Guest

Cisco 10000 Series Routers

Cisco 10008 Router PRE4 Installation and Configuration Guide

  • Viewing Options

  • PDF (2.0 MB)
  • Feedback
Cisco 10008 Router PRE4 Installation and Configuration Guide

Table Of Contents

Cisco 10008 Router PRE4 Installation and Configuration Guide

Contents

Product Overview

Redundant PRE4

PRE4 Front Panel

PRE4 Connectors

CompactFlash Card Slot

LED Indicators and Buttons

Alphanumeric Display

Prerequisites and Preparation

Safety Guidelines

Safety Warnings

Software Compatibility

Installation Guidelines

New Installation Guidelines

Replacement Installation Guidelines

Required Tools and Equipment

Powering Off the System

Installing or Replacing a PRE4

Installing a PRE4

Connecting the BITS Filter Module and Clock Contacts (Optional)

Configuring a PRE4

Removing a PRE4

Troubleshooting the Installation

Configuring Network Timing

Configuration Tasks

Enabling Network Timing

Selecting Clock Sources

Selecting Participating Subslots

Reverting to a Higher Priority Clock

Verifying the Network Timing Configuration

Configuration Examples

Forcing Failover in a Redundant Pair

Managing System Boot Parameters

Changing the Software Configuration Register Settings

Upgrading a PRE3 to a PRE4

Upgrading a PRE3 to a PRE4 Using ISU

Prerequisites

Upgrade Considerations

Procedure to Upgrade a PRE3 to a PRE4 Using ISU

Upgrading a PRE3 to a PRE4 Without Using ISU

Prerequisites

Upgrade Considerations

Procedure to Upgrade a PRE3 to a PRE4 Without Using ISU

Upgrading Software on a PRE4

Upgrading Software on a Single PRE4

Upgrading Software on Redundant PRE4

Managing the Router Using the Network Management Ethernet Port

Configuring the NME Port on the PRE4

Manually Setting the Duplex Mode for the NME Port for the PRE4

Manually Setting the Speed for the NME Port for the PRE4

Onboard Failure Logging

Logging details for OBFL

Storing OBFL Data

Displaying OBFL Data

Analyzing and Troubleshooting Packets

Access Control Lists

Packet Statistics and PXF Counters

IP Forwarding Counter

ICMP Created Counters

Feedback Counter

Displaying Packet Statistics

Sample Case Study

Displaying Packet Statistics for ACLs

Displaying IP Forwarding Statistics

Displaying Queueing Statistics

Displaying Drop Statistics

Displaying PXF Traffic Loads

Displaying Feedback Counts

IPv6 Forwarding over MPLS

TCAM Commands

hw-module tcam

show pxf cpu access-lists

show pxf cpu pbr action

show pxf cpu qos

show pxf dma

show pxf tcam

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines


Cisco 10008 Router PRE4 Installation and Configuration Guide


Product Number: ESR-PRE4

This publication contains instructions for installing and upgrading the Performance Routing Engine 4 (PRE4) in a Cisco 10008 router.

Feature Information for the PRE4

Table 1 describes the release history for this feature. The table lists only the Cisco IOS software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given Cisco IOS software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that Cisco IOS software release train also support that feature.

Table 1 Feature Information for the PRE4

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

PRE4

12.2(33)SB

The PRE4 is the fifth generation PXF packet processing and scheduling engine for the Cisco 10008 router.


Finding Support Information for Platforms and Cisco IOS Software Images

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS software image support. Access Cisco Feature Navigator at http://www.cisco.com/go/fn. You must have an account on Cisco.com. If you do not have an account or have forgotten your username or password, click Cancel at the login dialog box and follow the instructions that appear.

Contents

The following sections are included in this installation document:

Product Overview

Prerequisites and Preparation

Safety Guidelines

Software Compatibility

Installation Guidelines

Installing or Replacing a PRE4

Configuring Network Timing

Forcing Failover in a Redundant Pair

Managing System Boot Parameters

Upgrading a PRE3 to a PRE4

Upgrading Software on a PRE4

Managing the Router Using the Network Management Ethernet Port

Onboard Failure Logging

Analyzing and Troubleshooting Packets

TCAM Commands

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

Product Overview

The Performance Routing Engine 4 (PRE4) is the fifth generation parallel express forwarding (PXF) packet processing and scheduling engine for the Cisco 10008 router. Figure 1 shows the front of the Cisco 10008 router.

Figure 1 Cisco 10008 Router Chassis—Front View

1

Blower module

5

PRE4—slot 0A

2

Primary Power Entry Module (PEM)

6

PRE4—slot 0B

3

Redundant PEM

7

Line card slots 5 to 8

4

Line card slots 1 to 4


The PRE4 performs all Layer 2 and Layer 3 packet manipulation related to routing and forwarding through the Cisco 10008 router. Its advanced application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) technology supports very high performance throughput with IP services enabled on each port.

The PRE4 consists of two main logical and physical cards:

The fast packet (FP) card—Performs fast path forwarding and output scheduling.

The route processor (RP) card—Contains the configuration, management route processing engine, and backplane interconnect. The FP card plugs into the RP card.

The PRE4 runs Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SB and later releases. Benefits of the PRE4 include:

800-MHz dual processor

Sixty-four PXF network processors arranged as 8 columns and 8 rows

512 MB packet buffer and 128 MB control memory with error-correcting code (ECC)

4 GB ECC-protected route processor (RP) memory

10 million packets per second (Mpps) forwarding performance through the PXF complex

5.6 Gbps backplane bandwidth for each full-height backplane slot

11.2 Gbps backplane bandwidth to each SPA interface processor (SIP)

Maximum transmission unit (MTU) support of 9216 bytes

An external CompactFlash slot (Disk0)

A 100/1000 Mbit Ethernet interface for communication between two redundant PRE4.

Full backward compatibility with all existing line cards supported on the Cisco 10008 router

Hierarchical Queueing Framework (HQF) that provides up to three levels of service granularity

By centralizing packet processing in the PRE4, the Cisco 10008 router architecture frees up space on line cards, enabling high interface density, yet retaining the compact Network Equipment Business Systems (NEBS) transmission equipment form factor.

Redundant PRE4

You can configure two PRE4 in a single chassis for redundancy. If the active PRE4 fails, the standby PRE4 automatically takes over operation of the router. Because all the line cards are physically connected to both the active and standby PRE4, the failure of a single PRE4 does not require user intervention.

If a failure occurs, all line cards automatically reset to the redundant PRE4. Startup and running configurations of the standby PRE4 are synchronized with the active PRE4, ensuring the fastest possible cut-over time if the active PRE4 fails.

PRE4 Front Panel

This section describes the PRE4 front panel shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2 PRE4 Front Panel

1

Ejector Levers

7

ACO (Alarm Cut-off Button)

2

Console and Auxiliary Ports

8

CompactFlash Slot, Disk0

3

Network Management Ethernet (NME) Port

9

Slot0 (Disk0) LED

4

NME Activity and Link LEDs

10

Status, Fail LEDs

5

Push-button reset

11

Building Internal Timing Source (BITS) LED

6

Alarms: Critical, Major, Minor

12

Alphanumeric Display


PRE4 Connectors

The front panel on the PRE4 contains three ports with RJ-45 connectors.

Console port (CONSOLE)—This asynchronous serial port is used to connect a terminal to the PRE4 for local administrative access.

Auxiliary port (AUX)—This asynchronous serial port is used to connect a modem to the PRE4 for remote administrative access.

NME Port—This Ethernet port is used to connect the PRE4 to a Fast Ethernet port.

CompactFlash Card Slot

The external CompactFlash slot can store the Cisco IOS image or a system configuration file on a flash memory card. The system can also boot from the software stored on the flash memory card.

LED Indicators and Buttons

The LEDs on the PRE4 front panel provide a visual indication showing the status of PRE4 operation. Table 2 describes the PRE4 LEDs and buttons.


Note F or additional information about alarm connections, see the Cisco 10000 Series Router Performance Routing Engine Installation guide at the following URL:
http://cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/ps133/prod_installation_guides_list.html


Table 2 PRE4 LED Status and Button Descriptions 

LEDs and Button
Status
Description

ACTIVITY

Green

Packets are being transmitted and received.

Off

No activity.

LINK

Green

Carrier detected, the port is able to pass traffic.

Off

No carrier detected, the port is not able to pass traffic.

Push-button reset

n/a

Resets the PRE4.

CRITICAL, MAJOR, and MINOR LEDs

Off

No alarm.

Note Alarm relay contacts can be used to connect the router to an external visual or audio alarm system. This feature enables any CRITICAL, MAJOR, or MINOR alarms generated by the router to activate the visual or audible alarms. Shutting off an audible alarm does not disable the alarm LEDs.

Yellow

Indicates an alarm condition.

ACO (Alarm cut-off) button

n/a

Pressing this button disables an audible alarm.

CompactFlash Disk0

Green

Disk0 is active.

STATUS

Flashing Yellow

System is booting.

Green

PRE4 is active.

Flashing Green

PRE4 is standby.

Off

No power to PRE4.

FAIL

Yellow

A major failure has disabled the PRE4.

Off

The PRE4 is operating correctly.

BITS

Green

BITS input to the PRE is configured and functioning normally.

 

Yellow

BITS input to the PRE is configured, but not functional. For example, the framer may have detected a Loss of Signal (LOS).

 

Off

BITS input to the PRE4 is not configured.


Alphanumeric Display

The alphanumeric display on the front panel provides information on the state of the PRE4. The display consists of two 4-character LED panels. Table 3 describes the most common messages. If you report a problem to Cisco, it is helpful to include the message on the PRE4 alphanumeric display in your problem report.

Table 3 Messages on PRE4 Alphanumeric Display

Message
PRE4 Status

1111, 2222, 3333, 4444, 5555, 6666, 7777

The PRE4 has just been powered on and is running its power-on self-test.

ROM DONE

The PRE4 has loaded the ROM monitor. This message appears briefly if the system is configured to boot a Cisco IOS software image. If the system is not configured to boot Cisco IOS, this message remains on the display and the rommon> prompt appears on the terminal window.

AUTO BOOT

The ROM monitor is preparing to boot a Cisco IOS image.

BOOT IMGE

A Cisco IOS image is starting to boot.

IOS STRT, IOS EXC, IOS FPGA, IOS FPOK, IOS FILE, IOS STBY, IOS INTF, IOS MEM, IOS DRVR, IOS LIB, IOS MGMT, IOS PROT, IOS CONF

These messages appear in quick succession during the boot process.

IOS RUN

[On the primary PRE4] The PRE4 has finished booting and is running Cisco IOS. This is the normal operating status for the primary PRE.

IOS STBY

[On the secondary PRE4] The PRE4 is in standby mode and ready to take over if the primary PRE4 fails. This is the normal operating status for the secondary PRE4.


Prerequisites and Preparation

Before you perform any of the procedures in this guide, we recommend that you:

Read the safety guidelines in the next section and review the electrical safety and ESD-prevention guidelines as described in the Cisco 10008 Router Hardware Installation Guide at the following url: http://cisco.com/en/US/docs/routers/10000/10008/install_and_upgrade/hardware_installation/
guide/8-hig.html

Ensure that the software configuration meets the minimum requirements for the installation (see the "Software Compatibility" section).

Ensure that you have all of the necessary tools and equipment before beginning the installation (see the "Installation Guidelines" section).

Have a terminal console connected to the PRE4 to configure the PRE4 after it is installed.

The following publications can be used as reference material while performing procedures in this document:

Cisco 10000 Series Router Performance Routing Engine Installation at: http://cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/ps133/
prod_installation_guide09186a0080525aba.html

Cisco 10000 Series Internet Router Troubleshooting Guide at:
http://cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/ps133/
prod_troubleshooting_guide_book09186a00807a1043.html

Safety Guidelines

Before you begin the PRE4 installation procedure, review the safety guidelines in this section to avoid injuring yourself or damaging the equipment. Before you install, configure, or perform maintenance on the router, you should also review the safety warnings listed in the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 10000 Series Routers document.

Safety Warnings

Safety warnings appear throughout this publication in procedures that, if performed incorrectly, may harm you. A warning symbol precedes each warning statement. The following warning is an example of a safety warning. It identifies the warning symbol and associates it with a bodily injury hazard.


Warning IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS

This warning symbol means danger. You are in a situation that could cause bodily injury. Before you work on any equipment, be aware of the hazards involved with electrical circuitry and be familiar with standard practices for preventing accidents. Use the statement number provided at the end of each warning to locate its translation in the translated safety warnings that accompanied this device. Statement 1071

SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS



Note If you need translations of the safety warning, see the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco 10000 Series Routers document.


Software Compatibility

The PRE4 has specific Cisco IOS software requirements. Table 4 shows the minimum required Cisco IOS software for the PRE4.

Table 4 PRE4 Software Compatibility

PRE4 Product Number
Cisco IOS Release
Minimum Cisco IOS Release

ESR-PRE4

12.2(33)SB

12.2(33)SB


Use the show version command to display the system software version that is currently loaded and running.

If the output of the show version command indicates that the Cisco IOS software is a version earlier than the version identified as the minimum Cisco IOS software release in Table 4, check the contents of the CompactFlash memory to determine if the required images are available on your system.

The output of the show flash command provides a list of all files stored in the CompactFlash memory. If the correct software version is not installed, contact Cisco Customer Service (see the "Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines" section).

