp the power supply handle and pull the power supply halfway out of the bay. (See .)

Figure 3-9 Removing a DC-Input Power Supply


Caution   
The DC-input power supply weighs 19 lb (8.3 kg). Use two hands when handling the power supply.

Step 5 Place your free hand underneath the power supply to support it, and slide the power supply completely out of the bay. Set the power supply aside.

Repeat Step 2 through Step 5 for a second DC-input power supply.


Note   If your system is configured with only one DC-input power supply, two power supply blanks are installed in the empty power supply bays. You do not need to remove the power supply blanks.


Removing an AC-Input Power Supply

If you ordered a Cisco 12012 configured for source AC power, the system is shipped with two AC-input power supplies installed in the power supply bay. Systems configured with redundant AC-input power supplies have two power supplies shipped installed in the power supply bay and one or two redundant power supplies shipped in a large cardboard box on the front of the pallet.

Perform the following steps to remove an AC-input power supply from the power supply bay:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Turn the power supply power switch to the STANDBY position.


Note   Turning the power supply switch to the STANDBY position releases a latch that secures the power supply in the power supply bay.


Step 3 Loosen the captive screw on the power supply faceplate.


Caution   
The AC-input power supply weighs 18 lb (8 kg). Use two hands when handling the power supply.

Step 4 Grasp the power supply handle and pull straight out to disconnect the power supply from the backplane connector. Slide the power supply halfway out of the bay.

Step 5 Place your free hand underneath the power supply for support and slide the power supply completely out of the bay. Set the power supply aside.

Repeat Step 2 through Step 5 for the second AC-input power supply.

Removing the Card Cage Assembly

Perform the following steps to remove the card cage assembly (see ).


Caution   
An empty card cage assembly weighs 65 lb (29.5 kg). You need two people to safely lift the assembly. To prevent injury, keep your back straight and lift with your legs, not your back.


Step 1 Loosen the six captive screws on the front edges of the card cage assembly that secure it to the frame. (See .)

Step 2 With one person positioned on each side of the frame, grasp the handle at the top of each side of the card cage assembly and carefully slide the card cage assembly half way out the front of the frame.


Note   All electrical connections between the card cage assembly and the blower module harnesses in the frame are disconnected automatically when the card cage assembly is removed from the frame.


Step 3 With your free hand, grasp the handhold cutout on each side of the card cage assembly and carefully slide the card cage assembly completely out the front of the frame. Set the card cage assembly aside.

Figure 3-10 Removing the Card Cage Assembly from the Frame

Rack-Mounting the Frame

This section provides the procedure for installing the Cisco 12012 frame in a rack. Each side of the frame has mounting holes to secure the frame to the rack. For ease of installation, the holes on each side of the frame are divided into four groups: group A, B, C, and D. (See .)

Figure 3-11 Frame Mounting Hole Groups

The mounting holes are drilled in the frame so that one mounting hole in each group aligns with a mounting hole in the rack. By using the corresponding mounting hole (in the same group) on the opposite side of the frame, you can level the frame in the rack.


Caution   
An empty frame weighs 75 pounds (34 kg). You need two people to safely lift the frame. To prevent injury, keep your back straight and lift with your legs, not your back.

Perform the following steps to remove the frame from the shipping pallet and install it in a rack:


Step 1 Remove the four bolts and retainer clips that secure the base of the frame to the pallet.

Step 2 With one person positioned on each side of the frame, grasp the front and side of the frame, lift the frame off of the pallet, and position the frame in the rack. (See .)

Step 3 If you installed the optional brace bar, rest the frame on the brace bar while you perform the next step. If you did not install the optional brace bar, two people are needed to support the weight of the frame while a third person performs the next step.


Note   If you want to install the brace bat at this time, refer to the section "Installing the Brace Bar," earlier in this chapter; then continue with Step 3 above.


Figure 3-12 Installing the Frame in the Rack

Step 4 Look at the bottom group of mounting holes (group A) on the frame. (See .) Align one of the holes in group A with a mounting hole in the rack.

Step 5 Install one of the mounting screws provided.

Step 6 Go to the other side of the frame and adjust the position of the frame so that the same mounting hole in the bottom group of mounting holes (group A) is aligned with a hole in the rack.

Step 7 Install one of the mounting screws provided.

Repeat Step 4 through Step 7 for mounting hole groups B, C, and D.

Reinstalling the Cisco 12012 Components after Installing the Frame

After you rack-mount the frame, you must reinstall all Cisco 12012 components. This section contains the procedures for reinstalling the card cage assembly, the line cards, the RP, the clock and scheduler cards, the switch fabric cards, and the blower modules.


Note   The procedures for reinstalling power supplies are provided in a later section.


Reinstalling the Card Cage Assembly

This section contains the instructions for reinstalling the card cage assembly in the frame.


Caution   
The empty card cage assembly weighs 65 pounds (29.5 kg). You need two people to safely lift the card cage assembly. To prevent injury, keep your back straight and lift with your legs, not your back.

