Cisco 10008 Router Hardware Installation Guide
Cisco 10008 Router Overview
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Cisco 10008 Router Overview

Table Of Contents

Cisco 10008 Router Overview

Cisco 10008 Router Features

Cisco 10008 Router Software

Minimum Software Releases for the Cisco 10008 Router

Cisco 10008 Router Hardware Description

Blower Module

Power Entry Modules

Line Card and PRE Module Compartment

Performance Routing Engine

Connector Ports

PCMCIA Card Slots

PRE LED Indicators and Switches

Alphanumeric Display

Disposing of the PRE


Cisco 10008 Router Overview


The Cisco 10008 router is a high capacity Layer 3 router optimized to support selected Cisco IOS software services at wire speed performance on thousands of DS1/T1 connections. Designed primarily for use in a telco central office environment, it provides interfaces that connect to large numbers of subscribers using low-speed circuits, and then funnels all of that subscriber traffic into a small number of high-speed trunk interfaces. The chassis has eight line card slots and two slots for Performance Routing Engine (PRE) modules.

This chapter contains the following sections:

Cisco 10008 Router Features

Cisco 10008 Router Software

Cisco 10008 Router Hardware Description


Note The illustrations in this guide depict the original Cisco 10008 chassis. Your chassis may look slightly different, but it is functionally the same.


The Cisco 10008 router is designed to meet and exceed the most stringent ISP requirements for product availability and reliability. Its features include:

Redundant blowers

Redundant power (AC or DC)

Redundant PREs

Pairs of Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) interfaces which can be configured for redundancy using SONET 1+1 Automatic Protection Switching (APS)

All line cards, Power Entry Modules (PEMs), and blowers can be hot-swapped without powering down the chassis

Performance routing engine redundancy in the Cisco 10008 router is achieved through an implementation of Enhanced High System Availability (EHSA). This feature lets you configure the chassis for non-redundant operation with one PRE, or for redundant operation with two PREs.

In addition to PRE redundancy, SONET/SDH line cards can be configured for 1+1 Automatic Protection Switching (APS) to accommodate failure of either a line card or the transmission facility carrying trunk traffic to upstream equipment.

The Cisco 10008 router is designed to scale to unprecedented levels with plans to further increase scalability in future releases. The current release provides support for up to:

1300 PPP sessions

4200 Frame Relay sessions

300 Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) peers

For CT3 line cards, this equates to:

1176 T1 connections per chassis or up to 3900 T1 connections per 7-foot rack.

For channelized OC-12 line cards, this equates to:

2352 T1 connections per chassis or up to 7056 T1 connections per 7-foot rack.

Cisco 10008 Router Features

The Cisco 10008 router and power subsystem support the following key features:

19-inch rack mount, 12-inch depth

21.75-inch height (3 units per 7-foot rack)

Dual -48 VDC or 100 to 240 VAC redundant hot swappable PEMs

10 slots total, 2 central slots for PREs and 8 interface card slots

Multiple fans in blower module provide redundancy to support single failure, and blower replacement will not interrupt service (within certain time limits)

Brackets for cable management

Alarm relays; minor, major, and critical

Cisco 10008 Router Software

Software is stored on the PRE which includes two PCMCIA slots that are accessible from the front panel. Either slot can store an Cisco IOS image or configuration file.

The flash memory present on Cisco 10000 router line cards is used to store a simple ROM monitor/boot loader. The loader executes following a system reset, line card reset, or line card insertion.

Line card images may also be stored in PRE flash memory or on an external TFTP server.

The PRE stores the system configuration in a 512KB NVRAM device. Configuration information read from NVRAM is buffered in RAM following initialization, and is written to the device when you save the configuration.

Minimum Software Releases for the Cisco 10008 Router

For a listing of the minimum software releases supported on the Cisco 10008 router, see the
Cisco 10000 Series Routers Documentation Roadmap, Release Notes.

Cisco 10008 Router Hardware Description

The Cisco 10008 router is Network Equipment Building Standards (NEBS) Level 3 compliant. This includes:

Front-to-back airflow

12-inch depth

Less than 22 inches in height (you can configure up to three Cisco 10008 routers per 7-foot rack).

The chassis supports redundant AC or DC power, and contains:

8 line card slots

2 processor card slots

Backplane (with rear interconnects)

Capacity for dual -48 VDC or 100 to 240 VAC Power Entry Modules (PEMs)

Figure 1-1shows a front view of the Cisco 10008 router. Figure 1-2 shows the BNC connectors, line card slots from the rear, and half-height line card subslot designations on the rear of the router.