Installation Guidelines

This section contains guidelines for the following:

A new installation

A replacement installation

The required tools and equipment

The PRE4 is hot-swappable, which means you can remove and replace a PRE4 while the system is operating—if you have a standby (redundant) PRE4 installed in the chassis. This feature allows you to add, remove, or replace a PRE4 while the system maintains all routing information and ensures session preservation.


Caution Replacing the active PRE4 in a non-redundant chassis (no standby PRE4) causes a system shutdown and stops all traffic. If possible, alert all subscribers that the system will not be functioning during the replacement. The line cards shutdown automatically due to the hardware Online Insertion and Removal (OIR) interlock in their power systems.


Caution To prevent electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage, handle the PRE4 by the faceplate or the card carrier edges only. Avoid touching the printed circuit board and its components, or any connector pins.

New Installation Guidelines

If you are replacing the PRE4 in a non-redundant system, you must configure the PRE4 using the configure command. For configuration information, refer to the "Configuring a PRE4" section.

Replacement Installation Guidelines

If the PRE4 is replaced in a redundant system containing two PRE4, the standby (or newly installed) PRE4 automatically assumes the configuration of the active PRE4; do not configure the new PRE4.

Required Tools and Equipment

You need the following tools and equipment to install the PRE4:

A 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver

An ESD-preventive wrist or ankle strap with connection cord

A terminal console to connect to the PRE4 after it is installed

Powering Off the System

Use the following steps to power down the system:


Caution If you have redundant Power Entry Modules (PEMs), set both power switches to the off (0) position. See Figure 3 for the DC PEM power switch and Figure 4 for the AC PEM power switch.


Step 1 Attach an antistatic strap to your wrist or ankle and to an ESD socket on the chassis, or to a bare metal surface on the chassis or frame.

Step 2 Set the power switch to the off (0) position.

Step 3 Go to the "Installing or Replacing a PRE4" section.


Figure 3 Setting DC Power Switch to the Off Position

Figure 4 Setting AC Power Switch to the Off Position

Installing or Replacing a PRE4

This section describes how to install or replace the PRE4 in the Cisco 10008 chassis. It contains the following information:

Installing a PRE4

Connecting the BITS Filter Module and Clock Contacts (Optional)

Configuring a PRE4

Removing a PRE4

Troubleshooting the Installation

Installing a PRE4

Use the following procedure to install the PRE4 into slot 0A or slot 0B in the Cisco 10008 chassis.


Step 1 Attach an antistatic strap to your wrist or ankle and to an ESD socket (see Figure 5) on the chassis, or to a bare metal surface on the chassis or frame.

Step 2 Grasp the faceplate (see Figure 6) of the PRE4 with one hand and place your other hand under the frame of the PRE4 to support the weight of the PRE4. Position the PRE4 in front of the chassis slot.

Step 3 Carefully align the upper and lower edges (see Figure 6) of the PRE4 with the upper and lower guides in the chassis, and slide the PRE4 into the slot until you can feel it begin to seat in the backplane connectors.

Step 4 Simultaneously pivot both ejector levers (see Figure 7) toward each other, until they are parallel to the faceplate, to firmly seat the PRE4 in the backplane.

The PRE4 cycles through its power-on self-test. The FAIL LED stays on briefly (10 to 15 seconds) and then shuts off.

Step 5 Tighten the top and bottom captive screws (see Figure 8) to secure the PRE4 to the chassis.


Caution To ensure that there is adequate space for additional line cards, always tighten the captive screws on each newly installed PRE4 before you insert a standby PRE4 or any additional line cards. The captive screws prevent accidental removal and provide proper grounding for EMI shielding.

Step 6 Refer to the "Configuring a PRE4" section for information about configuring the PRE4.


Figure 5 ESD Chassis Connection

1

ESD socket


Figure 6 Inserting and Removing the PRE4

Figure 7 Closing and Opening the PRE4 Ejector Levers

Figure 8 PRE4 Captive Screw Locations

1

Captive screws


Connecting the BITS Filter Module and Clock Contacts (Optional)

The Cisco 10000 series router supports a Building Integrated Timing Source (BITS) Filter module. This module is already installed in a new chassis that is configured with a PRE4. If you are upgrading a Cisco 10000 series router with a PRE4, you can install the Building Integrated Timing Source (BITS) Filter module on the backplane of the chassis. This module is only required if you are connecting a BITS clock to the chassis.

The BITS Filter module (ESR-BITS-FLTR) allows you to attach BITS lines to the router using wire-wrap posts. It has a filter that prevents conducted emissions from the chassis traveling down the BITS lines and isolates the system from voltage surges.

The BITS Filter module has wire wrap posts to connect two sets of twisted pair (shielded or unshielded) receive TIP and RING lines from an external source to the system. The pins are associated with specific PRE slots.

Table 5 lists the wire wrap connector pinouts with the associated PRE slot.

Table 5 Wire Wrap Connector Pinouts

Pin Number
Function
Slot

1-A

TIP-A

PRE slot 0A

2-A

SHIELD-A

 

3-A

RING-A

 

1-B

TIP-B

PRE slot 0B

2-B

SHIELD-B

 

3-B

RING-B

 


Note Failure to use the BITS Filter module may result in electromagnetic emissions exceeding required levels



Caution Use extreme caution when wire-wrapping the pin connections on the BITS Filter module. Incorrect wire connections will cause damage to the equipment.


Caution The BITS clock distribution is rated for intra-building connection only.

Use the following procedure to connect the BITS clock to the wire-wrap pins on the BITS filter card:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic strap to your wrist or ankle and to an ESD socket on the chassis, or to a bare metal surface on the chassis or frame.

Step 2 Loosen the screw and remove the rear cover on the chassis to expose the BITS, Alarm, and DC power supply contacts (see Figure 9).

Figure 9 Removing Rear Cover

Step 3 Locate the J2402 EXT CLK connector and loosen the six screw terminals (see Figure 10).

Figure 10 Loosening the Screw Terminals

Step 4 Insert the BITS Filter module (see Figure 11) and tighten all six screw terminals.

Figure 11 Installing the BITS Filter Module

Step 5 Measure wire long enough to connect the appropriate pin on the BITS Filter module to the BITS clock. The BITS clock interface requires 24 to 26 American Wire Gauge (AWG) twisted-pair wire.

Step 6 Strip one end of the AWG wire approximately 0.75 inch (19.05 mm) using a wire stripper.

Step 7 Use a wire-wrapping tool to attach the wire to the appropriate pins on the BITS Filter module for the slot that contains the PRE4.


Note The BITS pins on the BITS Filter module are slot-specific. The RING-A, S-A, and TIP-A pins are for the PRE4 in slot 0A; the RING-B, S-B, and TIP-B pins are for the PRE4 in slot 0B.



Note Each BITS clock input is independent and terminated at 100 ohms. The BITS pair includes an optional SHIELD connection (pin S-A and pin S-B) for shielded twisted pair cabling.


Step 8 Attach the other end of the wire to the BITS clock distribution device.

Step 9 Repeat Step 5 through Step 8 to wire wrap the appropriate pins for the PRE4 in the other slot.

Step 10 Reinstall the rear cover on the chassis removed in Step 2.

Configuring a PRE4

After the PRE4 is successfully installed, you can configure it for network use. For information about configuring the PRE4, see "Managing the Router Using the Network Management Ethernet Port" section.


Note You do not need to configure a redundant (secondary) PRE4. The standby PRE4 automatically assumes the configuration of the active PRE4.


For further information about configuring a PRE4, refer to the Cisco 10000 series router publications at this URL:

http://cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/ps133/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

Removing a PRE4

Use the following procedure to remove a PRE from the chassis:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic strap to your wrist or ankle and to an ESD socket (see Figure 5) on the chassis, or to a bare metal surface on the chassis or frame.

Step 2 Loosen the top and bottom captive screws (see Figure 8) on the PRE.


Note The top and bottom captive screws must be loosened prior to pivoting the ejector levers in Step 3.


Step 3 Simultaneously pivot both ejector levers (see Figure 7) away from each other to disengage the PRE from the backplane.

Step 4 Slide the PRE out of the slot (see Figure 6) and place it on an antistatic surface, or in an antistatic bag.

Step 5 See the "Installing or Replacing a PRE4" section for instructions on how to install a new PRE.


Note If you are not installing a replacement PRE, install a blank faceplate in the slot.



Warning Do not operate the system unless all slots contain a PRE4, line card, or a blank faceplate. Blank faceplates are necessary in empty slots to prevent exposure to hazardous voltages, to reduce electromagnetic interference (EMI) that may disrupt other equipment, and to direct the flow of cooling air through the chassis.


Step 6 Power on the system if you have powered it off.

Troubleshooting the Installation

Refer to Figure 2 and Table 2 for descriptions of the LEDs on the PRE4. Follow the instructions in Table 6 to troubleshoot the installation.

Table 6 PRE4 Installation Troubleshooting

Symptom
Possible Cause
Corrective Action

PEMs, fans, and other line cards do not operate

1. Disconnected power cord.

2. Power switch is in the Off position.

3. The PRE4 fuses are blown.

1. Check that all power cords are properly connected to both the chassis and at the power connection end.

2. Set the PEM power switches to the On position.

3. Replace the PRE4.

The FAIL LED does not light during the power-on self-test

1. The PRE4 is not properly seated.

2. Bad PRE4 slot or backplane connector.

1. Be sure the ejector levers are fully closed and that the captive screws have been tightened.

2. Remove the PRE4 and install it in another PRE4 slot.

PRE4 does not operate properly

1. Bad PRE4 slot or backplane connector.

2. Bad PRE4.

1. Remove the PRE4 and install it in another PRE4 slot.

2. Replace the PRE4.


If these troubleshooting procedures do not correct the problem, refer to the Cisco 10000 Series Router Troubleshooting Guide for additional information.

Configuring Network Timing

Network Timing allows you to configure a common clock source, to drive the transmit clock on all the serial interfaces in the Cisco 10000 series router on the line cards that support this feature. Apart from the PRE4, the Cisco 10000 series router also supports the Network Timing module implemented as a daughter card on the PRE4.

This section describes items that need to be configured to enable Network Timing on the Cisco 10000 series router.

Configuration Tasks

Verifying the Network Timing Configuration

Configuration Examples

Configuration Tasks

This section explains the steps to configure Network Timing on the Cisco 10000 series router.

Enabling Network Timing

Selecting Clock Sources

Selecting Participating Subslots

Reverting to a Higher Priority Clock

Enabling Network Timing

Though several items must be configured to enable the Network Timing feature in the Cisco 10000 series router, the network-clock command is the main parser command issued from the global configuration mode. The other options included are specified below:

Router(config)# network-clock ?

Command
Purpose

Router(config)# network-clock select

Selects a network clock source. See Selecting Clock Sources.

Router(config)# network-clock participate

Enables or disables a slot/subslot from participating in network-clocking. See Selecting Participating Subslots.

Router(config)# network-clock revertive

Reverts the reference clock to the highest priority after the clock recovers from a previous failure. See Reverting to a Higher Priority Clock.


Selecting Clock Sources

Select a reference clock from the existing clock sources, to be used as the central timing source. When choosing a source clock, also select its priority.

The network-clock select command is issued from the global configuration mode, to select a clock source.

Router(config)# network-clock select ?

The following steps enable you to configure a clock source:


Step 1 Select a priority for the clock source. The priority is used to select a primary source and one or more secondary sources, in case of clock failure. Set the clock priority between 1 and 6. The highest priority is 1.

Router(config)# network-clock select <1-6>

Step 2 Select the controller, interface and slot options to source the clock, as shown in Example 1.

Example 1 Options to Source the Clock

In this example, `T'3 is the controller, `1:0' is the serial interface and `pre-a' denotes the active PRE4.

Router(config)# network-clock select 1 T3 5/0/0
Router(config)# network-clock select 1 interface serial 5/0/0/1:0
Router(config)# network-clock select 1 slot pre a

Note `pre-b' denotes the standby PRE4.


Step 3 After selecting the PRE4, select the parameters for the T1/E1 BITS input configuration.

T1 BITS Input

Router(config)# network-clock select 1 slot pre-a t1 {esf | sf} {b8zs | ami}

E1 BITS Input

Router(config)# network-clock select 1 slot pre-a e1 {crc4 | no-crc4} {hdb3 | ami}

For examples of T1 and E1 BITS input configuration, see Example 5 and Example 6 respectively.

Selecting Participating Subslots

Use the network-clock participate command in global configuration mode to configure individual subslot(s) that source the Network Timing clock. The range for slots is 1 to 8 and for subslots the range is 0 to 1.

Router(config)# network-clock participate [slot/subslot]

Reverting to a Higher Priority Clock

The network-clock revertive command allows you to automatically switch the clock to a higher priority after it recovers from a previous failure.

Router# network-clock revertive ?
<cr>

Verifying the Network Timing Configuration

The show network-clock command displays the clock sources configured, with their status and priority, and can be extended to display information about the daughter board and other digital phased locked loop (DPLL) information, as shown in Table 7.

Table 7 show network-clock Commands

Command
Purpose

Router# show network-clock dpll

Displays DPLL information as shown in Example 3.

Router# show network-clock ssm

Displays Source Specific Multicast (SSM) information as shown Example 4.

Router# show network-clock |

Displays other information.