Perform the following steps to reinstall the card cage assembly:


Step 1 With one person positioned on each side of the card cage assembly, grasp the handle on the front of the card cage assembly and the handhold cutout on the side of the card cage assembly.

Step 2 Lift the card cage assembly and position it on the rails inside the front of the frame. Slide the card cage assembly fully into the frame until the card cage assembly front flanges make contact with the front of the frame.


Note   All electrical connections between the card cage assembly and the wiring harnesses attached to the frame are made automatically as you slide the card cage assembly in the frame.


Step 3 Secure the card cage assembly to the frame by tightening the six captive screws.

Reinstalling the Blower Modules

The blower modules slide into the frame on rails located at the top and bottom of the frame. You must position the blower module correctly in the upper or lower frame rails so that the blower module electrical connector (recessed in the back of the blower module) mates with the connector mounted on the frame.

Perform the following steps to reinstall a blower module in the frame:


Caution   
The blower module weighs 22 lb (10 kg). Use two hands when handling a blower module.


Step 1 Attach a antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located above the handles on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Using two hands to support the blower module, position it in front of the frame so that the blower module connector (recessed in the back corner of the blower module) is aligned with the connector mounted on the back corner of the frame.


Note   When you install the top blower module, the blower module connector should be on the right side (facing the frame). When you install the bottom blower module, the module connector should be on the left side (facing the frame).


Step 3 Slide the blower module on the frame rails into the frame. Stop when the module makes contact with the frame connector.

Step 4 Firmly push on the blower module handle to seat the module connector in the frame connector. (When completely seated, the blower module faceplate flanges make contact with the front of the frame.)


Note   All electrical and control line connections are made automatically when the connectors mate.


Step 5 Tighten the two captive screws on the blower module faceplate.


Note   The front covers for the top and bottom blower modules are different; the name "Cisco 12000 Series" appears at the upper left side of the top blower module front cover. The lettering is missing from the bottom blower module front cover.


Step 6 Position the blower module front cover over the four alignment holes in the blower module faceplate and snap the front cover onto the faceplate.

Repeat Step 2 through Step 6 for the other blower module.

Reinstalling the Cards in the Upper Card Cage

Before you begin reinstalling cards in the upper card cage, identify slot assignments by referring to the list you prepared when you removed the cards.

Perform the following steps to reinstall a card in the upper card cage:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Select a card from the antistatic mat. Starting from slot 11 (right side of card cage), refer to your list of occupied card slots to determine which slot the card goes in.

Step 3 Grasp the front edge of the metal card carrier with one hand and place your other hand under the carrier to support and guide it into the card cage slot.


Note   There are alignment grooves at the top and bottom of each slot in the upper card cage. When you reinstall a card in the upper card cage, make sure you align the top and bottom edges of the card carrier in the slot grooves.


Step 4 Carefully slide the card carrier into the slot until the ejector levers make contact with the front of the card cage, then stop.

Step 5 Grasp the two line card ejector levers and pivot them away from the card until they are perpendicular to the line card faceplate to completely seat the card in the backplane connector.

Step 6 Tighten the two captive screws at the top and bottom of the line card.

Repeat Step 2 through Step 6 for the rest of the cards in the upper card cage.


Note   Card blanks must be installed in the upper card cage to fill any open slots. The card blanks are used to maintain proper air flow and for EMI considerations.


Reinstalling the Cards in the Lower Card Cage

The lower card cage slots are keyed and color coded; clock and scheduler cards are installed in the upper two slots (light blue), and switch fabric cards are installed in the lower three slots (magenta).

Perform the following steps to reinstall the clock and scheduler cards and switch fabric cards in the lower card cage:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 To access the lower card cage, loosen the two captive screws at the top of the air filter tray and pivot the tray down, away from the lower card cage. (See .)


Caution   
To prevent damage, do not place any tools on the air filter tray or inside the lower card cage. Damaging the honeycomb screen on the air filter tray or in the lower card cage could restrict the air flow causing an overtemperature condition in the Cisco 12012.

Step 3 To access the card slots in the lower card cage, you must first move the air deflector out of the way. Lift the air deflector up and secure it to the top of the lower card cage by turning the air deflector latch knob counterclockwise. (See .)

Step 4 Select a card from the antistatic mat. Determine which card slot the card should be installed in by checking the color of the label attached to the edge of the card carrier (near the ejector levers). Light blue labels identify clock and scheduler cards; magenta labels identify switch fabric cards.


Note   There are alignment grooves on both sides of each slot in the lower card cage. When you reinstall a card in the lower card cage, make sure you align the card correctly with both edges of the card carrier in the slot grooves.


Step 5 Grasp the card carrier edge with one hand and place your other hand under the carrier to support and guide it into the correct slot. Slide the card halfway into the slot. Avoid touching the card circuitry or any connectors.


