Cisco Prime Central for Hosted Collaboration Solution 9.2.1 Installation Guide
Chapter 3: Preparing for Installation
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Preparing for Installation

Table Of Contents

Preparing for Installation

Creating VMs Using an OVA File

Installing RHEL

Setting Up Credentials and Server

Using Appropriate vCenter Credentials

Setting Up an NTP Server

Setting Up Hostname and Domain Name

Downloading the Required RPMs

Setting Up Installer Code and Media

Integrating DMA-IM with Prime Central for HCS


Preparing for Installation


This chapter describes how to set up the environment for installation. This installation process requires Python 2.4 or later. By default, RHEL 5.5 ships with Python 2.4.

You need to complete the following steps to set up the right environment for the installation:

1. Creating VMs Using an OVA File

2. Installing RHEL

3. Setting Up Credentials and Server

4. Setting Up Hostname and Domain Name

5. Downloading the Required RPMs

6. Setting Up Installer Code and Media

7. Integrating DMA-IM with Prime Central for HCS

Creating VMs Using an OVA File

The Prime Central for HCS VMware image is packaged as an Open Virtualization Archive (OVA) file. Run the OVA file (hcs-sa.ova) that is available in the installer media to create VMs. Before you begin creating VMs, ensure that you have a machine with the required configuration. Required items typically consist of a virtual machine description file (.ovf), a manifest file (.mf), and virtual hard drive file (*.vmdk). A directory called ova contains the ova files. This directory is located inside the root media directory in the same location as the scripts directory.

Follow the procedure given below to create VMs; use a vSphere client to install OVA. You must run this procedure once on every virtual machine.


Step 1 Launch VMware vSphere Client and choose File > Deploy OVF Template.

The Deploy OVF Template page appears.

Step 2 Choose Browse and locate the HCS OVA file. Click Next.

After the OVA file is selected, VMware ESX/ESXi reads the OVA file attributes. The OVF Template Details page appears.

Step 3 In the OVF Template Details page, click Next.

The Name and Location page appears.

Step 4 Provide the name of the VM and Inventory Location for the deployed template and click Next.

The Deployment Configuration page appears.

Step 5 From the Configuration drop-down list, choose the VM that you want to create and click Next.

The Datastore page appears.

Step 6 Select the datastore where you want to store the virtual machine files and click Next.

The Disk Format page appears.

Step 7 Choose the Thick provisioned format radio button and click Next.

The Network Mapping page appears.

Step 8 Select the network that the deployed template will use and click Next.

The Ready to Complete page appears.

Step 9 Check all the given options and click Finish.

After the virtual machine is built, it appears on the left side of the window.


Note For the Infrastructure Monitor VM, if the number of UCS blades is higher than 50, increase the Infrastructure Monitor VM memory to 8 GB.



Installing RHEL

Follow the procedure given below to install RHEL:


Step 1 Open RHEL ISO application from the DVD/CD drive.

Step 2 Start the GUI installation process.

Step 3 Power on the virtual machine.

Step 4 When you begin the installation, a boot prompt appears at the bottom of the screen. At the Linux boot prompt, type the following command and press Enter.

linux ks=hd:sdb1:hcs.ks

Step 5 In the Red Hat Enterprise Linux server, choose Skip to skip the media test and start the installation.

Step 6 Click Next.

Step 7 Select the language as English.

Step 8 Enter the license key and click OK.

Step 9 Select Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server and click Next.

Step 10 To proceed with disk partitioning, click Next.

Step 11 Click Yes to remove all the Linux partitions.

Step 12 Click Edit to configure the network devices.

Step 13 In the Edit Interface screen, enter a valid IP address and netmask for IPv4 support.

Step 14 Uncheck the Enable IPv6 support check box and click OK.

Step 15 Select Manually and enter a valid hostname.

Step 16 Enter the Gateway and Primary DNS for the network device and click Next.

Step 17 Click the map to choose a region and its time zone for the server.

Step 18 Enter a password for the root user.

Step 19 Select Software Development as the additional task and uncheck the Virtualization check box.

Step 20 Click Next to begin the installation of the Linux server.

A confirmation message about RHEL installation is displayed.

Step 21 Click Reboot.

Step 22 In the Welcome screen, click Forward.

Step 23 Select the I accept the terms of the license agreement radio button and click Forward.