Configuration Examples

The following are examples of the show network-clock commands:

router# sh runn | i network
network-clock select 1 Slot pre-a t1
network-clock select 2 interface Serial7/1/0/1:0
network-clock select 3 controller T3 7/0/0

Example 2 Show Configured Clocks

router# sh network-clocks 
Active source = Slot pre-a
  Driving DPLL pri input from CPLD loc bits mux input
 Standby source = Serial7/1/0/1:0
  Driving DPLL sec input from CPLD pri lc mux input

 All Network Clock Configuration
---------------------------------
 Priority    Clock Source        State                         Reason
 1           Slot pre-a          Valid                         No errs
 2           Serial7/1/0/1:0     Valid                         No errs
 3           T3 7/0/0            Valid                         No errs
 
 Current operating mode is Revertive 
 
 Current OOR Switchover mode is Switchover 

There are no slots disabled from participating in network clocking

Example 3 Show PRE4 and Line Card DPLL Status

router# sh network-clocks dpll  
PRE-A Nettime Daughter Board DPLL using pri input:
 Cnfg Mode:norm  State:lock (L/H:1/0) Freq. Limit:no  BITS LED:green
 
           Input         Ref Freq.  OOR  Acq. Holdover
 Pri Input:loc bits(t1)  1.544 MHz  no      no 
 Sec Input:pri lc        1.544 MHz  no      no 
 
Line Card DPLLs:
 S/SS  Clock Source      Line Card    Source  Cnfg Mode  State  PRE-A  PRE-B  Local
 1/0   none              4jacket-1    pre-a     norm     lock     ok     ok     nc 
 7/0   T3 7/0/0          4cht3-hh-1   pre-a     norm     lock     ok     ok     ok 
 7/1   Serial7/1/0/1:0   4cht3-hh-1   pre-a     norm     lock     ok     ok     na 

Example 4 Show SSM Codes Received

router# sh network-clocks ssm 
SSM Codes:
 S/SS  Clock Source      Source Card    Rcv SSM (code)
 -/-   Slot pre-a        loc PRE          n/a   (0xFF)
 1/0   none              4jacket-1        n/a   (0xFF)
 7/0   T3 7/0/0          4cht3-hh-1       n/a   (0xFF)
 7/1   Serial7/1/0/1:0   4cht3-hh-1       n/a   (0xFF)

Example 5 PRE4 T1 BITS Input Configuration

Router(config)# network-clock select 6 slot pre-a t1 ?
  esf  ESF Framing
  sf   SF Framing

Router(config)# network-clock select 6 slot pre-a t1 esf ?
  ami   AMI Line Coding
  b8zs  B8ZS Line Coding

Example 6 PRE4 E1 BITS Input Configuration

Router(config)# network-clock select 6 slot pre-a e1 ?   
  crc4     CRC4 Framing
  no-crc4  No CRC4 Framing

Router(config)# network-clock select 6 slot pre-a e1 crc4 ?
  ami   AMI Line Coding
  hdb3  HDB3 Line Coding

Forcing Failover in a Redundant Pair

To manually force the active and standby devices in a redundant pair to failover, use the redundancy force-switchover main-cpu command. Manually force the active and standby PRE4 to reverse roles if you need to replace the active one. You can then replace the PRE4 while causing only minimal disruption of traffic.

The following example shows how to set the standby PRE4 to be active:

Router# redundancy force-switchover main-cpu 

This command does not generate an alarm.

Managing System Boot Parameters

During the boot process, the system reads a software configuration register that defines certain system parameters. The software configuration register is a 16-bit register in NVRAM used to define such characteristics as:

The source of the Cisco IOS software image required to run the router

Whether the system software should ignore the contents of NVRAM

The behavior of the Break function

By modifying the boot parameters, you can customize your Cisco 10008 router. For example, a common configuration register setting in some lab environments is 0x2100. Using this setting, the system boots to the ROM monitor (ROMmon) prompt, where a technician can load a specific image by entering the boot command at the ROMmon prompt.

Changing the Software Configuration Register Settings

The factory default value for the software configuration register is 0x2102. To change the software configuration register settings while you are running system software, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the config-register value command from the global configuration mode, to set the contents of the software configuration register; value is a hexadecimal number preceded by 0x. For example:

Router(config)# config-register 0x2100

Consult the hexadecimal column in Table 8 for the possible settings to enter as the 4-bit value parameter.

Step 2 Exit global configuration mode by pressing Ctrl-Z.

Router(config)# Ctrl-Z 
Router#  

Step 3 To display the new software configuration register setting, issue the show version command.

Router# show version 

. 
#Configuration register is 0x141 (will be 0x2100 at next reload)

Step 4 Save the configuration file to preserve the new software configuration register settings.

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Reboot the router.

The router reboots using the new register settings. The software configuration register setting takes affect only after you reload the system. This happens when you issue the reload command from the console or reboot the router.

Table 8 Definition of Bits in the Software Configuration Register 

Bit No.
Hex Value
Meaning/Function

00 to 03

0x0000 to 0x000F

Defines the source of a default Cisco IOS software image required to run the router:

00—At power-on, the system remains at the ROM monitor prompt (rommon>), awaiting a user command to boot the system manually by means of the ROMmon boot command.

01—At power-on, the system automatically boots the first system image found on the PRE4.

02 to 0F—At power-on, the system automatically boots from a default Cisco IOS software image stored on a TFTP server in the network. For this setting, the Fast Ethernet port on the PRE4 must be configured and operational. This setting also enables boot system commands that override the default filename.

06

0x0040

Causes system software to ignore the contents of NVRAM.

07

0x0080

Enables the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) bit.

08

0x0100

The Break function is disabled after 30 seconds.

09

0x0200

Not used.

10

0x0400

Broadcast based on 0.0.0.0 IP address.

11 and 12

0x0800 to 0x1000

Defines the console baud rate (the default setting is 9600 baud).

13

0x2000

Boots an image from Disk0.

14

0x4000

Broadcast using the subnet broadcast address.

15

0x8000

Enables diagnostic messages and ignores the contents of NVRAM.


Upgrading a PRE3 to a PRE4

This section describes the following procedures to perform a hardware upgrade from a PRE3 to a PRE4:

Upgrading a PRE3 to a PRE4 Using ISU

Upgrading a PRE3 to a PRE4 Without Using ISU

You can upgrade a PRE3 to a PRE4 using the In Service Upgrade (ISU) feature. A PRE3 to PRE4 ISU is non-service impacting. Powering down the router is not required.

A PRE3 to PRE4 upgrade without ISU is a service impacting upgrade. The router is not available for user traffic during the upgrade, and traffic cannot resume until the upgrade is complete.

Upgrading a PRE3 to a PRE4 Using ISU

This section describes the procedure to perform a PRE3 to PRE4 upgrade using the ISU feature:

Prerequisites

Upgrade Considerations

Procedure to Upgrade a PRE3 to a PRE4 Using ISU

Prerequisites

For all of the software features supported by your current PRE3 (c10k3-p11-mz) image to function correctly, they must be supported by the PRE4 image. Check with the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) to verify the correct upgrade path before initiating the upgrade.

The upgrade should be performed by a qualified engineer. This person must be familiar with the Cisco router console interface and be able to perform basic router operations, such as configuration loading and router reload functions.

Do not perform this upgrade if your current PRE3 software image supports new features not yet supported by the PRE4 software image. Performing this upgrade will cause these features to fail.

Stateful Switchover (SSO) must be configured and working properly. If you do not have SSO enabled, see the Stateful Switchover document for further information on how to enable and configure SSO.

The Cisco IOS software release on the PRE3 must be the same Cisco IOS software release that is on the PRE4. For information on how to perform full image software upgrades using the In Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) process, see the Cisco IOS In Service Software Upgrade and Enhanced Fast Software Upgrade Process publication.

Upgrade Considerations

The SPA interface processors (SIPs) reset during a PRE3 to PRE4 ISU.

If the Cisco IOS software release on the PRE4 is compatible with the software release on the PRE3, the system operates in Stateful Switchover (SSO) mode. If the images are not compatible, the system operates in route processor redundancy (RPR) mode.

We recommend that you copy the new Cisco IOS software release for the PRE4 on a separate system, and not on the system you are upgrading.

Procedure to Upgrade a PRE3 to a PRE4 Using ISU

To upgrade a PRE3 to a PRE4 using ISU, follow these steps:


Step 1 Verify that the Cisco IOS software release on the PRE3 is the same Cisco IOS software release on the PRE4 using the dir command.

Step 2 Install the PRE4. Refer to the "Installing a PRE4" section.

Step 3 Copy the Cisco IOS image from a TFTP server to Disk0 or bootflash on the PRE4.

Router# copy tftp disk0:  
Address or name of remote host []? 223.255.254.254  
Source filename []? PRE4/images/c10k4-p11-mz 
Destination filename [c10k4-p11-mz]? 
Accessing tftp://223.255.254.254/PRE4/images/c10k4-p11-mz... 
Loading PRE4/images/c10k4-p11-mz from 223.255.254.254 (via FastEthernet0/0/0): 
.
.
.
. 
[OK - 25251732 bytes]  
25251732 bytes copied in 50.356 secs (501464 bytes/sec)  
Router#  

Step 4 Verify the Cisco IOS image is in Disk0 or bootflash using the dir command.

Router# dir disk0:
Directory of disk0:/

    1  -rw-    25750196   Mar 4 2000 00:13:24 +00:00  c10k4-p11-mz 
256503808 bytes total (230752256 bytes free)

Step 5 Enter global configuration mode.

Router# configure terminal 
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#

Step 6 Delete the existing filename in the configuration file to use the current image.

Router(config)# no boot system flash disk0:c10k4-p11-mz.mce_rp_isp-20060127

Step 7 Add a new line in the configuration file to use the PRE4 image (c10k4-p11-mz).

Router(config)# boot system flash disk0:c10k4-p11-mz

Step 8 Set the contents of the software configuration register to 0x2100.

Router(config)# config-register 0x2100 

Note Do not make further changes in the configuration file.


Step 9 Return to privileged EXEC mode.

Router(config)# exit
Router#

Step 10 Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Router# copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? 
Building configuration...
[OK]

Step 11 Verify that the Cisco IOS image and register setting are correct.

Router# show bootvar 
BOOT variable = disk0:c10k4-p11-mz,1; 
CONFIG_FILE variable = 
BOOTLDR variable = 
Configuration register is 0x02

Standby BOOT variable = disk0:c10k4-p11-mz,1; 
Standby CONFIG_FILE variable = 
Standby BOOTLDR variable = 
Standby Configuration register is 0x2 

Step 12 Connect a terminal to the active PRE3 in the chassis you are upgrading.

Step 13 Copy the startup and running configuration on the PRE3 to a TFTP server or flash disk.


Caution When the PRE3 is removed from the chassis, any local configuration is lost. You must save your configuration to a TFTP server or flash disk.

Step 14 On the active PRE3 console, enter the hw-module pre isu enable command in privileged EXEC mode.

Step 15 Attach an antistatic strap to your wrist or ankle and to an ESD socket on the chassis, or to a bare metal surface on the chassis or frame.

Step 16 Remove the PRE3 in the standby slot. Refer to the "Removing a PRE4" section.

Step 17 Insert a PRE4 in the standby slot. Refer to the "Installing a PRE4" section. The system enters Stateful Switchover (SSO) operating mode.

Step 18 From the active PRE3 console, enter the redundancy force-switchover main-cpu command.

Step 19 Remove the PRE3 from the other slot and insert a PRE4. If you are not installing a redundant PRE4, cover the unused slot with a blank filler plate.

Step 20 Verify the upgrade status using the hw-module pre isu status command.


The PRE3 to PRE4 upgrade is complete.

Upgrading a PRE3 to a PRE4 Without Using ISU

This section describes the procedures for performing a hardware upgrade from a PRE3 to a PRE4 without using the ISU feature:

Prerequisites

Upgrade Considerations

Procedure to Upgrade a PRE3 to a PRE4 Without Using ISU

Prerequisites

For all of the software features supported by your current PRE3 (c10k3-p11-mz) image to function correctly, they must be supported by the PRE4 image. Check with the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) to verify the correct upgrade path before initiating the upgrade.

The upgrade should be performed by a qualified engineer. This person must be familiar with the Cisco router console interface and be able to perform basic router operations, such as configuration loading and router reload functions.


Caution Do not perform this upgrade if your current PRE3 software image supports new features not yet supported by the PRE4 software image. Performing this upgrade will cause these features to fail.

Upgrade Considerations

Every new PRE4 is shipped with an eboot image (c10k4-eboot-mz) stored in bootflash.


Note This is a service impacting upgrade. The router is not available for user traffic during the upgrade, and traffic cannot resume until the upgrade is complete.


Procedure to Upgrade a PRE3 to a PRE4 Without Using ISU

To upgrade a PRE3 to a PRE4 without using ISU, follow these steps:


Step 1 Connect a terminal to the active PRE3.

Step 2 Save the startup and running configuration to a location on a TFTP server.


Caution When the PRE3 is removed from the chassis, any local configuration will be lost. You must save your configuration to a TFTP server.

Step 3 Power down the router. All the traffic on the router stops.


Note A PRE3 is hot-swappable. However, we recommend that you power down the router to ensure a successful installation when removing a PRE3.


Step 4 Attach an antistatic strap to your wrist or ankle and to an ESD socket on the chassis, or to a bare metal surface on the chassis or frame.