Note   Make sure the card is centered in the slot. To do so, apply even pressure to both sides of the card carrier as you slide the card into the slot.

Also, lower card cage cards have guide pins that make initial contact with the backplane connector as you slide a card in its slot. After the guide pins make contact, continue pushing on the card carrier until the card ejector levers start pivoting forward. Then use the ejector levers to fully insert the card in the backplane connector.


Step 6 Pivot the card ejector levers out ninety degrees away from the sides of the card carrier.

Step 7 Continue sliding the card into the card cage slot until the card ejector levers engage the alignment grooves in the card cage slot.

Step 8 Grasp both card ejector levers and pivot them outward (toward the sides of the card cage) until they are parallel to the card carrier edge to seat the card in the backplane connector. Snap the card ejector levers into the sides of the card carrier.

Repeat Step 4 through Step 8 for the rest of the cards in the lower card cage, then proceed to Step 9.

Step 9 Release the air deflector latch and lower the air deflector down to its stops.

Step 10 Pivot the air filter tray up so that it is flush with the front of the lower card cage and tighten the two captive screws.

This completes the procedures for reinstalling components in the upper and lower card cages.

Connecting Line Card Cables

This section contains the instructions for placing the network interface cables in the Cisco 12012 cable-management system and attaching the network interface cables to the line card ports.

The Cisco 12012 cable-management system consists of two components: a horizontal cable-management tray mounted directly above the upper card cage, and vertical cable-management brackets that attach to each line card.

Additional line card information is contained in the respective configuration note for each line card. For example, if you are connecting the cables for a Quad OC-3c/STM-1c Packet-Over-SONET (POS) line card, refer to the configuration note Quad OC-3c/STM-1c Packet-Over-SONET Line Card Installation and Configuration (Document Number 78-4333-xx), which accompanies every Quad OC-3c/STM-1c POS line card that is shipped from the factory as a FRU or as an installed item in a Cisco 12012.

Perform the following steps to install the network interface cables in the Cisco 12012 cable-management system and connect the network interface cables to the line cards:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Proceeding from left to right in the upper card cage, identify the network interface cables that attach to the first line card.

Step 3 One network interface cable at a time, carefully route the identified cable through the horizontal cable-management tray and down to the line card interface port. (See .)


Note   On line cards with multiple ports, route and connect network interface cables to the line cards starting at the bottom line card port and working up.


Step 4 Proceeding from bottom port to the top port (on line cards with multiple ports only), identify the network interface cable that connects to each line card port. Connect the network interface cable to the line card port. (See a.)

Step 5 Proceeding from the bottom port to the top port (on line cards with multiple ports only), carefully press the network interface cable into the vertical cable bracket cable clip. Avoid any kinks or sharp bends in the cable. (See b.)

Step 6 Proceeding from bottom port to the top port (on line cards with multiple ports only), route the network interface cable up the vertical cable bracket carefully pressing the interface cable into the rest of the cable clips. (See c.) Avoid any kinks or sharp bends in the cable.


Note   Adjust the network interface cable in the vertical cable bracket cable clips to prevent any kinks or sharp bends in the cable.


Repeat Step 2 through Step 6 for the rest of the line card interface cables.

Figure 3-13 Attaching an Interface Cable to a Line Card

Connecting Route Processor Cables

The console and auxiliary ports for the Cisco 12012 are located on the RP. The GRP has an optional Ethernet port and the PRP has two Ethernet ports. This section contains connection equipment and pinout information for the console, auxiliary, and Ethernet ports on the GRP and PRP.

GRP Console and Auxiliary Port Connection Equipment

The GRP has two EIA/TIA-232 ports: a DCE-mode console port and a DTE-mode auxiliary port. The console port is a DCE DB-25 receptacle for connecting a console terminal, which you need to configure the Cisco 12012. The auxiliary port is a DTE DB-25 plug for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU) or other router) to the Cisco 12012 (see ).

Figure 3-14 Console and Auxiliary Port Connections


Note   The console and auxiliary ports are asynchronous serial ports; any devices connected to these ports must be capable of asynchronous transmission. (Asynchronous is the most common type of serial device; for example, most modems are asynchronous devices.)



Note   In order to maintain Class B EMI compliance, shielded cables must be used on the console and auxiliary ports of the GRP= and GRP-B=. An updated version of the GRP-B= board (Rev. F0) is available. This version does not require shielded cables for Class B compliance.


Before connecting a terminal to the console port, check your terminal's documentation to determine the baud rate of the terminal you plan to use. The baud rate of the terminal must match the default rate (9600 baud). Set up the terminal as follows: 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (9600 8N2). You need an EIA/TIA-232 DCE console cable to connect the terminal to the console port. Cisco Systems does not provide console and auxiliary port cables; cables are available from commercial sources.