Step 24 Disable the firewall settings.

Step 25 Click Yes to set the security level of the system and override any existing firewall configurations.

Step 26 Disable the SELinux settings.


Note The Enable Kdump option should be disabled.


Step 27 Set the date and time for the system.

Step 28 In the Network Time Protocol pane, select the Enable Network Time Protocol option and add an NTP server.

Step 29 From the Show advanced options drop-down list, choose Synchronize system clock before starting service.

Step 30 Click Forward.

Step 31 Select Yes to register your system or No to skip the registration.

Step 32 Skip the process of creating additional users, sound card and additional CD settings.

Step 33 Click Finish to complete the registration process.

Step 34 Click the OK button to reboot the server.


Setting Up Credentials and Server

Using Appropriate vCenter Credentials

Prime Central for HCS monitors vCenter after you add the vCenter credentials to HCM-Fulfillment. You must ensure that the vCenter user in HCM-Fulfillment is an administrator.

Setting Up an NTP Server

Before you install Prime Central for HCS, you must provision an NTP server for the VMs to connect. As part of the installation or upgrade procedure, the VMs will automatically set the correct time and date.

Setting Up Hostname and Domain Name

Ensure that the appropriate hostname and domain name are set up correctly on the machine. The hostname should be a resolvable IP address.


Note The length of the hostname must be from 2 to 18 characters. The hostname must not contain an underscore (_) and must start and end with an alphanumeric character. Any alphabetic characters used must be in lowercase.



Step 1 To set up a hostname and domain name, edit the /etc/hosts file; use the format IP-Address hostname.domain-name hostname.

For example, if the following conditions exist:

hostname is hostname123

domain name is cisco.com

IP address is 1.1.1.1.

Set up the details as follows:

127.0.0.1   localhost.localdomain   localhost
::1     localhost6.localdomain6 localhost6
1.1.1.1 hostname123.cisco.com hostname123

Tip Failure of VMs to launch, along with an error such as ?Hostname 'localhost' missing from '/etc/hosts' file.?., indicates a missing localhost entry in the /etc/hosts file. Verify that you have a localhost entry in the file.

The following is an example of a corre
ct /etc/hosts file:
# Do not remove the following line, or various programs that require network functionality will fail.
127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost
::1 localhost6.localdomain6 localhost6
1.1.1.1 hcm-test.cisco.com hcm-test

The following is an example of an incorrect /etc/hosts file:
# Do not remove the following line, or various programs that require network functionality will fail.
127.0.0.1 hcm-linux-staging localhost.localdomain localhost
::1 localhost6.localdomain6 localhost6


Step 2 Ensure the /etc/resolv.conf file is set up properly for the DNS server. For example,

domain cisco.com
nameserver 1.1.1.1

Note The DNS server configured in resolv.conf file should be in reachable state.


Step 3 Ensure the hostname, fully qualified domain name (FQDN), and IP address are fully resolvable on the target VM.

The following example is used to verify if the hostname, domain name, and IP Address are hostname123, cisco.com, and 1.1.1.1 respectively.


Note nslookup will only work if DNS is set up.


[root@hostname123 ~]# hostname
hostname123
[root@hostname123 ~]# nslookup hostname123.cisco.com
Server:         1.1.1.1
Address:        1.1.1.1#53
 
Name:   hostname123.cisco.com
Address: 1.1.1.2
 
[root@hostname123 ~]# nslookup hostname123
Server:         1.1.1.1
Address:        1.1.1.1#53
 
Name:   hostname123.cisco.com
Address: 1.1.1.2
 
[root@hostname123 ~]# nslookup 1.1.1.2
Server:         1.1.1.1
Address:        1.1.1.1#53
 
130.10.16.172.in-addr.arpa      name = hostname123.cisco.com.
 