Step 5 Remove the PRE3 from the chassis. Refer to the "Removing a PRE4" section.

Step 6 Insert a PRE4. Refer to the "Installing a PRE4" section.

Step 7 Remove the PRE3 from the other slot and insert a PRE4. If you are not installing a redundant PRE4, cover the unused slot with a blank filler plate.

Step 8 Power up the router. The router boots in read-only memory (ROM) monitor mode.

Step 9 From the console in ROM monitor mode, enter the appropriate boot command.

Booting from a TFTP Server

If you saved the PRE4 image on a TFTP server that is reachable from the router (for example, if the router and server are on the same LAN or there is a default proxy server), boot the router from the TFTP server.

In the following example, the router boots the PRE4 image from a network server with the IP address 172.16.15.112:

> boot tftp://172.16.15.112/c10k4-p11-mz

The configuration dialog appears.

You can now proceed to step 9.

Booting from Disk0

If the image was saved to Disk0, boot that image.

The following boot command loads the PRE3 image from Disk0:

> boot disk0:c10k4-p11-mz

The configuration dialog appears.

You can now proceed to step 9.

Booting from the eboot Image

If you did not save the PRE4 image to a TFTP server, boot the eboot (c10k4-eboot-mz) image stored in bootflash.

In the following example, the router boots from the eboot image:

> boot bootflash:c10k4-eboot-mz

The configuration dialog appears.

Proceed to the "Did Not Save the Configuration" section.

Step 10 Restore the startup and running configuration of the router.

Saved the Configuration on a CompactFlash Card

If you booted the PRE4 image and saved the previous configuration to a CompactFlash card:

a. Exit the configuration dialog and restore the previously saved startup and running configuration from the CompactFlash card.

b. Update any boot commands to use the new PRE4 image.

The router is available for normal operations and the upgrade is complete.

Saved the Configuration on a TFTP Server

If you booted the PRE3 image, and you saved the previous configuration to a TFTP server:

a. Enter the initial configuration dialog, and enter all required information to allow access to the TFTP server.

b. Assign the correct IP address for the Fast Ethernet interface to become active and for the TFTP server to become reachable. This may require adding an IP route for the server even after the initial dialog completes.

c. Restore the previous configuration from the TFTP server to the startup and running configuration on the router.

d. Restore the startup and running configuration and update any boot commands to use the new PRE3 image.

The router is available for normal operations and the upgrade is complete.

Did Not Save the Configuration

If you did not save the PRE2 image to a TFTP server and you booted the PRE3 image:

a. Enter the initial configuration dialog, and enter all required information. Be sure to assign the correct IP address for the Fast Ethernet interface to become active and for the TFTP server to become reachable.

b. The TFTP server should be reachable. If you wish to boot the PRE3 image from a local CompactFlash card, download the PRE3 IOS image from the TFTP server to the bootflash memory. If you wish to boot directly from the TFTP server, you can skip the image download.

c. Restore the previously saved configuration by downloading it from the TFTP server. Update any boot commands from the previous configuration to point to the new PRE3 image. Otherwise, update the boot command to point to the desired PRE3 image.

d. Reload the router. After reload, the router is available to resume normal operations and the upgrade is complete.


The PRE3 to PRE4 upgrade is complete.

Upgrading Software on a PRE4

This section describes the procedures to upgrade software on a single PRE4 or redundant PRE4:

Upgrading Software on a Single PRE4

Upgrading Software on Redundant PRE4

Upgrading Software on a Single PRE4

To upgrade software on a single PRE4, follow these steps:


Step 1 Copy the Cisco IOS image from a TFTP server to Disk0.

Router# copy tftp disk0:  
Address or name of remote host []? 223.255.254.254  
Source filename []? PRE4/images/c10k4-p11-mz 
Destination filename [c10k4-p11-mz]? 
Accessing tftp://223.255.254.254/PRE4/images/c10k4-p11-mz... 
Loading PRE4/images/c10k4-p11-mz from 223.255.254.254 (via FastEthernet0/0/0): 
.
.
.
. 
[OK - 25251732 bytes]  
25251732 bytes copied in 50.356 secs (501464 bytes/sec)  
Router#  

Step 2 Specify the location in which the new boot image resides. In the following example, the image "c10k4-p11-mz" is located in Disk0.

Router(config)# boot system flash disk0:c10k4-p11-mz 

Step 3 Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Step 4 Reload the software by entering the reload command.

Router# reload


The system is now using the new Cisco IOS image.

Upgrading Software on Redundant PRE4

To upgrade software on two redundant PRE4, follow these steps:


Step 1 Verify that both the PRE4 are up using the show redundancy states command.

Router# show redundancy states
my state = 13 -ACTIVE 
     peer state = 8  -STANDBY HOT 
           Mode = Duplex
           Unit = Primary
        Unit ID = 0

Redundancy Mode (Operational) = SSO
Redundancy Mode (Configured)  = SSO
Redundancy State              = SSO
     Maintenance Mode = Disabled
Manual swact enabled
 Communications = Up

   client count = 38
 client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
           RF debug mask = 0x0 

Step 2 Copy the Cisco IOS image from a TFTP server to Disk0 on the active PRE4.

Router# copy tftp disk0:
Address or name of remote host []? 223.255.254.248 
Source filename []? c10008/c10k4-p11-mz
Destination filename [c10k4-p11-mz]? 
Accessing tftp://223.255.254.248/c10008/c10k4-p11-mz... 
Loading c10008/c10k4-p11-mz from 223.255.254.248(via FastEthernet0/0/0):
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!...
[OK - 25750196 bytes]
25750196 bytes copied in 50.64 secs (508495 bytes/sec)

Step 3 Copy the Cisco IOS image from a TFTP server to Disk0 on the standby PRE4.

Router# copy tftp stby-disk0

The output is similar to that shown in the previous step.


Step 4 Verify the Cisco IOS image is in the Disk0 directories.

Router# dir disk0:
Directory of disk0:/

    1  -rw-    25750196   Mar 4 2000 00:13:24 +00:00  c10k4-p11-mz 

256503808 bytes total (230752256 bytes free)

Router# dir stby-disk0:              
Directory of stby-disk0:/

    1  -rw-    25750196   Mar 4 2000 00:14:56 +00:00  c10k4-p11-mz 

257544192 bytes total (231792640 bytes free)

Step 5 Display the system image on bootflash.

Router# show run | i boot     
boot-start-marker
boot system flash disk0:c10k4-p11-mz.mce_rp_isp-20060127 
boot-end-marker
exception crashinfo file bootflash:crashinfo

Step 6 Enter global configuration mode.

Router# configure terminal 
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#

Step 7 Delete the existing filename in the configuration file to use the current image.

Router(config)# no boot system flash disk0:c10k4-p11-mz.mce_rp_isp-20060127

Step 8 Add a new line in the configuration file to use the new image.

Router(config)# boot system flash disk0:c10k4-p11-mz

Step 9 Set the contents of the software configuration register to 0x2100.

Router(config)# config-register 0x2100 

Step 10 Return to privileged EXEC mode.

Router(config)# exit
Router#

Step 11 Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Router# copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? 
Building configuration...
[OK]

Step 12 Verify the running configuration is copied to the startup configuration on both the PRE4.

Router# show bootvar 
BOOT variable = disk0:c10k4-p11-mz,1; 
CONFIG_FILE variable = 
BOOTLDR variable = 
Configuration register is 0x0 

Standby BOOT variable = disk0:c10k4-p11-mz,1; 
Standby CONFIG_FILE variable = 
Standby BOOTLDR variable = 
Standby Configuration register is 0x0 

Step 13 Reload the system by entering the reload command.

Router# reload 
Proceed with reload? [confirm]

Resetting .......
.
.
.


Both the PRE4 are now using the new Cisco IOS image with the new register settings.

Managing the Router Using the Network Management Ethernet Port

The Network Management Ethernet (NME) port on the PRE4 is used to manage the Cisco 10008 router. The duplex mode and speed of the NME port are configurable.

The following sections describe how to configure the duplex mode and speed of the NME port for the PRE4.

Configuring the NME Port on the PRE4

The NME port for PRE4 supports the following operational modes:

Autonegotiation (the default)

Full-duplex

Half-duplex

Default configurations do not appear in the router's configuration file.

We recommend that you allow the NME port to autonegotiate the duplex mode. When autonegotiation mode is enabled, the NME port responds only to IEEE 802.3x pause frames from another device.

If the negotiation of duplex mode fails and a duplex mode mismatch occurs, manually set the duplex mode for full-duplex or half-duplex operation. Setting duplex mode disables autonegotiation mode. When you manually set duplex mode, the NME port does not support IEEE 802.3x flow control.

When you manually configure duplex mode, the NME port can experience problems. If this occurs, disable duplex mode by entering the no full-duplex or no half-duplex command. When you enter the no duplex command, the operational mode reverts to autonegotiation mode.

To configure the NME port, perform the following optional configuration tasks:

Manually Setting the Duplex Mode for the NME Port for the PRE4

Manually Setting the Speed for the NME Port for the PRE4

Manually Setting the Duplex Mode for the NME Port for the PRE4


Note We recommend that you allow the NME port to autonegotiate (default setting) duplex mode.


To manually set the duplex operational mode of the NME port for the PRE4, enter either of the following commands in interface configuration mode:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# full-duplex

Configures the NME port for full-duplex operational mode.

For PRE4, the full-duplex command appears in the router's configuration file. If the configuration file does not specify a duplex mode, half-duplex mode is implied.

Note To return the system to its default duplex mode (autonegotiation), enter the no duplex command.

Router(config-if)# half-duplex

Configures the NME port for half-duplex operational mode.

For PRE4, the half-duplex command does not appear in the router's configuration file, but it is implied.

Note To return the system to its default duplex mode (autonegotiation), enter the no duplex command.


Manually Setting the Speed for the NME Port for the PRE4

To manually set the speed of the NME port for PRE4, enter the following command in interface configuration mode. The default speed of the NME port is 100 Mbps.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# speed {10 | 100 | auto}

Configures the speed of the NME port.

10—Sets the speed for 10 Mbps.

100— Sets the speed for 100 Mbps (the default).

auto—Enables the NME port to autonegotiate the speed.

To return the system to its default speed (100 Mbps), enter the no speed command.


Onboard Failure Logging

The On-Board Failure Logging (OBFL) feature enables storage and collection of critical failure information in the nonvolatile memory of a field replaceable unit (FRU), like a Route Processor (RP) or Line Card. The Cisco 10000 series router supports OBFL on PRE4 and the SPA Interface Processor (SIP) or jacket card.

The OBFL stored data assists in understanding and debugging field failures upon RMA (Return Material Authorization) of a RP or Line Card at repair and failure analysis sites.

OBFL records operating temperatures, hardware uptime, interrupts and any other important events that assist board diagnosis in case of hardware failures.

For more information on the feature, see the Onboard Failure Logging feature guide located at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122sx/newft/122sxh33/
sxhobfl.htm#wp1053048

Logging details for OBFL

The logging details for the OBFL feature are described below:

OBFL is enabled by default. You need to enable the feature if it has been disabled previously.

On the Route Processor (RP), logging begins after the system starts up.

On the jacket card, logging begins two minutes after the card Online Insertion and Removal (OIR). This delay allows the Shared Port Adapters (SPAs) to complete initialization.

OBFL updates RP and jacket card temperatures and voltage sensors every five minutes.

Temperature and voltage data is stored only when it is different from the last stored record.

The maximum logging time is two hours, hence, a new record is stored every two hours, regardless of data variation.

Logs are organized as current (continuous) and historical (summarized) data records.

OBFL logging has no impact on performance.

Storing OBFL Data

The RP logs are recorded in the bootflash, where other system images, configuration information and crash dumps are stored. OBFL logs are identified by the extension (*_hist or *_cont). The maximum memory used on the flash disk for OBFL storage is 2 MB.


Note OBFL log files must not be modified, overwritten or deleted from the bootflash, as this information is used for failure analysis.


The dir bootflash command displays a list of log files (including OBFL logs). Given below is a sample output of the additional filenames in use by OBFL.

Router# dir bootflash:
Directory of bootflash:/

4 -rw- 202752 Jan 4 2008 16:13:10 -05:00 env_cont
5 -rw- 69120 Jan 4 2008 16:13:12 -05:00 temp_hist
13 -rw- 69120 Jan 4 2008 16:13:12 -05:00 volt_hist
14 -rw- 33792 Jan 4 2008 16:13:12 -05:00 uptime_cont
15 -rw- 201216 Jan 4 2008 16:13:18 -05:00 errmsg_cont
16 -rw- 67584 Jan 4 2008 16:13:16 -05:00 env_hist
17 -rw- 135168 Jan 4 2008 16:13:18 -05:00 temp_cont
18 -rw- 135168 Jan 4 2008 20:17:28 -05:00 volt_cont
19 -rw- 6144 Jan 4 2008 16:13:14 -05:00 uptime_exthist
20 -rw- 4096 Jan 4 2008 16:13:16 -05:00 uptime_hist

Displaying OBFL Data

The show logging onboard [status] <module> <slotnumber/subslotnumber/modulenumber> command displays the logs from the OBFL data. On the Cisco 10000 series router the term module is used to represent a Route Processor (RP) or the SPA Interface Processor (SIP).