Note   You must provide the EIA/TIA-232 cables to connect the terminal to the GRP console port or other devices to the auxiliary port. Cisco Systems does not provide console and auxiliary port cables; cables are available from other vendors. For compliance with GR-1089 (intra-building surge), you must use shielded cables on the GRP console and auxiliary ports.

Because the connectors on some standard cables are tall enough to interfere with the front covers installed on the card cages, Cisco includes a lower-profile cable adapter that permits you to connect a flat cable with modular RJ-45 plugs to the GRP console port.


For console and auxiliary port pinouts, refer to and , respectively.

GRP Console Port Signals

Both Data Set ready (DSR) and Data Carrier Detect (DCD) signals are active when the system is running. The console port does not support modem control or hardware flow control. The console port requires a straight-through EIA/TIA-232 cable. Table 3-1 lists the signals used on this port

Table 3-1 GRP Console Port Signals

Pin
Signal
Direction
Description

1

GND

-

Ground

2

TxD

Output

Transmit Data

3

RxD

Input

Receive Data

6

DSR

Input

Data Set Ready (always on)

7

GND

-

Ground

8

DCD

Input

Data Carrier Detect (always on)

20

DTR

Output

Data Terminal Ready


GRP Auxiliary Port Signals

The auxiliary port on the GRP is a DB-25 plug DTE port for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or other router) to the Cisco 12012. The port is located above the console port on the GRP faceplate. The auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and modem control. An example of a modem connection is shown in . Table 3-2 lists the signals used on the auxiliary port.

Table 3-2 Auxiliary Port Signals

Pin
Signal
Direction
Description

1

Signal Ground

-

Signal Ground

2

TxD

Output

Transmit Data

3

RxD

Input

Receive Data

4

RTS

Output

Request To Send (used for hardware flow control)

5

CTS

Input

Clear To Send (used for hardware flow control)

6

DSR

Input

Data Set Ready

7

Signal Ground

-

Signal Ground

8

CD

Input

Carrier Detect (used for modem control)

20

DTR

Output

Data Terminal Ready (used for modem control only)

22

RING

Input

Ring


GRP Ethernet Connection Equipment

The Ethernet port on the GRP has both a media independent interface (MII), 40-pin, D-shell type receptacle and a media dependent interface (MDI) RJ-45 receptacle that are capable of data transmission rates from 10 and 100 megabits per second (Mbps). (See .)


Note   At the auto-sensed data transmission rate of 100 Mbps, the Ethernet port provides maximum usable bandwidth that is less than 100 Mbps; a maximum usable bandwidth of approximately 20 Mbps should be expected from either the RJ-45 or MII connections. Transmission speed is determined by the network to which the Ethernet interface is connected and is not user-configurable.


Figure 3-15 RJ-45 and MII Ethernet Connections

Both the MII and RJ-45 receptacles support IEEE 802.3u Ethernet interfaces compliant with the 100Base-TX and 10Base-T standards. The MII receptacle requires an external transceiver that permits connection to multimode fiber for 100Base-FX or 100Base-T4 physical media. Only one Ethernet receptacle, either RJ-45 or MII, can be used at a time. Two LEDs on the GRP faceplate show which Ethernet receptacle is active.


Note   The Ethernet port can use either unshielded twisted-pair or screened twisted-pair cables. In sites where extremely high immunity to noise is required, screened twisted-pair cable is recommended.


Depending on the type of media you use between the MII receptacle and your switch or hub, the network side of your 100-Mbps transceiver should be appropriately equipped with ST-type connectors (for optical fiber), BNC connectors, and so forth.

shows the pin orientation of the female MII receptacle on the Ethernet port.

Figure 3-16 Ethernet MII Receptacle

The MII receptacle uses 2-56 screw-type locks, called jackscrews, to secure the cable or transceiver to the MII port. MII cables and transceivers have knurled thumbscrews that you fasten to the jackscrews on the MII connector and tighten with your fingers. Use the jackscrews to secure your MII cable to the MII receptacle.

Table 3-3 lists the signals used on the MII receptacle, and Table 3-4 lists the signals used on the RJ-45 receptacle.

Table 3-3 Ethernet MII Pinout 

Pin 1
In
Out
Input/Output
Description

14-17

-

Yes

-

Transmit Data (TxD)

12

Yes

-

-

Transmit Clock (Tx_CLK)2

11

-

Yes

-

Transmit Error (Tx_ER)

13

-

Yes

-

Transmit Enable (Tx_EN)

3

-

Yes

-

MII Data Clock (MDC)

4-7

Yes

-

-

Receive Data (RxD)

9

Yes

-

-

Receive Clock (Rx_CLK

10

Yes

-

-

Receive Error (Rx_ER)

8

Yes

-

-

Receive Data Valid (Rx_DV)

18

Yes

-

-

Collision (COL)

19

Yes

-

-

Carrier Sense (CRS)

2

-

-

Yes

MII Data Input/Output (MDIO)

22-39

-

-

-

Common (ground)

1, 20, 21, 40

-

-

-

+5.0 volts (V)

1 Any pins not indicated are not used.

2 Tx_CLK and Rx_CLK are provided by the external transceiver.


 

Table 3-4 Ethernet RJ-45 Pinout

Pin
Signal

1

TX+

2

TX-

3

RX+

4

Termination Network

5

Termination Network

6

RX-

7

Termination Network

8

Termination Network


shows the pin orientation of the female RJ-45 receptacle on the Ethernet port.