Figure 1-1 Cisco 10008 Router Chassis—Front View

1

Blower module

5

PRE - slot 0A

2

Primary PEM

6

PRE slot 0B

3

Redundant PEM

7

Line cards slots 5 to 8

4

Line cards slots 1 to 4

   

Figure 1-2 BNC Connectors on the Rear of the Chassis

1

Line card slot 8

5

Line card slot 1

2

Line cards slot 5

6

Power supply

3

Blower module

7

Half-height line card subslot 0

4

Line card slot 4

8

Half-height line card subslot 1


The Cisco 10008 chassis is designed for mounting in 19-inch or (optional) 23-inch equipment racks, and contains the following components:

Blower Module

Power Entry Modules

Connector Ports

PCMCIA Card Slots

Blower Module

The Cisco 10008 router uses a blower module (Figure 1-3) containing four fans to supply cooling air to the chassis.

Figure 1-3 Blower Module

The blower module is located at the top of the chassis and connects to a connector on the chassis.

1. Four internal fans draw cooling air into the front of the chassis and directs it across the internal components to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

2. The air is exhausted through openings in the rear of the chassis.

Although the blower module supports hot-swapping and can be replaced without interruption to system operation, do not power down the system without the blower unit for more than a few minutes to prevent overheating.

Power Entry Modules

The DC PEM provides filtering and supplies DC power to the chassis electronics (Figure 1-4). DC PEMs receive input power (-48 VDC from building centralized power source) through terminal block connections located on the rear of the chassis.

Table 1-1 describes the LEDs on the DC PEM.

Figure 1-4 DC PEM

Table 1-1 DC PEM LEDs

LED
Description

Power (green)

PEM is powered on and is operational.

Fault (yellow)

The PEM is not operating correctly (see the Cisco 10000 Series ESR Troubleshooting Guide).

Miswire (yellow)

-48V and RTN (+) wires are reversed (see the "Troubleshooting Installation Problems" section).


The AC PEM provides power conversion directly from the facility VAC input power (100-240 VAC) to the -48 VDC used internally by the system (Figure 1-5). AC power is delivered to the AC PEM from the VAC connection power cable to the power cord attached to the PEM.

Table 1-2 describes the LEDs on the AC PEM.

Figure 1-5 AC PEM

Table 1-2 AC PEM LEDs

LED
Description

Power (green)

PEM is powered on and is operational.

Fault (yellow)

The PEM is not operating correctly (see the Cisco 10000 Series ESR Troubleshooting Guide).


Line Card and PRE Module Compartment

The module compartment has 10 slots: the two central slots are reserved for PRE modules, and the remaining 8 slots accommodate full-height line cards. The PRE and line cards support hot-swapping and redundancy. See Figure 1-1 for a front view of the module compartment, and Figure 1-2 for a rear view of the module compartment, BNC connectors, and line card subslot designations.

For information about the line card that the Cisco 10008 router supports, see the Cisco 10000 Routers Line Card Hardware Installation Guide, and for line card configuration information, see the
Cisco 10000 Series Router Line Card Configuration Guide.

Performance Routing Engine

The PRE is the central router and system controller (SC) for the Cisco 10008 router. It is responsible for all Layer 2 and Layer 3 packet processing, as well as execution of routing protocols and management of the system. The PRE consists of two main logical and physical cards:

Forwarding processor card—Performs high-speed IP forwarding

Route processor card—Manages process switching and several protocols

The high performance forwarding engine in the PRE is Cisco's Parallel eXpress Forwarding (PXF) application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The two PXF ASICs on the PRE direct traffic to and from the router line cards.

Each PXF ASIC has 32 independent processors that work on per-packet feature processing, yielding high throughput while still allowing substantial feature processing. The PXF centralizes packet processing in the PRE, which frees up space on line cards, enabling high interface density, yet retaining a compact form factor.


Caution Although the PRE module supports hot-swapping, one PRE is required for the system to operate. Hot-swapping a non-redundant PRE results in a system outage stopping all traffic. A PRE in a redundant configuration can be hot-swapped without having an impact on system operation.

Figure 1-6 shows the front panel of the Performance Routing Engine, product number ESR- PRE.

Figure 1-6 Performance Routing Engine, Product Number ESR-PRE, Front Panel

Figure 1-7 shows the front panel of the Performance Routing Engine, product number ESR-PRE1.