For information on OBFL commands, see the "Configuration Tasks" chapter in the Onboard Failure Logging feature guide located at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/docs/ios/12_0s/feature/guide/12sobfl.html#wp1025118

Analyzing and Troubleshooting Packets

The PXF engine of the PRE4 is responsible for processing and forwarding packets. As processing occurs, PXF counters increment to reflect the internal behavior of the PRE. The router collects this statistical information from the counters and appropriately displays it when you enter specific show pxf cpu commands. The output from these commands is useful in analyzing and troubleshooting denied and logged packets.

To correctly interpret packet statistics, it is important that you understand the behavior of the router during packet and access list processing, and the counters that provide the statistical data. This section briefly describes access list processing, some PXF counters and their behavior, and some of the commands you can use to display statistical information. This section is based on PRE4 with differences noted for other PREs.

Access Control Lists

The Cisco 10008 router provides traffic filtering capabilities using Access Control Lists (ACLs). Access lists filter network traffic by controlling whether routed packets are forwarded or blocked at the router's interfaces. Using ACLs, you can do such things as restrict the contents of routing updates, provide traffic flow control, and provide security for your network.

The Cisco 10008 router supports the following ACL types and features:

Standard and extended ACLs

Named and numbered ACLs

Per-user ACLs

Time-based ACLs

The access-list command is used to configure an ACL. For example, the following configuration creates ACL 108:

access-list 108 permit udp any host 10.68.1.10 range 0 5000 log
access-list 108 permit udp host 10.1.1.10 range 0 5000 any log

After creating an ACL, it is applied to an interface using the ip access-group command. The router executes the ACL from top to bottom, denying or permitting packets as directed by the access-list entries (ACEs). When the log keyword is specified in an ACE, the router sends packet information to the console.

The last line of an ACL is an implicit deny statement that appears to the router as:

deny any any

This statement causes the router to deny any packets remaining after processing the ACEs of the access list. The implicit deny statement does not include the log keyword; therefore, the router does not send packet information to the console for those packets denied by the implicit deny statement.

For example, the router processes the following ACL from top to bottom as follows:

access-list 108 permit udp any host 10.68.1.10 range 0 5000 log
access-list 108 permit udp host 10.1.1.10 range 0 5000 any log

Statement 1—Allows any UDP packet to access host 10.68.1.10 if the UDP destination port of the packet is between 0 and 5000. The router logs packet information to the console if a match is made.

Statement 2—Allows any UDP packet from host 10.1.1.10 with a source port between 0 and 5000 to be permitted. The router logs packet information to the console if a match is made.

Implicit Deny—Denies all remaining packets and does not log the packet information to the console.

Packet Statistics and PXF Counters

The PRE4 provides high performance Layer 3 processing using its PXF engine and route processor (RP). As the PXF processes packets, counters such as the following reflect the internal operation of the PRE4:

IP Forwarding Counter

ICMP Created Counters

Feedback Counter

The statistical information that the PXF counters provide is useful in analyzing and troubleshooting denied and logged packets. Because the internal operation of the PRE4 differs for ACLs, the PXF counters are inconsistent between the PREs. However, system-wide router behavior is consistent for PREs despite the differences in counters.

The following sections describe the PXF counters and the way in which they increment.

IP Forwarding Counter

A Forwarding Information Base (FIB) lookup is one of the initial steps in forwarding a packet. When the router forwarding processor needs information to forward a packet, it performs a lookup operation on the FIB table. The IP forwarding counter reflects the state of that lookup operation. It does not reflect whether or not the packet was forwarded. This counter increments each time an FIB lookup successfully occurs.

ICMP Created Counters

Some FIB lookup operations can cause Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) messages to be generated. For example, if a packet's time-to-live (TTL) expires, an address is unreachable, or an ACL-denied packet is dropped, an ICMP message is generated. The ICMP created counters reflect the number of ICMP packets created. The counters increment each time an FIB lookup results in the generation of an ICMP message.

Feedback Counter

Sometimes the PXF cannot complete the processing of a packet before the packet completes a single pass through the PXF; the packet requires additional processing. As a result, the packet is fed back through the PXF and processing continues. This is referred to as a feedback operation.

The following are examples of packets that can cause feedbacks to occur:

Packets that are forwarded and logged to the console

ICMP packets that are sent

Packets that require both input and output quality of service (QoS)

The feedback counter reflects the total number of feedbacks through the PXF by all packets. The counter increments one time for each additional pass a packet makes.

When a packet is denied because of an ACL deny statement, the router drops the packet. Dropped packets do not need further processing and, therefore, are not fed back through the PXF. In this case, the feedback counter does not increment.

Displaying Packet Statistics

The Cisco 10008 router supports show pxf cpu commands that allow you to determine the following information:

Forwarding engine traffic load

Forwarding engine actions on the traffic

Traffic load from the PXF to the RP

Status of output packet buffers for the queuing system

To display packet statistics for the PRE4, enter the following commands:

Command
Purpose

Router# show running-config

Displays the current router configuration.

Router# show interfaces type slot/subslot/port

Displays information about an interface.

Router# show version

Displays information about the currently loaded software version along with hardware and device information.

Router# show pxf cpu access-lists

Displays PXF memory information for ACLs.

Router# show pxf cpu atom

Displays PXF Any Transport over MPLS (AToM) forwarding information for an interface or Virtual Channel Common Index (VCCI).

Router# show pxf cpu bba

Displays PXF broadband aggregation (BBA) groups information.

Router# show pxf cpu buffers

Displays packet buffer memory for temporary packet storage in the Cisco Internetwork Performance Monitor (IPM) of the PXF.

Router# show pxf cpu context

Displays the current and historical loads on the PXF.

Router# show pxf cpu feedback

Displays the total number of feedbacks through the PXF by all packets.

Router# show pxf cpu isg

Displays PXF policy and template information.

Router# show pxf cpu ipv6

Displays PXF IPv6 statistics.

Router# show pxf cpu mpls

Displays PXF MPLS Forwarding Information Base (FIB) information.

Router# show pxf cpu mroute

Displays PXF multicast route (mroute) information for a particular group or range of groups.

Router# show pxf cpu pbr action

Displays policy-based routing (PBR) actions configured in the PXF.

Router# show pxf cpu police

Displays all active policer policies in the PXF, including active interface and policing parameters.

Router# show pxf cpu policy-data

Displays PXF policy data index usage statistics.

Router# show pxf cpu queue

Displays queueing statistics for a single interface, all interfaces, or a queue identifier (QID).

Router# show pxf cpu statistics

Displays various PXF statistics for a configured router.

Router# show pxf cpu vcci

Displays VCCI to interface mapping information.


For more information about show pxf commands, refer to the Cisco IOS Command Reference publication for your Cisco IOS software release.

Sample Case Study

For the purposes of this case study, assume that the following ACL is configured on the router's outbound serial 1/0/0 interface:

access-list 108 permit udp any host 10.68.1.10 range 0 5000 log
access-list 108 permit udp host 10.1.1.l0 range 0 5000 any log

A traffic simulator is used to send 100 UDP packets to the Cisco 10008 router with the source and destination ports of the packets set to 6000. Packets arrive on the Gigabit Ethernet 2/0/0 interface and are supposed to leave the router through the serial 1/0/0 interface.

After processing the 100 UDP packets, the show pxf cpu commands are entered to display statistical information about the packets.

Displaying Packet Statistics for ACLs

The show pxf cpu statistics security command provides statistical information about the packets denied, permitted, and logged by ACLs. The router collects statistics for mini-compiled ACLs, but not for turbo-compiled ACLs.

The following example output provides packet information before sending the 100 packets. Notice that the Packets Denied field indicates that no packets have been denied by ACL 108. The Denied & Log field indicates that no denied packets have been logged.

Router# show pxf cpu statistics security

ACL    Pkts     Pkts        Denied   Permit   Other
Name   Denied   Permitted   & Log    & Log    Packets
108    0        0           0        0        0

The following example output results after sending the 100 packets. Notice that the Packets Denied field now indicates that 100 packets have been denied. Recall that the router denied the packets because they matched the implicit deny statement. This statement does not include a log keyword, which causes information to be sent to the console. Therefore, no logging occurs and the Denied and Log fields indicate this.

Router# show pxf cpu statistics security

ACL    Pkts     Pkts        Denied   Permit   Other
Name   Denied   Permitted   & Log    & Log    Packets
108    100      0           0        0        0

Displaying IP Forwarding Statistics

The show pxf cpu statistics ip command provides statistical information about IP forwarding. The following example output indicates that the count of the IP forwarding counter before sending the 100 packets is 402.

Router# show pxf cpu statistics ip

FP ip statistics
dropped        = 0
forwarded      = 402
punted         = 540
input_packets  = 942
icmps_created  = 0
noadjacency    = 0
noroute        = 6
unicast_rpf    = 0

FP ip multicast statistics
mcast total    = 0
mcast drops    = 0
mcast punts    = 0
mcast switched = 0
mcast encaps   = 0
mcast decaps   = 0

FP ip frag statistics
packets        = 0
fragments      = 0
fragfail       = 0
dontfrag       = 0
mcdontfrag     = 0

FP icmp statistics
unreachsent    = 2
ttlsent        = 0
echorepsent    = 5
echorcv        = 5
checksumerr    = 0

FP mpls statistics
diverted       = 0
dropped        = 0
switched       = 0
feedback        = 0
icmps created  = 0

The following example output results after sending the 100 packets. Notice that the IP forwarding counter is now 502.

Router# show pxf cpu statistics ip

FP ip statistics
dropped         0
forwarded     502   /*incremented by 100*/
punted        540
input_packets 942
icmps_created   0
noadjacency     0
noroute        = 6
unicast_rpf    = 0

FP ip multicast statistics
mcast total    = 0
mcast drops    = 0
mcast punts    = 0
mcast switched = 0
mcast encaps   = 0
mcast decaps   = 0

FP ip frag statistics
packets        = 0
fragments      = 0
fragfail       = 0
dontfrag       = 0
mcdontfrag     = 0

FP icmp statistics
unreachsent    = 2
ttlsent        = 0
echorepsent    = 5
echorcv        = 5
checksumerr    = 0

FP mpls statistics
diverted       = 0
dropped        = 0
switched       = 0
feedback        = 0
icmps created  = 0

Displaying Queueing Statistics

The show pxf cpu queue command provides queueing statistics for one interface, all interfaces, or a queue identifier (QID). The following example displays PXF queuing statistics for QID 591.

Router# show pxf cpu queue 591 

HW Queue: qid=591 
qlimit=25000 chain_size=7 user_defined_overhead_with_atm=0 
length_adjust_or_mlp_class=0 
        lblt=72 quantum=10000 (Y=29, X=53688) w=1 (brr=166) flags=0x0
        Shape x=0 y=0 (0 bps) invx=0 invy=0 maxTokens=0
        shapeTS=0x1F92C9F9 curr_token=0x0000 curr_quantum=9937

    Logical BLT Shadow data: qid=72
        hwidb=GigabitEthernet1/3/1, lfi bundle qid=0x0, def pblt=19
        atm_vc=Not an ATM VC, mqc_gqid=0x0, lblt flags=0x4

    HW Logical BLT: qid=72 
        pblt=19 quantum=10000 (Y=29, X=53688) w=1 (brr=166)
        Shape: x=0 y=0 (0 bps) invx=0 invy=0 maxTokens=0
        pkt_size_adj_type=PKT_SIZE_ADJ_TYPE_PRE3_NORMAL user_defined_overhead=0
        curr_token=0xFFFFFFC0 last_timestamp=0x00000000
        Flow Control: period=0 offset=0 frag=4095 byte=0 res=0
        ML / LFI: ml_lfi_flag=0 ml_size=0 start_flag=0 delay_start=1

    Physical BLT Shadow data: qid=19 
        hwidb=GigabitEthernet1/3/1, pbt flags=0x0
        Bandwidths  max=1000000 kbps, current=1000000 kbps, shaped=0kbps
        2 child lblts: 70 72
    HW Physical BLT: qid=19
        bwm=39322, bws=14,(999989827 bps), resource=11, burst_limit=6826, channel=113
        flow_period=8, flow_offset=1, flow_resource=14
        col6_burst_limit=169, pkt_size_adj_type=1, flowoff_byte=0
        vtp_bwm=0, vtp_bws=0, vtp_burst=0, next_send_blt=19, pblt=19

Displaying Drop Statistics

The show pxf cpu statistics drop command provides information about dropped packets and ICMP packets. The following example output indicates the count of the icmp_unrch_interval counter before sending the 100 packets. Notice that the count is zero.

Router# show pxf cpu statistics drop

FP drop statistics

                        packets            bytes
    reasm_err_or_badmtu   0                  0
    mpls_no_eos           0                  0
    fib_zero_dest         0                  0
    fib_drop_null         0                  0
    fib_icmp_no_adj       0                  0
    fib_icmp_bcast_dst    0                  0
    mfib_ttl_0            0                  0
    mfib_disabled         0                  0
    mfib_rpf_failed       0                  0
    mfib_null_oif         0                  0
    mfib_ttl_threshold    0                  0
    tfib_rp_flag          0                  0
    tfib_eos_violation    0                  0
    tfib_nonip_expose     0                  0
    tfib_label_invalid    0                  0
    tfib_path_unknown     0                  0
    tfib_nonip_ttl_exp    0                  0
    icmp_unrch_interval   0                  0  /*no ICMP packets created*/ 
    icmp_on_icmp          0                  0
    icmp_bad_hdr          0                  0
    icmp_multicast        0                  0
    icmp_frag             0                  0
    macr_bad_tag_num      0                  0
    no_touch              0                  0
    enq_id_0              0                  0
    no_pkt_handles        0                  0
    l2_unsupp_drop        0                  0
    ipm_replay_full       0                  0
    bad_atm_arp           0                  0
   nested_fragmentation   0                  0
    l2less drop packets   0
   ipv6_not_enabled       0                  0
   ipv6_version           0                  0
   ipv6_length            0                  0
   ipv6_src_mcast         0                  0
   ipv6_src_loopback      0                  0
   ipv6_dst_unspec        0                  0
   ipv6_dst_loopback      0                  0
   ipv6_rpf_fail          0                  0
.
.
.