Figure 3-17 Ethernet RJ-45 Receptacle


Warning   

The ports labeled "Ethernet," "10BASE-T," "Token Ring," "Console," and "AUX" are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits. Because the BRI circuits are treated like telephone-network voltage, avoid connecting the SELV circuit to the telephone network voltage (TNV) circuits.


PRP Console and Auxiliary Port Connection Guidelines

The system console port on the PRP is a DCE RJ-45 receptacle for connecting a data terminal, which you must configure. The console port is labeled Console, as shown in . Before connecting the console port, check your terminal's documentation to determine the baud rate of the terminal you plan to use.

The baud rate of the terminal must match the default baud rate (9600 baud). Set up the terminal as follows: 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits (9600, 8N2). The console port requires a straight-through RJ-45 cable.

Figure 3-18 PRP Console and Auxiliary Port Connections

1

Modem

4

Auxiliary port

2

Console terminal

5

Console port

3

RJ-45 Ethernet cables

   


Note   The console and auxiliary ports are both asynchronous serial ports; any devices connected to these ports must be capable of asynchronous transmission. (Asynchronous is the most common type of serial device; for example, most modems are asynchronous devices.)


PRP Console Port Signals

The console port on the PRP is a DCE RJ-45 receptacle. lists the signals used on this port.

Table 3-5 PRP Console Port Signals

Console Port Pin
Signal
Input/Output
Description

11

2

DTR

Output

Data Terminal Ready

3

TxD

Output

Transmit Data

4

GND

Signal Ground

5

GND

Signal Ground

6

RxD

Input

Receive Data

7

DSR

Input

Data Set Ready

81

1 These pins are not connected.


PRP Auxiliary Port Signals

The auxiliary port on the PRP is a DTE, RJ-45 plug for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the router. The port is labeled Aux, as shown in . The asynchronous auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and modem control. lists the signals used on the auxiliary port.

Table 3-6 PRP Auxiliary Port Signals

Auxiliary Port Pin
Signal
Input/Output
Description

1

RTS

Output

Request To Send

2

DTR

Output

Data Terminal Ready

3

TxD

Output

Transmit Data

4

GND

Signal Ground

5

GND

Signal Ground

6

RxD

Input

Receive Data

7

DSR

Input

Data Set Ready

8

CTS

Input

Clear To Send


PRP Ethernet Connection Equipment

There are two RJ-45 Ethernet interface receptacles on the PRP, providing media-dependent interface (MDI) Ethernet ports. These connections support IEEE 802.3 and IEEE 802.3u interfaces compliant with 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX standards. The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is auto-sensing by default and is user configurable.

The RJ-45 receptacles on the PRP provide two physical connection options for Ethernet interfaces. RJ-45 cables are not available from Cisco Systems; they are available from outside commercial cable vendors. To connect cables to the PRPs Ethernet interfaces (ports labeled ETH0 and ETH1), attach the Category 5 UTP cable directly to a RJ-45 receptacle on the PRP.

The Ethernet interfaces on the PRP are end-station devices, not repeaters; therefore, you must connect an Ethernet interface to a repeater or hub.


Note   Only connect cables that comply with EIA/TIA-568 standards. (See and for cable recommendations and specifications.)



Caution   
The Ethernet ports are primarily used as a Telnet port into the Cisco 12000 series Internet Router, and for booting or accessing Cisco IOS software images over a network to which an Ethernet port is directly connected. Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions are switched off by default for security reasons. Cisco strongly cautions you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on these ports.

shows an example of the functionality of an Ethernet port. In this example, you cannot access Network 2.0.0.0 via the Ethernet port (ETH0) on the PRP in Router A; you can only access the hosts and Router C, which are in Network 1.0.0.0. (See dotted arrows in .)

To access Network 2.0.0.0 from Router A, you must use an interface port on one of your line cards (in this example, a Packet-over-SONET (POS) line card in Router A) to go through Router B, through Router C, and into Network 2.0.0.0. (See solid arrows in .)

Figure 3-19 Using the Ethernet Port on the PRP

PRP Ethernet Connections

shows a PRP RJ-45 receptacle and cable connectors. The RJ-45 connection does not require an external transceiver. The RJ-45 connection requires Category 5 unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cables, which are not available from Cisco Systems, but are available from commercial cable vendors. lists the pinout for the RJ-45 receptacle.