[root@hostname123 ~]#ping -c1 hostname123
PING hostname123.cisco.com (1.1.1.2) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from hostname123.cisco.com (1.1.1.2): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.013 ms
 
--- hostname123.cisco.com ping statistics ---
1 packets transmitted, 1 received, 0% packet loss, time 0ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.013/0.013/0.013/0.000 ms
 
[root@hostname123 ~]# ping -c1 hostname123.cisco.com
PING hostname123.cisco.com (1.1.1.2) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from hostname123.cisco.com (1.1.1.2): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.011 ms
 
--- hostname123.cisco.com ping statistics ---
1 packets transmitted, 1 received, 0% packet loss, time 0ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.011/0.011/0.011/0.000 ms
 
[root@hostname123 ~]# ping -c1 1.1.1.2
PING 1.1.1.2 (1.1.1.2) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 1.1.1.2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.011 ms
 
--- 1.1.1.2 ping statistics ---
1 packets transmitted, 1 received, 0% packet loss, time 0ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.011/0.011/0.011/0.000 ms
 
   

Step 4 Set the HOSTNAME argument in /etc/sysconfig/network file. Below is an example with hostname and gateway as hostname123 and 10.10.10.10 respectively:

NETWORKING=yes
NETWORKING_IPV6=no
HOSTNAME=hostname123
GATEWAY=10.10.10.10

Downloading the Required RPMs

The install media, by default, ships with the required RPMs for RHEL 5.5. However, if you prefer to use the yum command option, you must register with the Red Hat site. The yum install command can connect to the Red Hat mirrors to install packages onto Linux. Registration ensures that you receive security updates, thus preventing any damage to the OS. We recommend that you register your VMs with Red the Hat server; registration must be done in a production environment so that you receive the latest security updates from Red Hat.


Note When you register with Red Hat, you have the option to upgrade your software. Do not select kernel upgrade. This will upgrade the OS from version 5.5 to version 5.8.


If you use yum at any time during VM setup, you must also use it during installation. If you are unable to install yum, the installer code sends the required RPMs as a backup to enable you to proceed with the installation. yum is the preferred method because it provides the latest security updates.

For instructions on registration, visit the Red Hat site: http://docs.redhat.com/docs/en-US/Red_Hat_Network_Satellite/5.3/html/Reference_Guide/ch-register.html

If you are in a proxy environment, set up your proxy as specified at: http://www.softpanorama.org/Commercial_linuxes/RHEL/Registration/
rhel5_registration.shtml

Setting Up Installer Code and Media

Access the installers placed in the DVD; alternatively, you can also download the software from Cisco.com.


Note We recommend that you use the remote installation method. Alternatively, you could move the installers to the local server and then begin the installation from the server; however, you may encounter issues if the user account used in the files of the target server is different from the user account used for installation.


To access the installers and run them, you need a central server with at least 34 GB free disk space. This server should be able to contact all the VMs on which you are going to install the various installers. Create a directory in this server to place the required files.


Caution This directory must have execute permission for all users (for example, 755 permission) and must not have any specific user directory (such as, /root, /home, /users). The recommended directory location for the media is /opt.

Run the following command on the server to set up the media:


Step 1 Log into the staging media VM as root user.

Step 2 Extract the media to the desired location; follow the instructions on the DVD.


Integrating DMA-IM with Prime Central for HCS

DMA-IM is a service that runs on the HCM-Fulfillment that allows automated configuration of monitors in the HCS Solution. Infrastructure Monitoring (IM) serves as a monitor for domain managers. DMA-IM configures IM for the following monitors: Cisco Prime Unified Operations Manager, CUCDM, CCDM, and vCenter.


Step 1 The following information is required for DMA-IM to provision a device in IM. Ensure that the following credentials are available:

For Infrastructure Monitoring

Credential with type—CLI type must be root OS user and password on IM. This allows DMA-IM to log into IM's CLI (ssh/shell access).

Credential with type—ADMIN type must be sysadmin OS user and password on IM (sysadmin password is the --admin-password argument). DB2 credentials that allows DMA-IM to issue TACMD CLI commands.

Network address that is part of the Service Provider network space.

Step 2 Add Prime Central to HCM-Fulfillment with the following information:

Credential with type—CLI type must be root OS user and password on PC

Network address for Prime Central for HCS must be specified in the Service Provider address space.

Step 3 Add the CUOM, CUCDM, vCenter and other domain managers to HCM-Fulfillment. Ensure that the following information is available:

Device must have a hostname.

SNMPv1 credentials.

For vCenter, ensure that admin and snmp credentials are specified.

For other domain managers, ensure that snmp, admin, and operator credentials are specified.

Network address that is part of the Service Provider network space.

Step 4 Ensure that the following services have been activated on HCM-F using the Administrative CLI.

Cisco HCS Fulfillment Service

Cisco HCS DMA-CUOM Service

Cisco HCS DMA-IM Service