The following example output indicates the count of the icmp_unrch_interval counter after sending the 100 packets. Notice that the icmp_unrch_interval count now indicates 100 due to the dropped packets.

Router# show pxf cpu statistics drop

FP drop statistics

                        packets            bytes
    reasm_err_or_badmtu   0                  0
    mpls_no_eos           0                  0
    fib_zero_dest         0                  0
    fib_drop_null         0                  0
    fib_icmp_no_adj       0                  0
    fib_icmp_bcast_dst    0                  0
    mfib_ttl_0            0                  0
    mfib_disabled         0                  0
    mfib_rpf_failed       0                  0
    mfib_null_oif         0                  0
    mfib_ttl_threshold    0                  0
    tfib_rp_flag          0                  0
    tfib_eos_violation    0                  0
    tfib_nonip_expose     0                  0
    tfib_label_invalid    0                  0
    tfib_path_unknown     0                  0
    tfib_nonip_ttl_exp    0                  0
    icmp_unrch_interval 100              12276  /*incremented by 100*/ 
    icmp_on_icmp          0                  0
    icmp_bad_hdr          0                  0
    icmp_multicast        0                  0
    icmp_frag             0                  0
    macr_bad_tag_num      0                  0
    no_touch              0                  0
    enq_id_0              0                  0
    no_pkt_handles        0                  0
    l2_unsupp_drop        0                  0
    ipm_replay_full       0                  0
    bad_atm_arp           0                  0
   nested_fragmentation   0                  0
    l2less drop packets   0
   ipv6_not_enabled       0                  0
   ipv6_version           0                  0
   ipv6_length            0                  0
   ipv6_src_mcast         0                  0
   ipv6_src_loopback      0                  0
   ipv6_dst_unspec        0                  0
   ipv6_dst_loopback      0                  0
   ipv6_rpf_fail          0                  0
.
.
.

Displaying PXF Traffic Loads

The show pxf cpu context command provides the current and historical loads on the PXF.


Note Enter the show pxf cpu context command twice in quick succession to obtain valid traffic load output.


The following example shows how busy the PXF forwarding process (FP) is with the current traffic load. The FP context statistics section displays the number of contexts of each type that have entered the PXF engine since it was last reloaded. If counters are idle, the PXF pipeline is hung.

Router# show pxf cpu context

FP context statistics    count          rate (since last time command was run)
---------------------    -------------  ----------
    feed_back            168635         0
    new_work_from_lc     7474477        13
    new_work_from_rp     964679         1
    new_work_from_replay 0              0
    null_context         3797097495884  6312156
                                        ----------
                                        6312170
FP average context/sec   1min        5min        60min
---------------------    ----------  ----------  ----------
    feed_back            0           0           0          cps
    new_work_from_lc     8           8           8          cps
    new_work             1           1           1          cps
    new_work_from_replay 0           0           0          cps
    null_context         6312260     6312261     6312250    cps
---------------------    ----------  ----------  ----------
    Total                6312270     6312271     6312260    cps

FP context utilization 1min        5min        60min
---------------------  ----------  ----------  ----------
    Actual             0   %       0   %       0   %
    Theoretical        0   %       0   %       0   %
    Maximum            98  %       98  %       98  % 

Displaying Feedback Counts

The show pxf cpu feedback command provides the total number of feedbacks through the PXF by all packets.

Router# show pxf cpu feedback

Load for five secs: 5%/0%; one minute: 6%; five minutes: 2%
Time source is hardware calendar, *21:13:02.615 UTC Tue Nov 29 2005

FP column 0 feedback counts

Global packet handle retry counter = 0

Name                      Current                Difference (since last show)
---------------------     ----------             ----------
bypass                  = 0                      0
schedule retry          = 0                      0
WRED sample             = 0                      0
MLPPP linkq update      = 0                      0
IP frag                 = 0                      0
ICMP                    = 7                      7
layer2 divert           = 0                      0
tunnel lookup           = 0                      0
tunnel RX               = 0                      0
tunnel TX               = 0                      0
output qos              = 0                      0
tag not ip              = 0                      0
netflow accumulate      = 0                      0
netflow age             = 0                      0
netflow swap            = 0                      0
.

IPv6 Forwarding over MPLS

The Cisco 10008 router supports PXF-accelerated IPv6 packet forwarding over Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) on the PRE4. This feature is enabled by default.

Table 9 lists common IPv6 commands. For more information about IPv6 commands, refer to the Cisco IOS Command Reference publication for your Cisco IOS software release.

Table 9 IPv6 Forwarding over MPLS Commands

Command
Purpose

Router(config)# ipv6 access-list

Configures an IPv6 access list and places the router in IPv6 access list configuration mode.

Router(config)# ipv6 cef

Enables Cisco Express Forwarding for IPv6 (CEFv6).

Router(config)# ipv6 cef distributed

Enables distributed CEFv6 (dCEFv6) to process IPv6 packets from the Route Processor (RP) to the line cards.

Router(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing

Enables the forwarding of IPv6 packets.

Router(config-if)# ipv6 enable

Enables IPv6 processing on an interface that has not been configured with an explicit IPv6 address.

Router(config-if)# ipv6 address

Configures an IPv6 address based on an IPv6 general prefix and enables IPv6 processing on an interface,

Router# show pxf cpu ipv6

Displays PXF IPv6 statistics.


TCAM Commands

This section describes the following commands for ACL lookup using the Ternary Content Addressable Memory (TCAM) on the PRE4:

hw-module tcam

show pxf cpu access-lists

show pxf cpu pbr action

show pxf cpu qos

show pxf dma

show pxf tcam

hw-module tcam

To configure the router to merge (or not merge) access control list entries (ACEs) when compiling and storing ACEs in Ternary Content Addressable Memory (TCAM), use the hw-module tcam command in global configuration mode. To not merge ACEs, use the no form of the command.

hw-module tcam compile {no-merge | with-pt-tree}

no hw-module tcam compile with-pt-tree

Syntax Description

no-merge

Programs the TCAM using the original ACE instead of merging ACEs. This option enables you to display per-ACE statistics for security access control lists (ACLs).

with-pt-tree

Uses a TCAM merge algorithm to collapse ACEs, which improves the utilization and scalability of TCAM. However, this option aggregates statistical information at the ACL level, disabling the router's ability to provide per-ACE statistics for security ACLS.


Command Default

The router uses the original ACE to program TCAM (no-merge option).

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(31)SB2

This command was introduced on the PRE3 for the Cisco 10000 series router.

12.2(33)SB

This command was introduced on the PRE4 for the Cisco 10000 series router.


Usage Guidelines

Ternary Content Addressable Memory (TCAM) is a hardware device on the PRE3 and the PRE4 that enables QoS ACLs to be collapsed and stored densely. Instead of using the TurboACL algorithm of the PRE3, the PRE3 uses the TCAM to implement ACL lookup for quick retrieval.

The PRE2 does not support the following features for IPv4 security ACLs:

IPv4 mini-ACLs (less than 8 ACEs)

Incremental compilation

IPv4 template ACLs have the same functionality on the PR2 as the PRE2 implementation.

The router supports the collection of per-ACE statistical information using the hw-module tcam compile no-merge command.

When configured, the hw-module tcam command applies to all newly added or modified ACLs and QoS-related TCAM entries. When you reload the router or microcode, the command applies to all ACL and QoS-related TCAM entries.

Examples

The following example merges ACEs in TCAM, conserving TCAM space. Per-ACE statistical information is not available when this command is configured.

Router(config)# hw-module tcam compile with-pt-tree
Router(config)# 

Related Commands

Command
Description

hw-module

Resets a line card.


show pxf cpu access-lists

To display parallel express forwarding (PXF) memory information for access control lists (ACLs), use the show pxf cpu access-lists command in privileged EXEC mode.

show pxf cpu access-lists [security | qos | pbr | compiled]

Cisco 10000 Series Router

show pxf cpu access-lists [security [[tcam acl-name [detail]] | flex-sum | children] | qos | pbr | compiled]

Syntax Description

security

(Optional) Displays information about the security ACLs defined in Cisco IOS and compiled to the PXF. Also displays information about split ACLs, such as how much memory has been used.

tcam acl-name

(Optional) Displays information about the specified security ACL stored in ternary content addressable memory (TCAM).

Note This option is only available on the PRE3 and PRE4 for the Cisco 10000 series router.

detail

(Optional) Displays decoded information about the packet fields used for matching in the TCAM.

flex-sum

(Optional) Displays summary information describing the amount of memory allocated in the parallel express forwarding (PXF) engine for use by the flexible key construction microcode. This information is useful for design teams.

Note This option is only available on the PRE3 and PRE4 for the Cisco 10000 series router.

children

(Optional) Displays information for child policies. If an ACL is a template child, the output typically does not display the child information. Specifying the children keyword displays data for child policies, too, and shows the children and the parent policy of each child.

Use caution when using the children keyword as there might be thousands of child policies configured, which could have negative effects on the command output.

qos

(Optional) Displays information about the QoS ACLs defined in Cisco IOS and compiled to the PXF.

pbr

(Optional) Displays information about ACLs for policy-based routing (PBR).

compiled

(Optional)  Displays information for all compiled Turbo-ACLs.

The PRE2 supports Turbo-ACLs and the compiled option. The PRE3 and PRE4 accept the PRE2 compiled option, but do not implement Turbo-ACLs.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2S

This command was introduced.

12.3(7)XI1

This command was introduced on the PRE2 for the Cisco 10000 series router.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was introduced on the PRE3 for the Cisco 10000 series router.

12.2(33)SB

This command was introduced on the PRE4 for the Cisco 10000 series router.


Usage Guidelines

Cisco 10000 Series Router (PRE2)

Because memory is shared between TurboACLs and MiniACLs, they can interfere with each other's capacities. The Mini-ACL is automatically set up with space for 8191 Mini-ACLs at router start. If more than 8191 Mini-ACLs are created, another block of MiniACLs (4096) is allocated. This process is repeated as necessary until the router is out of External Column Memory (XCM) in any one bank that the Mini-ACLs need.

Cisco 10000 Series Router (PRE3 and PRE4)

The PRE3 and PRE4 only implement TCAM ACLs. Turbo-ACLs and Mini-ACLs are not supported.

Examples

The sample output from the show pxf cpu access-lists security command (see Sample Output) is based on the configuration of the access control list (ACL) called test_list (see ACL Configuration). The sample output is divided into several sections with a description of the type of information displayed in each.

ACL Configuration

Router# show pxf cpu access-lists test_list

Extended IP access list test_list (Compiled)
    10 permit ip any host 10.1.1.1
    20 permit ip any host 10.1.1.2
    30 permit ip any host 10.1.1.3
    40 permit ip any host 10.1.1.4
    50 permit ip any host 10.1.1.5
    60 permit ip any host 10.1.1.6
    70 permit ip any host 10.1.1.7
    80 permit ip any host 10.1.1.8
    90 permit ip any host 10.1.1.9
    100 permit ip any host 10.1.1.11
    110 permit ip any host 10.1.1.12

Sample Output

The following sample output describes the information displayed in the first section of the command output from the show pxf cpu access-lists security command:

Router# show pxf cpu access-lists security

PXF Security ACL statistics:
ACL            State      Tables  Entries  Config  Fragment  Redundant  Memory ACL_index
 1            Operational   1        -       -        -        -         0Kb     1
sl_def_acl    Operational   2        -       -        -        -         0Kb     2
test          Operational   3        -       -        -        -         0Kb     3
test_list     Operational   1        12      11       0        0         7Kb     1

Table 10, Part 1 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 10, Part 1 show pxf cpu access-lists security Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

ACL

Identifies the ACL by name or number.

State

Displays the current state of the ACL:

Copying—ACL is in the process of being created or compiled.

Operational—ACL is active and filtering packets.

Out of acl private mem—ACL has run out of the private memory that was allocated exclusively to it.

Out of shared mem—ACL has run out of the memory that it shares with other ACLs.

Unknown Failure—ACL has failed because of an uncategorized reason.

Unneeded—ACL was allocated but is not currently in use.

Tables

An indicator of whether the ACL has been split into more than one PXF pass. The first three ACLs in the output are MiniACLs, and have the ACL_index duplicated in the Tables column.

Entries

The count of ACL rules as seen by the Turbo compiler. This is the sum of the Config, Fragment, and Redundant columns plus 1.

Config

The count of rules for this ACL.

Fragment

The count of extra rules added to handle fragment handling, where Layer 4 information is needed but not available in a packet fragment.

Redundant

The count of rules that are not needed because they are covered by earlier rules.

Memory

The amount of PXF XCM in use for the ACL.

ACL_index

The index of the ACL in XCM.