Figure 3-20 RJ-45 Receptacle and Plug (Horizontal Orientation)

1

RJ-45 receptacle

2

Category 5 UTP cable with plug



Warning   

The ports labeled Ethernet, 10BASE-T, Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits. Because the BRI circuits are treated like telephone-network voltage, avoid connecting the SELV circuit to the telephone network voltage (TNV) circuits.

Table 3-7 PRP RJ-45 Ethernet Receptacle Pinout 

Ethernet Port Pin
Signal
Description

1

TxD+

Transmit data +

2

TxD-

Transmit data -

3

RxD+

Receive data +

4

Termination Network

No connection

5

Termination Network

No connection

6

RxD-

Receive data -

7

Termination Network

No connection

8

Termination Network

No connection



Depending on your RJ-45 cabling requirements, use the cable pinouts shown in or .

Figure 3-21 Straight-Through Cable Pinout (Connecting MDI Ethernet Port to MDI-X Wiring)

Figure 3-22 Crossover Cable Pinout (for Connecting Two PRPs)

lists the cabling specifications for 100-Mbps transmission over unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cables.


Note   The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is auto-sensing by default and is user configurable.


Table 3-8

Parameter
RJ-45

Cable specification

Category 51 UTP, 22 to 24 AWG2

Cable length (max)

Segment length (max)

328 feet (100 m) for 100BASE-TX

Network length (max)

656 feet (200 m)3 (with 1 repeater)

1 EIA/TIA-568 or EIA-TIA-568 TSB-36 compliant. Not supplied by Cisco.

2 AWG = American Wire Gauge. This gauge is specified by the EIA/TIA-568 standard.

3 This length is specifically between any two stations on a repeated segment.


Specifications and Connection Limits for 100-Mbps Transmission

lists IEEE 802.3u physical characteristics for 100BASE-TX.

Table 3-9 IEEE 802.3u Physical Characteristics

Parameter
100BASE-TX

Data rate (Mbps)

100

Signaling method

Baseband

Maximum segment length

100 m between DTE1 and repeaters

Media

Category 5 UTP (for RJ-45)

Topology

Star/Hub

1 DTE = data terminal equipment.


Connecting Alarm Card Cables

The alarm card has two, 25-pin D-sub connectors, labeled ALARM 1 and ALARM 2, mounted on the alarm card faceplate. (See .)

Figure 3-23 Alarm Card Connectors

The alarm card connectors enable you to connect the Cisco 12012 to a site alarm maintenance system. Critical, major, and minor alarms generated in the Cisco 12012 system are displayed by LEDs on the alarm card faceplate. The generated alarms also control alarm relays mounted on the alarm card. The alarm relay contacts are accessible through the two alarm card connectors.

Table 3-10 lists the available common, normally open, and normally closed relay contacts available through the alarm 1 and alarm 2 connectors.

Table 3-10 Alarm 1 and Alarm 2 Connector Pinout

Pin Group
Common
Normally Open
Normally Closed

Critical audible alarm

2

1

14

Major audible alarm

16

3

15

Minor audible alarm

5

4

17

Critical visual alarm

19

6

18

Major visual alarm

8

7

20

Minor visual alarm

22

9

21

Alarm input

13

25

-



Note   Only safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits can be connected to the alarm 1 and alarm 2 connectors. Maximum rating for the alarm circuit is 2 amps, 50 volt-amp.



Warning   

The ports labeled "Ethernet," "10BaseT," "Token Ring," "Console," and "AUX" are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits. Because the BRI circuits are treated like telephone-network voltage, avoid connecting the SELV circuit to the telephone network voltage (TNV) circuits.


Connecting System Grounding

Before you connect power or turn on power to the Cisco 12012, we strongly recommend that you provide an adequate system grounding (earth) connection for your system. Two system grounding receptacles are provided on each Cisco 12012. (See Figure 3-24.)

To ensure the system grounding connection that you provide is adequate, you will need the following parts:

Two grounding lugs—Must have two M6 holes that have a 0.625-inch to 0.75-inch (15.86-mm to 19-mm) spacing between them and a wire receptacle large enough to accept a 4-AWG, or larger, multistrand copper wire. This type of grounding lug is not available from Cisco Systems; electrical-connector vendors, such as Panduit, provide this type of grounding lug.

Four M6 or equivalent hex-head bolts with locking washers and nuts—This mounting hardware is not available from Cisco Systems; it is available from any commercial hardware vendor.

Two grounding wires—4 AWG (0.204-inch [5.18-mm] diameter) or larger. The actual wire diameter and length are dependent on your router location and site environment. This wire is not available from Cisco Systems; it is available from any commercial cable vendor.

Perform the following steps to attach the grounding lugs to the grounding receptacles on your Cisco 12012:


Step 1 Locate the grounding receptacles on your Cisco 12012. (See .)

Figure 3-24 System Grounding Receptacles

Step 2 Position one of the grounding lugs over the grounding receptacle holes.

Step 3 Insert the two bolts through the holes in the grounding lug. (See .) Ensure that the grounding lug does not interfere with the other router hardware.