Figure 1-7 Performance Routing Engine, Product Number ESR-PRE1, Front Pane

Figure 1-8 shows the front panel of the Performance Routing Engine, product number ESR-PRE2.

Figure 1-8 Performance Routing Engine, Product Number ESR-PRE2, Front Panel

Connector Ports

The front panel on the PRE contains three ports with RJ-45 connectors (see Figure 1-6):

Console port (CON)—This asynchronous EIA/TIA-232 serial port is used to connect a terminal to the PRE for local administrative access.

Auxiliary port (AUX)—This asynchronous EIA/TIA-232 serial port is used to connect a modem to the PRE for remote administrative access.

Ethernet port (ETH)—This Ethernet port is used to connect the PRE to a 10/100BASE-T network management LAN.

PCMCIA Card Slots

Two PCMCIA Type II card slots can store the Cisco IOS image or a system configuration file on a flash memory card. The system can also boot from the software stored on the flash memory card. See "Removing the PCMCIA Flash Card" section for more information about inserting and removing flash cards from the PRE.

PRE LED Indicators and Switches

LEDs on the front panel of the PRE provide a visual indication showing the status of PRE operation (see Figure 1-6). The LEDs are separated into three categories:

alarms

status

failure

Alarm relay contacts on the Cisco 10008 router let you connect the router to a site alarm maintenance system. This allows critical, major, and minor alarms generated by the Cisco 10008 router to be displayed on both the PRE front panel and to external visual or audible alarms connected to the system. See the "Connecting Alarm Indicators" section for more information about alarm connections.

Pressing the alarm cutoff (ACO) switch on the (primary) PRE during an alarm condition shuts off the external alarm, but does not deactivate the alarm LEDs on the PRE front panel. Alarm LEDs on the front panel are deactivated only after the condition that caused the alarm is corrected.

Table 1-3 describes the LEDs and switch on the PRE.

Table 1-3 LEDs and Cutoff Switch

LEDs/Switch
Status
Description

Ethernet Port LEDs:

Activity

Link

Green

Off

Green


Off

Packets are being transmitted and received.

No packet activity.

Carrier detected; the port is able to pass traffic.

No carrier detected; the port is not able to pass traffic.

PCMCIA slot 0

PCMCIA slot 1

Green

Green

Flash card in Slot 0 is active.

Flash card in Slot 1 is active.

Critical, Major, and Minor LEDs

Off

Yellow

No alarm.

Indicates an alarm condition.

Alarm cutoff (ACO) switch

Pressing this switch disables an audible alarm.

Status

Green

Off

PRE is ready.

No power to the PRE.

Fail

Off

Yellow

The PRE is operating properly.

A major failure has disabled the PRE.


Alphanumeric Display

The small alphanumeric display on the front panel provides information on the state of the PRE. The display consists of two four-character LED panels. Table 1-4 lists the most common messages and explains what they mean. If you report a problem to Cisco, it is helpful to include the message on the PRE's alphanumeric display in your problem report.

Table 1-4 Messages on PRE Alphanumeric Display 

Message
PRE Status

1111, 2222, 3333, 4444, 5555, 6666, 7777, 8888, 9999

AAA, BBB, CCC

The PRE has just been powered on and is running its power-on self-test.

ROM DONE

The PRE has loaded the ROM monitor. This message appears briefly if the system is configured to boot a Cisco IOS software image. If the system is not configured to boot Cisco IOS, this message remains on the display and the rommon prompt appears on the terminal window.

AUTO BOOT

The ROM monitor is preparing to boot a Cisco IOS image.

BOOT IMGE

A Cisco IOS image is starting to boot.

IOS STRT, IOS EXC, IOS FPGA, IOS FPOK, IOS FILE, IOS STBY, IOS INTF, IOS MEM, IOS DRVR, IOS LIB, IOS MGMT, IOS PROT, IOS CONF

These messages appear in quick succession during the boot process.

- - - -
- - - -

[On the primary PRE.] The PRE has finished booting and is running Cisco IOS. This is the normal operating status for the primary PRE.

IOS STBY

[On the secondary PRE.] The PRE is standing by; it is ready to take over if the primary PRE fails. This is the normal operating status for the secondary PRE.


Disposing of the PRE

The PRE contains a small lithium battery. Some jurisdictions restrict the ways in which you may dispose of items containing lithium batteries. In particular, never dispose of lithium batteries or products containing lithium batteries in an unregulated fire. Other restrictions might apply in your area.


Warning Ultimate disposal of this product should be handled according to all national laws and regulations. Statement 1040