The following sample output describes the information displayed in the next section of the command output from the show pxf cpu access-lists security command:

First level lookup tables:
Block      Use              Rows       Columns   Memory used
  0   TOS/Protocol            1/128     1/32      16384
  1   IP Source (MS)          1/128     1/32      16384
  2   IP Source (LS)          1/128     1/32      16384
  3   IP Dest (MS)            2/128     1/32      16384
  4   IP Dest (LS)           12/128     1/32      16384
  5   TCP/UDP Src Port        1/128     1/32      16384
  6   TCP/UDP Dest Port       1/128     1/32      16384
  7   TCP Flags/Fragment      1/128     1/32      16384

Table 10, Part 2 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 10, Part 2 show pxf cpu access-lists security Field Descriptions

Field
Description

Block

Indicates the block number.

Use

Describes the IP packet field that is being matched.

Rows

An indication of where the largest variety of values are in use in the ACLs that are being applied. In the output, 12/128 means that there are 12 different values of significance in the field. If there are other rules added and the value exceeds 128, more memory will be needed to accommodate the new rules.

Columns

An indication of the number of TurboACLs in PXF memory. In the output, 1/32 means there is only one TurboACL in PXF memory. If there are more than 31 added, another chunk of memory is needed to accommodate the new ACLs.

Memory used

Displays the total amount of memory used for this particular lookup table.


The following sample output describes the information displayed in the next section of the command output from the show pxf cpu access-lists security command. There are 16 banks of XCM in each PXF column. This output section shows the usage level of each bank.


Banknum   Heapsize   Freesize  %Free
   0       4718592    4702208    99
   1       8126464    6012928    73
   2       8388608    6290432    74
   3       8388608    6290432    74
   4       5898240    5881856    99
   5       8126464    6012928    73
   6       8388608    6290432    74
   7       8126464    6012928    73
   8       4456448    4440064    99
   9       8126464    6012928    73

Table 10, Part 3 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 10, Part 3 show pxf cpu access-lists security Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Banknum

The block of memory used for this particular lookup table.

Heapsize

The total amount of memory, in bytes, allocated for this block.

Freesize

The amount of memory, in bytes, that is currently available for use by this block of memory.

%Free

The percentage of memory that is free and available for use for this block of memory. When the %Free drops to 0, the router cannot hold any more ACLs in PXF memory, and any new ACL will not pass traffic.


This section of the sample command output indicates the memory usage of the MiniACLs in the router. All of the rows state about the same thing. To determine the actual number of MiniACLs in play, divide the memory used in any of blocks 1 to 10 by 256, or blocks 11 to 14 by 16.


MiniACL XCM Tables:
Block   Use               Memory Used   %Free
  0   IP Src 1                 768        99
  1   IP Src 2                 768        99
  2   IP Src 3                 768        99
  3   IP Src 4                 768        99
  4   IP Dest 1                768        99
  5   IP Dest 2                768        99
  6   IP Dest 3                768        99
  7   IP Dest 4                768        99
  8   ToS                      768        99
  9   Protocol                 768        99
  10  TCP Flags/Fragment       768        99
  11  Source Port 1             48        99
  12  Source Port 2             48        99
  13  Destination Port 2        48        99
  14  Destination Port 2        48        99

The following describes the information displayed in the last section of the sample output from the show pxf cpu access-lists security command:

Available MiniACL count = 8191
Usable ranges(inclusive):
1->8191

Table 10, Part 4 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 10, Part 4 show pxf cpu access-lists security Field Descriptions

Field
Description

Available MiniACL

The number of ACLs currently available for allocation in XCM.

Usable ranges

The ACL indexes that will be assigned to MiniACLs.


PRE2 and PRE3 Security ACLs Examples (Cisco 10000 Series Router)

This section compares the output from the show pxf cpu access-lists security command when issued on the PRE2 and PRE3.

For the PRE2, the following sample output displays VMR (value, plus a mask and result) data for the ACL named ICMP_IGMP_MATCH:

Router# show pxf cpu access-lists security tcam ICMP_IGMP_MATCH detail 

-------------------------------------------------------------
VMR Format - handle: 524607B4
Format has 5 fields, refcount = 1
Field: Format, FIXED, start_bit = 69, end_bit = 71
Field: ACL index, FIXED, start_bit = 54, end_bit = 68
Field: Flags, FIXED, start_bit = 43, end_bit = 53
Field: L4 proto, FIXED CNV, start_bit = 16, end_bit = 23
Field: L4 source port, FIXED CNV, start_bit = 0, end_bit = 15 Total bits = 53, format = 72 
GMR used: 5 Col 2 LKBP Vector: 544
-------------------------------------------------------------
VMRs
------ VMR 0 ------
V: 001B0000 0000010B 00
M: FFFFC000 0000FFFF FF
R: 00010001
Format: 00000000/00000007
ACL index: 0000006C/00007FFF
L4 source port: 00000B00/0000FFFF
L4 proto: 00000001/000000FF
Flags: 00000000/00000000
------ VMR 1 ------
V: 001B0000 00000103 01
M: FFFFC000 0000FFFF FF
R: 00010002
Format: 00000000/00000007
ACL index: 0000006C/00007FFF
L4 source port: 00000301/0000FFFF
L4 proto: 00000001/000000FF
Flags: 00000000/00000000
------ VMR 2 ------
V: 001B0000 00000213 00
M: FFFFC000 0000FFFF 00
R: 00010003
Format: 00000000/00000007
ACL index: 0000006C/00007FFF
L4 source port: 00001300/0000FF00
L4 proto: 00000002/000000FF
Flags: 00000000/00000000
------ VMR 3 ------
V: 001B0000 00000214 00
M: FFFFC000 0000FFFF 00
R: 00010004
Format: 00000000/00000007
ACL index: 0000006C/00007FFF
L4 source port: 00001400/0000FF00
L4 proto: 00000002/000000FF
Flags: 00000000/00000000

For the PRE3, the following sample output displays for the show pxf cpu access-lists security command. Notice that the output does not include the columns shown above that are relevant to only the PRE2 and the output no longer displays first-level lookup tables.

Router# show pxf cpu access-lists security 

PXF Security ACL statistics:
 ACL                                     State           ACL_index
STANDARD_MATCH_PERMIT                    Operational           116
SRC_IP_MATCH144                          Operational           102
DST_IP_MATCH                             Operational           113
DST_IP_MATCH144                          Operational           112
PROTOCOL_MATCH                           Operational           104
PROTOCOL_MATCH144                        Operational           103
FRAG_MATCH                               Operational           109
PRECEDENCE_TOS_MATCH                     Operational           106
PRECEDENCE_TOS_MATCH144                  Operational           105

Related Commands

Command
Description

show pxf cpu statistics

Displays PXF CPU statistics.

show pxf statistics

Displays a chassis-wide summary of PXF statistics.


show pxf cpu pbr action

To display policy-based routing (PBR) actions configured in the Parallel eXpress Forwarding (PXF), use the show pxf cpu pbr action command in privileged EXEC mode.

show pxf cpu pbr action map-name

Cisco 10000 Series Router

show pxf cpu pbr [action map-name | tcam map-name | flex-sum]

Syntax Description

action map-name

(Optional) Displays PBR action information and redirects the command output to the route map you specify.

tcam map-name

(Optional) Displays VMR (value, plus a mask and result) information stored in ternary content addressable memory (TCAM) and redirects the command output to the route map you specify.

Note This option is only available on the PRE3 and PRE4 for the Cisco 10000 series router.

flex-sum

(Optional) Displays summary information describing the amount of memory allocated in the PXF engine for use by the flexible key construction microcode. This information is useful for design teams.

Note This option is only available on the PRE3 and PRE4 for the Cisco 10000 series router.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2S

This command was introduced.

12.3(7)XI1

This command was introduced on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE2.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was introduced on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3.

12.2(33)SB

This command was introduced on the PRE4 for the Cisco 10000 series router.


Usage Guidelines

This command is useful to determine if an adjacency has been found for a set ip next-hop ip-address route map configuration command.

Examples

The following example shows the PBR route maps configured in the PXF:

Router# show pxf cpu pbr action foo

Show PBR Action:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Policy number: 1           
route-map foo, permit, sequence 10
  map number    = 0           
  action index  = 0           
    primary action   : SET_ROUTE
    secondary action : - none -
    mac-rewr index = 0x0000 0015
    vcci = 0x09D4, qos group = 0, tos prec = 0
    tt_pkt_count = 0            tt_byte_count = 0           
 Adjacency data 0x20D29968
 XCM adjacency from 0x70000120(RP) 
   0xA0000120(FP) index 0x24:

Cisco 10000 Series Router (PRE3 and PRE4)

The following configuration example shows a PBR configuration in which traffic classification is based on the IP access list named pbr_length. The route map permits traffic based on the specified matching criteria and sets the next hop address of each packet.

ip access-list extended pbr_length
    permit tcp any any
!
route-map pbr_length permit 10
    match ip address pbr_length
    match length 100 200
    set ip next-hop 2.0.95.5                    !
route-map pbr_length permit 20
    match ip address pbr_length
    match length 200 300
    set ip next-hop 2.0.95.5                    !
route-map pbr_length permit 30
    match length 300 400
    set ip next-hop 2.0.95.5                    !

The following sample output from the show pxf cpu pbr command shows the type of information that displays based on the above PBR configuration:

Router# show pxf cpu pbr action pbr_length

Show PBR Action:

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Policy number: 3           

route-map pbr_length, permit, sequence 10
  map number    = 0           
  action index  = 64          
  map vcci out  = 0x0
  tt_pkt_count  = 0            tt_byte_count = 0           

    primary action   : NULL_ACTION
    secondary action : - none -
    mac-rewr index = 0x0000 0000
    vcci = 0x0000, qos group = 0, tos prec = 0

......................................................................

route-map pbr_length, permit, sequence 20
  map number    = 1           
  action index  = 65          
  map vcci out  = 0x0
  tt_pkt_count  = 0            tt_byte_count = 0           
          
    primary action   : NULL_ACTION
    secondary action : - none -
    mac-rewr index = 0x0000 0000
    vcci = 0x0000, qos group = 0, tos prec = 0

......................................................................

route-map pbr_length, permit, sequence 30
  map number    = 2           
  action index  = 66          
  map vcci out  = 0x0
  tt_pkt_count  = 0            tt_byte_count = 0           

    primary action   : NULL_ACTION
    secondary action : - none -
    mac-rewr index = 0x0000 0000
    vcci = 0x0000, qos group = 0, tos prec = 0

The following sample output from the show pxf cpu pbr tcam command shows the type of detailed VMR (value, plus a mask and result) information that displays:

Router# show pxf cpu pbr tcam pbr_length detail 

VMR data for Route-map pbr_length

-------------------------------------------------------------
VMR Format - handle: 5050BC90
Format has 5 fields, refcount = 1
Field: Format, FIXED, start_bit = 69, end_bit = 71
Field: ACL index, FIXED, start_bit = 54, end_bit = 68
Field: Flags, FIXED, start_bit = 43, end_bit = 53
Field: L4 proto, FIXED CNV, start_bit = 16, end_bit = 23
Field: Unknown, FLEX, start_bit = 0, end_bit = 15 Total bits = 53, format = 72 GMR used: 0 
Col 3 LKBP Vector: 96C
Status: Running

-------------------------------------------------------------
VMRs
------ VMR 0 ------
V: 7000C000 00000600 70
M: FFFFD800 0000FFFF F0
R: 80000104
Format: 00000003/00000007
ACL index: 00004003/00007FFF
L4 proto: 00000006/000000FF
Flags: 00000000/00000300
Packet Length: 00000070/0000FFF0
------ VMR 1 ------
V: 7000C000 00000600 68
M: FFFFD800 0000FFFF F8
R: 80000104
Format: 00000003/00000007
ACL index: 00004003/00007FFF
L4 proto: 00000006/000000FF
Flags: 00000000/00000300
Packet Length: 00000068/0000FFF8
------ VMR 2 ------
V: 7000C000 00000600 64
M: FFFFD800 0000FFFF FC
R: 80000104
Format: 00000003/00000007
ACL index: 00004003/00007FFF
L4 proto: 00000006/000000FF
Flags: 00000000/00000300
Packet Length: 00000064/0000FFFC
.
.
.
------ VMR 18 ------
V: 7000C000 00000000 00
M: FFFFC000 00000000 00
R: 80000110
Format: 00000003/00000007
ACL index: 00004003/00007FFF
L4 proto: 00000000/00000000
Flags: 00000000/00000000
Packet Length: 00000000/00000000

Related Commands

Command
Description

show pxf cpu policy-data

Displays QoS policy data index usage statistics.

show pxf cpu vcci

Displays VCCI to interface mapping information.


show pxf cpu qos

To display Parallel eXpress Forwarding (PXF) External Column Memory (XCM) contents related to a particular policy, use the show pxf cpu qos command in privileged EXEC mode.

show pxf cpu qos [policy-map policy-name | vcci]

Cisco 10000 Series Router

show pxf cpu qos [0-65535 | classifiers | flex-sum | policy-map policy-name | tcam | vcci-maps]

Syntax Description

0-65535

(Optional) Displays information for the Virtual Channel Circuit Identifier (VCCI) you specify.

classifiers

(Optional) Displays information about the criteria used to classify traffic.

flex-sum

(Optional) Displays summary information describing the amount of memory allocated in the PXF engine for use by the flexible key construction microcode.