Figure 3-25 Attaching a Grounding Lug to the Grounding Receptacles

Step 4 Install the locking washers and nuts and tighten to secure the grounding lug to the frame.

Step 5 Prepare the other end of the grounding wire and connect it to the appropriate grounding point at your site to ensure an adequate ground.

Repeat Step 2 through Step 5 for the second system grounding connection.

Connecting Power

This section provides procedures for installing an AC-input power supply and a DC-input power supply. Select the procedure appropriate for your system.


Note   Detailed instructions for handling and replacing the Cisco 12012 power supplies are contained in the configuration notes Cisco 12012 Gigabit Switch Router AC-Input Power Supply Replacement Instructions (Document Number 78-4334-xx) and Cisco 12012 Gigabit Switch Router DC-Input Power Supply Replacement Instructions (Document Number 78-4330-xx). One of these configuration notes accompanies the respective power supply shipped from the factory as a FRU. These configuration notes are also available on the Documentation CD and on Cisco Connection Online (CCO).



Caution   
Do not mix AC-input and DC-input power supplies in a Cisco 12012.


Caution   
To maintain agency compliance requirements and meet EMI emissions standards in the Cisco 12012 with fewer than four AC-input power supplies or only one DC-input power supply, power supply blanks must be installed in any empty power supply bays. Do not remove a blank from the bay except to install a power supply.


Note   AC-input power supplies and DC-input power supplies differ in width. An AC-input power supply occupies only one power supply bay. A DC-input power supply is twice as wide and occupies two power supply bays.



Warning   

AC operation requires a minimum configuration of two AC-input power supplies.


Reinstalling an AC-Input Power Supply

This section provides the procedure for reinstalling an AC-input power supply in the Cisco 12012. The Cisco 12012 power supply bays are labeled A1, A2, B1, B2 (from left to right). You should reinstall the AC-input power supplies in the bays in the following order: A1, B1, A2, and B2.

Perform the following steps to reinstall an AC-input power supply:


Caution   
The AC-input power supply weighs 18 lb (8 kg). Use two hands when handling the power supply.


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Verify that the power supply power switch is in the STANDBY position.


Caution   
To prevent damaging the power supply backplane connector, do not use excessive force when installing a power supply into the bay.


Note   Any bay that does not have a power supply installed must have a power supply blank installed to maintain airflow and for EMI considerations.


Step 3 Using two hands to support and guide the power supply, slide it into the vacant bay. Push the power supply all the way into the bay until the faceplate is flush with the front of the bay.


Note   All electrical connections between the power supply and the backplane are made automatically when the power supply is fully inserted in the power supply bay.


Step 4 Tighten the captive screw on the power supply faceplate. (See a.)

Figure 3-26 Connecting Source AC to the AC-Input Power Supply

Step 5 Locate the AC power cord and remove it from its shipping packaging. Verify that the AC power cord shipped with the power supply is the correct type for your site.


Note   If you have received the wrong type of power cord, contact your service representative for a replacement.


Step 6 Plug the AC power cord into the power supply AC receptacle. (See b.)

Step 7 Clip the spring clip over the power cord plug to secure the plug in place. (See c.)

Step 8 Connect the other end of the AC power cord to the source AC receptacle. (See d.)


Note   We recommend attaching each AC-input power supply to an independent power source for full redundancy. We also recommend that you use an uninterruptable power source (UPS) to protect against power failures at your site. Each AC-input power supply operates between 200 VAC and 240 VAC, and requires a dedicated 20A service for North American use and 10A or 16A for international use.


Step 9 Verify that the source AC circuit breaker servicing the source AC receptacle is switched on.


Note   Do not turn the power supply power switch ON (|) at this time.


Repeat Step 2 through Step 9 for the rest of the AC-input power supplies.

This completes the Cisco 12012 hardware installation procedure.

Proceed to the next chapter for procedures for observing system startup and performing a basic configuration.

Reinstalling a DC-Input Power Supply

This section provides the procedures for reinstalling a DC-input power supply in the Cisco 12012. You must meet the following site power and source DC power cable requirements prior to installing the DC-input power supply:

A dedicated 60-amp service is available for each DC-input power supply.

Power cables (three per power supply)—4 AWG, 0.204-inch (5.18-mm) diameter, high strand count. The cable length is dependent on your router location. This cable is not available from Cisco Systems: it is available from any commercial cable vendor.

Three power lugs—Must be dual-hole with .625-inch (15.86-mm) centers and able to fit over M6 terminal studs. (See .) This type of lug is not available from Cisco Systems; electrical-connector vendors, such as Panduit, provide this type of lug.

Figure 3-27 DC Power Cable Lug

The card cage assembly power supply bays are labeled A1, A2, B1, and B2 (from left to right). If your Cisco 12012 is configured with only one DC-input power supply, reinstall the power supply in power supply bays A1/A2. If your Cisco 12012 is configured with a second (redundant) DC-input power supply, reinstall it in power supply bays B1/B2.