Note This option is only available on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3 and PRE4.

policy-map policy-name

(Optional) Displays per-policy map information.

tcam

Displays PXF QoS ACL statistics.

vcci-maps

(Optional) Displays VCCI map values.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2S

This command was introduced.

12.3(7)XI1

This command was introduced on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE2.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was introduced on the PRE3 for the Cisco 10000 series router.

12.2(33)SB

This command was introduced on the PRE4 for the Cisco 10000 series router.


Usage Guidelines

This command is useful in verifying the presence of a policy on interfaces and indexes programmed in the PXF.

Examples

The following example shows XCM contents related to a policy called police_test, which is defined as follows:

policy-map police_test
 class high-priority
 priority
 class low-priority
  set atm-clp
 class class-default
    queue-limit 512

Router# show pxf cpu qos police_test

Output Policymap: police_test
 Vcci: A05  Flags: 4  Policymap_index: 6  Policymap_data_index: 12
 OUT AT1/0/0.111 (0x71764660) ref_count 1
Output Action Table Contents for vcci 0xA05 - Policymap index: 6
 class-name: high-priority  class_index: 0  action_flags: 0x00
  srp_class_id: 0x01  prec/dscp: 0x00  cos: 0
  discard_class: 0x00  exp_value: 0
class-name: low-priority  class_index: 1  action_flags: 0x10
  srp_class_id: 0x00  prec/dscp: 0x00  cos: 0
  discard_class: 0x00  exp_value: 0
class-name: class-default  class_index: 2  action_flags: 0x00
  srp_class_id: 0x00  prec/dscp: 0x00  cos: 0
  discard_class: 0x00  exp_value: 0

Related Commands

Command
Description

show pxf cpu statistics qos

Displays match statistics for a service policy on an interface.


show pxf dma

To display the current state of direct memory access (DMA) buffers, error counters, and registers on the Parallel eXpress Forwarding (PXF) engine, use the show pxf dma command in privileged EXEC mode.

show pxf dma [buffers | counters | reassembly | registers]

Cisco 10000 Series Router (PRE3 and PRE4)

show pxf dma [buffers | counters | reassembly | registers] [brief | config | errors | status]

Syntax Description

buffers

(Optional) Displays PXF DMA buffers information.

counters

(Optional) Displays packet and error counters for the PXF DMA engine.

reassembly

(Optional) Displays PXF reassembly table usage information.

registers

(Optional) Displays PXF DMA registers information.

brief

(Optional) Displays PXF DMA information, including the initialization state of each block in the PXF API and any errors that occurred.

Note This option is only available on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3 and PRE4.

config

(Optional) Displays a configuration summary of the registers in each of the PXF DMA blocks.

Note This option is only available on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3 and PRE4.

errors

(Optional) Displays the errors that occurred in each of the PXF DMA blocks.

Note This option is only available on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3 and PRE4.

status

(Optional) Displays the initialization state of each PXF DMA block. In normal operation, all blocks display the enabled state.

Note This option is only available on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3 and PRE4.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2S

This command was introduced.

12.3(7)XI

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.3(7)XI and implemented on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE2.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2 and implemented on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3.

12.2(33)SB

This command was introduced on the PRE4 for the Cisco 10000 series router.


Examples

The following example shows PXF DMA buffers information:

Router# show pxf dma buffers

PXF To-RP DMA Ring Descriptors & Buffers:

     Descriptor       Buffer        Buffer      Descriptor
     Address          Address       Length(b)   Flags
0    0x0CA06340       0x0AC097C0      512       0x0002
1    0x0CA06350       0x0AC088C0      512       0x0002
2    0x0CA06360       0x0AC07C40      512       0x0002
3    0x0CA06370       0x0AC0B5C0      512       0x0002
4    0x0CA06380       0x0AC0CC40      512       0x0002
5    0x0CA06390       0x0AC08640      512       0x0002
6    0x0CA063A0       0x0AC0C240      512       0x0002
7    0x0CA063B0       0x0AC08B40      512       0x0002
8    0x0CA063C0       0x0AC0AE40      512       0x0002
9    0x0CA063D0       0x0AC0BAC0      512       0x0002
10   0x0CA063E0       0x0AC0C9C0      512       0x0002
11   0x0CA063F0       0x0AC09CC0      512       0x0002
12   0x0CA06400       0x0AC0C740      512       0x0002
13   0x0CA06410       0x0AC0A6C0      512       0x0002
14   0x0CA06420       0x0AC0B0C0      512       0x0002
15   0x0CA06430       0x0AC09040      512       0x0002
16   0x0CA06440       0x0AC0A440      512       0x0002
17   0x0CA06450       0x0AC065C0      512       0x0002
18   0x0CA06460       0x0AC06FC0      512       0x0002
19   0x0CA06470       0x0AC06340      512       0x0002
20   0x0CA06480       0x0AC07240      512       0x0002
21   0x0CA06490       0x0AC092C0      512       0x0002
22   0x0CA064A0       0x0AC0D140      512       0x0002
23   0x0CA064B0       0x0AC0C4C0      512       0x0002
24   0x0CA064C0       0x0AC07740      512       0x0002
25   0x0CA064D0       0x0AC09540      512       0x0002
26   0x0CA064E0       0x0AC0A940      512       0x0002
27   0x0CA064F0       0x0AC06840      512       0x0002
28   0x0CA06500       0x0AC08140      512       0x0002
29   0x0CA06510       0x0AC06D40      512       0x0002
30   0x0CA06520       0x0AC07EC0      512       0x0002
31   0x0CA06530       0x0AC0ABC0      512       0x0003

PXF From-RP DMA Ring Descriptors & Buffers:

     Descriptor       Buffer        Buffer      Descriptor    Context
     Address          Address       Length(b)   Flags         Bit
0    0x0CA06580       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
1    0x0CA06590       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
2    0x0CA065A0       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
3    0x0CA065B0       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
4    0x0CA065C0       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
5    0x0CA065D0       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
6    0x0CA065E0       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
7    0x0CA065F0       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
8    0x0CA06600       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
9    0x0CA06610       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
10   0x0CA06620       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
11   0x0CA06630       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
12   0x0CA06640       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
13   0x0CA06650       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
14   0x0CA06660       0x00000000        0       0x0000        Not set
15   0x0CA06670       0x00000000        0       0x0001        Not set

Table 10, Part 1 describes the fields shown in the display.

Table 11 show pxf dma Command Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Descriptor Address

Memory address pointing to the descriptor for this buffer.

Buffer Address

Address of this buffer in memory.

Buffer Length

Length, in bytes, of this particular buffer.

Descriptor Flags

Internal flags identifying this buffer's use and status.

Context Bit

State of the context bit which is set when the buffer is currently in use by a context (the basic unit of packet processing).


Related Commands

Command
Description

clear pxf

Clears PXF counters and statistics.

show pxf cpu

Displays PXF CPU statistics.

show pxf microcode

Displays the microcode version running on the PXF.


show pxf tcam

To display version information about Ternary Content Access Memory (TCAM) devices, register values, and cell usage by application regions, use the show pxf tcam command in privileged EXEC mode.

show pxf tcam

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(31)SB2

This command was introduced on the PRE3 for the Cisco 10000 series router.

12.2(33)SB

This command was introduced on the PRE4 for the Cisco 10000 series router.


Usage Guidelines

The TCAM can only match binary ranges. Therefore, the router creates multiple entries, which together have binary ranges to cover a non-binary range. This is referred to as port expansion. Another example of entry expansion is matching the established keyword. The router implements this as two entries: one to check for the ACK bit and the other to check if the RST bit is set.

If per access control entry (ACE) accounting is required, the router limits you to 64K ACEs for each access control list (ACL). Otherwise, the available TCAM space defines the ACE limitation. If no TCAM space is available, the ACE is not placed into TCAM and the router uses an ACE equivalent to deny ip any any. When sufficient space becomes available in TCAM, you must first remove the ACL from the interface and then reapply it to activate it.

Examples

The following sample output shows the types of information that displays when you enter the show pxf tcam command:

Router# show pxf tcam

TCAM register info
Toaster Tcam config 0xFE39870F
Toaster Tcam status 0x00000000
Toaster Tcam Xtype/Mask 0x00000000/0x00000100 Toaster Tcam Instr_reg 0x00000004 Toaster 
Tcam clk cfg 0x000000A0 NETCAM3, dev 0 ver RC
NETCAM3 version value = 0x00000000:00000000:4E4C0201
NETCAM3 device id = 0x00000000:00000000:00000100
NETCAM3 CCR value = 0x00000000:08000059:C000101A
NETCAM3 STAT value = 0x00000000:00000000:00060100
NETCAM3 PER value = 0x00000000:00000000:00000000
NETCAM3 IAERR value = 0x00000000:00000000:00000000
NETCAM3 RPID1 = 0x00000000:00000000:00000000
NETCAM3 RPID2 = 0x00000000:00000000:00000000
NETCAM3 RPID3 = 0x00000000:00000000:00000000
NETCAM3 RPID4 = 0x00000000:00000000:00000000
NETCAM3 BCS value = 0x00000000:00002492:49000000
NETCAM3 HRR0 value = 0x00000000:00000000:C000FFFD NETCAM3, dev 1 ver RC
NETCAM3 version value = 0x00000000:00000000:4E4C0201
NETCAM3 device id = 0x00000000:00000000:00000104
NETCAM3 CCR value = 0x00000000:08000059:F000103A
NETCAM3 STAT value = 0x00000000:00000000:00020100
NETCAM3 PER value = 0x00000000:00000000:00000000
NETCAM3 IAERR value = 0x00000000:00000000:00000000
NETCAM3 RPID1 = 0x00000000:01010101:01010101
NETCAM3 RPID2 = 0x00000000:01010101:01010101
NETCAM3 RPID3 = 0x00000000:01010101:01010101
NETCAM3 RPID4 = 0x00000000:01010101:01010101
NETCAM3 BCS value = 0x00000000:00004924:92249249
NETCAM3 HRR0 value = 0x00000000:00000000:40000000


TCAM Info:
   total regions 133, used cells 7, free cells 524281,
                 used masks 7, free masks 524281

Region breakdown info (max=0 means no limit):
id   name                lk_size max_entry used_entry free_cells
----------------------------------------------------------------
0    72-bit ACL/QOS/PBR/i72        0         5          131067
1    144-bit ACL/QOS/PBR/144       0         0          99313
2    288-bit ACL/QOS/PBR/288       0         0          65536
3    IPv6 /128 Address Ma144       0         0          33778
4    IPv6 /127 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
5    IPv6 /126 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
6    IPv6 /125 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
7    IPv6 /124 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
8    IPv6 /123 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
9    IPv6 /122 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
10   IPv6 /121 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
11   IPv6 /120 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
12   IPv6 /119 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
13   IPv6 /118 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
14   IPv6 /117 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
15   IPv6 /116 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
16   IPv6 /115 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
17   IPv6 /114 Address Ma144       0         0          1010
18   IPv6 /113 Address Ma144       0         0          1009
19   IPv6 /112 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
20   IPv6 /111 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
21   IPv6 /110 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
22   IPv6 /109 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
23   IPv6 /108 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
24   IPv6 /107 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
25   IPv6 /106 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
26   IPv6 /105 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
27   IPv6 /104 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
28   IPv6 /103 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
29   IPv6 /102 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
30   IPv6 /101 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
31   IPv6 /100 Address Ma144       0         0          1008
32   IPv6 /99 Address Map144       0         0          1008
33   IPv6 /98 Address Map144       0         0          1008
34   IPv6 /97 Address Map144       0         0          1008
35   IPv6 /96 Address Map144       0         0          1008
36   IPv6 /95 Address Map144       0         0          1008
37   IPv6 /94 Address Map144       0         0          1008
38   IPv6 /93 Address Map144       0         0          1008
39   IPv6 /92 Address Map144       0         0          1008
40   IPv6 /91 Address Map144       0         0          1008
41   IPv6 /90 Address Map144       0         0          1008
42   IPv6 /89 Address Map144       0         0          1008
.
.
.
130  IPv6 /1 Address Mapp144       0         0          1007
131  IPv6 /0 Address Mapp144       0         1          1007
132  MCE V6 MCAST1       288       0         0          65536

Table 10, Part 1 describes the fields shown in the display.

Table 12 show pxf tcam Command Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Cells

Basic unit of allocation in the TCAM. A cell is 72 bits in length. Each cell has an associated value, plus a mask, and result—referred to as VMR. Cells are grouped in one of three sizes:

1—72 bits

2—144 bits

4—288 bits

Entry

Group of cells that together make a single lookup entry. For example, a standard ACL uses a 72-bit entry because the number of bits from a packet that compose a lookup fits within 72 bits. An extended ACE usually fits within 144 bits (a two-cell grouping). Exceptions to this are ACEs that use a match on a port range and ACEs that match on multiple TCP flag states.

Regions

Pool of cells that are set aside for a specific application. All entries in a region have the same grouping size of cells (1, 2, or 4 cells. All regions are dynamically sized with no minimum—one region can use free entries from another region if they have the same size.


Related Commands

Command
Description

show pxf cpu access-lists

Displays Parallel eXpress Forwarding (PXF) memory information for access control lists (ACLs).

show pxf cpu pbr action

Display policy-based routing (PBR) actions configured in the PXF.


Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

For information on obtaining documentation, obtaining support, providing documentation feedback, security guidelines, and also recommended aliases and general Cisco documents, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html