Note   Unoccupied power supply bays must have power supply blanks installed to maintain proper airflow and for EMI considerations.


Perform the following steps to reinstall a DC-input power supply:


Caution   
The DC-input power supply weighs 19 lb (8.3 kg). Use two hands when handling the power supply.


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Verify that the DC-input power supply power switch is turned OFF (O).

Step 3 Place the DC-input power supply faceplate-up, in front of the empty power supply bay.

Step 4 Loosen the two screws securing the power supply front cover in place. Lift up the cover slightly, then pull it away from the power supply faceplate. Set the front cover aside. (See .)

Figure 3-28 Removing the DC-Input Power Supply Front Cover and Cable Bracket

Step 5 Remove the two screws that secure the source DC power cable bracket to the power supply faceplate and remove the bracket. (See .) Set the two screws and bracket aside.


Caution   
Before proceeding to the next step, verify that the source DC circuit breaker servicing the source DC power cable you are attaching to the DC-input power supply is in the OFF position. Also verify that the power switch on the DC-input power supply is OFF (O). As an additional check, measure the voltages across the DC power cable leads you intend to attach to the power supply. All readings should be zero volts.

Step 6 Thread the source DC power cable leads up underneath the power supply handle. Allow sufficient slack in the power cable for strain relief.


Note   The color coding of the source DC power cable leads to the DC-input power supply depends on the color coding of the site DC power source. Typically, green or green/yellow is used for ground. Since there is no color code standard for the DC wiring, you must ensure that the proper polarity is connected to the DC-input power supply. In some cases, the source DC cables might have a (+) or a (-) label. This is a relatively safe indication of the cable polarity.



Warning   

When installing the unit, the ground connection must always be made first and disconnected last.


Step 7 Remove the nut and locking washer from each of the six power supply threaded terminals on the front of the power supply. Attach the source DC power cable lug to the power supply terminal in the following order (see ):

Ground to ground

Positive (+) to positive (+)

Negative (-) to negative (-).

Figure 3-29 Connecting the Source DC Power Cable Leads to the DC-Input Power Supply


Note   When securing the ground, positive (+), and negative (-) power cable lugs to the power supply terminals, leave a small service loop in the ground cable. This ensures that the ground lug is the last lead to disconnect from the power supply if a great deal of strain is placed on all three leads.


Step 8 Thread the power supply circuit breaker external alarm leads (if present) up through the power supply handle and attach them to the circuit breaker alarm terminal block on the power supply faceplate. (Some sites might not be equipped with a power supply circuit breaker external alarm.)

Step 9 Position the source DC power cable leads underneath the power supply handle on the power supply faceplate in the following order from left to right:
negative (-), positive (+), and ground.

Step 10 Place the DC power cable bracket over the power cable leads and secure the cable leads and the cable bracket to the power supply faceplate with the two screws that you removed earlier.

Step 11 Verify that the source DC wiring from the source DC breaker to the power supply is correct and that the terminal connections on the power supply are correct and tight.


Note   Verify the source DC cable connections to the DC-input power supply with a voltmeter. Always connect positive (+) leads to positive (+) terminals and negative (-) leads to negative (-) terminals on the power supply.


Step 12 Position the power supply front cover so that the keyholes are over the two standoff screws on the power supply faceplate. Slide the cover down slightly to engage the two screws and secure it in place by tightening the two screws.


Caution   
To prevent damaging the backplane power connector, do not use excessive force when sliding the power supply into the bay.


Note   The first DC-input power supply is installed in power supply bays A1/A2; the second DC-input power supply is installed in power supply bays B1/B2.


Step 13 Using two hands to support and guide the power supply, align it with the grooves in the power supply bay, and slide the power supply into the vacant bay. (See .) Push it into the bay until the power supply captive jackscrew makes contact with the power supply bay.

Figure 3-30 Reinstalling the DC-Input Power Supply

Step 14 Using a flat-blade screwdriver or 10-mm nutdriver, turn the captive jackscrew on the power supply faceplate clockwise (insert) to seat the power supply into the backplane power connector. Do not overtighten the jackscrew.


Note   To prevent connector alignment problems, apply even pressure to the power supply by pushing at the top of the power supply with one hand while you turn the captive jackscrew with the other hand.



Note   All electrical connections between the power supply and the backplane are made automatically when the power supply is fully inserted in the power supply bay.


Repeat Step 2 through Step 14 for a second DC-input power supply, then proceed to Step 15.


Note   Any power supply bay that does not have a power supply installed must have a power supply blank installed to maintain airflow and for EMI considerations.


Step 15 Turn on the source DC circuit breaker servicing each DC-input power supply. Do not turn on the DC-input power supply power switch at this time.

This completes the Cisco 12012 hardware installation procedure.

Proceed to the next chapter for procedures for observing system startup and performing a basic configuration.